Bresseys of Bulkeley

Bresseys of Bulkeley

compiled by Edwin C. Dunn

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Table of Contents

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Bouchier, Bracey, Brassey, Brassie, Bresey, Bressey, Jones, Lloyd, Maudsley, Owfield, Peacock, Pirie

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First Generation

1. Hamon le1 Bresey, son of Robert de Bresey, birth date unknown.

He married Isabella de Hadley. Isabella is the daughter of William de Hadley.

Hamon le Bresey and Isabella de Hadley had the following child:

child + 2 i. William de2 Bresey.

Second Generation

2. William de2 Bresey (Hamon le1) birth date unknown.

He married Margaret le Bret. Margaret is the daughter of Robert le Bret.

William de Bresey and Margaret le Bret had the following child:

child + 3 i. Thomas3 Bressey.

Third Generation

3. Thomas3 Bressey (William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) birth date unknown.

He married Margery Wrono. Margery is the daughter of John Wrono and Jane.

Thomas Bressey and Margery Wrono had the following child:

child + 4 i. Thomas4 Bressey was born about 1475.

Fourth Generation

4. Thomas4 Bressey (Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1)(1) was born about 1475.

He married Margaret Hassall. Margaret was the daughter of Hugh Hassall. According to Ormerod, the Cheshire historian, Hugh Hassall was the direct heir of Henry de Betley, who was granted the manor of Hassall in the parish of Sandbach by the Audleys, and whose descendants were known as "de Hassall" from their residence instead of "de Betley."

Hugh Hassall is said to have married Mary Mainwaring, daughter of Sir John Mainwaring of Over Peover, Cheshire. Hassall was living in 1488 when in the Recognizance Rolls there is a reference to Hugh Hassall of Honkilowe as collector of subsidies. The Hassalls acquired the manor of Hankelow, which they held under the Vernons, as early as 16 Henry VI (1438). Hankelow is about a mile and a half north of Audlem. The Hassall arms are: Party per chevron argent and or, three pheons sable.

Thomas Bressey and Margaret Hassall had the following children:

child + 5 i. Ralph5 Bressey was born about 1500.

child 6 ii. James Bressey. He made a will. His undated will was proved on 25 October 1561. He directed that he be buried in St. Magnus Churchyard in London, and left 10s to the church and 10s to the minister and to the clerk. To "the lord my master" he left an obligation of Thomas Harding to deliver £13.7.8 to Mr. Gilgate who was to give to "my daughter Audley" and to widow Applesby 60s., to Adam Beysmore and Thomas Kenyon 26s.8d, and to Mr. Gilgate and Thomas Andro dwelling in Old Brudfourde (Brentford?) 6s.8d. The other £6.13.0 to be bestowed among my fellows by Mr. Gilgate. To my brother Hamnet his bill of £50, willing him to give my sister Barens' two daughters £20. To Thomas Freman 40 marks, of which £10 is to be delivered to my sister Forcete's children. "The other 20 marks I give unto my brother Robarte Bresse £5 the other £20.6.8 and four pounds that my brother Barnes hath to my burial and to the poor, but most to the poor." To Raffe Egerton 26s.8d. To Rafe Bressey 40s. To John Warbeton 50s. Mr. Warbeton owes me £8, of which I give him half, the other to his children and servants. Mr. Peter Warbowton owes me £10, of which I give him 40s, and 40s to Mr. Bouthe and Mr. Richard Warbooton, £4, to the poorest tenants and neighbors he hath and "40s to the poorest householder in Aluenley the one half to of my grandsons I have in the town." Thomas Masterson owes me 52s; he is to bestow half on some highway. William Kerison owes me 20 marks, of which he is to have 5, 5 to his sisters, 5 to "my sister Morgames children," and the rest to my sister Pove, Richard Bressey, and Raffe Damparte, 40s "to make in death's heads, the other 26s.8d to the poorest householders in the Malpas." Clothes to my brother Forset, Thomas Freman, William Forset, Harry Forsete, little William (Forset), Edward (Forset), John Pove, my brother Robert, Richard Bressey, Ralph Bressey his brother, Randall Bressey, their sister Alice (a mazer to my sister, their mother), my brother Hamnet, my brother Barnes. Executors: Richard Forsytt, Hamnet Bressey, haberdasher, Robert Barnes, mercer, and Thomas Bressey, haberdasher. Overseer: my lord, best master that I ever had. Witnesses: Hamnet Bressey, Robert Byrne, Andrew Outlaw, the writer hereof, Dorothy Williams, Elizabeth Barnes, with others.

