Newspaper Abstracts relating to England
Millican, Milligan, Millikan, Milliken, Millikin, Mullican, Mulliken, Mullikin etc.



Newspaper Abstracts relating to England

1705 - 1860



Newspapers can provide a rich source of genealogical information particularly in the decades before the official registration of births, marriages and deaths in Britain and Ireland. The oldest newspapers in Britain to record births, marriages and deaths, first appear in the Post Boy founded in May 1695 and ceased in 1728, the Daily Post in October 1719 and ceased in 1746, the Daily Journal in 1721 and ceased in 1737, and the Gentleman’s Magazine from 1731 to 1868. All of them generally contained information on the middle classes and other persons of note in Britain and Ireland.

The earliest reference to the variant surnames Milligan, Milliken and Mulligan appears in the London Gazette, when John Millagan of Watton, chapman in Norfolk County, was declared bankrupt in 1705. Originally named the Oxford Gazette, the London Gazette is the oldest surviving English News Paper and the oldest continuously published News Paper in the United Kingdom. Since its first edition at Oxford in 1665 and subsequently in the City of London, it has published official court and government announcements, such as appointments to government, church and armed forces, grants of peerages, medal awards, naturalizations and notices of bankruptcies and company liquidations.


June 4, 1705
A commission of Bankrupt being awarded against John Millagan of Watton in the County of Norfolk, Chapman. All persons that owe him any Money, or have any Goods or other effects of his in their hands, are not to pay or deliver the same to any person, but to such only as give notice thereof to Mr. Edward Clive, one of the Commissioners in Ironmonger Lane, London.
[London Gazette, June 4-7, 1705]

December 27, 1717
Plymouth Port News, listed a vessel called the Society, of Plymouth, from Guinea with Redwood for London, and named its ship master Alexander Mullikin.
[Post Boy (1695), London, December 28-31, 1717]

January 1726
News by letter from Holland there is advice that the Mac Dowell, Capt. Milliken, from St. Christopher’s, was forced into the Texel, after being off of Dover, bound for London.
[The British Journal, London, Friday, January 7, 1726, Issue CCXXIV]

Note: Capt. Thomas Milliken of the vessel, MacDowell, is mentioned in a number of news papers sailing between St. Christopher’s in the West Indies and London and Greenock.

January 3, 1727
News from the out port of Deal, the Mac Dowel, Capt. Milliken, from St. Christopher’s, was forc’d back into the Texel, after having go to Dover, and coming from London.
[Parker’s Penny Post, London, Friday, January 6, 1727]

January 5, 1727
News from London, the Mac-Dowal, Thomas Miliken Master, from St. Christopher’s, for London, was in the Texell, having overshot her Port.
[Daily Journal, London, Thursday, January 5, 1727]

January 20, 1727
Arrived at Gravesend on January 20, 1727, the Mac Dowall, Captain, Miliken from St. Christopher’s.
[Daily Journal, London, Monday, January 23, 1727]

April 2, 1727
News from Deal, came down and sailed through Macdowell, Captain Millikin, for St. Chistopher’s.
[Daily Journal, London, Tuesday, April 4, 1727]

June 30, 1727
Port News from Deal, the Mc Dowall, Capt. Miliken from London, were arrived at St. Christopher’s.
[Daily Journal, London, Monday, July 3, 1727]

September 29, 1727
Arrived at Deal, the London, Capt. Mills, and Mac-Dowall, Capt. Miliken, both from St. Christopher’s.
[Daily Journal, London, Monday, October 2, 1727]

December 6, 1727
Arrived at Lisbon, the Magdalen, Miliken, from Zant.
[Daily Journal, London, Wednesday, December 14, 1727]

April 26, 1728
News from Gravesend, the Mary, Capt. Mc Dowall, the Mc Dowall, Capt. Miliken, the Clarendon, Capt. Temple, and the Matthew, Capt. Cobb, all from London, were arrived in St. Christopher’s the 11th of March.
[Daily Journal, London, Saturday, April 27, 1728]

October 27, 1728
In the preceding week have sailed from Alicant, the Magdalen, Capt Miliken, for Hamburgh.
[Daily Journal, London, Friday November 8, 1728]

