LEONARD SIBLINGS HENRY, JAMES, PHILIP, SARAH & THOMAS

IN AMERICA AND SOME OF THEIR DESCENDANTS

 

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Introduction

 

This article complements my previous article “Pre-American Ancestry of our Leonard Ironworkers” in which the eleven children of Thomas and Elizabeth (White) Leonard are identified and the emigration of five of them to America is established.  The five emigrants are:

1.      Henry born ca. 1618

2.      James born ca. 1620

3.      Philip born ca. 1630

4.      Sarah baptized 23 Feb. 1633/4

5.      Thomas baptized 20 Apr. 1636.

 

On 6 Jan. 1793 Rev. Perez Forbes wrote, “Where you can find iron works, there you will find a LEONARD.”[1]

 

1.      HENRY LEONARD

 

Henry was born ca. 1618 and was working at the Braintree Iron Works, Massachusetts Bay Colony, probably by 1646.  The basis for this statement is the deposition he made 27 Oct. 1655 in which he referred to his being at Braintrey Forge “about nine yeares agoe” (i.e., ca. 1646) (Fig. 1).[2]  The “coles” used as fuel at that time at Braintree was charcoal.  It was produced by charring wood in huge mounds covered with leaves or turf for 5 or 6 days (Fig. 2).  Note that Clarence Torrey also reported Henry was age 37 in 1655.  He also reported that Henry was age 40 in 1660 which would indicate that Henry was born ca. 1620.[3]  The basis for this latter statement was a Salem Court Record 26 June 1660 (see below).

 

Henry married MARY [-?-] 1645 (?) in Lynn, died before 1 Oct. 1695, probably in Monmouth Co., NJ.[4]  Mary was born ca. 1624/5 (see Salem Court Record 24 Sept. 1657 below), died in 1675 in Monmouth Co.[5] An undocumented source indicates that Henry’s wife’s maiden name was Mary Russell and that they were married in Lynn.  If this is true, then the next assumption might be that she was a sister or daughter of Ralph Russell.  This Ralph Russell was a less-experienced forge helper with Henry and James Leonard at Hammersmith (the name of the ironworks at Lynn).[6] 

 

Just when Henry emigrated is not known.  Alonzo Lewis and James R. Newhall state that Henry was in Lynn in 1642.[7]  Since John Winthrop, Jr., did not bring his first contingent of ironworkers over from England on the “An Cleve” of London until the fall of 1643,[8] this undocumented date of 1642 is suspect.

 

As stated above, Henry may have worked first at the Braintree Iron Works located about 10 miles south of Boston.  This was the first ironwork venture by John Winthrop, Jr., and the Company of Undertakers of the Iron Works in New England.  It was not initially a success due primarily to lack of ore for the furnace and was temporarily abandoned in 1647.[9] No record has been found establishing the presence of a Leonard in Braintree in this time frame other than Henry’s 1655 deposition that he was there “nine yeares agoe.”

 

The earliest records of his presence in America is in the Saugus Ironworks account book kept by Richard Leader’s clerk, Thaddeus Riddan, where on 26 Mar.(?) 1649 Mr. Brown(?) was instructed to pay Hen Leonard 14s. for a hat.[10]

 

In the Salem Quarterly Court Records & Files there appeared the following two citations for the year 1649:[11]

 

o        26:4:1649: “Witnesses agt Pray strike Pinion & Tho: Billington & Jno Vinton, Henry Leonard, Jos Jyarks, Nichs Pinion, Tobiah Saunders, Jno Dimond & his man” fined ten shillings at ye Iron works for a common swearer.  (Quentin Pray ran the forge and Richard Pray was a collier.  Nicholas Pinion was both a forge carpenter and a maker of iron.)[12]

 

o        11:7:1649: Henry Leonard’s wife and John Vinton’s wife fined for scolding, etc., by the worshipful Capt. Robert Bridgis. (John Vinton was in charge of the fineries at Saugus.)[13]

 

And in the Salem Quarterly Court Records & Files for 1650:[14]

 

o        25:4:1650: John Smith of Hammersmith confessed judgment in favor of William Osborne, agent of Mr. Richard Leadr. Henry Leonard & John Vinton, both of Hammersmith did the same.

 

o        27:4:1650: Joseph Armitage v. Nicholas Penyon, Debt.  Same v. Henry Leonard. Debt.

 

The Essex County, MA, courts met at Salem in its first and third quarters and at Ipswich in its second and fourth quarters, based on the calendar then in use. Before 1700, March 25th was most likely the start of a new year.  Thus we next find mention of Henry Leonard at the Ipswich Court Records & Files 24:7:1650 in the following citations:[15]

 

o        Larence Turner v. Henry Lenord and wife Mary. Defamation. (Lawrence Turner, born ca. 1621, was a brick worker at the Saugus ironworks until ca. 1653, He was a son of John Turner who was in charge of the fineries at Saugus and later was “working the forge” at Taunton.)[16]

 

o        Henry Lenord v. Larence Turner and wife. Battery.

 

o        John Herdman and Henry Lenord bound for the former’s appearance at the next court.

 

In the Lynn Iron Works manuscripts appear the following two entries:[17]

 

o         “To: Soemuch beeing a debt deue from Hennery Leonnard alloued him uppon arbitration 013=09=11.

 

o         “To: Sheartes for Henney Leonnard his mann and mendeing of them 001/17/04.

 

It is not clear whether these entries were made in 1650 or 1651. The Lynn Iron Works manuscripts are reported to be the oldest business record in the U.S.

 

Henry’s total earnings (per annum?) were £16.[18]  Henry and his brother James were among the ten highly skilled workers required for the operation of the forge and the rolling & slitting mill at Hammersmith (Fig.3).[19]  However, since they drew only small sums for their work there, it appears that they were at that time not in charge of any of the equipment but served as skilled forge hands.[20]  At that time the Hammersmith Forge consisted of two finery hearths (where the iron pigs were melted down, decarburized by oxidation and the resulting wrought iron heated to a semi-finished stage) and one chafery hearth (where the malleable iron was reheated for further welding and drawing out into finished bars).[21]  At each hearth charcoal was fiercely burned by exposure to a blast of air from leather bellows driven by water pressure.

 

Although the furnace at Braintree had been temporarily shut down, probably by 1647, the building of the forge was completed by Richard Leader, the first superintendent of the Ironworks.  It was located on the Monatiquot River, near the present junction of Adams & Middle Streets (Fig. 4)[22] and consisted of a dam, three water wheels, one finery, one chafery and a massive hammer.  Cast iron was brought by boat from Hammersmith to be reduced to wrought iron at Braintree Forge.[23] By 1652 Henry Leonard was working at this Braintree Forge.  The Braintree Furnace was located two miles away from the forge on Furnace Brook in what is now Quincy (just west of Braintree).

 

On 27 Apr. 1652 Goodwife Prey testified in the case of Wilson vs. Faxon that “the child of Joseph (Wilson) coming to Monaticut after the beast that was myred came for help to Goodman Leonards to help the beast, and he sent his man to help him…..”[24]  Note that Quentin Pray ran the forge at Braintree.[25] 

 

Then on 21 Oct. 1652 Henry Leonard of Braintree made an agreement with the town of Taunton to come there with his brother James and Ralph Russell to establish an ironworks (Fig. 5).[26] No doubt the reason for this agreement was that Plymouth Colony wanted to compete with the Massachusetts Bay Colony where the proprietors of the ironworks at Lynn and Braintree had a monopoly by grant.  In this regard, in a letter signed by Thomas ffolley, John Beck and Gaulter Frost, dated “London this 28th of September 1652,” in which an agreement to employ William Osborne (then in London) at “Bantry furnas & fordges” as “clark it is mentioned that “wee doe vnderstand so much by him, that if hath no imployment by us that then (he being desired long sense by thoes of Plimouth Patent) to be imployed by them in raysing of yron worckes thaer, to ower graet preindice; & without him wee are confident thay will not be attempted.”[27]

 

The Taunton proprietors “set off” land for the three ironworkers but there is no record that either Henry Leonard or Ralph Russell occupied it.[28]  Ralph Russell removed to Dartmouth, MA, and started a forge there at Russell’s Mills.[29]   James Leonard did take up residence in Taunton and did set up a furnace and forge in what is now Raynham (see ¶2. below).

 

Our Henry Leonard next shows up back in Lynn, where in the Salem Quarterly Court Records & Files appear the following pertinent citations: [30]

 

o        24:4:1656 Bond: Sureties: William Curtis and mark L.H. of Henry Lenerd.

 

o        24:9:1657 “Marye Lynard, aged about thirty-two or thirty-three years, deposed that Indion [Indian ?] hariust [harvest ?] Last was seaven year’s that Indion Harvist was gathered at the Iron Works before John Smith went away from the Iron Works.”  Sworn in court, 25:9:1657 by Wm Hathorne.

 

o        25:9:1657: Daniell Salmon and John Hathorne testified that said Daniell Salmon, deputy to the marshal of Salem, while serving a writ, attaching a parcel of bar iron, was violently resisted by Olliver Purchis, Henry Leoneard and Richard Blood, who took the iron from him, in the forge at the Ironworks.  All three were subsequently discharged.  [Mr. Oliver Purchase had replaced Thaddeus Riddan as accounting clerk in 1655.  Daniel Salmon operated the company farm.]

 

In the court held at Salem 26 June 1660:

 

Mr. Adam Haukes v. Mr. William Paine and company of undertakers of the Iron Works of Lynn and Mr. Oliver Purchass, their agent.  Trespass.  For damming their waters so high, which was the cause of floating his lands, well and bridge, to his great damage for several years.  Verdict for defendant.

 

This attack was easily defeated by proving that the current management had kept the water level low so as to prevent flooding of Adam Hawkes’ nearby farm.  Included in the testimony was:

 

Henorey Lenard, aged about forty years, Nicklis Pinnion and John Vinton deposed that ever since Mr. Porchas came to the works, the water had been kept low by his order, so low that it caused a great deal of difference between the workman and the water drawer; that the waste had been dug wider and deeper since he came, etc.  Sworn in court.

 

Among Oliver Purchis’ bill of costs for witness fees appears Henry Leonard’s name.

 

On 30 June 1668 Henry Leonard of Lynn took the oath of freeman.  The certificate was signed by Edw. Rawson, the Colony’s secretary.[31]

 

In 1668 or 1669 Henry Leonard and his family moved to Rowley Village (now Boxford) (Fig. 6).  The local farmers and others had realized that a new industry would be both a source of profit and a stimulus to settlement.  These men put up the money, found an “expert” to build the plant and then the clerk of the ironworks, Thomas Baker, and one of the co-owners, John Gould, leased it to him for £200 per year.  The expert was our Henry.  However, he was not the actual mover of the enterprise, he being the lessee of the works, and owning only one-sixteenth of them.  The works were owned by a company, whose capital stock amounted to about £1,000.  The bog-ore used was dug from meadows in Danvers, Ipswich, Boxford, Middleton, Topsfield and Saugus.[32] Henry was permitted to move his family into a house which stood on the lands of the ironworks.

 

In 1671-1672 Henry’s name appeared in court records as “Manager of the Rowley Village Ironworks” and he was referred to as “Mr. Leonard.” He ran the business, contracted with the colliers, made and sold iron, all in his own name.  Lawsuits proliferated.  There were lawsuits over Henry’s failure to pay colliers according to agreement:[33]

 

o        Bond, dated 22:3:1672, given by Henry (his mark) Lenard of Bromigum forge (the name of the Rowley Village plant) in the County of Essex to Anthony Carrell of Essex County, for 13li. to be paid in bar iron at 24 shillings per hundred.  Wit: Thomas Lenard (Henry’s son) and James Hanscombe.

 

o        Edmond Bridges v. Henry Leonard: non-performance of an agreement to deliver two tons of anchor iron, dated 18 June 1673: signed by Robert Lord for the court; and served by Joseph Leigh, deputy marshal of Ipswich, by attachment of a parcel of bricks and all his interest in the iron works.

 

o        Mr. Robert Paine v. Henry Leonard: debt, in bar iron; dated 18 June 1673; signed by Robert Lord, for the court; and served by Joseph Leigh, deputy for Robert Lord, marshal of Ipswich, by attachment of Leonard’s interest in the iron works, the house he lives in, and in his right in a frame standing by the works.

 

o        Thomas Newell v. Henry Leonard; debt; for not delivering 8li in bar iron in Salem, according to agreement, dated June 18, 1673; signed by Robert Lord, for the court; and served by Joseph Leigh, marshal’s deputy.

 

o        Major Genrll. Daniel Denison v. Henry Leonard; debt, in bar iron, due for his part of the rent of the Iron Works and arrears of rent; dated June 17, 1673; signed by Robert Lord, marshal of Ipswich; and served by John Gould, deputy for Robert Lord, marshal of Ipswich, who left the summons with said Leonard’s wife.

 

o        Deacon Wm. Goodhue v. Henry Leonard; debt; dated June 18, 1673; signed by Robert Lord, marshal of Ipswich; and served by Edmond Bridges, deputy for Robert Lord, marshal of Ipswich, by attachment of a parcel of bricks, etc.

 

o        Ens. John Gould v. Henry Leonard; trespass; for harm done by his horses in corn and orchard; dated June 17, 1673; signed by Robert Lord, for the court; and served by John How, marshal’s deputy by attachment of two chests and their contents, who read the attachment to Leonard’s wife and left a summons with his son.

 

o        Execution, dated Mar. 5, 1673-4, against Henry Leonard, sr., to satisfy judgment granted Mr. William Browne, sr., at Salem court 24:4:1673; signed by Hilliard Veren, for the court; and served by Henry Skerry, marshal of Salem, by attachment of said Leonard’s eighth of the iron works at Topsfeild (i.e., Rowley Village), which was delivered to Nathaniel Mihill, said Browne’s agent, by turf and twig.

 

o        Execution, dated 25:12:1673, against Henry Leonard, to satisfy judgment granted Mr. Robert Paine, sr., at Salem court, 24:4:1673; signed by Hilliard Veren, for the court; and served by Henry Skerry, marshal, by attachment of said Leonard’s share in the iron works at Rowley Village, which was delivered to Mr. Robert Paine, jr., for the use of his father, by turf and twig, and by a piece of the houses, for them.

 

o        Execution, dated 19:5:1673, against Henry Leonard, sr., to satisfy judgment grant Mr. William Browne, sr., by Worshipfull Major Daniell Denison, Mr. Thomas Danforth and Hilliard Veren, cleric, 24:4:1673, to be paid in bar iron at 18 shillings per C.; signed by Hilliard Veren, cleric; and served by Henry Skerry, marshal of Salem.  William Curties, Mr. Browne’s agent, took a bill of Samuel Lenard (Henry’s son) who offered the iron works as security.

 

o        Daniel Black, employee of the iron works, sued Henry Leonard for a debt of £2 12s 10d and received satisfaction by the court at Ipswich in Sept. 1673.[34]

 

o        Abraham Knoulton deposed that he heard his uncle Knoulton and Mr. Lennard make up their accounts and there were about nine pounds due his uncle.  Mr. Lennard received at the same time several pairs of shoes.  Sworn in court.  Edmond Bridges deposed that Mr. Leonard promised to pay Thomas Knoulton for what shoes he had of him every half year in iron, barley or hides.  Sworn in Count.

 

o        Ipswich, Mar. 31, 1674, Deacon Thomas Knowlton v. Henry Lenard, Debt, verdict for plaintiff.

 

The Ipswich Quarterly Court, meeting in Mar. & Sept. 1673 recorded the following entries having to do with the making, delivery and pricing of coal under Henry Leonard’s management:[35]

 

o        Writ dated 11:1:1672, signed by John Redington, for the court, and served by John How, deputy marshal of Ipswich, by attachment of the coals that lie by the coalhouse at the works at Rowly Village.  Henry Leonard’s bill of cost, 3li. 16s. 10d.

 

o        James Car deposed that on Mar. 22, Mr. Leonard desired him to go and see the coal cart measured and “it held 68 bushells one heapt & ye other strook & the cart was full up to the top …….”  Henry Leonard went on to tell Mr. Car that Mackfation & Ramsdell did not always make the best possible coal nor did they fill the carts full. Sworn in court.

 

o        William Doule, aged about thirty-two years, deposed that he heard Mr. Henry Lenard say about the time Mackfaston and Ramsdell were finishing the work in “colling the said Lenords wood: that the aforesaid colyers had coled all the wood that he the said Lenard had delivered them in this yer, it being some time in the eaight month 1672.”  Sworn in court.

 

o        Agreement, dated May 17, 1672, between Henery (his mark) Lenard and Ambros Mackfation and John Ramsdell “to Cole all the old wood and the new yt shall be cut and tacken in this yeare for & in consideration of the some of six shilling pr load to be paid unto the said mackfation & Ramsdell by mr Lenard…….”  Mackfation & Ramsdell further agreed to make good, firm coals and to deliver full carts of coal to the pits.  They were to be paid in goods or bar iron.

 

o        William Doule, aged about thirty-two years, and John Everet, aged about twenty-six years, deposed that Mr. Henery Lenard was living at the Iron works in Rowly Villag and had ten cords of wood that lay in such a place that it could not be coaled, but he said he was to cart it to some more convenient place.  He disappointed the wheeler by not carting it and had it carried home to burn.  Sworn in court.

 

o        Robert Baites deposed that Mr. Leonard said it was a pretty honest load when said Ambross filled the cart, etc.  Sworn in court.

 

o        Samuell Lenord and Nathanill Lenord (see ¶1.i. & ¶1.ii. below) deposed.  Sworn in court.

 

o        John Goold deposed that he was present when Mr. Leonard’s clerk, James Hanscom, reckoned with Mackfashon, and there was due the latter about 43li.  Sworn in court.

 

o        Edmond Bridges, jr., and John Gould deposed that Leonard said they had coaled all his wood except some that stood in water and some that was in rocks whence it could not be wheeled.  Sworn in court.

 

o        John Everard deposed that Leonard said to bring in better loads with fewer brands.  Sworn in court.

 

o        Tho. Looke and Tho. Towers testified that they received of Samuell Leonord and James Hanscomb by Henry Leanord’s order, forty cord of wood but by Daniell Black for Mr. Leonard’s use, which wood they had made into coal, and delivered to said Leanord.  Sworn in court.

 

o        Writ: Ambrose Mackfastion v. Henry Leonard; debt; dated Sept. 22, 1673, signed by Robert Lord, for the court; and served by Robert Lord, marshal of Ipswich.

 

o        John Bregges and John How deposed that they heard Mr. Lenord say that he and Makfasan had settled accounts, etc. Sworn in court.

 

The Salem court, meeting in alternate quarters, continued the business tribulations of Henry Leonard and sons Samuel & Nathaniel:[36]

 

o        Writ, dated 16:4:1673, signed by Hilliard Veren, for the court, and served by Nathaniell Ball, constable of Concord.  Account of damage sustained in not coaling the wood the past summer for Mr. Henrie Leonard, according to covenant: for 20 Load of Brands sent in amongst Coles, 6li.; cutting of wood that is not coled, 3li. 10s.; wood at ye stump at 4d. per cord, 11s. 1d.; brands left in the woods which would have made a load of Coles, 2li. 8s.; for a month’s rent that I was forced to lie still for want of the coles, 16li.; …….

 

o        Samuell and Nathaniell Leonard deposed that Mackfation and Ramsdell left of the old and new wood about thirty or forty cords, etc.  Sworn in court.

 

o        Henry Lenard’s bill of cost, 4li. 6d.

 

o        Hen. Leonard, sr., acknowledged judgment to Mr. Robt. Paine in bar iron.

 

o        Hen. Leonard, sr., acknowledged judgment to Mr. William Browne, sr., in bar iron and money.

 

o        Hen. Leonard acknowledged judgment to Jno. Goold in bar iron.

 

o        Hen. Leonard acknowledged judgment to the Worshipful Major Daniell Denison, in bar iron.

 

By this time Henry had disappeared owing the better part of a year’s rent and leaving the works in great danger of loss by fire.  On 31 Mar. 1674 the proprietors met and voted to recover possession of the premises by making an entry on them.  The entry was made on 6 April with Henry’s wife delivering up his lease[37] (Fig. 7). On the same day the proprietors arranged for three of the partners, John Gould, Thomas Andrews and Thomas Baker, or any two of them, to run the operation of the Company and with Henry’s sons Samuel, Nathaniel and Thomas (see ¶1.ii & v. below) doing the actual work under the following agreement:[38]

 

The Leonards were to repair the chimneys, backs, &c., to stop the leak in the dam and then to deliver the house, works and all utensils and appurtenances, with the wood and coals at the works or in the woods, to the owners or some one or two of them for the use of the rest; the owners were to speedily provide a stock of coal and mine, and bring it to the works, which the said Leonards are to make into good merchantable bar iron with due care and diligence, with as little loss of coal or mine as may be, for which the Leonards were to be allowed 5li. 10s. per ton to be paid in corn or iron at 24s. p C.; they were to have the use of two fires for the present, and what iron they made in excess of one ton per week for a month together, they should be allowed 6li. per ton; the third fire is reserved to be disposed of by the owners as they shall see cause; the Leonards were to keep a true account of every week’s product of iron and at least once a week, or oftener if desired, deliver the iron to the persons appointed, or if in anchors, the number of them; they were to take care to prevent danger or damage by fire or water, the necessary charges to be borne by the owners, and for other accidents or breaches that may happen without their fault or neglect, said owners were to repair speedily, or they may do it themselves and be allowed for it upon account, that the works may not stand still any longer than necessary; what mine they should dig or wood cut, when materials are wanting at the works, they should be allowed for in iron, at the rates given to other men for the like work, that they may never be out of employment; they were to observe the order and direction of any of the owners, especially in time of danger or floods, for taking and keeping down the flushboards; this agreement was for six months, and the Leonards were to have the use of two-thirds of the house, the other third to be at the disposal of the owners.

                                                                                                          

But the three brothers were already in trouble:[39]

 

o        1 May 1672:  Nathaniel Leonard & Thomas Leonard of Rowley Village, Joseph, Daniell and Benjamin Bixbee, sons of Sergeant Bixbee, and Robert & Thomas Andrews were presented for breach of the peace and some for swering , upon a common fame.  Nathaniel & Thomas Lenard and Thomas Andrews upon their presentment were fined.

 

o        Complaint being made against Nathll., Samll., and Tho. Leonard by Hanna Downing for several misdemeanors and lascivious carriages proved against them, but several of the charges having been proved several years since, court sentenced them to be whipped or pay a fine.  They were also bound to good behavior.

 

o        Warrant, dated June 16, 1674. Hannah (her mark) Downing’s complaint: that the Lenords had on many occasions annoyed her when she was in bed, kicked her and struck her several times until she thought they would kill her.  She told their father and mother and they would not believe it, and complainant was “afraid that thay would kille mee if the athoriaty dos not take some corse with them.  Said Hanna gave bond to Samuel Symonds, Dep. Govr., to prosecute.  Samuel and Thomas Leonard were also bound, with Thomas Baker as surety.

 

o        Jno. Hounkin deposed that he living at the house of Henery Linnard the last winter, never saw any miscarriage by Samuell nor Thomas Linnard toward Hannah Downinge, but that she went abroad at unseasonable times in the night and did not come home until it was almost day.  Also at sundry times she used to sit up almost all night with fellows who came to the house.  He told of her unbecoming conduct with Benjamin Bigsbee and of her lying upon the boy’s beds so that they had to get her up to go to bed.. ……..

 

o        Sarah Bates deposed that she saw the Leonards abuse said Hannah and pull off her head-cloth, etc.  Sworn, June 23, 1674, before Samuel Symonds, Dep. Govr.

 

o        John Gould deposed that he saw Samuel and Nathaniel Lenord come naked upon the dam, and when Goodwife Blake came over the dam, said Samuel spoke and acted indecently, etc.  Sworn in court.

 

o        Macam Douneing deposed that he came to Leonard’s to see his daughter when her master and dame were not at home.  At night Samuel lodged in the bed which his father occupied, and deponent sat up to smoke.  He later heard Samuel in the girl’s room and went and told him “I did not like such doing: and so I lodged in yt bed my salfe and Samuell lodged in ye Chamber.”  Sworn, June 23, 1674, before Samuel Symonds, Dep. Govr.

 

o        Elizabeth Symons …. testified that Samuell Lenord came to her house and asked her for some beer and she went into the cellar to draw some beer for him.  He followed her and tried to kiss her, and she said “there is maides a noufe for yu to kiss and not to Come to kise maried woeman,” and then he struck her a blow on the small of her back, “and when I came up I sayed surely Samuell Leonard is fuddled.”  Sworn in court.

 

o        Grace Andras, aged about sixty years, deposed that Elesibeth Boungkir being at her house in bed with deponent’s daughter Sary, Thomas Linnard came there and annoyed them all night, so that they could not sleep.  Sworn in court.

 

o        Hanah Pabody, aged about thirty years, deposed that Samuell Lennard and two others of the family came to her house as they went by to dig mine and spent much of the day there.  Samuell took her child out of her arms by force and laid it in the cradle, etc.  Then she said to her little boys, “ware is your father?” and said Samuell let her alone.  Sworn in court.

 

o        Faith Black, aged twenty-nine years, deposed that Thomas Lenord came to her house, into the room where she was, shut the door, drew out the latch string, and behaved very uncivilly until her children came to the door and interfered.  Sworn in court.

 

o        Faith Blacke deposed that Nathaniel Leonard said he went to Benj. Murries and the old devil was at home, and when deponent spoke to him for talking so vilely, he said he would not care if he were in hell a fortnight, and he did not care if the devil plucked the soul out of him, and a pox take him, he did not care.  Sworn in court.

 

o        Mary Leonard, aged about forty-nine years, deposed that they were very lying girls, etc.

 

Mary Leonard, Henry’s wife, was further cited in the Salem court records:[40]

 

o        Mary Leonard, aged about forty-nine years, deposed that this spring “a little before Election I went downe to Lynn & had with mee my son Thomas & Hannah Downing & was late & benighted and would haue turned Inn by ye way vnto the house of one Welman: & this Hannah would not be perswaded to stay, but would goe on thorow the woods in ye night whateuer I could say of the trouble of ye way and tearing clothes but would goe with my Sonn Thomas which if hee had offred her such abuse as she speaks off was a very bold attempt……”

 

o        Joseph Bexby, aged fifty-four years, deposed that he was in Lenord’s house in the early morning when Mrs. Lenord was dressing and there were several men in the room.  Also that he had seen her sitting by the flume or pond-side when her sons and other men were swimming and washing themselves and some of the men who were more modest than the rest were forced to creep up into the bushes and others put on their shirts in the water, letting them fall down by degrees as they came out. The Lennord’s had used very bad words, as Diuell & Damn yee & many words which I haue been very Freequent wth them.”  Sworn in court.