The legacy to "my daughter Audley" was so disproportionately small as to suggest that she may have been a step-daughter or even a god-daughter. The division of William Kerison's last 5 marks is very obscure. He was "servant to the Earl of Hertford," Edward Seymour (born 1537). Edward Seymour was a brother of Jane Seymour, third wife of Henry VIII, and of Thomas Seymour, who married Catherine Paar, Henry's sixth and last wife, after the king's death.

child 7 iii. Hamnet Bressey. He was a member of the Haberdasher's Company of London and executor of the wills of his brother James (1561) and of his brother-in-law Richard Forset (1561) and overseer of the will of his brother-in-law Robert Barnes (1562).

child 8 iv. Robert Bressey. He was mentioned in the will of his brother James in 1561 and was possibly that Robert Bressey who was buried at Malpas on 17 December 1561.

child 9 v. Margaret Bressey. She married three times. She married Richard Forset. Margaret was the second wife of Richard, of London, who was admitted to Gray's Inn in 1540, and to the Bar in 1552. He was Member of Parliament for Stafford in 1547, for Heytesbury, Wiltshire, in 1553/4, and for Trevenna, Cornwall, in 1554. He was lessee of the manor of Tyburn or Mary-le-Bone, Middlesex, and two years after his death, his widow entered into possession of the manor.

Richard died 1561. She married Roger Amice. Roger died 28 July 1574. He was of Wakes Colne, Essex.

She married William Massey 2 January 1575/6. He was of the Inner Temple. She was living in 1583, when she conveyed the rectory of Mary-le- Bone to her son Edward.

Both Richard Forset and Roger Amice left wills from which Margaret's Forset children can be identified. Of the six sons, four were Cambridge University men, one of them going on to Gray's Inn where the other two were also entered.

child 10 vi. Bressey. She married Robert Barnes. He was a mercer of London. His will dated 21 November 1562 names his brother-in-law Hamnet Bressey and his nephew Thomas Bressey as overseers and leaves legacies to several Bressey nephews and nieces. If she was the wife of Robert Barnes at the time of his death in 1562, her name was Elizabeth, but from the internal evidence of the wills of James Bressey, Richard Forset, and Barnes, himself, it would seem that the widow, Elizabeth Barnes, was a later wife, possibly having been previously a widow of Pomfret.

child 11 vii. Bressey. She married Povey. James Bressey's will mentions "my sister Pove" and John Pove. The wills of Roger Povey (1582), William Povey (1593), and John Povey (1598), all in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, contain no Bressey references.

child 12 viii. Elizabeth Bressey. She married Morgan.

Fifth Generation

5. Ralph5 Bressey (Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born about 1500. Ralph died probably before 1561. He was not mentioned in the will of his brother James. His widow was, however, remembered by her brother-in-law with the gift of a mazer (a drinking bowl or cup).

He married Margaret Massey. Margaret is the daughter of William Massey Esq.. The Masseys of Denfield had their principal seat at Moss Hall in the parish of Audlem, Cheshire, and were neighbors of the Bresseys of Bulkley. He succeeded to the family property at Bulkley. The Bressey pedigree was entered in the Heralds' Visitation of Cheshire of 1613, when Ralph Bressey's grandson, Thomas Bressey was alive and head of the family at Bulkley, and, although the pedigree was signed by his son Ralph, a young man of twenty-one, it is to be presumed that the information contained therein was supplied by his father who could state the names of his parents and grandparents without possibility of error.