November 14, 1728
News from Dartmouth, came in the Mackdowel, of and from London, Tho. Milikin, for St. Kit’s.
[Daily Post, London, Tuesday November 19, 1728]

November 17, 1728
Arrived at Dartmouth, the Mac Dowall, Capt. Milliken, of and from London, for St. Christopher’s, are still here, certained by contrary Winds.
[Daily Journal, London, Thursday, November 21, 1728]

November 26, 1728
This day sailed the Mac Dowall, Capt. Millican, for St. Christopher’s.
[Daily Journal, London, Wednesday, December 4, 1728]

March 27, 1729
News form Deal, the Mary, Mac Dowall, read Mac Dowall, Miliken, being arrived at St. Christopher’s with the Wind S. W.
[Daily Journal, London, Saturday, March 29, 1729]

June 18, 1729
Port News from Glasgow, arrived the Mac Dowall, Capt. Milliken, from St. Christopher’s.
[Daily Journal, London, Tuesday, June 24, 1729]

April 20, 1730
News from Deal, the Mac Dowall, Milliken, from Glasgow.
[Daily Journal, London, Wednesday, April 22, 1730]

May 12, 1730
From St. Christopher’s, may sail before the end of the month for Glasgow, the McDowall.
[Daily Journal, London, Monday, June 29, 1730]

July 21, 1730
News from Greenock, on 13th came in the Mac Dowall, Milliken, from St. Christopher’s.
[Daily Journal, London, Tuesday, August 11, 1730]

October 10, 1730
News from Greenock, the Mac Dowal, Milliken, for St. Christopher’s.
[Daily Journal, London, Thursday, October 22, 1730]

October 10, 1730
News from Greenock, arrived on October 2, the Mac Dowal, Milliken, for St. Christopher’s.
[Read Weekly Journal Or British Gazetter, London, Saturday, October 24, 1730]

June 28, 1731
News from Greenock, on 24th past arrived the Mac Dowall, Thomas Milliken, from St. Christopher’s.
[Daily Journal, London, Tuesday, July 20, 1731]

July 17, 1732
On the 17th Sailed, the Magdalene, Robert Millegen, from Genoa and Leghorn.
[Daily Journal, London, Thursday, August 3, 1732]

August 23, 1732
Arrived at Gravesend, the Mac Dowall, Thomas Milliken, from St. Christopher’s.
[Daily Journal, London, Friday, August 25, 1732]

September 27, 1732
Leghorn: Arrival, September 27, 1732, the Magdelen, Robert Millegen (Master), from Venice.
[Daily Journal, London, Tuesday, October 3, 1732]

October 13, 1732
Sailed from Deal, the Macdowall, Milliken, and the Friendship, Fenton, for St. Christopher’s.
[Daily Journal, London, Monday, October 16, 1732]

October 15, 1732
Sailed from Deal, the Friendship, Fenton, for St. Christopher’s, the Macdowall, Milliken, for Cork and St. Christopher’s.
[Daily Journal, London, Monday, October 17, 1732]

October 17, 1732
News from Deal, the Macdowall, Milliken, and the Friendship, Fenton, for St. Christopher’s.
[Daily Journal, London, Thursday, October 19, 1732]

May 23, 1733
Arrived at Gravesend, the Mac Dowall, Milliken, from St. Christopher’s.
[Daily Journal, London, Friday, May 25, 1733]

June 29, 1733
Bound from Deal, the Macdowall, Milliken, for St. Christopher’s.
[Daily Journal, London, Friday, November 16, 1733]

September 1, 1733
Lisbon arrived before then, the Magdelan, Millegen, for Cadiz, Malta, and Venice.
[Daily Journal, London, Tuesday, September 11, 1733]

September 8, 1733
Cadiz arrived before then, the Magdalen, Robert Millegan, from Lisbon.
[Daily Journal, London, Thursday, September 20, 1733]

August 26, 1733
Arrived the Gloucester, Bloss, at Nevis, the Macdowall, Milliken, Cambridge, Fogoe at St. Christopher’s, all three from London.
[Daily Journal, London, Wednesday, October 3, 1733]