 

o        Mary Leonard, the mother, for several uncivil carriages, was admonished.  Bill of cost brought in by Ensign Goold, Ed. Bridges and Marshal Lord was allowed.

 

o        Daniell Bexbey deposed that he had several times heard Goody Lenard use bad language and sing indecent songs, etc.  Sworn, July 2, 1674, before Daniel Denison.

 

o        In July 1675 William Smith deposed that he being at the works soon after the owners had made a re-entry of the works, Mrs. Lenord made a sad complaint how the owners had abused them, and said she did not question but that God would right their case, for they had done no wrong.  She said that it was never known that any workmen were turned out of the works but some sad thing did befall the works and she did not question that the works would be ruined either by fire or water.  Sworn in court.[41]

 

By the summer of 1674 the Leonard sons had so managed to incur the wrath of the dominant group of shareholders that the latter announced that they would suspend operations altogether until more reliable workmen could be found.[42] 

 

We next find our Henry Leonard in Monmouth County, N.J., where in 1674 Henry joined James Grover at Tinton Falls on a branch of the Navesink River, about 2 ½  miles south of Shrewsbury. (Fig. 8).  Grover, a farmer and wheelwright from Gravesend, Long Island, and one of the original settlers of Monmouth County under the 1665 Monmouth Patent, had operated a corn mill there.  He discovered bog-iron on his property.  Probably the Leonards built the resulting iron works.  They certainly operated it.[43]  In order to assist in financing this project, Grover mortgaged the property to Cornelius Steenwyck of New York.  On 29 Dec. 1675, when Grover ran out of capital, he sold a one-half interest of the Works to Col. Lewis Morris of Morrisiana, N.Y. and Barbados Island, West Indies.  Morris later took over Steenwyck’s mortgage and thus retained a three-quarters interest in the Works.  While it is unknown who owned the other quarter interest, it has been suggested that these associates were Henry, Samuel, Nathaniel & Thomas Leonard, James Grover, Richard Hartshorne and Richard Gardiner.[44]

 

Before the 1675 purchase of the iron works, Col. Morris secured certain privileges and subsidies from New Jersey Governor Phillip Carteret to foster the development of the Works.  These privileges and subsidies, which were granted by the General Assembly in 1677, included a seven-year tax exemption, five rent-free years, certain military exemptions for workers in times of war, workmen to be free from arrest for debt but not for suit, and extensive land grants and purchases to supply charcoal for iron smelting.  In addition, Tinton Falls Manor, which Col. Morris constructed near the Works, was the only iron works in New Jersey to be a legally recognized manor, complete with its own petty civil court, but not subservient land holdings. Note that Col. Lewis Morris was a son of William Morris of Monmouthshire, Wales.  When his father died Lewis inherited his father’s estate of Tintern, Monmouthshire.[45]

 

At its peak, Tinton Manor and the iron works contained nearly 6,000 acres.  The facilities on the property included the forge, blast furnace, the manor house, separate dwellings for black and white workmen, and gristmills.[46] It is recorded that in 1680 seventy Negroes and many white servants were employed by Mr. Morris.[47]

 

On 5 May 1676 Henary Lenard affixed his “HL” to a document acknowledging conveyance of mineral and wood rights to Lewis Morris and the Iron Works with fees “as shall be judged fitt to be payed by 3 honist Naibors indifferently chosen.”  His son Samuell Leonrd was one of the three witnesses.  This land (450 acres in Middletown and then 300 acres in Shrewsbury) had been “bought of the Indians” earlier in 1676.[48] It was abutting and joyning on the ffall Revar (Fig. 9).[49]

 

On 20 July of the same year, warrants were issued by Gov. Carteret to Henry Leonard, Sr. (450 acres), to Samuel Leonard (240 acres) and to Nathaniel, Thomas, John & Henry Leonard, Jr. (120 acres each).  Then on 11 June 1685 Henry, Sr., Samuel, Nathaniel, Thomas, Henry, Jr. and John Leonard petitioned the Board of Proprietors of the Eastern Division of New Jersey to have lands laid out to them according to the above warrants.  Samuel Leonard, being the only petitioner in attendance, was called in and questioned as to whether he had the Indian deed and the authority to make an Indian purchase.  He answered that he had the papers at home.  Upon inquiry, it appeared that land was taken up by the petitioners and sold to Col. Morris.  Upon further discourse, Samuel Leonard declared that the Indian deed of sale of Hogg Neck was burned, that for Colt’s Neck be here produced, and also a petition to Governor Carteret, whereon was an order in Anno 1681, that the petitioners should bring in the Indian Sachems to acknowledge the Indian purchase. In the records of warrants and surveys, it was found that in Anno 1676, Samuel Leonard had a large tract of land which he sold to Col. Morris, containing 570 acres.  It was agreed that the petitioners at or before the next Council bring to the Governor, the Indian Sachems who made his deed, to acknowledge the same, in order that a record be made.  Furthermore, at the next Council the remainder of the petitioners’ request would be fully considered.[50]

 

Finally, at a meeting on 10 July 1685, Samuel Leonard brought before the Council two Indians named Almeseke and Lamasand, who acknowledged a bill of sale made by them and other Indians to the said Samuel Leonard and others, of a certain neck of land lying in the County of Monmouth, called Colt’s Neck, whereupon, pursuant to a petition delivered to the Council, upon the 15th day of June last, it was agreed and ordered that Henry Leonard, Sr. and brothers Samuel, Nathaniel, Thomas, Henry, Jr. and John Leonard have new warrants granted them, according to their former warrants made by the late Governor Carteret, dated the 15th day of July, 1676, viz., for Henry Leonard, Sr., 450 acres, Samuel Leonard 240 acres, and for Nathaniel, Thomas, John and Henry Leonard, Jr., each of them, 120 acres, to be laid out upon Colt’s Neck.[51] Also on 10 July 1685 Henry Leonard obtained a warrant for survey of 450 acres and meadow in Colt’s Neck.[52]

 

On 15 Mar. 1679 Henry granted land to his son Samuel.  On the next day Samuel sold this land to Col. Lewis Morris at Shrewsbury.[53] 

 

 In a 15 Oct. 1686 list of Quitt Rents of Shrewsbury for the Lands Layd out to them by Warrant of Gouernor Cartret debit: Hendry Lenord 450 acres, Samuell Lenord 240 acres and 5 mor of his sons, ea. 120 acres: is all that was patented by Cartret:

1290 acres at 2l : 13s : 9d per annum from 1680 to the

year 1686 = 16:02:06

York pay      04:00:07

         20:03:01

 

By cash                                                                        05:00:00

By Bill to pay Nixt year                                                11:00:00

By What rests to pay then also if they be eable              04:03:01

                                  20:03:01[54]

 

On 14 Feb. 1678 a charter for a Whalefishing Company was proclaimed with exclusive authority to capture and kill whales and other fish in the sea harbor off the coast of Eastern Jersey from Barnegat at Northward to Sandy Hook.  Both Henry and his son Samuel were among the owners.[55]

 

On 2 Feb. 1684 Henry & Mary Leonard’s daughter Sarah (see ¶vii. below) was married to Job Throckmorton by Peter Tilton, Justice of the Peace in Middletown.  Witnesses were Henry Leonard, William Hunt, Samuel, John & Mary Leonard, Rebecca Tilton and Anne Hunt.[56] Was this Henry Leonard, Sr. or Jr.? and who was Mary Leonard?  Both the wife and daughter (named Mary) of Henry, Sr. were dead by 1684.

 

The children of Henry & Mary Leonard were:

 

i.         Capt. SAMUEL LEONARD, born ca. 1648 probably in Lynn, Massachusetts Bay Colony, married SARAH BROOKS before 1668, died between 16 Nov. 1702 and 29 July 1703 in South River, Monmouth Co., NJ.  Sarah was born ca. 1650 in Marshfield, MA, died ca. 1690 in Middletown.

 

As reported in ¶1. above, as early as 1674 Samuel, along with his brothers Nathaniel and Thomas, was providing the technical skills needed to operate the Rowley ironworks.  On 2:1:1676 Josias Bridges testified at Court held at Ipswitch that to his knowledge Samuel, son of Henry Leonard of Topsfield, transacted his father’s business in his absence and kept his books after his bookkeeper James Hansecon went away.[57]  The three brothers were also already in trouble with their Puritan neighbors.

 

By 1676 Samuel was at Tinton Falls, NJ with his father where:

 

·        He was a witness to his father’s conveyance of mineral and wood rights to Lewis Morris and the Iron Works (Fig. 9).

 

·        On 5 May 1676 he was paid 17s. 6d. by the Tinton Iron Works for expenses at New York.[58]

 

·        In 1677 James Grover and Sa. Leonard were paid 4li. 15d. by the Tinton Iron Works for the expense of a trip to New York.

 

·        On 16 Nov. 1679 Samuel Leonard deeded to Lewis Morris the Monmouth Indian tract which he had received from his father in the previous March.[59]

 

·        In 1683 only James Grover received more money from the Tinton Iron Works than Samuel Leonard did.  Samuel’s salary was £170.[60]

 

·        On 9 July 1685 Samuel Leonard petitioned the Board of Proprietors of the Eastern Division of New Jersey requesting a day be appointed for the hearing and determining a certain difference depending between the petitioner and William Whitelock concerning a neck of land lying in Monmouth County, called Hog Neck, and other land thereunto adjoining.[61]

 

·        On 10 July 1685 Saml Leonard had patented 250 acres + meadow at Coltsneck with a total yearly quit rent of 2/8 (L:27).[62]

 

·        Samuel Leonard was paid at £21 6s by the Receiver General for assistance in laying out a division line between the East and West Jersey Provinces in April and May 1686.[63]

 

·        On 16 Sept. 1686 Lewis Morris patented 500 acres to the East of ye fall river 300 in right of Samuel Leonard and 200 in right of Bartholemew Applegate.[64]

 

·        On 7 June 1687 Benjamin Devell of Middletoun deeded to Samuel Leonard of Monmouth County, finer, 100 acres at Manesquam.  This land had been surveyed for Leonard 15 Apr. 1686 (B:132).[65]

 

·        On 20 June 1687 Samuel Leonard of Middletown patented 200 acres on the North side of the Manesquam River, 100 acres thereof in his own right, the other 100 acres in right of Benjamin Devell by warrant of 24 Dec. 1685, also 8 chains square of lowland NE the river, on all other sides unsurveyed land (B:203).[66]

 

·        The 8:8:1687 Account of Debts Due on ye Book at Tinton Iron Works showed 0”9”6 due Samuell Leonard.[67]

 

·        On 28 Oct. 1687 Samuel Leonard of Middletoun was granted letters of administration on the estate of Bryant Blackman, late of the Island of Barbados, dec’d. (B:166).[68]

 

·        On 3 Dec. 1687 Samuel Leonard of Monmouth County deeded to Richard Stout junior of Middletown 200 acres on the North side of Manasquan River as granted by patent of 20 June 1687 (C:81).[69] Richard Stout, Jr., was an uncle of Frances Stout who married Job Throckmorton, son of Samuel’s sister, Sarah (Leonard) Throckmorton (see ¶vii. below).

 

·        On 3 Dec. 1687 Richard Stout, Jr., received land from Samuel Leonard.  The transfer may have been the result of a suit brought 21 Nov. 1687 by Richard Stout, Jr., of Middletown against Samuel Leonard of Colt’s Neck.[70]

 

·        On 3 Dec. 1687 Richard Stout, junior, of Middletown deeded to Samuel Leonard 50 acres in New Shroesberry Purchase that Richard had bought 23 June 1687 from Robert West of Shrewsberry (B:301 & 302).[71]

 

·        On 10 May 1688 Samuel Leonard of Midletown patented 300 acres on Hog Neck, Monmouth County.  The land was bounded on the SE and SW by branches of the Neversinks River, on the NW by land of Mordecai Gibbons and on the NE by land not laid out and Thurloe’s Brook (C:129).[72] The quit rent of 12/6 was due every 25 March thereafter.

 

·        On 24 June 1689 Samuel Leonard of Colt’s Neck bought lands from the Indian Sachems of Manasquan for various goods, rum, etc., which he assigned to Richard Stout, Jr., 19 Dec. 1689.[73]

 

·        On 25 June 1689 Samuel Leonard bought from Aramaseek, Hougham, Wayanutan of Mannusquam a tract of land at Mannusquam in the County of Monmouth beginning at the land called Sqaumcum, thence running down Mannusquam River until it comes to land of William Worth, then running back in the woods from the River (deed C:92).[74]

 

·        On 18 Aug. 1690 Job Throckmorton of Middleton, East Jersey, provided his “brother Samuel Leonard” power of attorney to collect debts due to deceased brother Joseph Throckmorton (West Jersey Records, B:1:261).[75] Job Throckmorton was the husband of Samuel’s sister Sarah (see ¶vii. below).  Joseph Throckmorton died between 2 Dec. 1689 and May 1690, probably in Barbados.[76]

 

·        From the Court of Sessions held at Shrewsbury 23-25 Sept. 1691, Mr. Samuel Leonard was constituted by the Court to be their Majesties Attorney (Book of Court Minutes, No. 1, 1688-1721 in Clerk’s Office at Freehold).[77]

 

·        On 1 Mar. 1692 Samuel Leonard received a commission as “captain of a good company.”[78]

 

·        On 16 Sept. 1692 Samuel Leonard was appointed by Gov. Hamilton “High Sheriff of Middletown.”[79]

 

·        On 16 Sept. 1692 Sherif Sam Leonard signed at Acts of Assembly the writ of election for Midletown, Shrewsberry, Wickatunck and Taponemus (C:152).[80]

 

·        On 26 July 1693 a patent was issued to Samuel Leonard of Colts Neck, Monmouth County, for (1) 160 acres there N & W of Sawmill Brook, E of grantee’s father, S of a small brook and grantee; (2) 170 acres S of barren land, W of Robert Barclay, N of a small run, E of grantee; (3) 6 acres of boggy meadow at the head of Mine Brook, on the S side of his brother Henrie; (4) 4 acres of such meadow on the E side of Rockie Hill, on the S side of grantee; (5) 6 acres of meadow at the S end of Cedar Swamp, S of grantee; in all 346 acres (E:97).[81]

 

·        On 1 Oct. 1695 Capt. Samuel Leonard of Shrewsbury quit claimed to his brother Nathaniel Leonard 100 acres and to his brother Thomas Leonard 80 acres, given them by their father Henry Leonard, deceased, in his lifetime (E:392).[82]

 

·        At a Court of Sessions held 26 Mar. 1696 at Middletown, Capt. Samuel Leonard with Daniel Harker, Thomas Warne and George Jobs acknowledged themselves “to be indebted to our Soveraign Lord, the King, in the full and just sum of one hundred and twenty-five pounds, each person, for the appearance of Mr. Samuel Forman at the next court of Common Right.” Samuel Forman, the High Sheriff of Monmouth County, had been accused of letting Negro Jeremy, a murderer, escape from the County Gaol and had been ordered by the Court to find four men to give £500 security.[83]

 

·        On 29 Sept. 1697 at a Court of Sessions and Court of Pleas held at Shrewsbury “Capt. Samuel Leonard was required to take upon him, ye office of kings Attorney, which ye said Leonard refused to take.  Therefore the Courtt committed ye said Leonard to close Gaole, until he should pay ye price of forty shillings.”[84]

 

·        In 1700 Capt. Samuel Leonard was a member of Gov. Andrew Hamilton’s Council of New Jersey.  Mr. Lewis Morris was president of the Council.[85]

 

·        On 24 May 1700 John Stewart of Shrewsberry, chirugeon, deeded to Capt. Samuel Leonard of the same place 125 acres in Freehold (G:153).[86]

 

·        Capt. Samuel Leonard was president of the Court of Sessions held at Middletown on 26 Mar. 1700 and was one of the justices at the Court of Sessions held at Shrewsbury on 7 July, 27 Aug., the fourth Tuesday in Sept., and Oct., 1700.[87]

 

·        On 19 Aug.1700 Capt. Samuel Leonard of Shrewsberry bought from Thomas Gordon of Perth Amboy 350 acres between Tennants Creek and Deep or Duck Creek, North of David Vilant, South of Duck or Deep Creek, West of South River and East of unpatented land (G:142).[88]

 

·        On 10 Oct. 1700 Capt. Samuel Leonard of Shrewsbury was confirmed to hold 1,350 acres in right of Robert Burnet, 125 acres in right of John Stewart and 45 acres in right of John Leonard, in all 1,520 acres as follows (G:211):

        970 acres on the East side of South River, adjoining Manalapan River

        100 acres between Manasquan River, Job Throckmorton and Sarah Reap

        250 acres between said Reap, the Long Run and Barclay’s Brook

        50 acres at the mouth of Long Run in Manasquan River and along Barclay’s Brook

        150 acres along Barclay’s Brook.[89]

 

·        On 18 Dec. 1700 letters of administration on the estate of Anthony Ashmore, dec’d., intestate, were granted to Samuel Leonard (G:207).[90]

 

·        From 1700 to 1702 Samuel Leonard served as a member of the Governor’s Council[91] (Fig. 10).  On the surrender of the proprietary government of East New Jersey to the royal authorities Queen Anne appointed him 16 Nov. 1702 one of the first Council under the new administration, with Lord Cornbury as Governor, but he died before the commission arrived in this country on 29 July 1703.[92]

 

·        On 25 Mar. 1701 Governor Andrew Hamilton, Governor’s Council Members Lewis Morris & Samuel Leonard, and Justices Jedediah Allen & Samuel Dennis, the King’s Attorney-General & Secretary, Clerk of the Court and the under Sheriff, who were holding a Court of Sessions, at Middletown, were seized by about 100 persons, who “kept them under guard, close prisoners, from Tuesday, the 25th of March, till the Saturday following, being the 29th of the same month, and then released them.”[93] Among the 100 rioters were Jonathan and James Stout.  They were probably sons of Richard & Penelope Stout. The Court had been examining Moses Butterworth who had confessed “yt he did sail wth Capt William Kid in his last voyage when he came from ye East Indies and went into Boston with him.”[94]

 

·        On 18 June 1701 Samuel Leonard was one of seven signers of a letter from the Council of East Jersey to the Proprietors in England objecting to the appointment of Andrew Bowne as Governor.[95]

 

·        On 28 July 1701 Capt. Samuel Leonard of Shrewsberry deeded to Thomas Daniell late of Hempstead, Queens County, Long Island, planter, 100 acres in Shrewsberry on Bound Brook near Manasquan River, along Long Brook and Sarah Reap (C:177).[96]

 

·        On 13 Sept. 1701 Samuell Leonard was one of nine men recommended by ye Majority of the Proprietors of the Province of East & West Jersie to be of ye Councill in New Jersie.  “These are Persons of ye Best Estates in East Jersie.[97]

 

·        On 2 Apr. 1702 Samuel Leonard of Monmouth, wrote his will.  Widow Sarah was administratrix of his estate and John & Henry Leonard, both of said County, gentlemen, were fellow bondsmen.  On 30 Jan. 1703/4 the £26.18.1 inventory of the personal estate of Capt. Samuel Leonard of South River was made by Alexander Neyer (?) and Will [-?-].  On 30 Oct. of the same year the inventory of the personal estate was £51.19.4½.[98]

 

·        On 12 Aug. 1702 a communication was received from the Earl of Nottingham listing persons proposed for the Councils of the two divisions in New Jersey (i.e. East & West New Jersey).  Along with this list was another list of nine persons who were considered to be objectionable they “being of the Scotch and Quaker ffactions concerned sundry years in ye divisions, and incendiary Parties, that has brought those Provinces into such Confusion of Governmt  Injustice to ye Proprietors and aversion of ye Planters and Inhabitants.” Mr. Samuel Leonard was one of the nine!

 

·        In a Sept. 1702 letter from Lord Clarendon to the Secretary of State about the Council for New Jersey, Lord Clarendon enclosed with his letter remarks made by Coll Basse relative to six Quakers under consideration.  Regarding Saml Leonard: “A man of no Estate Complain’d of by the country and a zealous stickler for the Quakers.”

 

In spite of the above, on 16 Nov. 1702 Queen Anne’s instructions to Lord Cornbury included Samuel Leonard among the members of the Council to be appointed by him.  Edward lord Cornbury was “our captain general and governor in chief, in and over our province of Nova Caesaria, or New Jersey, in America.”  Upon his arrival in New Jersey on 10 Aug. 1703 Lord Cornbury advised the Lords of Trade that mr Leonard was dead.[99]

 

The children of Samuel & Sarah (Brooks) Leonard were:

 

a.       HENRY LEONARD, gentleman, born ca. 1668 in Massachusetts Bay Colony,[100] married (1) SARAH MORFORD ca. 1710,[101] married (2) LYDIA WALL,[102] buried near his house at Colt’s Neck 2 May 1739.[103]  Sarah was born ca. 1687, a daughter of Thomas & Susannah Morford.  In his 1695 will Thomas Morford gave to his daughter Sary a cow when she marry or come to the age of eighteen years.[104] Lydia was a daughter of Jarrat & Lidia Wall of Middletown.[105]  [Note that G. Marston Leonard in 1954 listed only one wife for Henry and her name was Lydia Morford].

 

On 4 Oct. 1695 Henry received title for 170 acres at Colts Neck, Monmouth Co. from the proprietors of East New Jersey.[106]  Total yearly quit rent 8/1 (E:456).  Henry also obtained 132 acres in right of Walter and John Wall (O:244).[107]

 

On 17 July 1700 “John Stewart high sheriff and Henry Leonard were assaulted on the path neer to the house of Alexr  Adam Beat and grievously wound the said persons tak ther swords from them brak them caryd them away and keept them.”[108]

 

On 14 July 1703 Henry Leonard of Monmouth Co. received a deed from John Reid of Hortencie, deputy surveyor, for a lot there below the grantee’s sawmill, next to Lewis Morris (C:278).[109]

 

In the 10 June 1710 Record of Highways: the highway to Shrewsbury leads up to Henry Leonard’s sawmill (Deed D:202) and in 13 Oct. 1713: the highway from Henry Leonard’s sawmill leads to Barnegat.[110]

 

On 25 Nov. 1711 Henry was commissioned by Governor Hunter as High Sheriff of Monmouth.[111]  In 1732 he was recommended by Governor Morris to be one of Council, “being a rich churchman, and possessing one of the best estates.”[112]

 

On 1 Sept. 1712 Henry Leonard and John Throckmorton (see ¶vii.b. below) were presented to the Grand Jury for fencing and stopping the Queens highway.  They were ordered to open the highway before the next court or be prosecuted.[113]

 

On 28 Mar. 1717 Henry Leonard was one of His Majesty’s Justices of the Peace of Monmouth County.[114]

 

On 2 June 1732 Lewis Morris wrote to the Duke of Newcastle regarding the new government of New Jersey separate from New York the names of those proposed for his Majesty’s Councill for the Eastern Division.  Henry Leonard was one of the six. Regarding Henry, President Morris wrote that he was a churchman, his father was named of the Councill on the Surrendr of the government but dyed before the Queens letters patent arrived: he is a man of good Estate and well affected to the present government.[115]

 

On 3 June 1738 Gov. Burnet for King George II granted a charter for Christ Church in Shrewsbury.  The patent of incorporation was to Henry Leonard, John Throckmorton, Thomas Morford, Jeremiah Stillwell … and the rest of the inhabitants of the town of Shrewsbury and Middletown in communion with the Church of England……[116]  John Throckmorton was Henry’s cousin (a son of Henry’s Aunt Sarah who had married Job Throckmorton) (see ¶vii.b. below). Thomas Morford was a brother of Henry’s first wife, Sarah.

 

On 17 Apr. 1739 Henry Leonard, Gent., of Shrewsbury Township, wrote his will (Lib. 3:317): [117]

-         Wife, Lydia.

-         To son Henry: land where testator lived bounded by John Throckmorton, Esquire, Edward Taylor, deceased, whortleberry bog, son Samuel, David Kelly; also part of old mill, alias five acre bogg mill and lands.  If son Henry has no male issue, then to son Thomas.

-         To daughter, Mary: 50 pounds when aged 27 years.

-         To son Samuel: old saw mill or Mine brook mill.

-         To daughter, Sarah: bond from testator’s son, Samuel, dated Feb. 8, 1734, witnessed by John Fawcett and son Thomas Leonard.

-         To daughter, Susannah: bond of son Samuel; green plush bridle and saddle made by James Parker.

-         To son, Thomas: Salt meadow at Mateetcunck, Red Brook mill.

-         To son Henry: mare bought of Obadiah Herbert.

-         To daughter, Parthenia Cook [nothing willed].

-         To daughter, Margaret [nothing willed]

-         To son Henry: land surveyed for him by Jacob Dennis.

-         If wife does not accept dowry of 25 pounds, testator’s daughter, Elizabeth to be excluded from share of residue of estate.

Executors: brother, Samuel Leonard, brother-in-law, Thomas Morford, and sons, Samuel and Thomas Leonard.[118]

 

    Witnesses to the will were John Throckmorton, Jr. (see ¶vii.b. below), John Taylor and Robert Dodsworth.

 

·        1739, July 25.  Samuel Leonard, named as an executor of his brother, declined to serve.

 

·        1739, May 8.  Inventory of the estate (of Henry Leonard, Esquire) …. Included 2 negroes and their beddin (63 pounds).  Note of Michael Kearny, Esquire, bond of John Cleyton of Capefare. Made by Anthony Pintard, A. Forman and david Kelly.

 

John E. Stillwell assumed the following distribution of Henry’s children:

 

The children of Henry & Sarah (Morford) Leonard were:[119]

                                  

o        SAMUEL LEONARD, born 30 Jan. 1711, married ELIZABETH [-?-], died 13 May 1790, aged 79 years, 3 months, 14 days, buried Christ Church, Shrewsbury.[120] In 1759 Samuel inherited from his uncle Thomas Leonard (see ¶f. below) 20 shillings.[121]  Their children were:

 

·        JOSEPH LEONARD married MAGDELENE GUMBAULD (GOMBOULD)14 Sept. 1766 at Christ Church by Governor’s license,[122] died between 30 Nov. 1779 and 4 Oct. 1786.  A Joseph Leonard, adult, was baptized privately at Christ Church, Shrewsbury 10 Nov. 1760.[123] A Joseph Leonard was a witness at the 6 Jan. 1774 Quaker marriage of Joshua Morris of Abington, Pa., and Lydia Wardell of Shrewsbury.[124] Magdelin Leonard and Sarah Throckmorton witnessed at Shrewsbury the marriage of Isack Martain, Jr. and Catharine White 11 June 1807.[125] In his will Joseph Leonard of Shrewsbury Twp. left one-half of his real and personal estate to his wife Magdalen and the other half to his five children.  He recommended Honbl. James Searl of Philadelphia and Raveau Kerney of this place to assist his wife in managing the estate. Witnesses were Ann Searle, Elisha Newell and Elihu Cook (28:253).[126]  The children of Joseph & Magdelene (Gumbauld) Leonard were:[127]

§         WILLIAM LEONARD of Shrewsbury, baptized at Christ Church, Shrewsbury 9 June 1768.

