Barrett Genealogy

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There are two different coats of arms for the Barretts and there is some controversy over which is the one we associate with. Personally I believe that the striped one on the left is our coat of arms, but I have been known to be wrong in the past. Since I cannot go any further back than Cyrus and Susannah, and do not know where our Barrett family originates I cannot say for sure if we are indeed Irish or if we came from Germany. If we came from Germany it is possible the crest on the right is ours, but since I do not know where that crests originates I cannot even begin to speculate on it. However, as you read on you will see that the overwhelming evidence supports that we are from Ireland.

From Clans and Families of Ireland and Scotland:
Appendix I - The Coats of Arms
"Regarding the armorial shields listed in this appendix, these are arms that had ancient and tribal significance, as opposed to arms that were later assumed by an individual as a part, for instance, of a nonhereditary British knighthood. The symbols used are often highly significant within the tribal-dynastic sphere, in a uniquely Gaelic way. Some common abbreviations are: ar. = argent ... gu. = gules, ... Barrett Barry of ten per pale ar. and gu. counterchanged."

Barrett Coat of Arms 1 Barrett Coat of Arms 2

The Clan Barrett migrated to Wales with Strongbow during the Norman Conquest and settled in a county called Pendyne. Later, they migrated to Munster Ireland, County Cork, and became known as the Master Lords of Tirawley. Their motto was: “Frangas non Flectes: virtus probitas” meaning "Unbowed, Unbroken, Honor and Courage." Their Coat of Arms Barry of ten per pale argent and gules counterchanged. The Crest: A demi-lion rampant sable ducally crowned per pale argent and gules. This in laymen’s terms was the crowned lion atop a shield striped with red and white.

This small increment in time, of a two-hour battle, lasted forever in history as the tide was turned. One man died, and an empire was born along with the Thoroughbred. The fate of one King became the destiny of another as history fades into the present.

If you read on you can see a longer, more detailed story of our Barrett forefathers.

Ancient Barrett History

This is our Barrett history in a brief nutshell, as I understand it. Most of this I gleaned from the internet over the past 10 years but at the beginning I was not good at keeping records of where I got it. Briefly, this is my understanding of the Barrett History. If indeed we are from Ireland, which means that we were actually from the Norman conquerers then the following history of our name is valid for us.

The Barretts (Baroid—Cork, Baireid—Mayo) came to Ireland with the Anglo-Norman invasion and settled as two families of the same Welsh stock, one of which, seated at Castle Barrett, became influential in central County Cork, where they were large landowners down to the year 1691. In that year the then head of the Cork family, Colonel John Barrett, was deprived of 12,000 acres for raising a regiment of infantry for King James’ Irish army. The Cork Barretts had already suffered loss of land under earlier English encroachments, and originally had been proprietors of the whole of what is now the Barony of Barrett, formerly known as Barrett’s Country.

The Mayo Barretts had settled in the northwest of that county, in the Barony of Tirawley, where they became numerous and powerful. They came to form a clan in the Gaelic fashion, the head of which was known as Mac Bhaitin Baireid (Mac Watten Barrett). There were two sub-clans of the Barretts, the Clan Aindriu, or MacAndrews settled between Lough Conn and the River Moy and the Clan Toimin, or MacTimins.

From http://www.electricscotland.com/WEBCLANS/cairney/152.htm
Clans and Families of Ireland and Scotland
X. The Vikings and Normans:
"The Barretts (Baroid—Cork, Baireid—Mayo) came to Ireland with the Anglo-Norman invasion and settled as two families of the same Welsh stock, one of which, seated at Castle Barrett, became influential in central County Cork, where they were large landowners down to the year 1691. In that year the then head of the Cork family, Colonel John Barrett, was deprived of 12,000 acres for raising a regiment of infantry for King James’ Irish army. The Cork Barretts had already suffered loss of land under earlier English encroachments, and originally had been proprietors of the whole of what is now the Barony of Barrett, formerly known as Barrett’s Country.

The Mayo Barretts had settled in the northwest of that county, in the Barony of Tirawley, where they became numerous and powerful. They came to form a clan in the Gaelic fashion, the head of which was known as Mac Bhaitin Baireid (Mac Watten Barrett). There were two sub-clans of the Barretts, the Clan Aindriu, or MacAndrews settled between Lough Conn and the River Moy and the Clan Toimin, or MacTimins.

The History of the Barrett Name

There appears to be two distinct origins of the Barrett name, one branch was of Anglo-Saxon decent and the other was Norman. Both settled in Ireland which is where many of the American Barretts appear to originate. The Anglo-Saxon Barretts appeared in the Domesday book in 1086 as Yorkshire landlords. These Barretts moved to Ireland in the 13th century when they received control of most of North County Mayo from King John together with the title "Lord of Tirawley". In the 14th century they formed a Gaelic sept, their chief being known as Mac Bhaitín Báiréid or Mac Wattin Barrett.

The other line stemmed from Robert Baret, a knight who accompanied William the Conqueror from Normandy in France to England at the time of the Norman Conquest in 1066. The Barrett, who came to England with William I as participants in the Battle of Hastings and the Norman Conquest of England were "Northmen", Vikings (Danes) who migrated to the coast of France circa 800.

