EMIGRANTS ARRIVAL
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EMIGRANTS ARRIVAL: ARRIVALS IN U.S. PORTS

Arrivals in U.S. ports :
Emigrants ships manifests
from 1820 to 1870
Testimonies and Complaints :
Documents related to the emigration
 
Belgian regulations and legislation
at various dates
concerning ships & passengers

 

 

Distribution of immigrants : A statistic in "Reports of the Immigration Commission - Statistical Review of Immigration 1820-1910 - Distribution of immigrants 1850-1900 - presented by Mr Dillingham - Washington, Government Printing Office, 1911" give the total number of immigrants in the U.S. per year. I have put bellow the numbers given for all Europeans and Belgians for the years between 1820 and 1870.

Port of New York : Another statistic give the "Numbers and Nativities of alien Emigrants for whom Commutation and Hospital Moneys were paids or Bonds executed according to the Acts of May 5, 1847 (and subsequents), who arrived and were landed at the Port of New York, from May 5, 1847, to December 31, 1860 " and, for the Belgians, differ sensibly from the above statistics.
Distribution of immigrants
 
 Year   Europe   Belgium

 Year 

 Europe   Belgium 
    M F Tot.     Sept. 30 1845 109301 345 196  541 1041
Sept. 30 1820   1   1 1   Sept. 30 1846 146315 33 10  43 1084
Sept. 30 1821   2   2 3   Sept. 30 1847 229117 790 683  1473 2557
Sept. 30 1822   10   10 13   Sept. 30 1848 218025 534 363  897 3454
Sept. 30 1823   2   2 15   Sept. 30 1849 286501 330 260  590 4044
Sept. 30 1824   1   1 16   Sept. 30 1850   530 525  1055 5099
Sept. 30 1825   1   1 17   Dec. 31 1850 308323 5 20 25 5124
Sept. 30 1826   2   2 19   Dec. 31 1851 369510     ? 5124
Sept. 30 1827   7   7 26   Dec. 31 1852 362484 4 4  8 5132
Sept. 30 1828   2   2

28

  Dec. 31 1853 361576 73 14  87 5219
Sept. 30 1829         28   Dec. 31 1854 405542 193 73  266 5485
 Sept. 30 1830 7217      0 28   Dec. 31 1855 187729 819 687  1506 6991
 Sept. 30 1831 13039 1   1 29   1856 186083      1982 8973
Sept. 30 1832       ? 29   1857 216224      627 9600
  Dec. 31 1832 34193     ? 29   1858 111354      184 9784
  Dec. 31 1833 29111      0 29   1859 110949      25 9809
 Dec. 31 1834 57510 3    3 32   1860 141209      53 9862
 Dec. 31 1835 41987 1    1 33   1861 81200      51 9913
 Dec. 31 1836 70465      0 33   1862 83710      169 10081
 Dec. 31 1837 71039      0 33   1863 163733      301 10383
 Dec. 31 1838 34070 9 5  14 47   1864 185237      389 10772
 Dec. 31 1839 64148 1    1 48   1865 214048      741 11513
 Dec. 31 1840 80126 1    2 50   1866 278916     1254 12767
 Dec. 31 1841 76216 69 37  106 156   1867 283751     789 13556
 Dec. 31 1842 99945 34 10  44 200   1868 130090     14 13570
 Sept. 30 1843 49013 81 54  135 335   1869 315963     1922 15492
 Sept. 30 1844 74745 112 53  165 500   1870 328626     1002 16494

Port of New York

 Year 

 Belgium 
1847 551
1848 ...
1849 118
1850 250
1851 475
1852 82
1853 34
1854 398
1855 1201
1856 850
1857 444
1858 258
1859 57
1860 76
Total 4769
It is also said in 1860 Census statistics :  in 1860 the total number of arrival from 1820 to 1860 was 9,861. The deficiency of 789 is partly due to the imperfection of the census returns, partly to the unwillingness of many emigrants to reveal on their first arrival their native country, and the natural mortality rate.

From 1820 to 1832, and from 1844 to 1850, the statistic are from 30 Sept. to 30 Sept. From 1833 to 1843, they are from 31 Dec. to 31 Dec.

The Downs was a roadstead in the English Channel off the east coast of Kent, between the North and the South Foreland. The Downs served as a permanent base for warships patrolling the North Sea, and formed a favourite anchorage during heavy weather, protected on the east by the Goodwin Sands and on the north and west by the coast. It has depths down to 12 fathoms (22 m). Even during southerly gales some shelter was afforded, though under this condition wrecks were not infrequent. The Downs lie between the Strait of Dover and the Thames Estuary, so both merchant ships awaiting an easterly wind to take them down the English Channel and those going up to London gathered there, often for quite long periods. It could be quite a dangerous area. The Goodwin Sands were constantly shifting, and were not always adequately marked. Storms could also drive ships onto the shore or onto the sands.