§         ANN FRANCES LEONARD of Freehold baptized at Christ Church in June 1770.

§         JOHN LEONARD baptized privately at Christ Church 6 Apr. 1773, married CATHERINE DEBAN 31 Jan. 1808.

§         HENRY LEONARD baptized at Christ Church 25 Dec. 1774, married ELIZABETH HANSEL 8 Nov. 1807.

§         THOMAS LEONARD.

 

o       SARAH LEONARD married DANIEL ROBINS 12 Nov. 1747 in Upper Freehold, N.J.[128] In 1759 Sarah inherited from her uncle Thomas Leonard (see ¶f. below) £10.[129]

 

o       MARY LEONARD was a minor at the time of her father’s death.

 

o        Capt. HENRY LEONARD, born 1715, married EUPHEMIA ARABELLA (BELLFAME) KEARNY 18 Oct. 1751, died 1761.[130]  Euphemia was a daughter of Michael & Sarah (Morris) Kearny.  She was not 18 years of age at the time her father wrote his will 12 Mar. 1740/1.  In 1759 Capt. Henry inherited form his uncle Thomas Leonard (see ¶f. below) all his claim to the Indian Purchase of about 10,000 acres of land lying between Squam River and Metetieunk which he had obtained by deed from Capt. Henry’s brother Samuel.  Capt. Henry also inherited from his uncle a house and lot in Kingstown where Benjamin Maple kept a tavern.[131]  Henry’s will was written 4 Nov. 1759 and probated 2 Nov. 1761 in Essex Co.  The executors were his brothers Samuel and Thomas and his brother-in-law Samuel Cook. The children of Henry & Euphemia (Kearny) Leonard were:[132]

·        ROBERT MORRIS LEONARD, son of Henry & Bellfame Leonard, baptized privately 17 Sept. 1753 at Shrewsbury Christ Church.[133] In 1759 Thomas Leonard, Esq., (see ¶f. below) willed £10 to the eldest son of his nephew Capt. Henry Leonard.[134]

·        HENRY LEONARD, son of Mr. Henry Leonard, was privately baptized in Christ Church 21 Dec. 1755.  Henry Leonard, son of Henry & Euphamia Leonard, died 10 Apr. 1761, age 5 years & 5 months. Henry, son of H. & B. Leonard, was buried beneath the carpet in the body of Christ Church 12 April.[135]

·        SUSANNA LEONARD, born 26 July 1759, baptized privately 26 Aug. 1759 (1769?) at Christ Church,[136] married (1) ROBERT LAWRENCE 15 May 1783, married (2) JOHN JACOB FAESCH 21 Apr. 1790. John was an early ironmaster of Morris Co., NJ.[137]

 

o       MARGARET LEONARD married ROBERT MONTGOMERY, Jr. of Monmouth Co. 13 Nov. 1771.

 

o       SUSANNAH LEONARD of Burlington, married JOHN FLEGO of Burlington 1 Mar. 1775.[138]

 

o       PARTHENIA LEONARD, born 1706 (?), married ABIEL COOK of Southampton, Suffolk Co., NY[139] by 17 Apr. 1739.[140] On 12 Oct. 1741 Parthenay Cook was a witness to “Judge [John] Throckmorton’s Last Will” (see ¶vii.b below).[141]

 

o       THOMAS LEONARD married HANNAH WHITE 30 Apr. 1767 in Monmouth Co.[142]  Hannah was born 21 Sept. 1745, a daughter of Britton & Dinah (Corlies) White.[143] In 1759 Thomas inherited from his uncle Thomas Leonard (see ¶f. below) a 300-acre plantation in Amwell, Hunterdon Co., near the Delaware River, and a 100-acre plantation at Fly Brook, Middlesex Co., on the condition that he pay to his brother Capt. Henry Leonard £40.[144]  On 10 Jan. 1765 both Thomas Leonard and Hannah White were witnesses at the Quaker marriage of Briton Corlies & Anne White at the house of David Curtis.[145] The children of Thomas & Hannah (White) Leonard were:

·        JAMES LEONARD.

·        JOSEPH LEONARD.

 

Apparently the only child of Henry & Lydia (Wall) Leonard was:

 

o        ELIZABETH LEONARD married JOHN HOLMES 28 Nov. 1765 at Christ Church, Shrewsbury, by a Governor’s license.[146] On 17 Oct. 1805 an Elizabeth Leonard and Hannah Leonard (see immediately above) witnessed the Quaker marriage of George A. White & Elizabeth Corlies of Shrewsbury.[147]

 

b.      Capt. JOHN LEONARD, born 1670 in Massachusetts Bay colony,[148] married ELIZABETH (ALMY) MORRIS, died between 28 Feb. 1711/12 and 27 Mar. 1712 in Spottswood, Monmouth Co.  Elizabeth was born 29 Sept. 1663 in Portsmouth, Rhode Island, daughter of Christopher & Elizabeth (Cornell) Almy, died 12 Jan. 1714/5.  Christopher lived on an estate at the East end of the neck of land between the Shrewsbury and Navesink Rivers, later the property of his son-in-law Lewis Morris.  Christopher Almy was engaged in coastal shipping.[149] Elizabeth married (1) by Apr. 1679 Lewis Morris, son of Capt. Thomas & Sarah Morris.  Lewis Morris of Passage Point, Shrewsbury was born ca. 1655, was killed by one of his Negroes in 1694/5.[150] Elizabeth died in 1712 in Shrewsbury.[151] Note that in her 2 Feb. 1732/3 account Hannah Deane stated that “John married A. Almy (originally).”[152]

 

A John Leonard received Power of Attorney from Benjamin Devell ca. 1683.[153]

 

On 20 May 1699 John Leonard of Shrewsbury conveyed to Benjamin Cook of Middletown 60 acres on the North side of Manasquan River, S.W. John Houce, N.E. Edmon Lefettra, S.E. the river, N.W. the road; also 60 acres on Barnegat Creek, E. the sea, W. the bay, S. Nicholas Brown, N. unsurveyed; in all 120 acres, b’ot of Edward Wolley (G:5).[154]

 

On 5D 10M 1700 (28D 2M 1704?) a John Leonard was a witness to the Quaker marriage of Joseph Wing and Ann Lippincott, both of Shrewsbury, at the house of John Lippincott.  On 17D 8M 1701 a John Leonard was a witness to the Quaker marriage of Joseph Lippincott and Elizabeth White, both of Shrewsbury, at a public meeting of the Friends.[155]

 

On 27 Sept. 1705 a highway to begin below John Leonard “at the Landing, known by the name of the Cherry Tree Landing;” thence along the south side of the house to John Throckmorton’s.  All roads to be 4 rods in breadth.[156]

 

In 1708 and 1709 a John Leonard was a commissioner of highways.[157]

 

In 1710 John Leonard, Esq., bought from his stepson Lewis Morris for £600 Passage Point.  This land had originally belonged to Christopher Almy.[158] 

 

On 28 Feb. 1711/12 John Lenard wrote, “I do Empower my Cousin Henry lenard of the county of Monmouth present fhereif, … to sell … so “much of my lands and personal Estate as is sufficient to pay the debt which I owe to my wifes son Lewis Mores and “the remainder of my Lands and real estate … to my four sones  John, Henry, samuel and Christopher and their heirs to be Equally divided … excepting onely that the said John shall have the first choice and twenty pounds worth of the said land more than any of the other three sons one Heifer …”; “to my two daughters sarah and ann to each … one Bed and one Heifer and all the rest of my goods chattels and personal Estate … to my loving wife Elizabeth whom I appoint … my whole and onely executrix …”

 

John lenard [his mark]

Wits.:

 

William Lippincott

francis Borden

Sarah Powell[159]

 

An inventory of John Leonard’s personal estate (£100.1.4) was made 27 Mar. 1712 by Richard Chambers and Cornelius Lane.[160]  The will was proved 2 May 1712 (I:348).[161]

 

The children of John & Elizabeth (Almy) (Morris) Leonard were:

 

o        JOHN LEONARD, Jr., born ca. 1700, probably married DEBORAH SHEPHERD of Monmouth 19 May 1733,[162] died before 1785.  Deborah was born 22 Dec. 17__.[163]  She was a daughter of Joseph & Rebeckah (Lippet) Shepherd.  Joseph Shepherd’s inventory was taken 14 Sept. 1753 by Andrew Winter & Nathl Leonard (see ¶ii. below).  It amounted to £251/19/8.

 

In 1759 John inherited from his uncle Thomas Leonard (see ¶f. below) 640 acres of land on the northwest Branch of Cape Fear River near a place called Brumfiton.[164]

 

On 10 Mar. 1785 James & Catharina Woolley and William Woolley their son & Charity his wife deeded land to Deborah Leonard, the widow of John Leonard.[165]

 

On 21 Dec. 1791 John Wooley of Shrewsbury, yeoman, deeded to Deborah Leonard of Shrewsbury, widow, 12 acres of land at Poplar Swamp, which, with more, had been conveyed to the said John 3 Jan. 1787 by his father and mother, James Wooley & Catharine.[166]

 

John & Deborah (Shepherd) Leonard may have had a son THOMAS LEONARD of Crosswicks since Thomas Leonard (see ¶f. below) bequeathed “To Thomas Leonard of Crosswicks, son of John Leonard, my nephew, the house and lot in Kingstown where Martha Hide

lives.”[167]

 

o        HENRY LEONARD, born ca. 1701, probably married HANNAH [-?-]. A Henry Leonard received a lord grant in Brunswick Co., NC in 1756.  Henry & Hannah had four daughters.

 

o        SARAH LEONARD, born ca. 1710, married (1) [-?-] TINDALL, married (2) JOHN ROBINSON after 1759. Sarah Tindall inherited in 1759 from Thomas Leonard (see ¶f. below) land in Middlesex Co. at a place called the Landing, on the Rariton River above New Brunswick.[168]

 

o        ANN LEONARD.

 

o        CHRISTOPHER LEONARD was mentioned in the will of his uncle Nathaniel Leonard (see ¶c. below).

 

o        SAMUEL LEONARD, Esq., married MARY [-?-], buried 23 Oct. 1742 in Christ Church graveyard, Shrewsbury.[169] The only known child of Samuel & Mary Leonard is SAMUEL LEONARD, Jr., born 1 Jan. 1711 in Freehold, Monmouth Co., married MARY THROCKMORTON at Christ Church, Shrewsbury, 4 Mar. 1734, died 12 May 1790, aged 79 years, 3 months, 14 days, buried Christ Church, Shrewsbury.  Mary was born Monday, 16 Apr. 1716, died 16 Dec. 1782, aged 66 years, 8 months, buried Shrewsbury Churchyard.  She was the eldest daughter of Judge John & Mary (Stillwell) Throckmorton (see ¶vii.b. below).  In his 1741 will John wrote, “I give to my Daughter Mary Leonard one hundred pounds to be paid to her her heirs Exect or assigns by my Exct within six months after My Decease.”[170] John was a son of Sarah (Leonard) Throckmorton (see ¶vii. below).

 

Samuel Leonard, Jr., was a Justice of the Peace, Monmouth County, for many years.  He was one of the executors of his father’s will in 1739 and witness to the 1748 will of a Job Throckmorton.

 

Abraham, a Negro boy in the service of Samuel Leonard, Esq., was baptized 22 May 1749 at Christ Church, Shrewsbury, and Oliver, a Negro child belonging to Samuel Leonard, Esq., was privately baptized 30 Mar.1752 at Christ Church.

 

On 10 Mar. 1790 Samuel Leonard of Shrewsbury made his will:

        “The article I made with James Throckmorton is to be fulfilled.”

        My right in the saw mill tract to be sold; also my land over Squan River, joining David Ketcham and Abraham Gifford, of 30 acres.

        To daughter Mary £50.

        To my sister Hughs £20.

        Goods to daughters Mary, Lucy and Susannah

        Rest of my personal estate to children Mary, Deborah, Lucy, Susannah and Samuel.

        Executors: daughter Deborah Holmes, friend Joseph Holmes and my brother-in-law Joseph Throckmorton.

        Witnesses: John Hyers, Jarrald Jeffery and Edmund Williams.

The will was proved 9 June 1790.  The inventory made 8 June 1790 by Denise Denise and William Grandin amounted to £1,143.3.8 (30:392).[171]

 

Subsequently Samuel’s children Samuel, Mary & Deborah sold their shares of Samuel’s real estate to Simon Pyle who was the widower of their sister Susannah.[172]

 

The children of Samuel & Mary Leonard were baptized at Christ Church, Shrewsbury:

 

·        HARTNESS LEONARD, baptized 28 Sept. 1735.

 

·        SARAH LEONARD, born 1735/36, died 7 June 1761, aged 25 years, 5 months, buried 8 June at Shrewsbury Churchyard.

 

·        MARY LEONARD, died 11 (14?) Feb. 1807, aged 66 years, 11 months, 26 days, buried Shrewsbury Churchyard.

 

·        ELIZABETH LEONARD, baptized 9 Feb. 1746, (according to G. Marston Leonard, she married JOHN HOLMES 28 Nov. 1765).

 

·        DEBORAH LEONARD baptized 7 Dec. 1746, aged ____ weeks, married JOHN ASHTON in 1774(?), died aged 66 years, 11 months, 26 days.

 

·        ANASTASIA LEONARD, publicly baptized 7 May 1749, died 20 Jan. 1790, aged 40 years, 11 months, 20 days buried Christ Churchyard, Shrewsbury.

 

·        LUCY LEONARD, publicly baptized 19 May 1751, died 4 Apr. 1791, aged 40 years, 2 months, 7 days, buried Shrewsbury Churchyard.  She had no children.

 

·        SUSANNAH LEONARD, publicly baptized 27 Jan. 1753/4, married Rev. SIMON  PYLE, died 13 Jan. 1813, aged 59 years, 19 days, buried Shrewsbury Churchyard..  Rev. Simon Pyle was born ca. 1759, married (2) Abigail Lippencott, died 7 Nov. 1822 in his 63rd year, buried in Blue Ball cemetery, Adelphia, NJ.  The children of Rev. Simon and Susannah (Leonard) Pyle were:

        

§         MARY L. PYLE born ca. Sept. 1792, married JOB THROCKMORTON ca. 1812, died without issue 19 June 1813, aged 20 years, 4 months, 14 days.  Job was born 20 Aug. 1787 in Freehold, Monmouth County, died 31 Mar. 1831.  He was a son of Job & Mary Jane (Robinson) Throckmorton.  Job (husband of Mary) was a merchant at Freehold.  His house in West Freehold was still standing in 1929.  The inventory of his estate was $2,990.53.

 

§         REBECCA PYLE, born ca. Dec. 1794,  was the second wife of the above Job Throckmorton.  She died without issue 7 Aug. 1830, aged 35 years, 7 months, 9 days.  Job and his two wives were all buried in Blue Ball Cemetery, Adelphia, NJ.[173]

 

§         SAMUEL L.  PYLE born 10 Dec. 1797 in Freehold, Monmouth Co., married EMELINE MORFORD 19 Nov. 1823 in Christ Church, Shrewsbury,[174] died 11 May 1879 in Amboy, IL.  Emeline was born 11 July 1805 in Red Bank, Monmouth Co., died 3 Oct. 1881 in Amboy, IL.  She was a daughter of Thomas & Rebecca (West) Morford.

 

In Oct. 1824 Samuel L. Pyle petitioned to have the dower of Abigail Pyle, widow of Simon Pyle, dec’d., set off.  The record noted that his sister Rebecca Pyle was then Rebecca Throckmorton, wife of Joh Throckmorton, dec’d.[175]

 

Samuel and Emeline had a daughter MARY S. PYLE who was born in 1827 and married WILLIAM P. ROFF.

 

·        SAMUEL LEONARD, privately baptized 9 Feb. (3 Apr.?) 1755/6, married EMELINE [-?-].[176]

 

·        DEBORAH LEONARD, baptized 7 Dec. 1746, aged ___ weeks, married JOHN ASHTON in 1774 (?), died aged 66 years, 11 months, 26 days.

 

c.       NATHANIEL LEONARD, married ANNE MARTHA BOUCHER ROIGNAN (RUNYAN/RUNION) ca. 1700, died between 11 Sept. and 9 Dec. 1727.  Anne was born ca. 1684/5, a daughter of Vincent and Anne Martha (Boucher) Roignan, died after Feb. 1748/9.[177]  Vincent was a French Huguenot.  Nathaniel and his wife settled in Piscataway, NJ.

 

Nathaniel’s will was written 11 Sept. 1727 in Trenton and proved 9 Dec. 1727.  In it he named his wife Anne, children Samuel, Thomas, Nathaniel, Maurice, Mary, Anne, all under age, his brother Thomas Leonard and Christopher Leonard (see ¶b. above).  His estate included:

        ferry and 20 acres

        home farm

        farm in Somerset Co., now occupied by Jno. Runion

        land bought of Henry Farnsworth

        land bought of Jno. Reading

        farm now occupied by Jno. Reynolds

        house and lot in Trenton, adjoining the Court House, bought of James Trent

        part of Sybal’s Plantation, bought of Thomas Wyatt with wife Syball and John Rogers with wife Martha

        land in Amwell

        personal estate (two slaves, bonds due by Henry Vroom).

 

Executors were brother Thomas Leonard (see ¶f. below), James Leonard & Daniel Howell of Trenton, blacksmith.  Witnesses were Edward Fitz Randolph, Jno. Stockton, James White, Isaac Reeder, James Geary & Joseph Harden (2:480).[178]

 

Following Nathaniel’s death, Anne married (2) James Gould.[179]

 

The children of Nathaniel & Anne (Roignan) Leonard were:

 

o        SAMUEL LEONARD.  A Samuel Leonard of Shrewsbury married ELIZABETH [-?-], died between 14 Nov. and 20 Dec. 1742.  In his will Samuel bequeathed to his sons Joseph and Thomas lands at Black River and in Burlington Co., and to his wife and daughters the residue of his estate.  Executors were John Eatton and Joseph Wardell.  Witnesses were Margaret Wardell, Joseph Eatton and John Wardell.  John & Joseph Wardell were Quakers.  An inventory of the estate was made 20 Dec. 1742 by Adam Brewer and Joseph Parker.  It amounted to £376.19.06 and included a servant man (£10.17).  The will was proved 16 Feb. 1742/3 (D:68).[180]

 

o        THOMAS LEONARD.

 

o        NATHANIEL LEONARD, buried Christ Church, Middletown 18 Nov. (Dec.?) 1763.

 

o        SARAH LEONARD.

 

o        MORRIS (MAURICE) LEONARD, died between 11 Jan. and 15 Feb. 1748/9.  In his will Morris Leonard of Trenton, Hunterdon Co., yeoman, left his real estate in Trenton to his mother, Ann Gould, and to his sisters Mary Taylor, Frances Gould and Elisabeth Gould.  His mother was executrix.  Witnesses were Peter Lott, David Howell and William Green (31:258).[181]

 

o        MARY LEONARD married [-?-] TAYLOR before 11 Jan. 1748/9.

 

o        ANNE LEONARD.

 

d.      Capt. SAMUEL LEONARD, Jr., born ca. 1673-76 in NJ, married ANNE [-?-], died between 13 Apr. 1757 and 13 Feb. 1758.

 

In 1700 Samuel was a member of Gov. Hamilton’s Council. Apparently on 20th 2nd mo. 1700 Samuel wrote a letter to William Penn, Governor of Pennsylvania, regarding New Jersey affairs. William Penn replied 26th 3d mo. 1700.[182]

 

In 1710 Samll and Thomas (see ¶f. below) signed a Petition of the Freeholders of Middlesex Co. to Gov. Hunter against Peter Sommans, Esq.’s insolent behavior.[183]

 

Samuel was one of the four first aldermen of the City of Perth Amboy as named in the 24 Aug. 1718 charter.[184]  On 7 Mar. 1721 Capt. Samuel Leonard, member for Perth Amboy, was present at a Council meeting held at Perth Amboy.  At another Council meeting held 23 July 1725 at Perth Amboy mr Boune and mr Samuel Leonard delivered a message from the house of Representatives, initiating an act “to lay a duty on wheat, wheat meal, staves and heading and all sorts of bolts whereof staves or heading may or can be made, to which they desire the concurrence of this board.”[185]

 

On 26 June 1734 Wan, half Indian and half Negro, ran away.  Samuel Leonard of Perth Amboy advertised in “The American Weekly Mercury” that “Any Person bringing home the said Fellow to his Master, shall have Three Pounds Reward with reasonable Charges.”[186]

 

On 2 Sept. 1741 Samll Leonard was one of four of the Eastern Division who were appointed by the Council of Proprietors to promote settling of the Division Line between the Provinces of New York and New Jersey and also the line between the Eastern and Western Divisions of New Jersey Province.  On 26 June 1744 he was one of six in the Committee voting Nay to the resolution regarding an Act for Settlement and better Regulating of the Militia of the Province of New Jersey.  The motion carried.[187]

 

On 28 Mar. 1754, Samu Leonard as a Proprietor of the Eastern Division of New Jersey signed with his seal a Bond of Indemnification concerning Charge of Settling bonds (bounds?) between New York and New Jersey in which Samuel and 9 others bound themselves in the amount of £2,000 (see Fig. 11).[188]

 

Anne had a sister Mary Farrington who wrote her will 2 Apr. 1754.  She left a portion of her estate to nieces Sarah Billop, Rachal Sarjant and Elizabeth (wife of Francis Goelet).  Samuel Sarjant and John Berien were her executors (G:334).[189]  A Sam Leonard junr was mentioned in Jonathan Holme’s diary for 13 June 1737.[190]

 

In his will written 2 Apr. 1754 Samuel Leonard of Perth Amboy named his “now wife” Ann and daughters Mary Berrien, Sarah Billop, Rachel Sarjant, Elizabeth Goelet and Alice Lawrence.  He directed that daughter Elizabeth’s share be given in trust to the executors who were sons-in-law John Berrien, Samuel Sarjant and John Lawrence.  Witnesses were Thomas Bartow, William Burnet and Andrew Smyth.  In a 7 Feb. 1757 codicil he gave daughter Mary’s share to her husband John Berrien in case of her death.  In a 13 Apr. 1757 codicil he made a special bequest to son-in-law John Lawrence.  The will was proved 13 Feb.1758 (F:489).[191]

 

In her 31 Aug. 1758 will Anne Leonard of Perth Amboy, Middlesex Co., widow of Capt. Samuel Leonard bequeathed to:[192]

        Son-in-law John Berrien £200.

        Granddaughter Elizabeth Lawrence £200 when she is of age, provided she continue under the care of my daughter Rachel Sarjant or live in such other place as my daughters Sarah Billop, Rachel Sarjant, Elizabeth Goelet or my Executor think proper.

        Son-in-law John Lawrence £50.

        Sister Mary Farrington my ½ part of the house where I live and the house where Edward Griffen lately lived and after her death then to my daughters Sarah Billop, widow of Thomas Billop, and Rachel Sarjant, wife of Samuel Sarjant, as also the 2 acres of land in Perth Amboy east of Market Street which formerly belonged to my father-in-law (step-father ?), Benjamin Griffith, and afterwards to my mother and whereon I now live.

        Daughter Elizabeth Goelet during her life my brick house contiguous to the Court House which Samuel Leonard, my late husband, bought of William Hodshan and the new house by it to be finished; and after her death the same is to go to my daughters Sarah Billop, Rachael Sarjant and my grandson John Goelet.

        Rest of estate to daughters Sarah, Rachel and Elizabeth.  “The share of Elizabeth Goelet is to be managed by my Executor during the life of her present husband, Francis Goelet, and, after his death, if it should please God he should die, then her share is to be given to her.”

        Executor: son-in-law John Berrien.

        Witnesses: John Smyth, Norris Thorp and Alexander Watson.

The will was proved 13 June 1761 (H:9).

 

The children of Samuel & Anne Leonard were:

 

o        MARY LEONARD, married JOHN BERRIEN.  In 1759 Thomas Leonard (see ¶f. below) bequeathed to “my friend John Berrien my house and about one acre of land in Kingstown, which I bought of Abraham Bonnell; and to his brother, Peter Berrien, house and lot in Somerset Co. adjoining the plantation where he lives.”[193]

 

o        RACHEL LEONARD of Perth Amboy, married SAMUEL SARGEANT/SARJANT of Perth Amboy 20 Jan. 1753.[194]

 

o        ANNE/ANN/ALICE LEONARD, born ca. 1732,[195] married JOHN BROWN LAWRENCE (an attorney-at-law) by license dated 18 July 1753, died 31 Aug. 1758.  John was born ca. 1728,[196] married in Monmouth County (2) Martha Tallman 14 Nov. 1759, possibly died in 1796 in Upper Canada.  John was a son of Elisha Lawrence.

 

In 1753 John was living in Burlington, NJ.  He was a King’s attorney in 1761, a Member of Governor Franklin’s Council in 1775, and probably a Judge in Monmouth County. “His inclination was to take no part in the Revolution; but suspected by the Whigs from the first because of his official relations to the Crown, he was arrested and imprisoned in the Burlington jail for a long time.  Accused of treasonable intercourse with the enemy, he was tried and acquitted.”

 

In Apr. 1777 John Lawrence of Burlington was accused of high treason.  Joseph Lawrence, Esq., among others, appeared before the Council of Safety and gave evidence against him; while Mr. Peter Imlay gave evidence against John Lawrence, Sr., of Monmouth.

 

Through his incarceration with Lt. Col. John Simcoe, a fellow prisoner, and the future Governor of Canada, whose friendship he acquired, John obtained a large grant of land in Canada, which, following his death, was forfeited to the Crown for nonfulfillment of obligations.

 

The only known child of John & Anne (Leonard) Lawrence was ELIZABETH LAWRENCE who married MICHAEL KEARNY 30 June 1774.  Michael was born 11 Nov. 1750, died 24 Feb. 1791.  Elizabeth inherited property from her grandfather Samuel Leonard through her mother Anne (Leonard) Lawrence.[197] Michael was a merchant in Perth Amboy and a Loyalist.[198] He served as a searcher of imports and exports in New York.

