John Chipman

 

  AMERICA THE GREAT MELTING POT

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Direct descendant is highlighted in red

John Chipman
Immigrant Ancestor see FAMILY TREE(Brooke)
see FAMILY TREE (White)
Born: 30 Aug 1621 Bryants Puddle, Dorset, Dorchester, England

 

   
Married: 13 Sept 1646 Plymouth, MA

 

   
Died: 17 April 1708 Sandwich, Barnstable, MA    

WIFE

Hope Howland

CHILDREN

1. Elizabeth Chipman b. 24 June 1647

2. Hope Chipman b. 31 Aug 1652

3. Lydia Chipman b. 25 Dec 1654

4. John Chipman b. 02 March 1656

5. Hannah Chipman b. 14 Jan 1658

6. Samuel Chipman b. 15 April 1661

7. Ruth Chipman b. 31 Dec 1663

8. Bethiah Chipman b. 01 July 1666

9. Mercy Chipman b. 06 Feb 1668

10. John Chipman b. 03 March 1671

11. Desire Chipman b. 26 Feb 1674

"In 'Gen. Notes Barnstable Families,' is given a statement or 'a brief declaration in behalf of John Chipman, of Barnstable, 1658,' in which he declares himself to be 'ye only son and heir of Mr. Thomas Chipman late deceased at Brinspittell about five miles from Dorchester in Dorcetshire in England,' and supposes his age to be thirty-seven years, it being twenty-one since he came from England, making the year of his birth 1621. He had two sisters, Hannah and Tamson, and his father dying early, he lived with an Uncle Mr. Christopher Derby. 'In May, 1637, Richard Derby (a son of Christopher) came to New England, bringing with him his cousin John then sixteen years o9ld, and others in capacity of servants.' Richard settled at Plymouth where he remained several years, but no mention is made of John till the spring of 1642, when he had arrived at legal age. 'It is probable that during the four years that intervened he had served an apprenticeship.' In 1646 he married Hope, second daughter of Mr. John Howland, and was living at Barnstable in 1649, having purchased a homestead next to that of George Lewis, Sr., it containing eight acres and also a 'garden spot and orchard.'
His wife, Hope, died at Barnstable, January 8 or 18, 1683, and was interred in the old cemetery, where it is said, her tombstone is still standing, and in good preservation, the inscription being as follows:
Here Lyeth-------, interred ye Body of Mrs. Hope Chipman, wife of Elder John Chipman, Aged 54 years, who changed this life for a better, ye 8th of January, 1683"
Reference is made to John having married a second time in 1684, but the wife's name is not mentioned. He removed to Sandwich, but reappears in Barnstable. 'His removal was deeply regretted by the people and many efforts were made to induce him to return,' the town voting him a liberal grant of meadow lands; and agreeing to pay him if he would resume the office of elder.
In June 1659, he, with three others, was appointed by the Plymouth Colony Court, to attend the meetings of the Quakers 'to endeavor to reduce them from the error of their ways.' He was appointed important tasks in the colony, was representative to the court for five years, and selectman for Barnstable for four."

 

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