August 26, 1733
Arrived, the Gloucester, Bloss, at Nevis, the Macdowall, Milliken, and the Cambridge, Fogoe, at St. Christopher’s, and all three from London.
[Penny London Post, Friday, October 5, 1733]

September 1, 1733
Lisbon arrived before then, the Magdelan, Millegen, for Cadiz, Malta, and Venice.
[Daily Journal, London, Tuesday, September 11, 1733]

September 8, 1733
Cadiz arrived before then, the Magdalen, Robert Millegan, from Lisbon.
[Daily Journal, London, Thursday, September 20, 1733]

November 15, 1733
Arrived at Gravesend the Mac Dowall, Thomas Milliken, from St. Christopher’s.
[Daily Journal, London, Friday, November 16, 1733]

November 13, 1733
News from Deal, the Mac Dowall, Milliken, from St. Christopher’s.
[Read’s Weekly Journal or British Gazetteer, London, Saturday, November 17, 1733]

March 23, 1734
In a list of persons polled for Mr. John Bosworth, at the Election of a Chamberlain for the City of London, James Milliken, apothecary, Gracechurch Street, London.
[Daily Journal, London, Tuesday, April 9, 1734]

April 29, 1734
News from Deal, at St. Christopher’s were arrive the Macdowal, Milliken, from London.
[Daily Journal, London, Thursday, May 2, 1734]

May 6, 1734
Last Monday one Robert Milligan, a Marshall Officer, who lived in Queen’s Head Court, Windmill Street, arrested one Nathanael Hilliard, formerly a drummer of the Foot Guard, at the lower end of the Hay Market; upon which Hilliard drew his sword and stabbed Mr. Milligan through the Right Thigh and afterwards made his escape. Mr. Milligan was carried home in a chair, where he languished till Thursday last and then died of the wound [Thursday, May 9, 1734]. The sword having gone quite through the Thigh near the Pope’s Eye.
[Penny London Post, Monday 13, 1734]

September 2, 1734
News from Deal, arrived the Macdowal, Miliken, from St. Christopher’s.
[Daily Journal, London, Wednesday, September 4, 1734]

September 6, 1734
Arrived at Gravesend, the Mc Dowal, Thomas Milliken, from St. Christopher’s.
[Daily Journal, London, Monday, September 9, 1734]

November 9, 1734
Came down and sailed from Deal with the Mcdowal, Milliken, for Nantz.
[Daily Journal, London, Monday, November 11, 1734]

April 29, 1735
Arrived at Cadiz, the M’dowall, Milliken from Nantz.
[Daily Journal, London, Friday, May 16, 1735]

May 24, 1735
News from Cadiz, the Mcdowall, Milliken, for America.
[Daily Journal, London, Thursday, June 5, 1735]

November 25, 1735
News from Deal, the Macdowall, Milliken, from St. Christopher’s.
[Daily Journal, London, Thursday, November 27, 1735]

November 25, 1735
News from Deal, arrived the Macdowall, Milliken, from St. Christopher’s.
[Read’s Weekly Journal or British Gazetteer, London, November 29, 1735]

December 1, 1735
Arrived at Gravesend, the Macdowal, Milliken, from St. Christopher’s.
[Daily Journal, London, Wednesday, December 3, 1735]

December 1, 1735
Arrived at Gravesend, Macdowell, Millican, from St. Kitts.
[London Daily Post and General Advertiser, Wednesday, December 3, 1735]

April 19, 1736
Whereas William Milligan hired a light Chestnut Mare, with flaxen main and tail, 14 hands 3 inches high, on Monday 19th instance, of Robert Cummins, at the Yorkshire Grey, the Corner of the King’s Road, Grey’s Inn Lane, to go to Gravesend, and has not been head of since. Whoever will stop the said man or mare, and give notice to Robert Cummins aforesaid, shall have one Guinea reward, and reasonable charges. The said William Milligan is about 6 feet high, long visage, stammers in his speech, and had a light wig on, but had a dark one in his pocket, a brown great coat with large cape.
[Daily Journal, London, Monday, April 19, 1736]