 

o        SARAH LEONARD, married THOMAS FARMAR/BILLOPP after 22 Mar. 1735/6.

 

Thomas was born in Perth Amboy in 1711, son of Thomas & Ann (Billopp) Farmar, died 2 Aug. 1750 at Bentley Manor, Staten Island, NY. Thomas Farmar, Sr. was born in Garranckinnefeake, Co. Cork, Ireland, married Ann Billopp in London ca. 1705, died intestate. The administrator of his will was appointed 10 June 1752 in New Brunswick, Middlesex Co., NJ.  Ann Billopp was baptized 12 Mar. 1673 in St. Nicholas, Cole Abbey, London.

 

Thomas (husband of Sarah Leonard) wrote his will 5 Oct. 1749 and added a codicil 10 Oct. 1749.  The will was probated 6 Aug. 1750. Thomas had married (1) Eugenia Stelle.  She was born in 1710, died 22 Mar. 1735/6.  Thomas’ surname originally was Farmar but later changed to Billopp pursuant to the will of his maternal grandfather in order to inherit the Billopp properties.

 

On 18 Apr. 1749 a Thomas Billopp filed an affidavit that he was unaware that Capt. Samuel Leonard had obtained “a Patent for the erecting and keeping a Ferry over the Rariton River, on the East Side, opposite to New Brunswick.[199]

 

Sarah Billopp of Perth Amboy, Middlesex Co., widow of Thomas Billopp, wrote her will 23 Sept. 1765. It was proved 7 Sept. 1770.  To her eldest son, Christopher Billopp she left £100.  The rest of her estate she left to her seven children, namely Mary (widow of Richard Nickelson), Elizabeth, Rachel, Thomas, Sarah, Catharine and Jasper.  Executors were her sons Christopher & Thomas.  Witnesses were John Berrien, Samuel Sarjant, Francis Goelet.  In May 1771 Christopher Billopp filed the inventory of £2,141.8.10 [K:235].[200]

 

The children of Thomas & Sarah (Leonard) Billopp were:

        Col. CHRISTOPHER FARMAR/BILLOPP, born 1737 in Bentley Manor, Staten Island, NY, married FRANCES WILLETT in New York 2 Nov. 1762, died 28 Mar. 1827 in New Brunswick.  His will was dated 29 Aug. 1820 with a codicil dated 28 Nov. 1822.  Frances was born 2 Nov. 1739. Christopher inherited the Billopp properties. William Addams Reitwiesner is a descendant (see his ahnentafel at http://homepges.rootsweb.com/~addams/personal/family.html).

        THOMAS FARMAR/BILLOPP married (1)  ELIZABETH FARMAR, married (2) SUSANNAH SKINNER.  Elizabeth was a daughter of Samuel & Christina (Peck) Farmar.  Susannah had married (1) Jasper Farmar in 1771 (see below).

        JASPER FARMAR/BILLOPP married SUSANNAH SKINNER in 1771.  Susannah was a daughter of Courtland & Elizabeth (Kearney) Skinner.  Jasper & Susannah had no children.  Susannah later married Thomas Farmar (see above).

        MARY FARMAR/BILLOPP married (1) RICHARD NICKELSON, married (2) Col. [-?-] DAVIS. Richard died before 23 Sept. 1765.

        ELIZABETH FARMAR/BILLOPP married PETER GOELET 26 Oct. 1775 in New Brunswick, NJ.  They had 2 sons.  Peter married (2) Rachel Farmar (see below).

        RACHEL FARMAR/BILLOPP married PETER GOELET (see above).

        SARAH FARMAR/BILLOPP married ALEXANDER ROSS 11 Feb. 1776 in New York, NY.

        CATHARINE (KATHARINE) FARMAR/BILLOPP married EFFINGHAM LAWRENCE, died 1806.

 

o        ELIZABETH LEONARD of Perth Amboy, married FRANCIS GOELET of New York 20 June 1752.[201] Francis & Elizabeth had a son JOHN GOELET.

 

e.       JAMES LEONARD, born 1680 (1683?), married CHARITY WHITEHEAD 18 Aug. 1724, died 1750 in Princeton, NJ.  Charity came from Jamaica, Long Island, NY.[202]

 

James Leonard of Kingston in Middlesex advertised in “The Pennsylvania Gazette” on 11 Sept. 1740 that a Negro man named Simon aged about 40 years had run away.  James posted a £3 reward and reasonable charges.

 

On 12 Sept. 1745 James Leonard in Kings-Town advertised that he would take subscriptions for making a survey of the road from Trenton to Amboy with possible extensions to New York and Philadelphia.[203]

 

The children of James & Charity (Whitehead) Leonard were:

 

o       WHITEHEAD LEONARD, born 1725. In 1759 Whitehead inherited from his uncle Thomas Leonard (see ¶f. below) a house and lot which Thomas had bought of Stephen Gudgeon in Kingston, now in possession of widow Brunson. Whitehead and his brother Thomas (see below) inherited from their uncle Thomas Leonard the 270-acre plantation in Middlesex Co. on Gristmill Brook near Kingstown, adjoining land of Thomas Vandike and west by the Millston River.[204]

 

On 28 May 1768 John Moores, Sheriff of Middlesex Co., seized from Whitehead Leonard “about ten acres of land with a fulling mill thereon situate in South Brunswick, in the county aforesaid, near Kingstown; the said mill hath the advantage of a good stream of water, and a well settled neighborhood.”  The said land and mill were to be exposed to sale, at public vendue, 29 July at the house of William Van Tilbury, innholder, in Kingstown.[205]

 

Whitehead had daughters:

 

·        LUCY LEONARD, inherited £10 from Thomas Leonard, Esq., in 1759 (see ¶f. below).

 

·        CHARITY LEONARD.  In 1759 Thomas Leonard (see ¶f. below) bequeathed to Charity Leonard and to Deborah Doughty (see ¶f. below) his house and lot in Kingstown where Richard Stippey lived.[206]

 

·        MARY LEONARD, born 4 Dec. 1744, married MOSES ANDERSON 27 Jan. 1768.  Moses was born 25 July 1736 at Hopewell, NJ, a son of Isaac Anderson.[207] Mary inherited from Thomas Leonard, Esq. (see ¶f. below) a house and lot in Kingston which he had bought from Richard Huff.

 

o        MARY LEONARD.

 

o        DANIEL LEONARD. In 1759 Daniel inherited from his uncle Thomas Leonard (see ¶f. below) a house and lot in Princetown where Samuel Horner lived.  After the death or marriage of Abigail, wife of Uncle Thomas, Daniel was to pay £10 to his sister Sarah Leonard and £10 to Uncle Thomas’ niece, Sarah Tindall, daughter of his brother John Leonard (see ¶b. above.)[208]

 

o        THOMAS LEONARD, born 1728, married MARY LAWRENCE 21 May 1741,[209] died 1769.  Thomas inherited in 1759 from his uncle Thomas Leonard (see ¶f. below) all land held in partnership with Thomas’ brother Samuel Leonard (see ¶a. above).[210] Thomas also inherited a tract in Princetown, a 20-acre plantation where Nathaniel Runnion lived, a plantation called Man’s Grove, a plantation “I had of the Stocktons,” a plantation called Cole Brook and 130 acres of land in Prince Town.  Thomas was an executor of the will of his uncle Thomas Leonard. The children of Thomas & Mary (Lawrence) Leonard were:

 

·        THOMAS LEONARD, born abt. 1743, married HANNAH WHITE 30 Apr. 1767.[211]  Hannah was born21 Sept. 1745, died 30 Apr. 1767.  She was a daughter of Britton and Dinah (Curtis/Corlies) White.[212]  In 1759 Thomas inherited from Thomas Leonard (see ¶f. below) his house and lot in Trenton.[213] The children of Thomas & Hannah (White) Leonard were:

 

§         JAMES LEONARD, born ca. 1767, married 7 Apr. 1790 at the First Presbyterian Church, New York, DEBORAH KELLY, a widow.

§         JOSEPH LEONARD, born ca. 1769.

§         JOHN LEONARD, born ca. 1772 in Monmouth Co., NJ, married MARIA CHEVALIER 12 Jan. 1800. 

 

·        PAMELIA LEONARD, inherited £10 from Thomas Leonard Esq., in 1759 (see ¶f. below).

 

·        CHARITY LEONARD. In 1759 Thomas Leonard (see ¶f. below) bequeathed to “Charity, a daughter of my said nephew Thomas Leonard, and to Mary, daughter of Whitehead Leonard, brother of said Thomas (see above) that house and lot in Kingstown which I bought of Richard Huff.”[214]

 

o        JAMES LEONARD, born 1730, married (1) MARY SMITH 21 Aug. 1762 in Christ Church, Plainfield, married (2) MARGARET RIGGER 11 Apr. 1771, died intestate 1787 in the Eastern Precinct (now Franklin Twp., Somerset Co.).  Sarah Williams of Philadelphia and Daniel Perrine of Eastern Precinct were appointed administrators on 2/9/1787.[215]  James and his brothers Whitehead and Thomas inherited in 1759 from their uncle Thomas Leonard (see ¶f. below) 1500 acres of land and a saw mill in Middlesex Co. on Deep Run.[216]  James also inherited a plantation in tenure of Nevill Furman and a plantation where Jeremiah Denton lived. The children of James & Mary (Smith) Leonard were:

 

·        WHITEHEAD LEONARD, born 1765, married ALCHE HARRISON 26 Sept. 1788 in Somerset Co., NJ.  Whitehead went to Kentucky.

 

·        JOHN LEONARD, born 17 Aug. 1768 in Kingston, Middlesex Co., married MARY OLIVER 19 Aug. 1790. Their children were:

         CORNELIA B. LEONARD, born 1793, died 1869.

         JAMES LEONARD, born 25 Jan. 1796 (?) at Bound Brook, NJ, married MARY WEBSTER 25 Nov. 1805. died 30 July 1876 at Plainfield, NJ.  Mary was a daughter of Morris & Sarah Webster.  She was born ca. 1806.

 

In the 1850 census for Plainfield, Essex Co., NJ (Roll 450, p. 371), James Leonard was head of the following household:

        James Leonard, 53, M, farmer, value of real estate $15,000, born NJ

        Mary Leonard, 44, F

        Cornelia Leonard, 16, F, in school

        William J. Leonard, 12, M, in school

        Oliver Leonard, 10, M, in school

        Emily Leonard, 8, F, in school

        Esther Alwood, 14, F,.

 

The children of James & Mary (Webster) Leonard were:

-        WILLIAM JAMES LEONARD, born 1837, married MARTHA WHTICOMB, died 1920.  Their son, WILLIAM ELLERY LEONARD married (1) CHARLOTTE FREEMAN 25 June 1909, married (2) CHARLOTTE CARLETON 1 May 1911, divorced, married (3) GRACE GOLDEN 29 June 1935. William was a professor in Madison, WI.  He was an author and poet.[217]

-        CORNELIA B. LEONARD, perhaps died 7 Apr. 1849, buried Fair View Cemetery, Red Bank, Middletown.  Plot owned by William Leonard, Jr. (see immediately above).[218]

-        OLIVER B. LEONARD, born 1839, married ELIZABETH B. MARSH 24 Oct. 1865, died 21 Apr. 1917.  Elizabeth was a daughter of Ellston & Elizabeth (Steele) Marsh.  The children of Oliver & Elizabeth (Marsh) Leonard were JAMES LEONARD and ELLSTON LEONARD.

-        EMILY LEONARD, born ca. 1842.

         JULIA T. LEONARD.

         NETTY FIELD LEONARD.

         JOHN LEONARD, born 1799, died 1835.

 

o       JOHN LEONARD born after 1738.  John & his brother Whitehead (see above) inherited in 1759 from their uncle Thomas Leonard (see ¶f. below) a grist mill on the North side of Opposite Brook in Middlesex Co.[219]

 

o        SARAH LEONARD. In 1759 Sarah inherited from her uncle Thomas Leonard (see ¶f. below) a lot at Amboy adjacent to a lot devised to her by her late father.  Also a small plantation of 30 acres in Middlesex Co. where Samuel Groves lived and £10.[220]

 

f.        Judge THOMAS LEONARD, Esq., born 1685, married (1) SUSANNAH WALKER, married (2) ABIGAIL (WHITEHEAD) DOUGHTY, died between 1 June and 23 Nov. 1759 in Prince Town, Somerset Co., NJ[221] with no issue. Abigail survived Thomas.

 

On 3 Nov. 1718 Governor Hunter recommended, in case of a vacancy, Thomas Leonard for a seat in the Eastern Division of the New Jersey Council.[222] Thomas Leonard was a member for Somerset of the New Jersey Council held at Perth Amboy 7 Mar. 1721.[223]

 

In 1734/5 a Judge Leonard owned land near the tavern in Princetown.[224]

 

On 28 May 1740 Thomas Leonard was a representative of the Province of New Jersey for Somersett in place of Hendrick Fisher.[225]

 

On 28 May 1745 Governor Lewis Morris wrote to the Lords of Trade in London recommending Thomas Leonard for membership in His Majesty’s Council of New Jersey.  On 20 June 1745 the Lords of Trade passed the recommendation on to the Lords Justices in Whitehall.[226]

 

A Thomas Leonard was a pall-bearer at the Morrisania, NY, burial of Governor Lewis Morris who had died 21 May 1746 in Trenton.[227]

 

In the summer of 1748 Judge Thomas Leonard rented a house in Princeton to William Mountere (Montier) at £20/annum.[228]

 

On 31 Jan. 1748/9 “The Pennsylvania Journal” reported that at a Convention of the Trustees of the College of New Jersey Thomas Leonard, Esq., of Prince-Town, had been chosen to “Take in the Subscriptions and receive the Monies of all such publick spirited Persons as shall be willing to promote this worthy a publick Design.[229]

 

On 21 Feb. 1750 in a letter to the Governor regarding Joseph Bonny’s petition, Judge Thomas Leonard excused himself for having qualified John Riddel as Sheriff of Somerset Co.[230]

 

Thomas Leonard was one of seven Councillors qualified to be members of the Council of New Jersey per letter dated 30 Jan. 1752 from Robert H. Morris, Esq., Chief Justice of New Jersey, to the Lords of Trade, London.[231]

 

On 13 Dec. 1753 Thomas Leonard placed an advertisement in the “Pennsylvania Gazette” posting a reward for the recovery of Catherine Carle, a servant girl.[232]

 

On 25 June 1756 letters remained in the Trenton Post Office for Thomas Leonard, Esq., of Prince Town.[233]

 

On 24 Aug. 1758 Thomas Leonard, due to his age, resigned his seat in the New Jersey Council.  He was replaced per order of the King at the Court of St. James 12 Dec. 1758.[234]

 

In his will written 6 Dec. 1755 Thomas bequeathed to his wife Abigail, while my widow:

-        house and lot in Princetown where Samuel Homer lives and after her marriage or death, it to go to my nephew Daniel Leonard (see ¶e. above).  Note that in his will Thomas also bequeathed this same property directly to nephew Daniel Leonard!

-        House and lot in Princetown where Richard Patterson dwells which she bought of John Dare, Esq., sheriff of Middlesex County, and by her conveyed to me before our marriage, and after her death to go to her three daughters Hannah Doughty, Susannah Doughty and Deborah Doughty.

-        Five acres of pasture land lying next to land I sold to Joseph Green.

 

Thomas also bequeathed to his stepdaughter Hannah Doughty the house and lot in Pensneck in Middlesex County.[235]

 

Thomas bequeathed his extensive land holdings mainly to his nephews and nieces:

        nephew Samuel, son of brother Henry, deceased (see ¶a. above)

        nephew Thomas, son of brother Henry, deceased (see ¶a. above)

        nephew Capt. Henry, son of brother Henry, deceased (see ¶a. above)

        nephew John, son of brother John, deceased (see ¶b. above)

        nephew Whitehead, son of deceased brother James (see ¶e. above)

        nephew John, son of deceased brother James (see ¶e. above)

        nephew Daniel, son of deceased brother James (see ¶e. above)

        niece Sarah, daughter of deceased brother James (see ¶e. above)

        niece Sarah, daughter of deceased brother Henry (see ¶a. above)

        eldest son (Robert Morris) of nephew Capt. Henry (see ¶a. above)

        Pamelia, daughter of nephew Thomas (see ¶a. above)

        Lucy, daughter of nephew Whitehead (see ¶e. above)

        Sarah Tindall, daughter of deceased brother John (see ¶b. above)

        Charity, daughter of nephew Thomas (see ¶e. above)

        Mary, daughter of nephew Thomas (see ¶e. above)

        Charity, daughter of nephew Whitehead (see ¶e. above)

        nephew Thomas, son of deceased brother James (see ¶e. above)

        Thomas, son of nephew Thomas (see ¶e. above)

        Nephew James, son of deceased brother James (see ¶e. above)

        Thomas, son of nephew John (see ¶b. above)

 

These bequests are cited under the pertinent individuals above.  In addition, there are four unidentified recipients:

-        To niece Nancy Eldridge £5.

-        To my sister’s Walker’s two daughters £15 (sisters-in-law ?).

-        To Hannah, wife of Richard Salter, Esq., £10.

-        To Samuel Homer the plantation in Middlesex County I bought of Stephen Gudgeon.  Samuel to pay to his daughter, Amey, £10.

 

Executors of Thomas’ will were his nephew Thomas Leonard, son of Thomas’ brother James, and Thomas’ friend John Berrien of Rockyhill.  Witnesses were Thomas Watson, Richard Patterson and Joseph Murrow.  A 1 June 1759 codicil to the will was witnessed by Thomas Watson, Joseph Yard, Jr., and Joseph Murrow.  The will was proved 23 Nov. 1759 (10:1).[236]

 

 

       ii.            NATHANIEL LEONARD born 16 June 1652 in Lynn, Essex Co., MA, married 9 Jan. 1694/5 HANNAH/SUSANNAH LAWRENCE GROVER of Middletown, NJ,[237] died 1707.[238] Peter Tilton wrote, “In Middletown in the province of East Jersey the 9 day of January in ye Yeare 1694-5 Nathaniell Leonard of Middletown & Hannah Grover of the same Town after Lawfull Publication Did before me & severall witnesses; take each other in Marriage till Death part them.”[239]   Hannah was a daughter of William Lawrence and widow of Joseph Grover.[240]  Hannah died after 1712 in Middletown.

 

Along with his father, Henry, and brothers Samuel & Thomas, Nathaniel established an iron works in Rowley, MA, in 1669.  Henry removed to Taunton, MA, in the winter of 1673/4 and afterwards to New Jersey.  His three sons tarried in Boxford, MA, and on 6 Apr. 1674 contracted with the owners of the ironworks there to carry them on.  After continuing for a short time in the business, they followed their father to New Jersey.[241]

 

Following the departure of his father, Nathaniel (and his brothers Samuel & Thomas) remained in Rowley and worked the ironworks there under an agreement made 6 Apr. 1674 (see ¶1. above).  In July of that year the ironworks were demolished by fire.  In a court hearing in September (Nov. ?) Evan Moris deposed that he was at the works the evening before they were burned and when Nathanell Lenard left work, the deponent never saw so much care taken to put out the fire as was that night, “thou I had ben a retainer to the workes 3 months bed and bord.”

 

On 30 Mar. 1675 John Floyd deposed to the court held at Ipswitch that Goodwife Leonard (Nathaniel’s mother ?) and Nathaniel Leonard said that they were done at the works and would work no more and deponent saw that their goods were gone out of the house, save a few trifles.[242]

 

 

According to the “Minutes of the Board of Proprietors of the Eastern Division of New Jersey from 1685 – 1705,” a petition was filed 11 June 1685 at Elizabeth, NJ, by Henry Leonard, Sr., and Samuel, Nathaniel, Thomas, Henry, Jr., and John Leonard to have land laid out to them according to warrants made them on 20 July 1676 by Gov. Carteret.  Nathaniel received 1 Oct. 1695 from his brother Capt. Samuel Leonard by quit claim 100 acres which had been given them by their father Henry Leonard, deceased, in his lifetime.[243]  On the next day (i.e., 2 Oct.) Nathaniel patented 211 acres.[244]

 

On 2 Oct. 1695 Nathl Leonard patented 220 acres of sundry tracts at Colt’s Neck with a total yearly quit rent of 9/2 (E:443).[245] The 220 acres consisted of:

        211 acres SW his brother Samuel Leonard, SE the Mine Brook, S a swamp & a run of water, N & NW a branch of Sawmill Brook

        6 acres of bogg meadow, SE of grantee

        2 acres of meadow on the north side of Sawmill Brook

        6 acres of meadow on the SW side of Thomas Leonard.

 

On 7 Jan. 1700 Nathaniel and his wife Susannah exchanged with Job Throckmorton (husband of Nathaniel’s sister Sarah) the Colt’s Neck land for Job’s land in Middletown. They named the land Leonardsville.  It was a Leonard homestead for over 200 years.[246]

 

The children of Nathaniel and Hannah (Lawrence) Leonard were:[247]

 

a.       THOMAS LEONARD born 1708, removed to Virginia.

 

b.      Lt. NATHANIEL LEONARD, gentleman, born 1712, married DELIVERANCE LIPPITT ca. 1737, buried in Middletown, NJ, 18 Dec. 1763.[248] Deliverance died in 1798.  She was a daughter of Moses & Sarah (Throckmorton) Lippitt.[249]  In 1739 Nathaniel received a Royal Commission under King George II as a lieutenant of the Middle Company of Monmouth Co., NJ.[250] Nathaniel wrote his will 13 Dec. 1763.  It was proved 29 Dec. 1763.  In it he named his wife Deliverance and sons John, Nathaniel, Joseph & Thomas (a minor).  Executors were his sons John, Nathaniel & Joseph and “my relation” Andrew Bowne. The children of Nathaniel & Deliverance (Lippitt) Leonard were:

 

o        JOHN W. LEONARD born 1738, went to Cuba and married a Spanish Lady.

 

o        NATHANIEL LEONARD born 1739 married CATHERINE CRAWFORD 17 Sept. 1751, died between 25 Feb. and 8 Mar. 1774 in Middletown.[251]  Catherine was a daughter of Richard & Catherine (Shepard) Crawford.[252]  In his will written 25 Feb. 1774 Nathaniel Leonard of Middletown, yeoman, left to his wife Catherine “the land and buildings left me by my Father during her widowhood and if delivered of a child to be brought up by my executors and if alive at 21 to inherit the above bequest.”  He ordered his executors to purchase “the Place” left to my brother Thomas by their father’s will.  Catherine was to receive 2 cows “as soon as my brother Joseph and she divide the cattle to be sold.”  Brother Joseph Leonard, Cousin Andrew Bowne and Catherine Leonard were qualified as the executors on 8 Mar. 1774.[253]  The witnesses to the will were Henry Tunis, Catherine Crawford and Andrew Brannan.  The inventory made by John Stillwell and Jonathan Herbert 9 Mar. 1774 amounted to £312.8.5 (L:113).[254]  The children of Nathaniel and Catherine (Crawford) Leonard included:

 

·        MARGARET/POLLY LEONARD married SAMUEL C. MOTT.  On 4 May 1781 Margaret received £120 from her father’s will. The children of Samuel & Margaret (Leonard) Mott were:[255]         

§         LEONARD MOTT

§         SAMUEL MOTT

§         ANN MARIA MOTT

§         JERUSHA MOTT

§         CLEMENTINA MOTT

§         CATHARINE MOTT born 9 Apr. 1800, died 21 Sept. 1800.

 

·        MARY LEONARD stillborn 7 Apr. 1774.[256]

 

o        JOSEPH LEONARD born 1743, married by Trenton license SARAH ANN BRAY 12 Oct. 1773, both of Monmouth Co.,[257] died intestate 16 Jan. 1784. His widow, Sarah Leonard, was the administratrix of his estate.  Fellowbondsman was Samuel Bray of Monmouth Co.  The inventory made 24 Jan. 1784 by Thomas Walling and Richard Applegate amounted to £185.11.9 (26:386).[258]

 

o        SAMUEL LEONARD born ca. 1750, in Monmouth Co., married LYDIA MADDON.[259]  Their children were:[260]

 

·        THOMAS LEONARD born 2 (3?) Mar. 1780, married NANCY YEIGH/YEIGHT/YEICHT ca. 1840(?) in Juniata Co., PA, died 2 (24?) Sept. 1867.  Nancy was born 8 May/June 1782, died 23 Oct. 1863.  Nancy’s mother’s maiden name was Casner.  Both Thomas and Nancy were buried in the Myers-Leonard Cemetery near Oakland Mills, Juniata Co., PA.  The known children of Thomas & Nancy were:

 

§         SAMUEL LEONARD, born 6 June 1813 (1815?) married ELIZABETH [-?-].  She was born ca. 1820.  In the 1850 census for Fayette Twp., Juniata Co., PA (Roll 786, page 296), Samuel was head of the following household:

        Samuel Leonard, 38. M, farmer, value of real estate $5,000

        Eliza Leonard, 30, F

        Malinda Leonard, 11, F

        Morris Leoanrd, 8, M

        Catha Heim, 55, F

        Wm. Lichenten, 19, M, labourer

        Thos. Fuly, 50, M, labourer

        John James, 30, M, labourer.

The children of Samuel & Elizabeth were:

·          MALINDA LEONARD born ca. 1839

·          MORRIS LEONARD born 1842.

 

§         THOMAS REUBEN LEONARD born 1 Apr. 1817 (1815?) in Mifflin Co., PA, married ELIZABETH AIRGOOD, died 26 (2?) Sept. 1907.  Elizabeth was born 24 (3/4?) Mar. 1824/5, died 1 Jan./5 June 1897.  Both Thomas & Elizabeth were buried in the Leonard Cemetery near Oakland Mills, Juniata Co., NJ.[261]  In the 1850 census for Fayette Twp., Juniata Co., PA (Roll 786, page 296), taken 29 Oct., Reuben Leonard was head of the following household:

        Reuben Leonard, 33, M, farmer

        Eliza Leonard, 25, F

        Thos. Leonard, 6, M,

        Marlan(?) Leonard, 5, M

        Morgan Leonard, 3, M

        Infant Leonard, 3 months, F.

        Robert Carter, 21, M, colored, Labourer.