About 1100 there was a Barrett who was the Lord of Pendine at Carmarthen, Wales. These Barretts arrived in Ireland in the wake of the 1171 invasion and were granted estates in County Cork, Munster. Seated at Castle Barrett in "Barrett's County", they lost some of their lands during the English settlements during the 17th century. The remainders were lost during the Williamite confiscations of 1691 when Col. John Barrett was deprived of more than 12,000 acres for raising an infantry regiment for James II's army. From 1169-1170 Richard FitzGilbert de Clare, also known as "Strongbow" organized an expedition of Cambro-Norman and Flemish knights and mercenaries from Wales to invade Ireland with the agreement of King Henry II, and in response to the invitation of MacMurrough, a minor Irish King, who wanted support in a dispute with another Irish King. Five Barretts, William and four sons, including William and Philip, were among this group. At that time the Barretts were tenants of Carew in Pembrokeshire. The literature infers Philip may have been the original invader and the others joined him as the early invaders brought additional family from Wales. The literature also infers that there was a certain amount of two way traffic as the invaders traveled back and forth to home in Wales for additional support and to keep hold of their Welsh possessions. The Norman invasion gained much power in Ireland through the first half of the thirteenth century. The Barretts, maintaining their relationship with Carew, came into possession of a great part of County Cork that had been first given to DeCogan's. Literature speaks of "Barretts Country" and "The Nation of Barretts". This land has been identified as 26,280 acres reaching from four miles north of Mallow to six miles south-west of Cork.

William Barrett, a descendant, joined with Burke, Carew and other Normans in a further adventure in Mayo where, in addition to his land at Glandore in County Cork, he became the Barony of Tirawley in 850. In Cork, Barretts were in possession of several castles over the years. These included Castlemore or Castle Barrett in the Parish of Mourne Abbey, and Cloughphillip built by Philip Barrett 3.5 miles to the west of Blarney, Balincolig Castle in the Parish of Carregrohane, Glandore Castle built above the village of Cuan, Barrettstown Castle west of Fethard, now County Tipperary, and Castle Inch. Over the ensuing years the Barretts generally side with "Geraldine," Desmond, and Jacobites causes. In turn they were frequently at odds with the McCarthy clan who eventually regained much territory from the Barretts.

In regard to religion the original Norman/English would be Catholic from a time before Protestantism originated. Mourne Abbey was Catholic up until the time it was dissolved by Henry VIII in 1541. At the time of Oliver Cromwell, Castlemore was damaged in 1645 by a force of Cromwell's army and the Barretts Barony at Castlemore was said to be Protestant and the land was retained by the Barretts (1652). Forty years later, subsequent to the Battle of the Boyne in 1690, John Barrett, who fought as a Jacobite on the side of the Catholic King James, lost to the Williamites (William of Orange) and suffered the loss (and destruction) of Castlemore and 12,000 acres of his land. In the earliest times, religion was apt to be situational and political in many circumstances.

The 11th and 12th Century Normans who went to Ireland spoke French. You will find in some of the old literature the name referred to as "de Barrett." Assimilation is an historic character of the Normans and those in Ireland became very Irish in loyalty, but were long referred to as the "Old English" in Ireland. Over the years we have been well mixed but all Baretts have a great deal of common heritage.

More Recent Barrett History

Cyrus BARRETT.Cyrus was born in 1797 at Seneca Falls, Seneca Co, NY. He married Susannah SETTLEMAYOR from PA and had three children. With his family, Cyrus returned to NY, probably to Seneca Co. Here Cyrus and Susannah had three more children. The family then migrated to Ohio sometime before 1839. Cyrus was the first settler of Madison Twp, Williams Co, OH. Here in Northwestern Ohio, Cyrus played a large role in this new twp. He, as well as his oldest son Cyrus, and Elias (probably brother to the elder Cyrus) were some of the first elected officers of Madison Twp. in 1843. In 1858 both Cyrus and Susannah passed away and were buried in the BARRETT Cemetery which Cyrus had purchased in the 1830's. Hid occupation was farmer, as many people were in those days. He was the first settler of Madison Township, Wiliams Co, OH, purchasing 240 acres of land from Jonathan Metcalf for $600. In April 1839 he donated one acre of the land for establishing the private Barrett Cemetery. The first election of officers for Madison Twp. was held in his home. This information is in County of Williams Ohio, by Goodspeed, Pub. 1882, Pg. 408.

William was the first white child born in Madison Twp, Williams Co,Ohio. After the death of his father in 1858, he chose Willard F. Kelsey as his guardian at the age of 18 years. Kelsey accepted the appointment and became guardian for the property of William and given $300 bond on 20 Dec. 1858. Final account was brought on 19 Sep. 1861 in which the balance of $51.53 cents was distributed. William, son of Cyrus, enlisted as a private on October 7, 1862, and served in Company F, 38th Reg. Ohio Volunteers Infantry during the Civil War. The above information is from 1850 Williams Co. (Madison Twp), Ohio, Census, Journal 1, Pg. 207; the Probate Records of Williams Co, OH, Journal 1, Pg. 328; Probate Records of Williams Co, OH 1 and the Barrett Cemetery Record, Williams Co., Ohio, Pg. 7

This is a map of the Finger Lakes region of New York, where Seneca Falls, Seneca County are, and where some of Cyrus and Susannah's children were born.

MY PARENTS RUTH RUSSELL TIM RANDY ROLLY PAM SANDE

OBITUARIES CENSUS BARRETT HISTORY
BARRETT CEMETERY ZETTELMEYER HISTORY BATES HISTORY
CRARY HISTORY BREWER HISTORY D'ALBINI HISTORY
LAKE HISTORY GALLUP HISTORY MacQUARRIE HISTORY

Here are some of my favorite websites:

The Cyrus Barrett Legacy Website

A link to my Loebrich Genealogy will be here as soon as I am done revamping the site.

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