December 9, 1736
News from Gravesend, the Nelly, Milliken, from St. Christopher’s, at Cork.
[Daily Journal, London, Saturday, December 11, 1736]

September 22, 1737
News from Deal, came down and sailed the Eagle, Millikin, for Cadiz.
[Daily Gazetteer, London, Monday September 26, 1737]

February 3, 1738
Yesterday Nathaniel Hillyard (sometime since a Sergeant in the Guards) was committed to the Gate House, Westminster, by Nathaniel Blackerby Esq., by Virtue of a warrant under the Hand and Seal of Robert White, Gent., coroner of Westminster, dated the 16th May 1734 being charged before him on the Verdict of his Inquest, for the murder of Robert Milligan, late a Marshall’s Court Officer, and also on suspicion of stealing two horses, the property of Mark Ford, at Lambeth in the County of Surrey.
[London Evening Post, February 4-7, 1738]

February 25, 1738
Yesterday 26 Prisoners were tried at the Old Baily, 3 whereof were capitally Convicted, viz, Nathaniel Hillyard, for the murder of Robert Milligan a Marshall’s Court Officer in St. James’s Haymarket in May 1734; Samuel Taylor and John Berry, for sodomy. William Clarke was tried for the murder of Mary Humphrey, by drawing a cart over her, and found guilty of manslaughter. Nine were cast for Transportation, and 13 acquitted.
[Daily Gazetteer, London, Saturday, February 25, 1738]

February 25, 1738
Last Saturday the Session ended at the Old Baily, when six persons received Sentence of Death, including Nathaniel Hillyard, for the murder of Robert Milligan a Marshall’s Court Officer in St. James’s Haymarket in May 1734.
[Old Common Sense or The Englishman’s Journal, London, Saturday, March 4, 1738]

September 1738
News by letters from North Carolina, we have Advice that the Rev. Boyd, missionary there from the Society for the propagating of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, died lately on the plantation of Col. Millikin.
[London Evening Post, September 16-19, 1738]

January 18, 1739
News from Glasgow, the Nelly, belonging to Col. M’Doual and Major Milliken, drove above the full Sea-mark at the Castle, and overset, much bulg’d and shatter’d.
[London Daily Post and General Advertiser, Thursday, January 25, 1739]

February 22, 1739
Whereas there was published in the Daily Gazetteer of February the 8th, That James Milligan of Newport Pagnell in the county of Bucks, Chapman, having assigned all his Debts and effect to William Butler, of London, Linendraper, in Trust for himself and the rest of the Creditors of the said James Milligan, there now two James Milligans belonging to Newport Pagnell, This is to certify, that it is not James Milligan the Innholder, as is said or imagined, but that he now keeps the Ram Inn in Newport Pagnell, and in good Credit and Reputation.
[Daily Gazetteer, London, Thursday February 22, 1739]

February 7, 1743
News from Deal, the Eagle, Milligan, from London, is arrived at Lisbon.
[London Daily Post and General Advertiser, London, Wednesday February 9, 1743]

May 4, 1745
London, by the Lisbon Mail there is Advice that the Toison d’Or, James Polock, of 20 Guns, and 69 men, the St. Phillip, Robert Campbell, of 20 Guns, and 65 men, the Vigilance, William Malon, of 167 Guns, and 49 men, and the Reine de France, Roger Jones, of 14 Guns, and 40 men, were on the 12th April, N.S. taken about eighty leagues from Cape Finisterre, bound from France for Martinico, by the Leostaff, Capt. Fieldier, the Townsend, Capt. Lewis, and the Shoreham, Capt. Milligan, after a smart Engagment, and on 22nd of the said Month were carried into Lisbon.
[Daily Advertiser, London, Saturday May 4, 1745]

July 2, 1745
For Sale by the Candle at Lloyd’s Coffee House in Lombard Street tomorrow, at twelve o’clock at Noon. The Joseph and Mary, a French Prize, taken by the Shoreham, Capt. Robert Milligan, Commander, Burthern about 140 tons, Square-streaned, now lying at Ratcliff Cross, with all her Materials; together with her Cargo of Mud-Fish being about 5000, more or less, with 60 or 80 Tons of French Salt, and 25 casks with Blubber, being ready to Sail.
Inventories to be had on Board, at Sam’s Coffee House hear the Custom House; the Ship and Pilot, Mr. Silvester, at Wapping, at the Place of Sale, and of D. H. S. Augier, broker.
[General Advertiser, London. Tuesday July 2, 1745]