The children of Thomas Reuben & Elizabeth Leonard were:

·          THOMAS LEONARD born 12 Sept. 1840, died 30 June 1900

·          MORGAN SEWARD LEONARD born 30 Mar. 1844, married MATILDA VARNER, died 5 Feb. 1923.  Matilda was born 12 Jan. 1847, died 5 June 1912.[262]

·          MILO (MARLAN) LEONARD born 13 Feb. 1846, died 19 Feb. 1901

·          MARY LEONARD born 5 Aug. 1849, died 2 Oct. 1854

·          SCOTT LEONARD born 12 Oct. 1852, died 30 Oct. 1940

·          JOHN LEONARD born 2 Dec. 1856

·          SAMUEL LEONARD born 24 Jan. 1858, died 17 Aug. 1943

·          ALVEY LEONARD born 14 Oct. 1860, died 12 Aug. 1933

·          JERSEY LEONARD born12 Feb. 1863, died 23 Jan. 1951

·          JENNIE LEONARD born 4 Apr. 1867, died 24 July 1959.

§         ELIZABETH LEONARD born 2 Nov. 1818, married JOHN KEPNER, died 24 Dec. 1897.

§         SOPHIA HESTER LEONARD born 29 Oct. 1820 in PA, married THOMAS J. KNOX.  Thomas was born in 1811 in New York, NY, buried in Taylor Co., IA.  Connie K. Beck (cbeck@lenox.heartland.net) is a descendant.  In the 1850 census for Delaware Twp., Juniata Co., PA (Roll 786, pp. 266-267), Thos. J. Knox was head of the following household:

        Thos. J. Knox, 40, M, Agent, born PA

        Sophia Knox, 30, F, born PA

        A. E. Knox, 10, F, born PA, in school

        Jno. J. Knox, 7, M, born PA, in school

        Geo. D. Knox, 5, M, born  PA

        E. S. Knox, 2, M, born PA.

The children of Thomas & Sophia Knox were all born in PA:

·          A. E. KNOX born ca. 1840

·          JNO. J. KNOX born ca. 1843

·          GEO. D. KNOX born ca. 1845

·          E. S. KNOX born ca. 1848.

§         Dr. EDWARD ALVA LEONARD.

 

·        CATHERINE LEONARD born ca. 1784, married [-?-] HIMES.

 

o        SARAH LEONARD.

 

o        ANNIE LEONARD.

 

o        Sgt.(?) THOMAS LEONARD born 1753,[263] married ALICE LAWRENCE at the First Reform Church, Freehold, NJ, 30 Oct. 1786,[264] died 1801 in Beaver Co., PA.  Thomas enlisted in 1776 and was in the Battle of Monmouth.  The children of Thomas & Alice included:

 

·        WILLIAM LEONARD born 20 Aug. 1787, married (1) ELIZABETH APPLEGATE, married (2) ELIZABETH [-?-], died 19 July1873.  Elizabeth Applegate was born 8 Apr. 1792, died 12 Apr. 1836.  She was a daughter of Richard & Mary (Stillwell) Applegate of Middletown.  Elizabeth [-?-] was born 9 Nov. 1791, died 27 Mar. 1880.  Was she living with William’s son Thomas Leonard at the time of the 1850 census?  In 1807 William went to live at the Leonard Homestead at the crossroads in Leonardsville.  The house had been built before 1807 and was still standing in 1911.[265]  William and both of his wives were buried at the Cemetery of the Society of Friends, Houston St., Middletown, NJ.[266]  The children of William and Elizabeth (Applegate) Leonard were:[267]

§         RICHARD APPLEGATE LEONARD, born 12 Feb. 1812 at Middletown, married (1) ELIZABETH ROBERTS 1 Mar. 1833, married (2) SARAH ROBERTS, died 5 May 1877.  Elizabeth was born in 1809 and died 18 Feb. 1848.  Both Elizabeth and Sarah were daughters of Rev. Thomas Roberts.  The children of Richard & Sarah (Roberts) Leonard were:

        RICHARD A. LEONARD, born 185_, married DELIA FOSTER PATTERSON.  Delia was born 24 Mar. 1840. The children of Richard & Delia (Patterson) Leonard were:

×           CHARLES G. LEONARD, born 16 Apr. 1887, married ANNIE BOWNE JOHNSON 17 Feb. 1909.  The children of Charles & Annie (Johnson) Leonard were:

RUSSELL GROVER LEONARD, born 7 Mar. 1912.

ELSIE MAY LEONARD, born 11 Mar. 1916.

CHARLES THOMAS LEONARD, born 8 July 1917.

MILLARD ALLEN LEONARD, born 10 Mar. 1919.

×           ALICE LEONARD married [-?-] LOUX.

×           BERBA LEONARD married [-?-] BROWN.

×           DAVID C. LEONARD, born 1894/5.

        MARY LEONARD. married GEORGE SHERMAN.

        SARAH LEONARD, married CHARLES McCLEEVE.

        EMMA LEONARD, married GEORGE SHERMAN.

        CHARLES T. LEONARD, married (1) ANNIE GROVER 5 Oct. 1876, married (2) MARTHA W. TOMPKINS 24 Oct. 1893.  Annie died in 1891.  She was a daughter of James C. & Rachel Grover.  Martha was a daughter of David & Sarah Tompkins.

        WILLIAM T. LEONARD, born 8 July 1857 in Leonardsville, NJ, married FRANCES MARIA CLARK in Nov. 1882.  The children of William & Frances (Clark) Leonard were:

×           ELLA S. LEONARD, married ELMER HODGES of Winchester, VA.

×           GLADYS LEONARD was a professor of Physical Training at the University of Vermillion in So. Dakota.

×           FRANCES J. LEONARD married LOUIS MENDEL of Red Bank, NJ.

        ELLA S. LEONARD.

§         THOMAS LEONARD, born 5 Sept. 1815, married MARY ANN HOPPING 5 Feb. 1840, died 19 July 1872.[268]  Mary was born ca. 1813.  In the 1850 census for Middletown Twp., Monmouth Co., NJ (Roll 457, pages 333B & 334), Thomas was head of the following household:

        Thomas Leonard, 36, M, Merchant, value of real estate $8,000, born in NJ

        Mary Leonard, 37, F, born in NJ

        James Leonard, 9, M, born in NJ

        Thomas Leonard, 7, born in NJ

        Elizabeth Leonard, 57, F, born in NJ

        Margaret [-?-], 25, F, born Ireland

        C____ Clark, 16, M, clerk, born NJ.

The children of Thomas & Mary Ann (Hopping) Leonard were:

        JAMES LEONARD, born 8 Jan. 1841, married EMMA C. TAYLOR 19 Nov. 1863.  The children of James & Emma (Taylor) Leonard were:

×           MARY LEONARD, born 8 Apr. 1866.

×           GEORGE T. LEONARD, born 3 Aug. 1872, died 1874.

×           ALBERT T. LEONARD, born 27 Mar. 1875.

        THOMAS HENRY LEONARD, born 30 June 1843, married MARIA RUNYAN. The children of Thomas & Maria (Runyan) Leonard were:

×           CLARA LEONARD.

×           MABEL LEONARD.

×           MARIE LEONARD.

×           MARIANNA LEONARD.

        EDWARD H. LEONARD, born 13 Feb. 1853.

        JOHN JOSEPH LEONARD, born 6 Mar. 1856.

§         MARY A. LEONARD married WILLIAM McLANE.

§         ELIZABETH ANN LEONARD.

§         JOHN S. (T.?) LEONARD.

§         WILLIAM LEONARD born 1819 in NJ, probably married (1) ELIZABETH [-?-], married (2) ABIGAIL GROVER, died 1885.  Abigail was born ca. 1823 in NJ.  She was a daughter of James & Deborah (Voorhees) Grover and of the same Grover family as Joseph Grover, the first husband of Hannah Lawrence who married (2) Nathaniel Leonard (see above).

 

In the 1850 census for Middletown Twp., Monmouth Co., NJ (Roll 457, page 304), William Leonard was head of the following household:

        William Leonard, 30, M, farmer, born NJ

        Abigail Leonard, 26, F, born NJ

        Enoch Leonard, 3, born NJ

        Deborah Leonard, F, 8 months, NJ.

 

In the 1860 census for Middletown, Monmouth co., NJ (Roll 702, page 755), William Leonard was head of the following household:

        Wm Leonard, 40, M, farmer, value of real estate $15,000, value of personal property $2,000, born NJ

        Abbey Leonard, 37, F, born NJ

        Enoch W. Leonard, 13, M, born NJ

        Deborah G. Leonard, 10, F, born NJ

        John S. Leonard, 7, M, born NJ

        Brazel Matthews, 19, male, laborer, born NJ.

 

In the 1880 census for Middletown, Monmouth Co., NJ (FHL film 1254791), William was head of the following household:

        William Leonard, 60, M, born NJ

        Abigail Leonard, 57, F, born NJ.

 

Apparently William & Elizabeth had a son DANIEL F. LEONARD and William & Abigail had 3 children:

         ENOCH WILLING LEONARD, born 25 Mar. 1847, married MARY E. HENDRICKSON in 1871.  Mary was a daughter of Danl & Mary Hendrickson.  Their children were:

×           WILLIAM W. LEONARD, born 13 Feb. 1872, married MABEL LEONARD (his cousin?).

×           PHILIP LEONARD, born 18 Apr. 1875, married EVA LAUX.

×           ABIGAIL G. LEONARD, born 23 Mar. 1881.

        DEBORAH GROVER LEONARD, born ca. Jan. 1850.

        JOHN STILLWELL LEONARD, born 6 Dec. 1852, married JENNIE FROST. They had a daughter LILLIAN LEONARD who was a science teacher in Long Branch, NJ.  She wrote a letter to the Old Colony Historical Society, Taunton, MA in 1976.

·        ELIZABETH LEONARD born 1793, died 18 Sept. 1882, age 89 years, 3 months, 13 days, buried in the Cemetery of Society of Friends, Huston St., Middletown, NJ.[269]

 

·        JOSEPH LEONARD married SARAH EDWARDS 6 Mar. 1816.

 

c.       JOHN LEONARD.[270]

 

iii.      HENRY LEONARD, born 14: 4m: 1656, died _: 7m: 1657 in Lynn, MA.[271]

 

iv.     HENRY LEONARD, Jr., born 14 June 1658, married HANNAH JOHNSON HOLDEN, died before July 1726.  Hannah was the widow of Joseph Holden whom she had married 11 Oct. 1690 in Cape May Co.[272]  She was a daughter of William & Elizabeth (Tuthill) Johnson of Elizabethtown, NJ.  Hannah filed an affidavit 29 Jan. 1697/8 at Cape May concerning her father’s will and why it was not proved earlier, her father having died 14 May 1687 (G:18).[273] Hannah married (3) Ephraim Allen July or Aug. 1726.[274] She died ca. Dec. 1728.

 

It would appear that Henry removed to Monmouth Co., New Jersey ca. 1674 with the rest of his father’s family but just how long he remained there is a good question.  By 29 Jan. 1697/8 he was in Cape May Co., NJ, where Hannah, wife of Henry Leonard of Cape May, daughter of William Johnson and formerly wife of Joseph Holden, filed the above affidavit.

 

On 12 Aug. 1686 at a Meeting & Council of the Board of Proprietors of the Eastern Division of New Jersey, Henry Leonard, Junior, was granted “200 acres of land upon the Hope River adjoining John Johnston’s land as he and the said Johnston can agree being to complete the full complement of the said Henry Leonard’s land, his father’s and brethren.”[275]

 

The 8:8:1687 Account of Debts Due on ye Book at Tinton Iron Works showed 1:3:3 due Henry Leonard, Jnr.[276]

 

On 12 June 1688 at New Perth Henry Leonard petitioned the Council of Proprietors “for 200 acres of land in Monmouth County, one hundred and twenty acres in his own right, and 80 acres in right of his father, for which he has paid the proprietors quit rents for sundry years…”  It was ordered the Mr. John Reid, the Surveyor, go along with the petitioner to see the land for which he petitions, and make a report there against the next council.”[277]

 

On 4 Oct. 1695 Henry patented 70 acres in Monmouth Co. (E:456).[278] Note that some of the above land transactions may apply to his nephew Henry Leonard (see ¶1.a. above) and vice versa.

 

In 1700 Henry held title to 150 acres on the seaside in Middle Twp., Cape May Co.  His was one of the 35 “Whaler Yeoman Families” who had settled Cape May and dominated county affairs for the next two or three generations.[279]

 

On 29 Dec. 1714 Henry & Hannah Leonard witnessed the will of John Reaves of Cape May.  Henry reported he was 56 years old.[280]

 

On 11 Sept. 1715 henry Lenard and hanah Lenard signed with their respective “H” and “X” marks as witnesses in Cape May to the Marriage of Benjamin holden and Margaret Gareson.[281]

 

In her 23 May 1720 will Sarah (Leonard) Thompson of Salem Co., NJ, named her “kinsman Henry Leonard of Cape May” (see ¶4. below).

 

On 5:25:1726 Hannah Lennard was received on certificate from Cape May and Egg Harbor monthly meeting.[282]

 

The children of Henry & Hannah Leonard were:[283]

 

a.       HENRY LEONARD, Jr., died between 11 Apr. 1759 and 4 Oct. 1760 in New Hanover Co., NC.[284]  In his will (10:161) written 11 Apr. 1759 and proved 4 Oct. 1760 Henry left to his father (!) all the lands of his estate at Cape May and in North Carolina.  His father was his executor!  Witnesses to the will were John Leonard, William Goff and Dinah Robinson. Henry’s children were:

 

o        JOHN LEONARD born ca. 1700, married widow ANN/ANNE CORSON of Cape May 29 Nov. 1732,[285] died before 24 Oct. 1771.  Ann was no doubt of the “Whaler Yeoman Family” Corson of Upper Twp.  She died before 15 Sept. 1779.

 

  A John Leonard was a justice in Cape May, NJ in 1770.[286]

 

On 6 Dec. 1770 John Leonard was one of three Justices of Cape May who issued a warrant for the apprehension of John Hatton and his slave Ned of Lower Precinct and to bring them before one of the three justices.  On the next day John Hatton, Collector of Salem and Cohensy, wrote a letter to Gov. Franklin complaining of the action taken by John Leonard and the two other Justices regarding smugglers “depending on the Magistrates for Support in the Villany.”[287]

 

 On 10 Feb. 1771 John Leonard of Cape May Co. wrote his will:

-        To wife Anne all of my moveable estate, the use of my plantations and cedar swamp and, if she want money, she can sell the swamp.

-        To Nathan Goff £40 and my plantation.

-        To my Leonard cousins in Carolina: to Samuel £18, to John £16, to Henry £18, to Jacob £16 and to cousin John Robinson £16.

-        To my brother Samuel £10, but if he be not living, then to my cousin Samuel’s son John Leonard and to my cousin Henry’s son John Leonard.

-        The said Nathan Goff is to pay the above amounts, but if he does not pay them then Samuel, John, Henry or Jacob Leonard to sell the lands and the money given to my brother Henry’s four daughters £10 each.

-        To my sister Sarah Robinson’s daughters £5 a piece.

-        The rest to my brother Samuel if he is living, but if not, then to his daughter Jane Ludlam and, if any remains, to Samuel, John, Henry and Isaac Leonard and John Robinson.

John’s wife Anne was named executrix.  Witnesses were Jacob Smith, Jonathan Edwards, Shamgar Hewit and Enoch Smith.

The will was proved 24 Oct. 1771.

The inventory of John Leonard, Esq., was taken 24 Oct. 1771 by Nathan Corson and Jacob Smith.  It amounted to £145.17.0 (16:19).[288]

 

Anne Leonard of Cape May Co. died intestate.  The administrator of her estate was Nathan Corson and fellowbondsman Abner Corson, both of Cape May Co.  Joseph Hildreth was the witness.  On 15 Sept. 1779 the inventory of Anne’s estate was made by David Corson and Abner Corson.  It amounted to £217.8.7 (22:38).[289]

 

 

 

o       SAMUEL LEONARD born ca. 1705, married JOAN WILLIAMS 27 June 1732 (1733?) in Cape May Co.[290] Their daughter JANE LEONARD married [-?-] LUDLAM, no doubt of the “Whaler Yeoman Family” Ludlam of Upper and Middle Twps.  Note that Sarah (Leonard) Thompson named in her 1720 will “kinsman Samuel Leonard of Cape May” (see ¶4. below).

 

o        SARAH LEONARD married [-?-] ROBINSON.

 

o        HENRY LEONARD born ca. born ca. 1702, married HANNAH [-?-] .  They had four daughters.

 

b.      JOHN LEONARD, may have removed to Brunswick Co., NC.

 

v.       THOMAS LEONARD, born ca. 1660 in Lynn, Essex Co., MA, married HESTER [-?-] in Virginia, died before 5 Jan. 1713/4 in Shrewsbury, Monmouth Co., NJ.  Thomas left no will but Robert Hunter, the Governor of New York & New Jersey, by an order dated 5 Jan. 1713 at Burlington appointed a Henry Leonard to be administrator (I:437).  On 5 Aug. 1714 an inventory of the personal property of Thomas was made by David Killy, John Powell and Peter Helson (?) and sworn to by Henry Leonard on 26 Aug. 1714.  It amounted to £57.18.0[291]

 

In 1675 a complaint was issued that Thomas had tried to burn the coal house at the Boxford ironworks.[292]  He was sentenced to be whipped if found within 7 miles of the works.  But Thomas had already departed Rowley

 

On 30:6:1675 Thomas Leonard and John Alley were brought to court in Salem for fighting in Lynn.[293]

 

On 18:10:1676:

o        William Lattarmore testified that upon the 9th day of this month coming from Boston in the evening near Gorg Darling’s, he met with Tho. Lenard, Samuell More and Blaze Vinton in the King’s highway.  “The furst salutation that I had Tho. Lennard bid me stand: and Asked me whoe was thare and I made Answer we ware men: then Lenard challinged us of our horsis to try our manhood and said that he would take me by ye Iylides and make my heels strik fiar against the eliment: sum small spass aftar these words the abouesaid lennard and Samuell more folowed me and plucked me of my horse and robed me and touck from me: a gould ring tow shilings in monny of silver and Gould ribbin: and fower yards of silver twest.” Sworn, 18:10:1676, before Wm. Hathorne, assistant.

 

o        Richard Simons testified that he was with William Lattarmor and John Trevit, and was pulled from his horse, chased and forced against a tree, where they struck him as many as a hundred blows.  At last someone came from Darling’s and rescued him or else he might have been robbed for he had a great deal of money about him, etc.  Sworn, 18:10:1676, before Wm. Hathorne, assistant.

 

The result of these testimonies was that Thomas Leonard, Samuell Moore and Blaze Vinton, for robbing on the highway, were ordered in Mar. 1677 to be branded upon the forehead with the letter B and each to pay to Wm. Lattimore five nobles and to Richard Simons 20s.[294]

 

The 8:8:1687 Account of Debts Due on ye Book at Tinton Iron Works showed 3:0:0 due Thomas Leonard.[295] 

 

Thomas & Hester Leonard had a daughter SARAH LEONARD who was born in Shrewsbury, married JOHN WHITE, died ca. 1749 in Frederick, MD. John was a son of Peter White.

 

On 22 May 1722 John White and Sarah, his wife, as heirs of Thomas Leonard, conveyed land on the East side of Mine Brook to John Throckmorton and Samuel Davis, Jr.  In the following deed they quit claimed to the same parties land adjoining the above which had been bought by Hester Leonard, the mother of the said Sarah White and widow of the said Thomas.[296]

 

vi.     Capt. JOHN LEONARD, born 1670, married MARGARET [-?-], murdered in 1727 by Wequalia, an Indian king, in his own yard near Crosswicks.  Wequalia was found guilty at a trial held 23 June 1727 in Perth Amboy and was hung on 30 June.[297] Margaret married (2) John Johnson ca. 1729.[298]

 

On 4 Nov. 1687 a patent was issued to a John Leonard of Middletown for 194 acres in Monmouth Co., S & SE Lewis Morris, N & NW, W & SW unsurveyed land.  Also 6 acres of meadow at the NW corner of the first (B:195). On  29 Nov. 1690 John Leonard of Colt’s Neck deeded to Wm Lawrence of Midletown 6 acres on the Westside and part of the tract granted to him by patent of Nov. 4, 1687 (D:273).[299]

 

Apparently John was Captain of the Sloop “Dolphin.”  “The American Weekly Mercury” newspaper reported, “Perth Amboy, 30 Oct. 1724, Entered Inwards: John Hance and John Leonard from Rhode Island” and “Perth Amboy, 3 Feb. 1725, Outward Bound: John Leonard for Rhode Island.”[300]

 

On 12 July 1727 the administration of John’s estate was granted to his widow, Margaret Leonard (B:51).[301]

 

John & Margaret Leonard were the parents of THOMAS LEONARD born ca. 1715.  He was a prominent citizen of Freehold, residing on Lahaway creek, near its junction with Crosswicks Creek, on the place where his father was murdered.

 

On 1 Aug. 1757 Thomas Leonard of Freehold encouraged the publication of “A New American Magazine” and on 12 Oct. 1758 Mr. Thomas Leonard at Freehold Court House encouraged the printing of “A second Volume of the Laws of the Province of New Jersey.”[302]

 

Thomas was a loyalist during the Revolution, and as early as 3 Apr. 1775, the Committee of Inspection for the Township of Freehold decided that he had “in a number of instances been guilty of a breach of the Continental Association, and that, pursuant to the tenour of said Association, every friend of true freedom ought immediately to break off all connexion and dealings with him, the said Leonard, and treat him as a foe to the rights of British America.” (Fig.11)[303] He narrowly escaped arrest once by disguising himself as a negro, and so passed out from his home forever.  He was a Major in the First Battalion of New Jersey Loyalists in 1778.  He went to New York, and after the war removed with his family to St. John, New Brunswick, where he was granted Lot No. 1 in Parr Town (afterwards incorporated in St. John), in 1783. His property in Monmouth County was confiscated, and in 1779 was sold to Gen. David Forman, of Revolutionary fame.[304]

 

Another source states that Major Thomas Leonard was born ca. 1715 and lived at Greenwich Farm, five miles from Freehold, Monmouth Co., NJ.  For many years he was High Sheriff of Monmouth, his native county, and lived well on his considerable property.  He was a prisoner on parole for two years early in the War, apparently while holding the rank of Major in the 1st New Jersey Volunteers.

 

A schedule of his property includes an estate inherited from his uncle, Thomas Leonard, Esquire, deceased.  John Thompson and Cornelius Thompson, “gentlemen,” of Monmouth Co., testified at New York in Aug. 1783 to their personal knowledge of the Leonard property.  His estate in Monmouth Co., forfeited 13 May 1779, was sold for £5,456. 14. 9., in New Jersey currency.

 

Major Leonard’s name is on the list of Seconded officers.  He claimed £1,590 and was allowed £1,210.  His place of residence in 1786 was Parrsborough in Nova Scotia.[305]

 

A further source has Thomas Leonard living in Freehold, NJ for many years but obliged to flee.  He joined the Army shortly after landing on Staten Island. Appointed Major of the 1st Battalion of N.J. Volunteers, he was ordered to the Jerseys. When the German troops were captured at Trenton, Major Leonard was exceedingly ill in bed.  He was taken prisoner and held for two years before he was exchanged.  Upon his return to the British lines, he found that his Corps had been reformed.  Unprovided for, Major Leonard was retired on half pay for the remainder of the war.  In far advanced life, he was in great want.  Memorial by attorney William Taylor 10 Feb. 1784 London, for claimant, now in N.S. Claim: 70 acres and house half-mile from Freehold, purchased from John Conk and John Vaneleaf; farm of 370 acres called Greenwich and house where he lived about five miles from Freehold, purchased from Joel Bordon and John Williams; 30 acres of woodland two miles from Freehold, purchased from Cornelius Barchelow; 70 acres of pine land at Yellow Brook, seven miles from Freehold, held by deed of gift from father; 100 acres and common house at South Amboy and farm of 300 acres at Amwell, Hunterdon Co., devised to him by will of uncle Thomas Leonard; negroes; cattle, etc. Evidences: Copy of inquisition and proceedings of June 1778.  Deposition 25 Aug. 1783 N.Y.C. by John Thompson and Cornelius Thompson that they know claimant’s property and have valued it.[306]

 

Yet a fourth source states that at a 27 Mar. 1779 sale, John Schenck bought Thomas Leonard’s property which had been confiscated.  Thomas had been a Freehold merchant.  He became a major in the Royalist service and was taken prisoner by the Americans in 1777 and confined at Easton, PA.  At the close of the war he went to St. John, New Brunswick.[307]

 

Finally, by an 18 Apr. 1778 “Act for taking charge or leasing the real estate and for forfeiting the personal estates of certain fugitives and offenders” notice was given that the real and personal estates belonging to Thomas Leonard and others of the township of Freehold were to be sold.[308]

 

vii.    SARAH LEONARD,[309] born 26: 4M: 1663 in Lynn, MA,[310] married JOB THROCKMORTON 2 Feb. 1683/4 in Freehold, NJ (2 Feb. 1684/5 in Middletown by Peter Tilton?), died 5 Feb. 1743/4, aged 83 years, 8 months, 6 days, buried 7 Feb. in Christ Churchyard, Shrewsbury. Witnesses to the wedding were Henry Leonard, William Hunt, Samuel, John & Mary Leonard, Rebecca Tilton and Anne Hunt.[311]  Job was born 30 Sept. 1650 in Providence, RI, died 20 Aug. 1709 intestate, aged 58 years, 10 months, 21 days, buried in the Throckmorton-Lippit-Taylor burying ground near Middletown, NJ.  Frances G. Sitherwood photographed both tombstones in 1909.  Job was a son of John & Rebecca Throckmorton. Witnesses to the marriage of Job & Sarah were Henry Leonard, Samuel Leonard, John Leonard, Mary Leonard, William Hunt, Anne Hunt and Rebecca Tilton.

 

At the age of 16 Job (and his elder brother John) came to Monmouth County from Rhode Island. On 18 Nov. 1676 Job Throckmorton obtained a survey for 140 acres and on Nov. 23 of the same year a patent for the same land.  Job drew Lot No. 22 in the division of land at Middletown 30 Dec. 1667 and the next day he drew Lot No. 36.  He was one of the Proprietors of East Jersey and a man of prominence and property.  Included in the list of his land purchases and sales is the 20 Jan. 1700 purchase by Job Throckmorton of Shrewsbury, gent., from Nath: Leonard of Middletown (see ¶ii above) “all those Tracts of Land and Meadow Situated…at Colts Neck beginning at a white oak marked on four sides, &c., 220 acres….Together with all manner of Houses, Edifices, buildings, fences, fields, improvements, Trees, wood, water, etc.  1701, June 7: Quit Rent, 610 acres.”

 

On 18 Aug. 1690 Job Throckmorton gave power of attorney to his brother (i.e., brother-in-law) Samuel Leonard (see ¶i. above), to collect debts due to Job’s deceased brother Joseph Throckmorton.[312]

 

On 11 Oct. 1693 Job testified as witness to his brother John’s will.