Ralph Bressey and Margaret Massey had the following children:

child + 13 i. Richard6 Bressey was born about 1525.

child + 14 ii. Thomas Bressey was born about 1527.

child 15 iii. Alice Bressey. She married Henry(?) or Roger Wright. (Additional notes for Henry(?) or Roger Wright(2)) The Wrights of Nantwich, Cheshire, were a large family of town merchants who married into families of the Cheshire landed gentry and were of armorial rank. Alice is mentioned in the wills of her uncle, James Bressey , in 1561, and of her brother, Thomas Bressey, in 1591, at which latter date she was a widow. She was very probably the Alice Wright, widow, "of the porche" (the name of one of the town mansions of Nantwich), who was buried 29 May 1609.

child 16 iv. Anne Bressey. Her body was interred 10 October 1610 St. Dionis Backchurch in London, Middlesex, England. She married Ralph Egerton before 1561. His body was interred 12 December 1612 St. Dionis Backchurch in London, Middlesex, England. He made a will 17 November 1612. He appointed his wife's niece, Mrs. Katherine Woodward, one of his overseers. He was a mercer of London, who was mentioned in the 1561 will of Anne's uncle, James Bressey. Sir Richard Egerton, Kt., of Ridley, Cheshire, had many illegitimate children, at least ten of whom are listed in a copy of the visitation of Chester of 1613, with additions, apparently in the hand of Mr. Jacob Chaloner, now in the British Museum. Three of them left Cheshire for London--"Raffe Egerton of London Bridge, by Mald Dutton," "Thomas Egerton, Lord Chancellor (Viscount Brackley), and William Egerton of London Bridge by Ales Sparke." Ralph Egerton, Anne Bressey's husband, was probably a son of William "of London Bridge." Anne was a legatee in the wills of her brother Thomas Bressey, in 1591, and of her sister-in-law Anne Bressey, in 1596, and of her niece Mary (Bressey) Walmesley, in 1605. She and her husband Ralph first resided in the parish of St. Magnus Martyr, but later in the parish of St. Dionis Backchurch. Nine children were recorded at St. Magnus Martyr in London between 1562 and 1576.

child + 17 v. Edmund Bressey was born about 1539.

child + 18 vi. Ralph Bressey.

child 19 vii. Katherine Bressey. She married Biddulphe. He may have belonged to the Staffordshire family of that name. She was living in 1594 when she and her husband were mentioned in the will of her brother Thomas Bressey.

child + 20 viii. Randall Bressey.

Sixth Generation

13. Richard6 Bressey (Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born about 1525. His body was interred 20 July 1592 in Bunbury, Cheshire, England.

He married Elizabeth Bulkley before 1557. Elizabeth is the daughter of Randall Bulkley. Her body was interred 28 December 1578 in Bunbury, Cheshire, England. The parish church of Bunbury was closer to their home than was that of their own parish of Malpas. He succeeded his father at Bulkley.

Richard Bressey and Elizabeth Bulkley had the following children:

child + 21 i. Thomas7 Bressey was born about 1557.

child 22 ii. Ralph Bressey.

child 23 iii. Hugh Bressey.

child 24 iv. William Bressey. He was living in 1631.

child 25 v. Eleanor Bressey. She married John Kerison 6 December 1580 in Malpas, Cheshire, England. He was of Wigland, a neighboring township in the parish of Malpas.

child 26 vi. George Bressey. He was living in 1631.

child 27 vii. Anne Bressey. She married Thomas Burghaugh.

child 28 viii. Alice Bressey. She married John Luther 10 July 1581 in London, Middlesex, England. He was of the parish of St. Nicholas Acon, she being of the parish of St. Dionis Backchurch, where she doubtless lived in the family of one of her uncles. In the Randle Holme pedigree she is "ux Lutter of London."

child 29 ix. Amy Bressey. She married Wren. He was of Tatnall. She was a legatee of her uncle Thomas's widow, Anne Bressey, of London, in 1596.