July 2, 1745
For Sale by the Candle, at Lloyd’s Coffee House in Lombard Street, on Friday next, at Twelve o’clock at Noon. The Good Snow the Concord, a French Prize, taken by the Shoreham, Capt. [Robert] Mullegan, and the Lowestoff, Capt. Fielding, Burthern about 130 tons, plantation built, fit for most trades, and a Prime Sailor, now lying in the Great Wet Dock.
Inventories to be had on Board, at Sam’s Coffee House; the Ship and Pilot, Mr. Sivester’s, Wapping; at the place of Sale, and of D. H. S. Augier, broker.
[General Advertiser, London. Tuesday July 2, 1745]

June 16, 1750
On Tuesday last [16 June] was committed to Newgate [London], by Alderman Rawlinson, sitting Alderman at Guildhall, William Wilson, a noted Gambler, on the Oaths of Joseph Milikin and John Gravener, for feloniously robbing the said Milikin of one Three Pound-twelve, Two Thirty-six Shillings Pieces, Three Moidores, and two Watches, the one Silver and the other Pinchbeck, at a house in Shire-Lane, where he was taken.
[London Evening Post, June 19-21, 1750]

June 16, 1750
On Tuesday [16 June] was committed to Newgate [London] by Alderman Rawlinson, sitting Alderman at Guildhall, William Wilson, a noted Gambler, on the Oaths of Joseph Milikin and John Gravener, for feloniously robbing the said Milikin of one Three Pound, twelve, Thirty-six Shillings Pieces, Three Moidores, and two Watches, the one Silver and the other Pinchbeck, at the White Hart in Shire-Lane where he was taken.
[Penny London Post or The Morning Advertiser, London, June 20-22, 1750]

July 14, 1750
Yesterday (13) 22 persons were tried at the Old Baily, ten of whom were cast for Transportation and twelve acquitted. William Wilson had a special Verdict found, for that he, in Company with two persons unknown, in the dwelling house of Anne Glover in Chick-Lane, did steal two Watches, one Silver the other Pinchbeck, a Three-Pound-Twelve, two Thirty-six shillings Pieces, and three Moidores, the property of Joseph Millikin. But he was cast for Transportation on a second Indictment.
[London Evening Post, July 12-14, 1750]

March 1755
Death on Tuesday as Mr. Millikin, a Surgeon and Apothecary at Mile-end, was returning home from London, he dropped from his horse at Mile-end Turnpike, and died immediately.
[London Evening Post, March 6-8, 1755]

May 1759
The Hannah, Milliken, from Ireland for Jamaica, captured by French, carried into Martinico.
[The Scots Magazine, May 1759, Vol. 21, p. 271]

May 21, 1759
Letter from Plymouth, the Hannah, Milikin, from Ireland, to Jamaica, is taken and carried to Martinico.
[Public Advertiser, London, Thursday May 24, 1759]

September 1760
Bankrupt. James Milligan, of Newport Pagnell in Buckinghamshire, Linen-draper, to appear Sept. 27, Oct. 1, and Nov. I, at Guildhall, London.
[London Evening Post, September 20-23, 1760]

June 19, 1762
News from Deal, Mary, Millikin, from Bristol, at Virginia.
[Public Advertiser, Monday June 21, 1762]

June --, 1762
Port News at Virginia, arrival Mary, Millikin, from Bristol.
[London Evening Post, June 19-22, 1762]

September --, 1763
Arrival at Lisbon, Mary, Millikin, from Virginia.
[St. James’s Chronicle or the British Evening Post, London, September 24-27, 1763]

May 23, 1768
Certificate to be allowed to Bankrupt, John Milligan of Liverpool, Lancashire, brewer, on or before the 11th of June next.
[Gazetteer and New Daily Advertiser, London, Monday, May 23, 1768]