 

In 1693 he represented Middletown in the General Assembly.

 

In 1705 Job & Sarah Throckmorton of Shrewsbury conveyed lands to Daniel Applegate.

 

An inventory of the goods and chattles of Job Throckmorton of Shrewsbury, deceased, totaled £90-00-00.  The inventory was taken by Henry Leonard, David Kilby & William Leeds, Jun.  On 8 June 1711 widow Sarah Throgmorton and John Throgmorton (Sarah’s son) were appointed administrators “of all and singular Goods, etc.” of the deceased Jobe Throgmorton. Fellow bondsmen were Henry Leonard and John Powell (1:321).[313]

 

Widow Sarah probably made her home with her son John.

 

The children of Job & Sarah (Leonard) Throckmorton were:

 

a.       SARAH THROCKMORTON, born 2nd mo. 2, 1684/5, married (1) JOHN POWELL ca. 1702/3, married (2) Dr. WILLIAM NICHOLS of Freehold, died 6 Apr. 1755, aged 70 years, 2 months, 4 days.  William was born 23 Oct. 1685 in Dublin, Ireland, died 9 Apr. 1743 in Freehold, age 58. William and Sarah had no children. William had married (1) a daughter of William Smith of New York. He was a “Practicioner of Physic and Chirugery. A gentleman of great experience and moderation in his Practice.” William & Sarah were both buried in Old Topanemus Cemetery near Marlboro, NJ.

 

John & Sarah had a son WILLIAM POWELL who died in Nov. 1720 (1721?), age 18. John died 8 June 1728, aged about 40 years.  He and his son were buried in the “Ancient Throckmorton-Lippit-Taylor Burying Ground” near Middletown.

 

Dr. William Nichols was High Sheriff of Monmouth Co. from May 1722 until at least 1727.  On 12 Oct. William witnessed the will of his brother-in-law John Throckmorton (see ¶b. below).  In his will, written 24 Nov. 1729 and proved 21 Apr. 1743 William bequeathed to George Morrison, a nephew of his first wife, all of his estate which had belonged to him and his first wife. To Sarah, he the residue of his estate and, in case George Morrison died before age 21 without issue, the above bequest.  He appointed Sarah to be his sole executrix.  Witnesses to his will were James Reid, Amice Grandin and Danll Grandin.

Sarah’s will was executed 27 Mar. 1755 and proved 1 July of the same year.  In it she bequeathed:

-        To brother Joseph Throckmorton “20 pound like money at Eaight shill. Pr. Ounce” (see ¶d. below).

-        To Sarah, John, Rachel, Amos & Daniel Grandin, children of my sister Patience Grandin, deceased, 40 pounds apiece.

-        To Hartness & Martille (Myrtilla) Throckmorton, children of my brother Samuel Throckmorton, 17 pounds apiece (see ¶g. below).

-        To John, Samuel & Philip Grandin, children of my sister Mary Grandin, deceased, respectively 17, 17 & 20 pounds apiece (see ¶e. below).

-        To my sister Rebackah holmes £17 (see ¶c. below).

-        To John Throckmorton, son of my brother John, deceased, £20 (see ¶b. below).

-        To John, William, Thomas, Mary fouster, wife of Reuben fouster, Daniel, Job, Rebackah, Lewis and Joseph Throckmorton Thourty Pounds Equely Devided and to said Daniel Throckmorton my Bay Mare (a negro boy?) and to said William Throckmorton 17 Pounds.

-        To Elizabeth Throckmorton, Dotter of Job Throckmorton, deceased, Ten Shillings.

-        To An Applegate the sum of £4.

-        To brother Samuel Throckmorton all the Remainder of my Bonds together with the twelf Pound one shilling & six pence after paying the above Leageses he Paying the Doctor’s charge he Paying my funeral and tomb stone (see ¶g.  below).

-        To Philip Grandin, son of my sister Mary Grandin, the Remainder of my Estate, he paying my Dets, putting a headstone to my father and mother, my husband John Powell and my son (see ¶e. below).

She appointed Samuel Throckmorton and Daniel Grandin to be her Executors.  Witnesses to the will were Thomas & Mary Leonard and John Vancleave.

 

b.      Judge JOHN THROCKMORTON, born 10 Aug. 1688 in Middletown, married (1) MARY STILLWELL ca. 1712, married (2) ABIGAIL (HICKS) TALLMAN 12 (8?) Oct. 1740 by Mr. Miln, died 31 Oct. 1741, age 53 years, 2 months, 21 days, buried in Shrewsbury.  Mary was born ca. 1690, died 3 (5?) Feb. 1738/9, about 49 years of age.  Mary was a daughter of Capt. Jeremiah & Sophia Stillwell.  Both John and Mary were buried in Christ Churchyard, Shrewsbury. Abigail Hicks was the widow of James Tallman, whom she had married 8 br, 27, 1712 when both were residents of Long Island.

 

At the 28 May 1706 Court of General Quarter Sessions held at Shrewsbury Mary Daniel on oath said that John Throckmorton was the father of her bastard child and “Nobody Else.”  John and Job Throckmorton as surety, in the sum of  £50, agree to maintain the child and keep harmless the town of Freehold.

 

On 21 Jan. 1718 John Throckmorton bought 100 acres of land in the Eastern Division of New Jersey for 10 lb. current silver money.  Also in 1718 John & Mary Throckmorton of Shrewsbury conveyed land to Peter Tilton.  In 1722, 1728 and 1738 John was a Justice in Monmouth Co.

 

John was Colonel of the Militia of the Province of Monmouth Co. in 1735 and 1739.  On 18 Apr. 1740 he was appointed to take names of persons willing to enlist in His Majesties name to take service.  In 1738 he was vestry-man at Christ Church, Shrewsbury and was named in the charter granted 3 June of that year by Gov. Burnet for King George II.

 

Apparently John & Mary employed servants.  Advertisements in “The American Weekly Mercury” for June 11-18, 1724 and Sept. 8-15, 1726 contained advertisements by John Throckmorton of Shrewsbury offering rewards for return of run-away servants. The latter involved a watch-maker by trade.  “Whoever shall take up the said Servant and secure him, and give notice to the Printer hereof, or to Nathaniel Leonard Esq. At Trent Town, so as his Master may have him again, shall have Forty-Shillings if taken in New Jersey, but if out of the Jerseys Three Pounds Reward and Reasonable Charges paid by me.”[314]

 

In his will written 12 Oct. 1741 and proved 11 Nov. of the same year (C:461), Judge John Throckmorton of Shrewsbury, yeoman and sick, bequeathed:

-        To his wife Abigail £50.

-        To his mother Sarah Throckmorton £10 per annum.

-        To sons Job and Joseph his land in Shrewsbury.

-        To son Job, the farm on which I now live in Shrewsbury including the farm I purchased of John Williams, a meadow laying to the southwest of Wintopock bog purchased by my father of Nathan Leonard, etc., with Job paying his two brothers Samuel and James the sum of £600.

-        To son John approximately 600 acres of land in Middlesex Co. he had purchased from Robt Lueting and William Bradford of New York.

-        To son Joseph the remainder of his lots of land and meadows in Shrewsbury.  Joseph to pay son James £100 when he (James) becomes 21.

-        To sons Job & Joseph his lands at Colt’s Neck which my father bought of Nathaniel Leonard[315]

-        To daughter Mary Leonard £100.

-        To son James £100 when he 21.

-        To daughter Sarah £250 when she 18.

-        To daughter Elizabeth £250 when she 18.

John appointed his brothers Joseph & Job Throckmorton and Thomas Morford to be his Executors.

Witnesses to the will were parthenay Cook, Wm  Nichols (see ¶a. above) and Richd  Salter.

 

The inventory of the estate of John Throckmorton, Esq., late of Shrewsbury, dec’d, taken 10 Nov. 1741 by John Campbell, Jonathan Forman and Jno. Forman amounted to £1,259-3-7.  It was filed 16 Mar. 1742/3.  The inventory included sword, 4 negroes (£180), 92 head of cattle, 13 horses, 35 sheep, 32 hogs, 3 guns etc.

 

The children of John & Mary (Stillwell) Throckmorton were:

 

o       JOB THROCKMORTON of Colts Neck, born 24 Apr. 1714 (1715?) in Shrewsbury, married his cousin HANNAH ASHTON, died 23 Apr. 1748, aged 33 years, 11 months, 29 days, buried Christ Churchyard, Shrewsbury.

 

o        MARY THROCKMORTON, born 16 Apr. 1716, married SAMUEL LEONARD, Jr. of Freehold, NJ (see ¶i.b. above) 4 Mar. 1734, died 16 Dec. 1782.

 

o        JOHN THROCKMORTON, born 20 Feb. 1718 in Shrewsbury, married his cousin SARAH HOLMES 24 (28?) Dec. 1739, died intestate in Amwell, NJ, in 1776.  Sarah was a daughter of Jonathan & Rebecca (Throckmorton) Holmes (see ¶c. below). John witnessed Henry Leonard’s 1739 will (see ¶ i.a. above).

 

o        JOSEPH THROCKMORTON, born 19 June 1720 in Shrewsbury, married MARY FORMAN 4 May 1747, died 12 Nov. 1800, age 80 years, 3 months, 24 days. Mary died 7 Aug. 1766.  She was a daughter of Capt. John & Jane (Wyckoff) Forman. Both Joseph & Mary were buried in Christ Churchyard, Shrewsbury. Joseph & Mary had 8 children.

 

o        SAMUEL THROCKMORTON, born 6 July 1723 in Shrewsbury, married CATHERINE FRANSES (FRANCIS) 4 (1?) Nov. 1755 by Rev. Vease, died 29 Dec. 1786 at Trenton, buried in the Episcopal Churchyard there.

 

o        JAMES THROCKMORTON, born 23 May 1726 at Shrewsbury, married ROSINA (ROZINA/ROZI ANN/ROSSANNAH) VAN NOTE (VUMOST) 2 Jan. 1767 (7 Jan. 1787?), died before 10 Sept. 1782.  On that date Rozina Throckmorton, late Shrewsbury, Widdow, “procured and had a Quantity of Provisions, to wit, cheese and Fowls, and with intention to traitorously convey the same to the Subjects and Troops of the said King of Great Britain & did so.”

 

o        SARAH THROCKMORTON, born 10 Jan. 1727 (16 Jan. 1727/8), married JONATHAN FORMAN 11 Feb. 1745, died 11 July 1787, aged 59 years, 6 months, 24 days, buried Christ Churchyard.  Jonathan died 20 May 1758, buried Old Scots Presbyterian Graveyard, Marlboro Twp., Monmouth Co.

 

o        ELIZABETH THROCKMORTON, born 20 Dec. 1731, married Capt. JOHN STEVENSON at Christ Church, Shrewsbury, 17 June 1754, died between 13 June 1813 and 15 Jan. 1817.

 

c.       REBEKAH THROCKMORTON, born 10 Feb. 1690/1, married JONATHAN HOLMES ca. 1715/16, died 10 Nov. 1761, aged 70 years, 9 months.  Jonathan, born 1682, died 26 Dec. 1766, aged about 85 years & 6 months.  He was a son of Jonathan & Sarah (Borden) Homes. Jonathan married (1) Deliverance Ashton, cousin of Rebekah.[316] Both Jonathan and Rebekah were interred in the Old Topanemus burying-ground.

 

The children of Jonathan & Rebekah (Throckmorton) Holmes were:

 

o       SARAH HOLMES, born 18 Aug. 1717, married JOHN THROCKMORTON (see ¶b. above).

 

o        JOSEPH HOLMES, born 26 Nov. 1721, died 23 Mar. 1738, buried Old Topanemus.

 

o        SAMUEL HOLMES, born 4 Oct. 1726, married MOLLY (MARY) STOUT in 1749, died 29 Nov. 1769.  Molly was a granddaughter of Richard & Penelope Stout.

 

o        JOHN HOLMES, born 27 July 1730, died unmarried 26 Aug. (Mar.?) 1804.

 

o        REBECCA HOLMES, born 4 Mar. 1734, married GILBERT TICE of Freehold 2 Mar. 1756, died 24 June 1757, buried in Old Topanemus alongside her brother Joseph.

 

o        OBADIAH HOLMES.

 

d.      JOSEPH THROCKMORTON, born 14 Aug. 1693 in Middletown, married ALICE COX ca. 1716, died 6 Aug. 1759, aged 65 years, 11 months, 12 days, buried in Christ Churchyard, Shrewsbury (Topanemus Graveyard, Marlboro?).  Alice was born 30 May 1696, the eldest daughter of James & Ann Cox.

 

On 22 Apr. 1748 Joseph’s brother Job (see ¶f. below) deeded to him a piece of Bogg meadow on the east side of Mine Brook that had been granted Job in his father’s will. 

 

In 1756 Joseph inherited 20 pounds from his sister Mrs. Sarah Nichols (see ¶a. above).

 

On 16 Mar. 1756 at a council held at Elizabeth Town his Excellency nominated Joseph Throck Morton to be appointed Justice of the Peace in Monmouth Co.

 

In his will written 1 Aug. 1759 Joseph Throckmorton of Middletown instructed “that all my Real & Personal Estate (Except one Bed & Furniture for ye use of my wife) be sold by my Executors and a good Living for my wife to be kept In ye hands of my Executors for her use as She shall have Necesity During her widowhood or Natural life.”  He bequeathed:

        To son John and daughters Rebecca, Alice, Catherine & Mary each £30.

        To sons, Job and John his Wearing apparel & Arms.

        Remainder of estate to be equally divided amongst the children of daughters Sarah, Ann & Patience and daughters Rebecca, Alice, Catherine & Mary and son John.

He appointed son Job and friend John Campbell Junr of Freehold Twp. to be his Executors.

Witnesses to the will were John Stout, Jonathan Stout and John Mount Junr.  It was proved 30 Aug. 1759.[317]

 

The inventory taken 14 Aug. 1759 totaled £435-17-11.

 

The children of Joseph and Alice Throckmorton were:

 

o       SARAH THROCKMORTON, born 29 July 1718, married STEPHEN HEAVILAND, Sr., of Monmouth Co. as his 2nd wife by license dated 20 (30?) Apr. 1748.

 

o        JOB THROCKMORTON, born 10 Dec. 1720 in Middletown, married MARY MORFORD 7 Apr. 1743, died 2 Feb. 1765.  Mary was born 22 May 1723, died 19 Apr. 1790.  She was a daughter of Thomas & Sarah (Stillwell) Morford.  Both Job & Mary are buried in Old Topanemus. Lynn Sherman (gls1941@yahoo.com) is a descendant of this line.

 

In Nov. 1742 Job was living at Freehold and “belonged to the gentry of the Freehold neighborhood.”

 

About 1763 Job made a subscription toward paying a debt on St. Peter’s Episcopal Church at Freehold where he was a member and his children were baptized.

 

o        ANN THROCKMORTON, born 31 Jan. 1722/3, baptized publicly 14 Apr. 1754 at Freehold, probably married JOSIAH HALSTEAD 20 May 1755, died 14 Nov. 1760, buried Christ Churchyard, Shrewsbury.

 

o        JOSEPH THROCKMORTON, born 24 Oct. 1724, died 21 Feb. 1725.

 

o        JOSEPH THROCKMORTON, born 18 Dec. 1725, died 8 Apr. 1752 age 26 years, 3 months, 20 days, buried Old Topanemus.

 

o        REBECKAH THROCKMORTON, born 5 May 1727, married SAMUEL ELLIT/ELLIOT, died after 1782.

 

o        PATIENCE THROCKMORTON, born 8 Dec. 1728, married DANIEL WOOLLEY of Shrewsbury 8 May 1758.

 

o        ALICE (ELSE) THROCKMORTON, born 25 June 1731.  In 1776 she was assessed in Freehold for 17 acres and two horses.  Value was £12.  She died single prior to 1782.

 

o        CATHERINE THROCKMORTON, born 6 Mar. 1732/3, married RICHARD NORRIS of Shrewsbury 19 Oct. 1765.

 

o        JAMES THROCKMORTON, born 26 Nov. 1734, baptized 3 Aug. 1735, probably died young.

 

o        MARY THROCKMORTON, born 20 July 1738, baptized with her younger brother John 9 Feb. 1746 at Christ Church, Shrewsbury, married EATON NORRIS of Shrewsbury 3 Sept. 1767.

 

o        JOHN THROCKMORTON, born 24 Feb. 1741/2, baptized with his sister Mary 9 Feb. 1746.  His father bequeathed him £30, a gun, wearing apparel, etc.

 

e.       MARY THROCKMORTON, born 1695, married DANIEL GRANDIN ca. 1719/20, died 26 Oct. 1739.  Daniel was born 1694 in Isle of Jersey of French Huguenot parents.  He was a “Practitioner of Law.” For £5 and natural love and affection Daniel Grandin, practitioner of law at Freehold, conveyed lands in Freehold to his sister-in-law Sarah Powell of Freehold, widow (see ¶a. above).

 

In 1733 Daniel Grandin, attorney at law, mortgaged land in Upper Freehold to the Land Commissioners.  Daniel was a Loyalist Associator at New York in 1782.  He removed to Shelburne, Nova Scotia, the following year with his family of three persons.

 

The children of Daniel & Mary (Throckmorton) Grandin were:

 

o        JOHN GRANDIN, born 28 Apr. 1721, married ABIGAIL LIPPINCOT 19 Mar. 1747/8, died 25 Aug. 1777.  Abigail died 18 Mar. 1788.  John & Abigail resided in Hunterdon Co., New Jersey.  He was a magistrate. Both are buried at Kingwood (Quakertown) Friends’ Cemetery.

 

o        DANIEL GRANDIN, born 11 May 1723 in Freehold, married his cousin SARAH THROCKMORTON 20 Sept. 1749 at Christ Church, Shrewsbury.  Sarah was born 1 Nov. 1721, died 1 Feb. 1761. She was a daughter of Job & Frances (Stout) Throckmorton (see ¶f. below).  Daniel was probably a Loyalist officer in the New Jersey Royal Brigade.  Both Daniel & Sarah were buried in the Topanemus graveyard.

 

The children of Daniel & Sarah (Throckmorton) Grandin were:

 

·        MARY GRANDIN, born 23 Oct. 1749 (1750?), baptized 8 Nov. 1751, married CORNELIUS CLARK 25 Jan. 1769, died 9 Aug. 1836 in Sherburne, Chenango Co., NY.  Cornelius was born 9 Apr. 1746 in Freehold, died 10 May 1810 in Sherburne.  He was a son of John & Anna (Van Dorn) Clark.

 

Cornelius took part in the battle of Monmouth which was fought near his farm.  Mary watched it from the door of her farm and saw Gen. Washington.  The Clarks later left Freehold and wandered to Schoharie Co., NY, and then to Sherburne.

 

·        WILLIAM GRANDIN, born 4 May 1751, privately baptized 8 Mar. 1751/2, married AME LEWIS 11 Mar. 1783, died 6 June 1813 in Pultneyville, Wayne Co., NY.  Ame was born 7 May 1764, died 4 Aug. 1853 in Pultneyville.  She was a daughter of William & Abigail Lewis.  William & Ame removed to Williamson, Wayne Co., NY as early as 1808.

 

·        JOB GRANDIN, born 5 Jan. 1753, died 3 Aug. 1774, buried in Old Topanemus.

 

·        SARAH GRANDIN, born 29 Oct. 1754, married SAMUEL COOPER, died Jan. 1813, age 58.

 

·        RACHEL GRANDIN, born 24 Oct. 1756, married WILLIAM JACKSON 2 Oct. 1790, died 10 Feb. 1793.

 

·        DANIEL GRANDIN, born 29 July 1758, died Nov. 1760, buried in Old Topanemus Graveyard.

 

·        JOHN GRANDIN, born July 1760, died 31 May 1761, buried in Old Topanemus Graveyard.

 

o        WILLIAM GRANDIN died 1 Oct. 1747.  He resided in Trenton, N.J.

 

o        SAMUEL GRANDIN, married SUSANNAH JOHNSON (JOHNSTON?) 22 (23?) Dec. 1752, died in 1776 at Flanders, N.J. Susannah was born 8 July 1729, daughter of Hon. Samuel Johnston, Colonial Judge of Hunterdon Co., N.J. and Sara Oakley. Samuel was a distinguished lawyer and during the Revolutionary War, a prominent Tory. His effigy was burned by the Whigs in 1776 according to a diary kept by his daughter Susan.

 

In March 1765 and again in July 1766, Samuel Grandine applied for a license to keep a public house.  Samuel and Susannah had a daughter SUSAN GRANDIN who married Colonel (or Squire) JOHN de CAMP.

 

PHILIP GRANDIN, born 14 Aug. 1731, married ELEANOR FORMAN 18 Mar. 1753, died 23 Feb. 1791.  Philip and his brother John removed to Hunterdon Co., NJ, where they owned 1,000 acres of land in the valley of Raritan with slaves and mills. The children of Philip & Eleanor (Forman) Grandin included:

 

·        MARY GRANDIN, married JOHN VOUGHT of Clinton, NY, died 29 Mar. 1831.  John was born 6 Aug. 1750, died 7 Sept. 1803 in Duanesburg, NY.[318]

 

o        MARY GRANDIN, born 20 Oct. 1736.

 

o        JOB GRANDIN, born 19 Oct. 1739, died 26 Oct. 1739.

 

o        JOSEPH GRANDIN, born 19 Oct. 1739, died 26 Oct. 1739.

 

f.        JOB THROCKMORTON, born ca. 1696 in Middletown, married FRANCES STOUT ca. 1720 in Shrewsbury, died 22 Feb. 1747 intestate, buried 24 Feb. 1747 in Christ Churchyard, Shrewsbury.  Frances was probably a daughter of John & Elizabeth (Crawford) Stout.[319] Frances was born 1700 in Freehold, married (1) Samuel L. Breeze.  Both Job and Frances were baptized 9 Feb. 1746 at Christ Church, Shrewsbury.[320]

 

On 22 Mar. 1719 John Powell and Job Throckmorton, both of Freehold, yeoman signed a bond (note?) to Gabriel Stylle, merchant, for £77-3-0.  If either payed Steele £38-11-6 before 1 May 1721, then the bond to be null and void.  Then in the August 1734 Term of the Supreme Court Gabriel Steele by Fenwick Lyell, his attorney, sued Job Throckmorton for an obligation of £77-3-0 which Job refused to pay.  Joseph Murray was Job’s attorney.

 

In 1734 Job Throckmorton, yeoman, mortgaged land in Freehold bounded by land formerly belonging to Samuel Leonard.

 

On 25 July 1748 Frances Throckmorton, widdow and relick of Job Throckmorton of said Freehold, late Deceased who died intestate Do Renounce and Relinquish my Right of Administrating the Sd Deceased’s Estate and Desire that the Same may be Granted to my Eldest Son John Throckmorton. Witness was Elizabeth Dennis.  Bond of John Throckmorton, yeoman, of Freehold, Samuel Throckmorton of same place, yeoman, fellow bondsman.  Witnesses Jonathan Burdy and Elizabeth Dennis.[321]

 

The children of Job & Frances (Stout) Throckmorton were:

 

o       SARAH THROCKMORTON, born 1 Nov. 1721 in Middletown, married her cousin DANIEL GRANDIN 20 Sept. 1749 at Christ Church, Shrewsbury, died 1 Feb. 1761.  Daniel was born 11 May 1723, died 1 Nov. 1790. He was a son of Daniel, Sr., & Mary (Throckmorton) Grandin (see ¶e. above).  Both Daniel & Sarah were buried in Old Topanemus Graveyard.

 

Daniel was one of the executors of his Aunt Sarah Nichols in 1755 (see ¶a. above) and was administrator of the estate of his Uncle Samuel Throckmorton in 1758 (see ¶   ).  Daniel gave £5 to Topanemus Church in 1763.

 

Daniel wrote his will 24 June 1790.  In it he mentioned his daughter Mary, wife of Cornelius Clark, to whom he left 20 shillings.  His executors were his “beloved children – William, Sarah and Rachel Grandin.”

 

o        MARY THROCKMORTON, born ca. 1725, married REUBEN FOSTER 21 June 1750.  Reuben was born ca. 1725.  For further information see my Throckmorton article, Part I, #2, p. 7.

 

o        JOHN THROCKMORTON, born ca. 1724 (1728?) in Freehold, married LYDIA WEST, died 1775 in Freehold.  For further information see my Throckmorton article, Part I, #4 (should be #3), p. 7.

 

o        WILLIAM THROCKMORTON, born 27 Jan. (June?) 1730 in Freehold, married SARAH GILLETT 26 Dec. 1759 at the First Presbyterian Church, Morristown, NJ, died Oct. 1796 in Berkeley Co., VA (now WV).  Sarah was born 2 Apr. 1742 in Morris Co., NJ, daughter of Elijah & Jane Gillett.  For further information see my Throckmorton article, Part I, #4, p. 7 – Part II, p. 10.

 

o        THOMAS THROCKMORTON, born ca. 1732 in Freehold, married MIRIAM [-?-] before 1762 in Roxbury, Morris Co., died in the spring of 1763.

 

Thomas removed to Roxbury, Morris Co., before 1762.  On 28 Sept. 1762 he presented a petition to keep a public house.

 

On 13 Feb. 1763 Thomas wrote his will which was proved 3 May 1763.  Son Thomas to receive when he reaches the age of 5 years, which will be in 1768, one-half of the joint movable estate of his father Thomas, and one-half of the remainder which belongs to Thomas’ brother Daniel (i.e., uncle), and the balance of the estate at the age of twenty one; testator’s wife Merium all that she brought upon her marriage, etc.; brothers and sisters contingent legatees, i.e., John, William, Daniel, Job, Lewis, Mary Foster and Rebecca Throckmorton.  The executors were wife Merium Throckmorton, Hartshorn Fitz Randolph and Job Throckmorton.  Witnesses were Benjamin Heard, John Throckmorton, and Benjamin Hart.  His inventory was made 7 Mar. 1763/4 and amounted to £945-5-7.

 

The only child of Thomas & Miriam Throckmorton was THOMAS THROCKMORTON, born before 13 Feb. 1763.

 

For further information, see my Throckmorton article, Part II, #5, p. 10.

 

o        DAVID THROCKMORTON, baptized 11 May 1735 at the Freehold Chapel of Christ Church, Shrewsbury.[322] David lived in Freehold.  He probably died young.

 

o        DANIEL THROCKMORTON, born 1734/1736 in Freehold, baptized 9 Feb. 1746, married RACHEL [-?-], died 26 Sept. 1798 in Hampshire Co., VA.  Rachel was born ca. 1751.

 

For further information, see my Throckmorton article, Part II, #7, pp. 10-26.

 

o        JOB THROCKMORTON, born ca. 1740 in Freehold, baptized Christ Church, Shrewsbury 9 Feb. 1746, married MARY RUSSELL 10 Nov. 1769, accidentally drowned 19 Nov. 1800 in Monmouth Co.  Mary was born ca. 1750, died 23 May 1840.

 

For further information, see my Throckmorton article, Part III, #8, p. 1.

 

o        REBECCA THROCKMORTON, born ca. 1742/3 in Freehold, baptized 9 Feb. 1746 at Christ Church, Shrewsbury, married CHARLES DUMAS (DEMOSS) ca. 1765, died after 1792.

 

For further information, see my Throckmorton article, Part III, #9, p. 1.

 

o        LEWIS THROCKMORTON, born 9 Feb. 1745/6, baptized 9 Feb. 1746 in Christ Church, Shrewsbury, married RACHEL DEMOSS 1766-1770 near Deer Creek, Garrett Co., MD, died ca. 1799 in Hampshire Co., VA.

 

For further information, see my Throckmorton article, Part III, #10, pp. 1-13 and Part IV, pp. 1-7.

 

o        JOSEPH THROCKMORTON was privately baptized 26 Aug. 1746 in Christ Church, Shrewsbury, probably went to Virginia, probably died 1755-1763.

 

For further information, see my Throckmorton article, Part IV, #11, p. 7.

 

o        ELIZABETH THROCKMORTON, probably married JAMES HANKINSON 25 May 1757.  Elizabeth was mentioned in the 1755 will of Sarah Nichols (see ¶a. above).

 

g.       SAMUEL THROCKMORTON, born 4 July 1706 in Middletown, married MARY WEST before 1729, died intestate 21 July 1758, buried Christ Churchyard, Shrewsbury.  Mary was baptized 28 Aug. 1747 in Christ Church and was buried 21 Aug. 1766 in Shrewsbury.  She was a daughter of Mary West.

 

On 16-17 Apr. 1730 Samuel Throckmorton of Freehold advertised in the “American Weekly Mercury” a reward of forty shillings and reasonable charges for the return of a servant man named Edward Holland.

 

On 31 Dec. 1741 Samuel Throckmorton witnessed the will of Aaron Forman of Freehold.

 

Samuel Throckmorton was named an executor of the 1755 will of his sister Sarah Nichols (see ¶a. above).

 

Daniel Grandin (see ¶e. above) was granted papers of administration on Samuel Throckmorton’s estate 15 Dec. 1758.

 

Mary Throckmorton, widow, was named administratrix of her mother, Mary West, 17 Apr. 1759, Monmouth Co.

 

The children of Samuel & Mary (West) Throckmorton were:

 

o        SARAH THROCKMORTON, born 18 Feb. 1730, died unmarried 3 June 1756, aged 26 years, 3 months, 15 days, buried 6 June at Christ Churchyard.

 

o        HARTNESS THROCKMORTON, born 21 Aug. 1735, baptized “7:28:1735 of Freehold at Topanemus,” married SUSANNA WILLIAMS of Freehold 21 Apr. 1757, died 22 Aug. 1760, aged 25 years, 1 day, buried 27 Aug. at Christ Churchyard.  Susanna Throckmorton presumably married (2) Robert Francis of Freehold 8 Apr. 1765 with Samuel Leonard witness.

 

o        SAMUEL THROCKMORTON, privately baptized 7 Oct. 1747, probably died before 27 Mar. 1755.

 

o        JOHN THROCKMORTON, privately baptized 7 Oct. 1747, died 20 Aug. 1749, aged 2 years, 3 months, 18 days, buried 20 Aug. at Christ Churchyard.

 

o        MARTILLA (MYRTILLA) THROCKMORTON, buried at Shrewsbury 4(?) Feb. 1763.  Martilla was mentioned in Sarah Nichols’ will (see ¶a. above).

 

h.       PATIENCE THROCKMORTON, born ca. 1708, married AMICE (AMOS) GRANDIN of Monmouth Co. by license dated 23 Sept. 1732, died before 27 Mar. 1755.  Amice was a brother of Daniel Grandin (see ¶e. above).  Amice was a witness to the 1729 will of Dr. William Nichols (see ¶a. above).

 

Amice & Patience resided in Freehold.  They later removed to Morris Co., NJ, where in July 1796 an Amos Grandine went surety on the petition of Morgan Young for a license to keep a public house.[323]  Their children were:

 

o        SARAH GRANDIN, baptized 11 May 1753 in Freehold.

 

o        JOHN GRANDIN.

 

o        RACHEL GRANDIN.

 

o        AMOS GRANDIN, born 1746 (?), died 13 Jan. 1817, aged 71 years, 9 months, buried Flanders, NJ.

 

o        DANIEL GRANDIN.

 

viii.  MARY LEONARD, born 13: 11m: 1665 in Lynn, MA, died Aug. 1667 in Lynn.[324]

 

2.      JAMES LEONARD

 

James Leonard, born 1620, married (1) JANE [-?-], married (2) MARY MARTIN after 8 Aug. 1641, married (3) MARGARET FORD ca. 1662, died between 27 Aug. and 18 Sept. 1691 in Taunton, Bristol Co., MA.

 

See “James Leonard of Taunton, Mass., Ironmaster” at http://www.usigs.org/library/books/ (under “Families” and “leonarda”) and my companion article “Pre-American Ancestry of our Leonard Ironworkers.”

 

3.      Sgt. PHILIP LEONARD

 

Philip Leonard, born ca. 1630 in England, married LYDIA [-?-], died intestate 3 July 1708 (13 Nov. 1707?)[325] in Marshfield near the Duxbury line, Plymouth Co., MA.  Lydia died 13 Nov. 1707 in Duxbury.[326]

 

The first known record of Philip locates him in Dec. 1652 at the Saugus Iron Works with his brother Henry (see ¶1. above).  In this record payment of six shillings was made to “hennery and phillipe lennard for searching after scott.”  Presumably this action refers to the Scotch prisoners brought to these shores after the Battle of Worcester (1651) and employed in the ironworks.

 

By 1657 Philip was of Taunton when he became a freeman by taking the Oath of Fedelitie.  On 6 Oct. 1659 James Leonard (see ¶2. above) and Phillip Lenard and others, all of Taunton, were warned to appear in court for sundry misdemeanors committed in Taunton.  On 1 May 1662 the estate of Thomas Billington of Taunton was appraised and Jeremiah Newland, Philip Leanard and James Leanard had sums due them by the estate.  On 1 Mar. 1663/4 Henery Green of Taunton was fined 03:04 for breach of the peace by striking Phillip Leanard.

 

Next we find farmer Philip Leonard in Marshfield where Phillip Leanard and others were on 29 Oct. 1669 presented for not “paying theire rate to the ministry,” the verdict being that they must pay as rated last year “and that a constable be payed for his distresse.[327]

 

On 27 Jan. 1671/2 Philip Leanard and Peregrine White took the inventory of the estate of Ralph Chapman, Sr., late of Marshfield (see accompanying article My Line of William Bassets, <1600 – 1670, ¶1.iii.).

 

In the expedition to New York against the Dutch, Phillip Leanard was one of four Sarjeants and was to be paid 3 shillings a day, effective 17 Dec. 1673.

 

On 5 June 1678 Phillip Leanard of Marshfield in the jurisdiction of New Plymouth, nailer, was bound unto the Court in the sum of £30 sterling to pay towards the support of a child he had of Elizabeth Loe, a single woman, until the child attained the age of seven.

 

In Jan. 1680/1 Philip Leonard was named as indebted to the estate of William Sherman of Marshfield in the amount of £7:6:0.

 

On 12 July 1708 Philip’s son-in-law, Samuel Hill, was appointed administrator of Philip’s estate.  The inventory had been taken 8 July by William Carver and Arthur Howland.

 

i.                     The only child of Philip & Lydia Leonard was PHEBE LEONARD.  She married SAMUEL HILLS of Duxbury 6 Nov. 1694. Samuel was born 29 May 1671 in Saybrook, Middlesex Co., CT,  the son of John & Jane (Bushnell) Hills.  Samuel married (2) Abigail Hinchley 25 Feb. 1734/5 in Lebanon, CT.  He died before 22 Oct. 1753 in Lebanon, New London Co., CT.  Most of the following data on the Hills line was kindly supplied by John Hills (Ktbricks@msn.com).

 

In 1708 Samuel Hills inherited from his father-in-law Philip Leonard 40 acres of land.  From 1714 to 1725 he disposed of his land in Duxbury and from 25 May 1726 to Sept. 1727 bought most of  a 100-acre tract in Lebanon from the Gillett family (see accompanying Gillet article, ¶6.i. & ii. and 7.).  With his sons Phillip and Samuel, Jr., Samuel petitioned on 12 Oct. 1727 and in May 1728 for the creation of a new parish in Lebanon.  This parish became the Lebanon Third Church (or Goshen).  Samuel served as a grand juror.  He had been trained as a cordwainer (leather worker – shoes, harness, etc.).

 

Samuel wrote his will 6 Nov. 1748.  It was witnessed by Andrew Churchill, Isiah Tiffany, Jr., and Jon Trumble (later governor of CT?).  He appointed Amos Thomas to be his executor.  The inventory of his estate taken 12 Oct. 1753 by Joseph White and Josiah Bartlett amounted to £281/0/6 and included 2 silver spoons, a silver-tipped cane, 5 books, an English Print Bible and one gun.

 

The children of Samuel and Phebe were all born in Duxbury:

 

a.       ABIGAIL HILLS born 26 May 1697, married WILLIAM BARBRICK (BATHARICK, BATHARACK) 12 Nov. 1735 in Lebanon.  They had no children.

 

b.      PHILLIP HILLS born 8 Aug. 1699, married HANNAH CUTTER (CUTTEN) 7 Feb. 1726/7 in Lebanon, died before 6 Sept. 1748.

 

c.       SAMUEL HILLS born 25 June 1701, married HANNAH TURNER of Marshfield, Plymouth Co., MA, 28 Nov. 1722 in Duxbury, died 14 Feb. 1792.  Hannah was born in 1701, died 17 Mar. 1777 in Lebanon.  She was a daughter of Eliab & Elnathan (Hinksman) Turner.

 

Samuel was a surveyor of highways in 1734.  He was listed as a Lebanon freeman in 1730 and 1739.  On 12 May 1767 Samuel Hill of Lebanon signed his will.  He appointed his son Consider Hill executor.  Witnesses were John Waltrous, Joshua Waltrous & John Waltrous, Jr.  The inventory taken 24 Mar. 1792 by Patrick Butler & Simon Abel indicated the value of the estate to be £53/0/9, including 20 acres of land, farm implements, stock and crops.

 

Samuel and Hannah had 10 children.  The first two were born in Duxbury in 1723 and 1725.  The others in Lebanon, 1726 – 1741.  Their fifth child was SAMUEL HILLS born 28 July 1729, married (1) SARAH LILLIE 28 Oct. 1756 in Lebanon, married (2) THANKFUL ROWLEY 3 Sept. 1767, died 28 Feb. 1803 in Canajoharie, Montgomery Co., NY.  Sarah was born 11 May 1735 in Woodstock, CT, widow of Benjamin Barney, died before 1765 in Colchester, CT.  She was a daughter of Samuel & Mehitable (Bacon) Lillie.  Thankful was baptized 31 Aug. 1740.  My Rowley article, ¶3.vi.g., identifies their children.

 

d.      RICHARD HILLS born 3 Feb. 1703(?), married JEMIMA RAMSDELL 20 Feb. 1728/9, died intestate between 12 Apr. 1773 and 5 Mar. 1779 in Pembroke, MA.

 

e.       EBENEZER HILLS born 6 Dec. 1705, married MARGARET INGRAHAM of Lebanon 28 Oct. 1737 in the First Church, Lebanon.

 

f.        EPHRAIM HILLS born 13 Dec. 1707, married (1) HANNAH BENTLEY 19 Feb. 1736 in the Second Church, Lebanon, married (2) LYDIA [-?-].  Ephraim succeeded to the Samuel Hills home farm in Lebanon, which he sold in 1760.

g.       JOSEPH HILLS born 25 Aug. 1710, died July 1711.

 

h.       LYDIA HILLS born 25 Aug. 1710, married PHINEAS FOSTER 1 May 1735 in Lebanon.

 

4.      SARAH LEONARD

 

Sarah Leonard, baptized 22 Feb. 1633/4 in Publow Parish, Somersetshire,[328] married (1) ROBERT FAIRBANKS in Ireland 27: 6: 1676, married (2) JOHN THOMPSON 4 Feb. 1679 in Salem Co., NJ, died between 23 May 1720 and 25 Oct. 1721.[329] According to the Society of Friends Historical Library in Dublin, Sarah Leonard of County Wexford was married at the house of Robert Cuppage at Lambstown.[330] County Wexford is located at the SE corner of Ireland.  The shortest distance between Wales and Ireland is from Fishguard, Pembrokeshire to Rosslare, Co. Wexford.

 

Robert Fairbanks was born ca. 1632, son of Robert & Elizabeth Fairbanks of Market Harborough, Leicestershire, England.  He went to Ireland in the English army ca. 1651.  By his first marriage, Robert had a daughter Elizabeth who married Henry Stubings.  Robert, his wife Sarah, his daughter Elizabeth and her husband Henry Stubings were among the passengers aboard the ship “Mary” which departed Dublin, Ireland, 16 Sept. 1677 and arrived Elsinborough Point, West New Jersey 22 Dec. 1677.  They settled in Elsinburgh (now Elsinboro, Salem Co.).  In 1675 this area had been colonized by the Quakers.[331] Robert died before 23 Sept., 1678, at which time an inventory of the personal estate of Robert Fairbanck of Elsenbugh, tailor, was made by Richard Guy and Andrew Thompson.  The inventory totaled £36, including 1/20 of a share, £7.  Administration of the estate was granted on 13 Nov. 1682 to John Thompson of Elsenburgh, carpenter “who has married Sarah, the widow of Robert Fairbanks.”[332]

 

John Thompson was born in May 1635 in Kirkfenton, Yorkshire, a son of Thomas & Elizabeth Thompson.  In 1658 Thomas, Elizabeth and their two minor sons removed to Ireland and located near Dublin. John married (1) Jane Humbly in 1665. John and his family emigrated along with Robert Fairbanks and his family aboard the ship “Mary” in 1677.  In John Thompson’s group were also his serving man William Hall and an Andrew Thompson.  Most likely this was the Andrew Thompson who, along with Richard Guy, made the 1682 inventory of the estate of Robert Fairbanks.[333]

 

On 4 Feb. 1679 the declared marriage intention of John Thompson and Sarah Fairbanks was recorded at the Salem (NJ) Monthly Meeting of Friends (i. e., Quakers). John was a farmer and a brewer and an elder of the Quaker church.

 

The will of John Thompson, yeoman of Elsonbourrow, Salem Co., was written 24 Aug. 1715 and proved 27 Jan. 1715/6.  In it were identified wife Sarah, children James, Thomas & Mary Woodnut and grandchildren John, James, Thomas (sons of James) and Sarah (daughter of Thomas) and son-in-law Richard Woodnut.

The 31 Jan. 1715/6 inventory of John’s personal estate amounted to £436/11/2, including a servant man called Satterick Moor (£7) and a Negro man (£15).  The inventory was made by John Mason and Bartholomew Wyatte.

 

The will of Sarah Thompson of Elsinboro, widow, was written 23 May 1720 and probated 25 Oct. 1721 (2:172).  In it Sarah divided her “worldly estate” between:

        Kinsmen Henry Leonard of Cape May (see ¶1.iv.a. above) and Thomas Leonard of East Jersey (see ¶5. below).  Thomas to dispose of his share “according as he shall think fit amongst my relations thereaway.”

        Granddaughters Lydia, daughter of Thomas Thompson, and Mary Thompson.

        Henry, son of Samuel Stubbins.

        John, Jane, Ann, Elizabeth & James, children of James Thompson.

        Rachel Tyler, daughter of Thos. Thompson.

        Children of brother James Leonard (see ¶2. above).

        William Hancock and wife Sarah, residuary legatees and executors.

 

On 24 Oct. 1721 the inventory was determined by John Mason and Andrew Thompson to amount to £131/11/7.[334]

 

From the above, it appears that Sarah had no children of her own.

 

5.      THOMAS LEONARD

 

Thomas Leonard was baptized 20 Apr. 1636 in Publow Parish, Somersetshire, son of Thomas and Elizabeth Leonard, married KATHERINE (KETHERIN) [-?-], died 19 May 1682 – 1st day, 1st month 1682-3. (See my companion article, “Pre-American Ancestry of our Leonard Ironworkers,” child #11)

 

In spite of various theories on how Thomas got to Piscataway, New Jersey, we know that once he got there he took the oath of allegiance to King Charles II in 1665 at Elizabeth, NJ.[335] 

 

In the office of the Register of Colonial Deeds at Trenton, is found a transfer dated July 26, 1677, for sixty acres of land in Woodbridge, from Thomas Leonard to John Jones.  On 19 May 1682 Thomas Leonard of Woodbridge wrote in his will Wife Ketherin and my kinsman Halick Codriack sole heirs. Halick Codriak executor of real and personal estate  Legacy of a 2 year old heifer to the boy, “that now livith with me,” called Thomas Cromwell.  Witnesses to the will were Henry Greenland, John Gilman and Samuel Moore.  The will was proved 1st day, 1st month, 1682/3 in Middlesex Co., NJ (A:22).[336]  Henry Greenland was of Piscataway.

 

Whether it was Thomas who drowned at Piscataway, is not definitely known, though there is a tradition among the New England family that one Thomas Leonard thus met his death.[337]

 

 

 

Revised May 4, 2006          



[1] Rev. Perez Forbes, “Topographical Description of Raynam”  (Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society, 1810), 3:175.

[2] Alonzo Lewis & James R. Newhall, History of Lynn, Essex County, Massachusetts  (1865), 1:207.

[3] Clarence Torrey, New England Marriages Prior to 1700 (1985), 461.

[4] William Nelson, ed., Patents & Deeds & Other Early Records of New Jersey, 1664-1703 (1976), 236 (Deed Book E:392).

[5] G. Marston Leonard’s Descendancy Chart #1 (of 7) compiled 1954 at NEH&GS library; Judy Leonard Anderson, “Henry & James Leonard” (Leonard Lines, Dec. 1991).

[6] E. N. Hartley, Ironworks on the Saugus (1957), 100-109 and Richard S. Dunn, Puritans & Yankees: The Winthrop Dynasty in New England (1962), 87-90.

[7] Alonzo Lewis & James R. Newhall, History of Lynn, Essex County, Massachusetts (1965), 1:206.

[8] William W. Barton, The Establishment of the Iron Industry in America (2001).

[9] E. N. Hartley, Ironworks on the Saugus (1957), 109.

[10] Riddan Account Books, Essex Institute, and E. N. Hartley, 129.

[11] Essex Antiquarian (1902), 6:160-161; Stephen Innes, Creating the Commonwealth: The Economic Culture of Puritan New England (1995), 257-262.

[12] E. N. Hartley, Ironworks on the Saugus (1957), 189 & “Records & Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Massachusetts, 1636-1656” (1911), 1:173-174.

[13] E. N. Hartley, Ironworks on the Saugus (1957), 189; George F. Dow, ed., “Records & Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Massachusetts, 1636-1656 (1911), 1:174..

[14] Essex Antiquarian (1903), 7:23 & 24; George F. Dow, ed., “Records & Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Massachusetts, 1636-1656 (1911), 1:192,194.

[15] Essex Antiquarian (1905), 9:44.

[16] E. N. Hartley, Ironworks on the Saugus (1957), 189 & 273; Arthur H. & Katharine W. Radasch, “John Turner of Lynn, Massachusetts & some of His Descendants” (NEH & GR, 1969), 123:35.

[17] Lynn Iron Works 1650-1685, mss 301, Baker Library, Harvard University, 60 & 107.

[18] E. N. Hartley, Ironworks on the Saugus (1957), 192.

[19] Elizabeth H. Cushing, The Lynn Album: A Pictorial History (1990).

[20] E.N. Hartley, Ironworks on the Saugus (1957), 189.

[21] E.N. Hartley, Ironworks on the Saugus (1957), 176.

[22] H. Hobart Holly, ed., Braintree, Massachusetts, Its History (1985), 42 & 152-153.

[23] Hartley, Ironworks on the Saugus (1957), 121-3, 153 & 176.

[24] Waldo C. Sprague, Genealogy of the Families of Braintree, Massachusetts, 1640-1850  (1983)  (FHL film #1405272).

[25] Hartley, Ironworks on the Saugus (1957), 189.

[26] J.W.D. Hall, “Ancient Iron Works in Taunton” (NEH&GR, 1884), 38:265.

[27] William R. Deane, “Genealogical Memoir of the Leonard Family,” (NEH & GR, 1851), 5:404-405; H. Hobart Holly, ed., Braintree, Massachusetts and Its History (1985), 42 & 152-3.

[28] J.W.D. Hall, “Ancient Iron Works in Taunton” (NEH&GR, 1884), 38:266.

[29] Barrett B. Russell, “The Descendants of John Russell of Dartmouth, Massachusetts” (NEH&GR, 1904), 58:364.

[30] Essex Antiquarian (1905), 9:61 & 159;  George F. Dow, ed., “Records & Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Massachusetts, 1656-1662,” 2:58, 98-99, 109 & 210-211.

[31] George F. Dow, ed., “Records & Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Massachusetts, 1667-1671,” 4:38.

[32] Sidney Perley, “Mining & Quarrying & Smelting of Ores in Boxford” (Historical Collections of the Essex Institute, 1888) 25:295-300; E.N. Hartley, 294.

[33] George F. Dow, ed., “Records & Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Massachusetts, 1672-1674,” 5:130-132, 173, 196-197, 218-219, 227, 264-265 & 285; Sidney Perley, The History of Boxford, Essex County, Massachusetts (1888), 25:298-299 & E.N. Hartley, Ironworks on the Saugus (1957), 295; Judy Leonard Anderson, “Henry & James Leonard” (“Leonard Lines,” Dec. 1991).

[34] Sidney Perley, The History of Boxford, Essex County, Massachusetts (1888), 49.

[35] George F. Dow, ed., “Records & Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Massachusetts, 1672-1674” 5:130-132 & 227.

[36] George F. Dow, ed., “Records & Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Massachusetts, 1672-1674” 5:196-7.

[37] Sidney Perley, “Mining and Quarrying, and Smelting of Ores, in Boxford,” Historical Collections of the Essex Institute (1888), 25:298-299; E.N. Hartley, Ironworks on the Saugus (1957), 295.

[38] “Records & Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Massachusetts, 1675-1678,” (1917), 6:1-2.

[39] George F. Dow, ed., “Records & Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Massachusetts 1672-1674,” 5:31&351-354; Stephen Innes, Creating the Commonwealth: The Economic Culture of Puritan New England (1995), 266-267.

[40] George F. Dow, ed., “Records & Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Massachusetts 1672-1674,” (1916), 5:352-355.

[41] “Records & Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Massachusetts, 1675-1678,” (1917), 6:34.

[42] E.N. Hartley, Ironworks on the Saugus (1957), 296.

[43] Charles S. Boyer, pres. Camden County Historical Society, Early Forges in New Jersey  (1931/1963), 196; Dean Freiday, “Tinton Manor: the Iron Works” (Proceedings of the N.J. Historical Society, 1952), 70:252.

[44] “Tinton Falls Iron Works Collection, #7” Monmouth County Historical Association Library & Archives, Freehold, NJ  – gift of Mr. Bertram H. Borden, Rumson, NJ.

[45] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York and New Jersey,  (1916), 4:14.

[46] “Tinton Falls Iron Works Collection, #7,” Monmouth County Historical Association Library & Archives, Freehold, NJ – gift of Mr. Bertram H. Borden, Rumson, NJ.

[47] Ora E. Monette, First Settlers of Ye Plantations of Piscataway & Woodbridge, Olde East New Jersey, 1664-1714 (1930), 984.

[48] Salter, History of Monmouth & Ocean Counties, New Jersey (1890), xxxvii; E.N. Hartley, Ironworks on the Saugus (1957), 300; John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1906), 2:396.

[49] Shrewsbury, Monmouth County, N.J., Deed 1:96.

[50] Minutes of the Board of Proprietors of the Eastern Division of New Jersey from 1685-1705 (1949), 1:65-66

[51] Minutes of the Board of Proprietors of the Eastern Division of New Jersey from 1685 to 1705 (1949) 1:75.

[52] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany: Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York and New Jersey (1906), 2:399.

[53] Orra E. Monnette, First Settlers of Ye Plantations of Piscataway and Woodbridge, Olde East New Jersey, 1664-1714 (1930), 143.

[54] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany: Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York and New Jersey (1906), 2:405.

[55] Donna Hutchings (hutching@erols.com); Archives of the State of New Jersey, 1st series, 21:42; Deed Book 3:152..

[56] Mrs. Harriotte Leonard Standish, The Leonard Dictionary (1943), 2:305A; John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany: Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York and New Jersey (1932), 5:83.

[57] “Records & Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Massachusetts, 1675-1678,” 5:239.

[58] “Tinton Falls Iron Works Collection” at Monmouth County Historical Association, Freehold, NJ.

[59] O.B. Leonard, “The Leonard Family in New Jersey” (The “Monmouth Inquirer,” Nov. 8 & 15, 1883), 3.

[60] Dean Freiday, “Tinton Manor: the Iron Works” (Proceedings of the New Jersey Historical Society, 1952), 70:256-257.

[61] “Minutes of the Board of Proprietors of the Eastern Division of New Jersey from 1685-1705” (1949), 1:74.

[62] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1906), 2:399.

[63] “Minutes of the Board of Proprietors of the Eastern Division of New Jersey from 1685-1705” (1949), 1:14.

[64] “Extracts of Patents & Deeds for Land in Monmouth, Tinton, etc.” at Monmouth County Historical Association, Freehold, NJ.

[65] William Nelson, ed., Patents & Deeds & Other Records of Early New Jersey, 1664-1703 (1976), 101.

[66] William Nelson, ed., Patents & Deeds & Other Early Records of New Jersey 1664-1703 (1976), 106.

[67] “Tinton Falls Iron Works collection” at Monmouth County Historical Association, Freehold, N.J.

[68] William Nelson, ed., Patents & Deeds & Other Early Records of New Jersey, 1664-1703 (1976), 104.

[69] William Nelson, ed., Patents & Deeds & Other Early Records of New Jersey, 1664-1703 (1976), 136.