June 4, 1768
Lords of the Admiralty announce promotions in his Majesty’s Navy, including, John Milligen to captain, date of commission as master and commander February 27, 1761.
[Gazetteer and New Daily Advertiser, London, Saturday, June 4, 1768]

May 1769
The Creditors of James Milligan, jun., of Newport Pagnell, Bucks, who have executed his Release, may receive a Dividend of Five Shillings in the Pound, by applying to Mess. Divetts, West Smithfield, London, where the Deed is left.
[St. James’s Chronicle or the British Evening Post, May 20-23, 1769]

April 13, 1774
Bankrupt. John Stuttard and Mark Milliken of Kensington, Middlesex, carpenters and co-partners, to appear April 19, May 3 & 24, at ten, at Guildhall, London. Attorney, Mr. Stevenson, Goldsmith-row, Gough-square.
[Gazetteer and New Daily Advertiser, London, Wednesday, April 13, 1774]

July 1774
List of prisoners in the Castle or Goal for the County of Lancashire, including, John Milligan, late of Liverpool in the County of Lancashire, Dealer and Chapman.
[London Gazette, July 16-19, 1774]

January 1775
Conviction at the Old Bailey in London of Mark Millikin of obtaining by false presences from Charles Doxey, an iron chest, value 19L 16s.
[London Evening Post, January 14-17, 1775]

March 8, 1775
Bankrupt. James Milligan, Merchant in Newtonstewart, personal estate sequestrated.
[Gazetteer and New Daily Advertiser, London, Wednesday, March 8, 1775]

January 2, 1776
War Office announces promotion of Surgeon William Douglas to be surgeon to the garrison in South Carolina, vice George Milligen, removed.
[Middlesex Journal and Evening Advertiser, London, January 2-4, 1776]

June, 1776
Prisoner in the Goal, in and for the County of Cumberland, England, John Milliken, formerly of the City of Dublin in the Kingdom of Ireland, late of Whitehaven in the Cumberland, bookseller.
[London Gazette, June 8-11, 1776]

March 1777
On Thursday died Mr. Jane Milliken, grocer, at Whitechapel.
[London Evening Post, March 27 to 29, 1777]

April 9, 1777
News from Charleston, South Carolina. The Rutledge privateer of this port, commanded by Capt. Jacob Milligan, has lately carried into a safe port, a brigantine, of ten guns, from the coast of Guinea, with 42 slaves, a large quantity of elephants teeth, etc., which he took almost under the guns of a fort at Barbados, and in fight of several vessels at anchor, one of [?], supported a man of war, weighted and gave him chase.
[London Evening Post, July 22-24, 1777]

December 23 1778
Bankrupt. William Milligan of Kirkby Kendal, Westmorland, linen draper, to surrender, January 13, 14, and February 2, at Mr. John Atkinson’s Coffee House, in Kirkby Kendal.
[Daily Advertiser, London, Wednesday, December 23, 1778]

May 21-28, 1779
Good Imported at the Port of Liverpool. In the Portland, James Millikin, from Sligo. Thos Booth and Co. 108 sacks and loose containing 290 qrs oats 14 bls beef 90 cows hides. Js and Charles Whitfield 2 hhds hogs lard 64 cow hides and skins. S. Green 9 trusses linen yarn benson and Postlethwaite 8 ditto, James Ansdell 7 ditto, Thomas Beckett 4 ditto, John Kennion 4 ditto, B. P. Wagner 4 ditto.
[Manchester Mercury, Tuesday June 1, 1779]

February 15, 1780
On Monday last was married, at Wanstead in Essex, by the Reverend Doctor Markham, Mr. H. B. Millikin, to Miss Parry, niece to James Spalding, Esq., of the same place.
[General Evening Post, London, February 8-10, 1780]

February 15, 1780
On Monday last was married, at Wanstead in Essex, by the Reverend Doctor Markham, Mr. H. B. Millikin, to Miss Parry, niece to James Spalding, Esq., of the same place.
[Gazetter and New Daily Advertiser, London, Friday, February 11, 1780]