[70] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1916), 4:319.

[71] William Nelson, ed., Patents & Deeds & Other Early Records of New Jersey, 1664-1703 (1976), 113.

[72] William Nelson, ed., Patents & Deeds & Other Early Records of New Jersey, 1664-1703 (1976), 139; John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1906), 2:380.

[73] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1916), 4:318.

[74] Edwin Salter & George Beekman, Old Times in Old Monmouth, Historical Reminiscences of Old Monmouth County, New Jersey (1980), 251.

[75] William Nelson, ed., Patents & Deeds & Other Early Records of New Jersey, 1664-1703 (1976), 430.

[76] Frances G. Sitherwood, Throckmorton Family History (1929), 70.

[77] Edwin Salter & George Beekman, Old Times in Old Monmouth, Historical Reminiscences of Old Monmouth County, New Jersey (1980), 253.

[78] O. B. Leonard, “The Leonard Family in New Jersey” (The Monmouth Inquirer, Nov. 8 & 15, 1883), 3.

[79] O. B. Leonard, “The Leonard Family in New Jersey” (The Monmouth Inquirer, Nov. 8 & 15, 1883), 3.

[80] William Nelson, ed., Patents & Deeds & Other Early Records of New Jersey, 1664-1703 (1976), 211 & 272.

[81] East Jersey Deed E:97; William Nelson, ed., Patents & Deeds & Other Early Records of New Jersey, 1664-1703 (1976), 156.

[82] William Nelson, ed. Patents & Deeds & Other Early Records of New Jersey, 1664-1703 (1976), 236.

[83] Edwin Salter & George Beekman, Old Times in Old Monmouth Historical Reminiscences of Old Monmouth County, New Jersey (1980), 257.

[84] Edwin Salter & George Beekman, Old Times in Old Monmouth Historical Reminiscences of Old Monmouth County, New Jersey (1980), 258.

[85]

[86] William Nelson, ed., Patents & Deeds & Other Early Records of New Jersey, 1664-1703 (1976), 313.

[87] Edward Salter & George Beekman, Old Times in Old Monmouth, Historical Reminiscences of Old Monmouth County, New Jersey (1980), 260-262.

[88] William Nelson, ed., Patents & Deeds & Other Early Records of New Jersey, 1664-1703 (1976), 312,

[89] William Nelson, ed., Patents & Deeds & Other Early Records of New Jersey, 1664-1703 (1976), 319.

[90] William Nelson, ed., Patents & Deeds & Other Early Records of New Jersey, 1664-1703 (1976), 318.

[91] William A. Whitehead, Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, 1687-1703 (1881), 2:430-431.

[92] O. B. Leonard, “The Leonard Family in New Jersey” (The Monmouth Inquirer, Nov. 8 & 15, 1883), 3.

[93] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1916), 4:26; Ernest W. Mandeville, The Story of Middletown (1927), 56-58.

[94] William A. Whitehead, Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, 1687-1703 (1881), 2:362-364.

[95] William A. Whitehead, Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, 1687-1703 (1881), 2:385-386.

[96] William Nelson, ed., Patents & Deeds & Other Early Records of New Jersey, 1664-1703 (1976), 144.

[97] William Whitehead, ed., Documents Relating to Colonial History of State of New Jersey, 1687-1703 (1881), 2:417.

[98] Abstracts of Wills 1670-1730, vol. I (New Jersey Archives, 1st series), 33:291.

[99] William A. Whitehead, ed., Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, 1687-1703 (1881), 2:487-8 & 501-2 and 3:1, 40 & 78.

[100] O. B. Leonard, “The Leonard Family in New Jersey” (The Monmouth Inquirer, Nov. 8 & 15, 1883), 3.

[101] Enid E. Adams, “Whose Morford Was He – John’s or Tom’s?” (Genealogical Magazine of New Jersey, Sept. 1983), 58:103 (http://www.pacificsites.com/~cmorford/MIA/whose21htm).

[102] “Morford Historian” (Apr. 1981), 2:34, kindly provided by Brad Leonard (bradl@colorado.net).

[103] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1903), 1:161.

[104] “Morford Historian” (Apr. 1981), 2:33-39, kindly provided by Brad Leonard (bradl@colorado.net).

[105] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement 7 Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1932), 5:226.

[106] O. B. Leonard, “The Leonard Family in New Jersey” (The Monmouth Inquirer, Nov. 8 & 15, 1883), 3.

[107] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1906), 2:393.

[108] William A. Whitehead, ed. Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, 1687-1703 (1881), 2:332-3; Edwin Slater & George Beekman, Old Times in Old Monmouth, Historical Reminiscences of Old Monmouth County, New Jersey (1980), 261

[109] O. B. Leonard, “The Leonard Family in New Jersey” (The Monmouth Inquirer, Nov. 8 & 15, 1883), 3; William Nelson, ed., Patents & Deeds & Other Early Records of New Jersey, 1664-1703 (1876), 156.

[110] Edwin Salter & George Beekman, Old Times in Old Monmouth, Historical Reminiscences of Old Monmouth County, New Jersey (1980), 170-171.

[111] William A. Whitehead, ed., Archives of the State of New Jersey, 1707-1720 (1982), 1ST series, 4:141-142.

[112] Donna Hutchings (hutching@erols.com); Edwin Salter & George Beekman, Old Times in Old Monmouth, Historical Reminiscences of Old Monmouth County, New Jersey (1980), 269.

[113] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1932) 5:87.

[114] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1914), 3:172.

[115] William A. Whitehead, ed., Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, 1720-1737 (1882), 3:314-319.

[116] Frances G. Sitherwood, Throckmorton Family History, (1929), 71.

[117] Donna Hutchings (hutching@erols.com) kindly provided will data from “Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, 1730-1760,” 2:297.

[118] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1916), 4:12; “Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, 1730-1760,” 2:297 kindly provided by Donna Hutchings (hutchings@erols.com).

[119] G. Marston Leonard’s 1954 Henry Leonard Descendancy Chart #1.

[120] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1903), 1:212.

[121] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, Vol. 32, “Calendar of Wills, 1751-1760,” 3:196.

[122] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1903), 1:193 & 212.

[123] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1903), 1:137.

[124] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1903), 1:309.

[125] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1903), 1:328.

[126] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 35, “Calendar of Wills, 1781-1785,” 6:245.

[127] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1903), 1:195-199.

[128] “Genealogies of New Jersey Families from the Genealogy Magazine of New Jersey” (1996), 1:588-594; “Morford Historian” (Apr. 1981), 2:34.

[129] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 32, “Calendar of Wills, 1751-1760,” 3:196.

[130] Elizabeth Morris Lefferts, Descendants of Lewis Morris of Morrisania, (ca. 1903-1906), courtesy of William Ferris (wrferris@yahoo.com); William Nelson, New Jersey Marriage Records, 1665-1800 (1967), 239, in New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 22..

[131] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 32, “Calendar of Wills, 1751-1760,” 3:196.

[132] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1914), 3:389; WorldConnect GEDCOM by William Ferris (wrferris@yahoo.com).

[133] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement of Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1903), 1:179.

[134] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 32, “Calendar of Wills, 1751-1760,” 3:196.

[135] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement of Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1903), 1:181, 189 & 215.

[136] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement of Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1903), 1:186.

[137] “Genealogies of New Jersey Families from the Genealogy Magazine of New Jersey” (1996), 2:852.

[138] William Nelson, New Jersey Marriage Records, 1665-1800 (1967), 250 from New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 22.

[139] Data from Ms. Laura North, Cylinder, IA 50528.

[140] “Genealogies of New Jersey Families from the Genealogy Magazine of New Jersey” (1996), 1:588-594.

[141] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1932), 5:87.

[142] William Nelson, New Jersey Marriage Records, 1665-1800 (1967), 239 from New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 22.

[143] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1932), 5:268.

[144] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 32, “Calendar of Wills, 1751-1760,” 3:196.

[145] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1903), 1:301.

[146] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1903), 1:193.

[147] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1903), 1:327.

[148] Clarence Torrey, New England Marriages Prior to 1700  (1985), 401.

[149] “Genealogies of New Jersey Families from the Genealogical Magazine of New Jersey” (1996), 2:273.

[150] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1916), 4:25 & 34-35.

[151] Abstracts of Wills, 1670-1730 (New Jersey Archives, 1st series), 33:290.

[152] “Brief Memoirs of Notices of Prince’s Subscribers” (NEH & GR, 1853), 7:72.

[153] Edwin Salter & George Beekman, Old Times in Old Monmouth, Historical Reminiscences of Old Monmouth County, New Jersey (1980), 248 & 265-6.

[154] William Nelson, ed., Patents & Deeds & Other Early Records of New Jersey 1664-1703 (1976), 295; John E. Stillwell (1932), 5:427.

[155] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1903), 1:251-252.

[156] Edwin Salter & George Beekman, Old Times in Old Monmouth, Historical Reminiscences of Old Monmouth County, New Jersey (1980), 248 & 265-6.

[157] Edwin Salter & George Beekman, Old Times in Old Monmouth, Historical Reminiscences of Old Monmouth County, New Jersey (1980), 169-170.

[158] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1916), 4:38-39.

[159] Transcription courtesy of Wayne & Pat Mount at ftp://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/nj/monmouth/wills/colwills05.txt.

[160] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1916), 4:35.

[161]  New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 33, “Abstracts of Wills, 1670-1730,” 1:290.

[162] William Nelson, New Jersey Marriage Records, 1665-1800 (1967), 239, in New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 22.

[163] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1916), 4:279.

[164] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 32, “Calendar of Wills, 1751-1760,” 3:196.

[165] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1916), 4:279 and (1932), 5:444.

[166] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1932), 5:444.

[167] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 32, “Calendar of Wills, 1751-1760,” 3:196-197.

[168] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 32, “Calendar of Wills, 1751-1760,” 3:196-197.

[169] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1903), 1:162.

[170] Frances G. Sitherwood, Throckmorton Family History (1929), 73-74; John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1903), 1:158, 164-166, 170, 175, 179, 182, 189, 190, & 212;  (1932), 5:88; G. Marston Leonard’s Henry Leonard Descendancy Chart #2 compiled 1954 at NEH&GS Library.

[171] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 36, “Calendar of Wills, 1786-1790,” 7:136.

[172] “Intestates and others from the Orphans Court Books of Monmouth Co., NJ, 1785-1906.”

[173] Frances G. Sitherwood, Throckmorton Family History (1929), 128.

[174] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1903), 1:207.

[175] “Intestates and others from the Orphans Court Books of Monmouth Co., NJ, 1785-1906.”

[176] G. Marston Leonard’s 1954 Henry Leonard Descendancy Chart #2.

[177] Orra E. Monnette, First Settlers of Ye Plantations of Piscataway & Woodbridge, Olde East New Jersey, 1664-1714 (1930), 626.

[178] New Jersey Archives, 1st Series, vol. 33, “Abstract of Wills, 1670-1730,” 1:290-1.

[179] G. Marston Leonard’s 1954 Henry Leonard Descendancy Chart #3.

[180] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 30, “Calendar of Wills, 1730-1750,” 2:298.

[181] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 30, “Calendar of Wills, 1730-1750,” 2:298.

[182] William A. Whitehead, ed., Documents Relating to the Colonial History of New Jersey (1881), 2:318-320.

[183] William A. Whitehead, ed., Archives of the State of New Jersey, 1709-1720 (1882), 4:8-10.

[184] William A. Whitehead, Contributions to the Early History of Perth Amboy & Adjoining Country (1856), 53.

[185] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 14, “Journal of  Governor & Council,” 2:204 & 288.

[186] “Newspaper Extracts, 1704-1739,” 1:393 in “New Jersey Colonial Documents,” vol. XI.

[187] William A. Whitehead, ed., Archives of the State of New Jersey, 1738-1747 (1882), 6:139 & 202.

[188] William A. Whitehead, ed., Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, 1751-1757 (1885), 8:200-201.

[189] G. Marston Leonard’s 1954 Henry Leonard Descendancy Chart #4 & New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 3, “Calendar of Wills, 1751-1760,” 3:112.

[190] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1914), 3:370.

[191] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 32, “Calendar of Wills, 1751-1760,” 3:196.

[192] New Jersey Archives,1st series, vol. 33, “Calendar of Wills, 1761-1770,” 4:247-8.

[193] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 32, “Calendar of Wills, 1751-1760,” 3:196.

[194] William Nelson, New Jersey Marriage Records, 1665-1800 (1967), 250, in New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 22.

[195] Cary Williams at zandra@cinci.rr.com.

[196] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1914), 3:418.

[197] New Jersey Historical Society Proceedings, (July 1926), 11:2:337.

[198] Jones, The Loyalists of New Jersey (  ), 16.

[199] “Newspaper Extracts, 1740-1750,” 2:538-9, in New Jersey Colonial Documents, vol. 12.

[200] Archives of the State of New Jersey, 1st series, vol. 33, “Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, 1761-1770” (1928), 4:42.

[201] William Nelson, New Jersey Marriage Records, 1665-1800 (1967), 250, in New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 22.

[202] G. Marston Leonard’s 1954 Henry Leonard Descendancy Chart #4.

[203] “Newspaper Extracts, 1740-1750,” 2:51 & 273-274 in New Jersey Colonial Documents, vol. XII.

[204] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 32, “Calendar of Wills, 1751-1760,” 3:196-197.

[205] William A. Whitehead, Documents Relating to the Colonial History of New Jersey, vol. 26.

[206] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 32, “Calendar of Wills, 1751-1760, 3:196-197.

[207] Genealogies of New Jersey Families from Genealogy Magazine of New Jersey (1996), 1:340.

[208] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 32, “Calendar of Wills, 1751-1760,” 3:196-197.

[209] William Nelson, New Jersey Marriage Records, 1665-1800 (1967), 239, in New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 22.

[210] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 32, “Calendar of Wills, 1751-1760,” 3:196-197.

[211] William Nelson, New Jersey Marriage Records, 1665-1800 (1967), 239, in New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 22.

[212] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1932), 5:268.

[213] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 32, “Calendar of Wills, 1751-1760,” 3:196-197.

[214] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 32, “Calendar of Wills, 1751-1760,” 3:196-197.

[215]

[216] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 32, “Calendar of Wills, 1751-1760,” 3:196-197.

[217] David Blackwell, “James Leonard of Taunton 7 Generations,” http://genforum.genealogy.com/leonard/messages/337.html

[218] Fair View Cemetery Transcription at http://distantcousin.com/Cemetery/NJ/Monmouth/Fairview/Leonard.html

[219] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 32, “Calendar of Wills, 1751-1760,” 3:196-197.

[220] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 32, “Calendar of Wills, 1751-1760,” 3:196-197.

[221] Orra E. Monnette, First Settlers of Ye Plantations of Piscataway & Woodbridge, Olde East New Jersey, 1664-1714 (1930), 771.

[222] William A. Whitehead, ed., Archives of the State of New Jersey, 1709-1720 (1882), 4:376-377.

[223] “Journal of the Governors & Council, 1715-1738,” 2:204 in Frederick W. Ricord & William Nelson, ed., Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, 9:127 & 151.

[224] “Newspaper Extracts, 1704-1739,” 1:410, in Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, vol. XI.

[225] William Nelson, ed., Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, 1751-1755, 19: 391.

[226] William A. Whitehead, ed., Archives of the State of New Jersey, 1738-1747 (1882), 1st series, 6:232-233 & 238.

[227] William A. Whitehead, ed., Archives of the State of New Jersey, 1738-1747 (1882), 6:368.

[228] William Nelson, ed., Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, 20:557.

[229] “Newspaper Extracts, 1740-1750,” 2:512-513, in New Jersey Colonial Documents, vol. XII.

[230] William Nelson, ed., Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, 1751-1755, 19:212-217 & 220-221.

[231] Frederick W. Ricord & William Nelson, eds., Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, 1751-1757, 7:16.

[232] William Nelson, ed., Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, 1751-1755, 19:319-320.

[233] William Nelson, ed., Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, 20:50.

[234] Frederick W. Ricord & William Nelson, eds., Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, 9:127 & 151.

[235] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 32, “Calendar of Wills, 1751-1760,” 3:196-197.

[236] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 32, “Calendar of Wills, 1751-1760,” 3:196-197.

[237] William M. Clemens, American Marriage Records before 1699 (1926), 141.

[238] G. Marston Leonard’s 1954 Henry Leonard Descendants chart #5.

[239] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey  (1914), 3:262.

[240] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1914), 3:259 & 262; William S. Hornor, This Old Monmouth of Ours (1932), 210.

[241] Sidney Perley, The History of Boxford, Essex County, Massachusetts (1880) 59: Alonzo Lewis & James R. Newhall, History of Lynn, Essex County, Massachusetts (1865), 1:207.

[242] “Records & Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Massachusetts, 1675-1678” (1917), 6:4 & 396.

[243] William Nelson, ed., Patents & Deeds & Other Early Records of New Jersey, 1664-1703 (1976), 236.

[244] William Nelson, ed., Patents & Deeds & Other early Records of New Jersey, 1664-1703 (1976), 239.

[245] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1906), 2:383; New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 21, “Calendar of New Jersey Records, 1664-1703,” 239.

[246] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1932), 5:82; Frances G. Sitherwood, Throckmorton Family History (1929), 61.

[247] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey  (1914), 3:262.

[248] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey 1:190, 3:262 & 466.

[249] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1914), 3:466 & 5:86; Frances G. Sitherwood, Throckmorton Family History (1929), 61.

[250] Fanny L. Koster, Annals of the Leonard Family (1911/1969), 196.

[251] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1914), 3:191-192.

[252] Leonard file in “Stillwell Collection,” Monmouth Co., Historical Society, Freehold, NJ.

[253] Leonard file in “Stillwell Collection,” Monmouth County Historical Society, Freehold, NJ.

[254] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 34, “Calendar of Wills, 1771-1780,” 5:306.

[255] Edwin Salter & George C. Beekman, Old Times in Old Monouth (1887/1980), 317.

[256] Betty Malesky (jbmal@nbtx.net) is a descendant of Mary Leonard.

[257] John E. Stillwell, 3:125; William Nelson, “New Jersey Marriage Records, 1665-1800” (New Jersey Archives, 1967), 22:239.

[258] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 35, “Calendar of Wills, 1781-1785,” 6:245.

[259] Fanny L. Koster, Annals of the Leonard Family (1911/1969), 196.

[260] Data provided by Connie K. Beck (cbeck@lenox.heartland.net).

[261] Both Jonathan Wert (jwert@mdi-wert.com) & Karen E. Leonard (keleonard@mediaone.net) are descendants.

[262] Dan Silvers (dansilvers@aol.com) is a descendant of Morgan & Matilda.

[263] Fanny L. Koster, 196; John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1914), 3:262; G. Marston Leonard’s 1954 Henry Leonard Charts 5 & 6.

[264] John E. Stillwell, Historical and Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey, 3:262 & 466.

[265] Fanny L. Koster, Annals of the Leonard Family (1911/1969), 196-197.

[266] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey, 2:286.

[267] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey, 3:13.

[268] Fanny L. Koster, Annals of the Leonard Family (1911/1969), 196.

[269] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey, 2:286.

[270] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1914), 3:263.

[271] Vital Records of Lynn, Massachusetts (1905), 1:234 & 2:524; “ Genealogical Items Relative to Lynn, Massachusetts” (NEH & GR, 1851), 5:254.

[272] H. Stanley Craig & Julius Way, Cape May County, New Jersey, Marriage Records (1931), 8.

[273] William Nelson, ed., Patents & Deeds & Other Early Records of New Jersey, 1664-1703 (1976), 297.

[274] “Genealogies of New Jersey Families from the Genealogy Magazine of New Jersey” (1996), 239.

[275] Minutes of the Board of Proprietors of the Eastern Division of New Jersey, 1685-1705 (1949), 1:141.

[276] “Tinton Falls Iron Works Collection” at Monmouth County Historical Association, Freehold, NJ.

[277] Minutes of the Board of Proprietors of the Eastern Division of New Jersey, 1685-1705 (1949), 1:174.

[278] William Nelson, ed., Patents & Deeds & Other Early Records of New Jersey, 1664-1703 (1976), 239-240.

[279] Jeffrey M. Dorwart, Cape May, New Jersey: The Making of an American Resort Community (1992), 23-25, 66, 273.

[280] G. Marston Leonard’s 1954 Henry Leonard Descendants, chart #7.

[281] John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1903), 1:392.

[282] W. W. Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy (1938), 2: __.

[283] G. Marston Leonard’s 1954 Henry Leonard Descendants, chart #7.

[284] Calendar of Wills, 1751-1760, 3:195 in New Jersey Colonial Documents, vol. 32.

[285] William Nelson, New Jersey Marriage Records, 1665-1800 (1967), 239, in New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 22; H. Stanley Craig & Julius Way, Cape May County, New Jersey, Marriage Records (1931), 9.

[286] Jeffry M. Dorwart, Cape May Co., NJ: The Making of an American Resort Community (1992), 48.

[287] Frederick W. Ricord & William Nelson, eds., Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, 1767-1776, 10:207-213 & 276-284.

[288] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 34, “Calendar of Wills, 1771-1780,” 5:306.

[289] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 34, “Calendar of Wills, 1771-1780,” 5:306.

[290] William Nelson, New Jersey Marriage Records, 1695-1800 (1967), 239.

[291] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 33, “Abstracts of Wills, 1670-1730,” 1:291.

[292] Sidney Perley, “Mining & Quarrying & Smelting of Ores in Boxford” (Historical Collections of the Essex Institute, Jan.-Mar. 1888), 25:300.

[293] “Records & Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Massachusetts, 1675-1678” (1917), 6:63.

[294] “Records & Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Massachusetts, 1675-1678” (1917), 6:256-257.

[295] “Tinton Falls Iron Works Collection” at Monmouth County Historical Association, Freehold, NJ.

[296] John E. Stillwell, Historical and Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York and New Jersey (1932), 5:364.

[297] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 11, “Newspaper Extracts, 1704-1739,” 1:129-133; William S. Hormor, This Old Monmouth of Ours (1932), 210.

[298] Data from Dorothy Hays 19 Oct. 1992.

[299] William Nelson, ed., Patents & Deeds & Other Early Records of New Jersey, 1664-1703 (1976), 106 & 184.

[300] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 11, “Newspaper Extracts, 1704-1739,” 1:86 & 90.

[301] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 33, “Abstracts of Wills, 1670-1730,” 1:290.

[302] William Nelson, ed., Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, 20:151 & 293-294.

[303] Minutes of the Provincial Congress & the Council of Safety of the State of New Jersey (1879), 100.

[304] “New Jersey Biographical Sketches, 1665-1880,” and “Newspaper Extracts, 1756-1761,” 4:153, in New Jersey Colonial Documents (1898), vol. 20.

[305] “New Jersey Historical Society Proceedings” (July 1926), 11:2:350.

[306] National Genealogical Society, “American Loyalist Claims,” 286-7.

[307] Edwin Salter, History of Monmouth & Ocean Counties, New Jersey, xxxvii.

[308] Edwin Salter & George Beekman, Old Times in Old Monmouth, Historical Reminiscences of Old Monmouth County, New Jersey (1980), 14-15.

[309] Frances G. Sitherwood, Throckmorton Family History (1929), 62-69, 71-92; John E. Stillwell, Historical & Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York & New Jersey (1932), 5:82-83, 87-93.

[310] Vital Records of Lynn, Massachusetts (1905), 1:234.

[311] Mrs. Harriotte Leonard Standish, The Leonard Dictionary (1943), 2:305A.

[312] Mrs. Harriotte Leonard Standish, The Leonard Dictionary (1943), 1:203A.

[313] William Nelson, ed., Calendar of Wills, 1670-1730, 1:462-3 in New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 33.

[314] “Newspaper Extracts, 1704-1739,” 1:111, in William Nelson, ed., New Jersey Colonial Documents, vol. XI.

[315] John E. Stillwell, Historical and Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York and New Jersey (   ), 5:86-7.

[316] Frances G. Sitherwood, Throckmorton Family History (1929), 57.

[317] New Jersey Archives, 1st series, 32:325.

[318] Charles W. Throckmorton, A Genealogical & Historical Account of the Throckmorton Family in England & the United States (1930), 214.

[319] “Descendants of John Stout, Generation #4, Frances Stout #16,” <http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/s/t/o/William-R-Stout/GENE9-0006.html>

[320] John E. Stillwell, Historical and Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York and New Jersey (1903), 1:164.

[321] William Nelson, ed., “Calendar of Wills, 1730-1750,” 2:481, in New Jersey Colonial Documents, vol.  XXX.

[322] John E. Stillwell, Historical and Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York and New Jersey (1903), 1:158.

[323] John E. Stillwell, Historical and Genealogical Miscellany, Data Relating to the Settlement & Settlers of New York and New Jersey (1932), 5:93.

[324] “Genealogical Items Relative to Lynn, Massachusetts” (NEH & GR), 1851), 5:254; Vital Records of Lynn, Massachusetts (1905), 1:234 & 2:524.

[325] James Savage, Genealogical Dictionary of New England (1860-2), 3:80.

[326] Winifred L. Holman, Descendants of Samuel Hills – A Supplement to the Hills Family in America (1957), 67-71.

[327] Professional research performed by Janet Peterson 30 Sept. 1977 for Alice A. Everett.

[328] William W. Barton, “Pre-American Ancestry of our Leonard Iron Workers,” child #10.

[329] Data kindly supplied in 1992 by Wayne C. Patterson, Route 3, Box 417, Fair Grove, MO  65648.

[330] Alice A. Everett, “Leonards of Monmouthshire & Somersetshire, England,” (TAG, 1977), 53:103.

[331] William W. Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy (    ), 2:18.

[332] Lewis D. Cook, “Origin of James & Henry Leonard” (NEH & GR), 1933-34), 10:200-201.

[333] Thomas Shourds, History & Genealogy of Fenwick’s Colony (1876), 283-4.

[334] William Nelson, ed., Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, 1670-1730 (1901), 1:459-460 in “Archives of the State of New Jersey,” 1st series, vol. 23.

[335] William A. Whitehead, ed., Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, 1631-1687 (1880), 1:59.

[336] Orra E. Monnette, First Settlers of Ye Plantations of Piscataway & Woodbridge, Olde East New Jersey, 1664-1714 (1930), 813 & 838; New Jersey Archives, 1st series, vol. 33, “Abstracts of Wills, 1670-1730,” 1:291; William Nelson, ed., Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, 1664-1703 (1899), 21:53.

[337] O. B. Leonard, “The Leonard Family in New Jersey” (Monmouth Inquirer, Nov. 8 & 15, 1883).