May 18, 1780
Port of London, from Yarmouth, The Peggy, Master William Milliken.
[Public Advertiser, London, Thursday, May 18, 1780]

October 13, 1781
Saturday was married Mr. Milligan, Merchant, in Fenchchurch Street, to Miss Dunbar, of John Street, Bedford Row.
[Morning Chronicle and London Advertiser, Monday, October 15, 1781]

March 1783
Letter referring to the singular alabaster figure, called ‘Dio Adame’ exhibited to the Society of Antiquaries at London, April 26, 1750, by Mr. James Milliken, apothecary, of Ivy-Lane.
[The Gentleman’s Magazine and Historical Chronicle 1783, Vol. 53, part I, p.229]

October 14, 1783
Printed in Carlisle by J. Milliken and to sold by all the booksellers in the County, More Facts or reply to a Pamphlet called a State of Facts, etc, by John Heysham, M. D.
[Cumberland Pacquet, and Ware’s Whitehaven Advertiser, Tuesday October 14, 1783]

March 9, 1785
Deserted from the Forth Battalion of the Royal Regiment of Artillery, at Woolwich, Thomas Millican, aged about 23 years, five feet ten inches and half a high, by trade a labourer, born in the City of Carlisle, in the county of Cumberland, of a fair complexion, fair hair, and blue eyes, was formerly in the guards.
[Gazetteer and New Daily Advertiser, Monday, March 21, 1785]

April 5, 1785
Sold by John Milliken, bookseller, Carlisle, in one large volume, The Princples of Moral and Political Philosophy by William Paley, M. A. Archdeacon of Carlisle.
[Cumberland Pacquet, and Ware’s Whitehaven Advertiser, Tuesday April 5, 1785]

October 14, 1786
Marriage Saturday at St George’s the Martyr, Queens Square, William Paterson, Esq., of Great Ormond Street, to Miss Callander, neice of David Milligan, Esq., of Nicolas Lane, London.
[Gazetteer and New Daily Advertiser, London, Wednesday, October 18, 1786]

November 27, 1786
Bankrupt. Joseph Wilkinson and John Milligan, of Bethnal Green, Middlesex, cow-keepers, to surrender December 2, 9 & January 6, at eleven, at Guildhall, London. Attorney Mr. Duncan, No. 21, Lincoln’s Inn.
[Morning Post and Daily Advertiser, London, Monday, November 27, 1786]

June --, 1792
Died a few days ago, Mrs. Sarah Milliken, wife of Mr. John Milliken of Maryport, in the 88th year of her age; her surviving husband is in the 102nd year of his age, and possess the use of all his faculties in a surprising degree.
[Leeds Intelligencer, Monday June 11, 1792]

October 20, 1792
Married Saturday, at St. George’s Church, Liverpool, by the Rev. Mr. Renshaw, Mr. James Knight, Attorney at law in Manchester, to Miss Milligan of Liverpool, daughter of the late Mr. John Milligan.
[World, London, Thursday, October 25, 1792]

July 1793
Lately died at Maryport in Cumberland, Mr. John Milliken, at the great age of 112 years, having been born in the parish of Bridekirk in July 1681.
[London Chronicle, July 16-18, 1793]

July 1793
Died last week, at Maryport, Mr. John Milliken at the great age of 112 years, having been born in the parish of Bridekirk in July 1681.
[Gazetteer and New Daily Advertiser, London, Thursday, July 18, 1793]

January 23, 1800
Died on Thursday last, after an illness of four days, Mr. Michael Milliken of Richmond Green, Surrey, aged 75, sincerely lamented by all who knew him.
[True Briton (1793), London, Saturday, January 25, 1800]

February --, 1801
Death at Seaton in Cumbria, Mrs. Ann Milliken, relict of the late Mr. John Milliken, many years master of the brig Mary of Workington.
The Monthly Magazine, March 1, 1801, Vol. 11, p. 184]

November 11, 1801
Death of wife of H. B. Millikin, Esq., of Norfolk Street, Stand.
[The Gentleman’s Magazine, Vol. 21, part 2, p. 1062]

November 11, 1801
Death on Wednesday morning, Mrs. Milliken, wife of H. B. Milliken, Esq., of Norfolk Street, Strand.
[The Morning Post and Gazette, London, Wednesday, November 18, 1801]

February 1, 1811
Marriage of Thomas Hughan, Esq., M.P. to Miss Milligan, eldest daughter of the late Robert Milligan, Esq., [of Hampstead, England].
[The Scots Magazine and Edinburgh Literary Miscellany, Vol. 73, p. 157]

February 1, 1811
Marriage of Thomas Hughan, Esq., M.P. of Devonshire Place, to the eldest daughter of the late Robert Milligan, Esq., of Hampstead, England.
[The Gentleman’s Magazine and Historical Chronicle, Vol. 82, part 1, p. 132]

August 29, 1815
Marriage on Tuesday last, Mr Walter Milligan, linen draper to Miss Riley, both of Bradford.
[The Leeds Mercury, Saturday, September 2, 1815]

July 11, 1816
Marriage of Robert Milligan, Esq., Captain in the 25th Foot, to Elizabeth Margaret, only daughter of Mathew Baillie, M.D.
[The Gentleman’s Magazine, Vol. LXXVI, part 2, p. 80]

July 11, 1816
Marriage at St. George’s, Hanover Square, R. Milligan, Esq., Captain in the 25th Regiment of Foot, to Elizabeth Margaret, only daughter of Matthew Baillie, M.D.
[Jackson’s Oxford Journal, Saturday, July 20, 1816]

October 2, 1817
Death off the Isle of Wight, on the 2nd current, deeply and justly regretted, Henry Davidson Milligan, Esq., third son of the late Robert Milligan, Esq. Of Rosslyn, Hampstead.
[Caledonian Mercury, Edinburgh, Thursday, October 9, 1817]

January 6, 1818
The Creditors who have proved their Debts under a Commission of Bankrupt awarded and issued forth against George Geddes, Alexander Geddes and Thomas Milliken, late of Finsbury-Place, in the County of Middlesex, since of Fea-Church Buildings, in the City of London, Merchants, Dealers, Chapmen, and Co-partners (trading under the firm of George Geddes and Co.) are desired to meet the Assignees of the estate effects of the said Bankrupts, on the 19th day of January instant, at Twelve O’clock at Noon, at the Office of Swain, Stevens, Maples, Pearse and Hunt Solicitors, Frederick’s Place, Old Jewry, London.
[London Gazette, January 6, 1818, p. 55]

January 14, 1820
Death on Friday, the 14th instant, at Hampstead, in her 63rd year, Jean Milligan, relict of the late Robert Milligan, Esq., of Rosslyn, Hampstead.
[Morning Post, London, Monday, January 17, 1820]

June 1, 1826
Marriage at Dinapore, Maj. T. W. Broadbent, to Miss Antonia Milliken, niece of Mr. A. Dickson, superintending surgeon at that station.
[The Asiatic Journal and Monthly Register for British India and its Dependencies, December 1, 1826]

February 1830
Married at Islington, the Rev Richard Milliken of Chichester, to Rebecca, daughter of Thomas Richards, Esq., of Islington.
[The Morning Post, London, Thursday, February 4, 1830]

May 10, 1842
Married at Newbury, Berkshire, Andrew, second son of the late Richard Milliken, Esq., of Dublin, to Georginna Charlotte, second daughter of John Alexander, Esq., of the former place.
[The Satirist or Censor of the Times, Sunday, May 15, 1842]

May 10, 1842
Married at Newberry, Berks, Georgianna, daughter of John Alexander, Esq., to Andrew, 2nd son of the late R. Milliken, Esq.
[Le Belle Assemblée or Bell’s Court, London, June 1, 1842]

April 29, 1854
Birth at No. 3, Torriano Gardens, Camden Road, London, the wife of Frederic Milliken, Esq., of a son.
[The Lady’s Newspaper & Pictorial Times, London, Saturday, May 13, 1854]

January 6, 1859
Died at Marquis Road, Canonbury, Lower Islington, Rebecca Mary, the wife of the Rev. Richard Milliken, Vicar of Stoughton, Sussex.
[John Bull, London, Saturday, January 8, 1859]






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