14. Thomas6 Bressey (Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born in Bulkeley, Cheshire, England about 1527. His body was interred 10 Mary 1592 St. Dionis Backchurch in London, Middlesex, England.

He married twice. He married Anne Ober 15 January 1553/4 in London, Middlesex, England. Thomas Brassye of St. Magnus parish was licensed to marry her in the church of St. Christopher-le-Stocks.

Her body was interred 7 March 1568/9 St. Dionis Backchurch in London, Middlesex, England. He married Agnes Lawrence 29 July 1572 in London, Middlesex, England. She was a widow and they were licensed to marry at St. Christopher-le-Stocks. Anne (or Erne), as she was also called, had married at St. Christopher-le-Stocks on 13 September 1559 to Felix Lawrence, grocer, of London and Steventon, Bedfordshire, who was buried 21 January 1570/1.

Her body was interred 27 October 1596 St. Dionis Backchurch in London, Middlesex, England. She made a will 4 October 1596 in London, Middlesex, England. The will of Anne Bressie of the City of London was proved 19 November 1596 and was very long. She was to be buried in the chapel of St. Dionis Backchurch, as nigh as possible to my husband Thomas Bressie. My executors at my funeral to have to dinner and supper all my neighbors of St. Dionis, as well poor as rich. To my brother, Edmund Bressie. To my brother Robert Fletton, grocer, and my sister Elizabeth, his wife. To my sister-in-law Christian Joanes. To my cousin Robert Carrell and Mary his wife, dwelling in Whittington College, London, and their children Anne, Thomas, John, Henry, Robert, and Clemence. To my son Woodward and my daughter his wife. To my son Garway and my daughter his wife. To my son Walmesley and my daughter his wife. To my sister Hyll (Alice Hill sister to Felix Lawrence my late husband) and her daughter Christian.To my cousin William Allen, draper. To cousin Elizabeth Allen. To cousin Staynes and his wife (William Staynes and Alice his wife). To cousin Amie Wrenne (daughter of Richard Bressey of Bulkley). To young Parrott that married my sister's daughter, and (later in document) Raufe Parrett's daughter by my cousin his first wife. To my daughter Katherine Woodward. To my daughter Anne Garway and her children, Ann, Thomas, Timothy, and Catherine. To my daughter Mary Walmisley and her daughter Anne. To Anne Edgerton, daughter of my sister Anne Edgerton. To cousin Judith Terrell and her daughters, Elizabeth and Ellen. To my sister Bressey, wife of Randolf Bressey, and their son Thomas. To Thomas and Anne Bressey, children of my son-in-law Raphe Bressey. to the Company of the Haberdashers £100 for a loan fund. To the parishes of Edmonton, Middlesex, St. Andrews Hertford, Hertfordshire, Haverhill, Suffolk, Southwark, St. Sepulchre's, St. Giles Cripplegate, St. Botolph Bishopsgate, St. Botolph Aldgate, St. Leonard Shoreditch, and Whitechapel (London). To Robert Fletton, John Woodward, Thomas Garway, John Maplesden (Archdeacon of Suffolk), William Charke, preacher, and Jeffrey Massey, £1300 to buy lands in trust for my kinsman Felix Maplesden with remainders to his sisters Mary Carrell and Ann Auncell in turn. Executors: Robert Carrell and Mary his wife. Overseers: Robert Fletton, Edmund Bressey, John Woodward, Thomas Garway, William Warmisley, William Staynes, Felix Maplesden, William Charke, and Jeffrey Massey. Witnesses: Robert Fletton, Michael Palmer, Jeffory Massie, Edward Massie, John Partridge, scriptor.

He made a will 9 August 1591 in London, Middlesex, England. He was stated to be a citizen and haberdasher of London, and the will was proved 13 June 1592. He directed that he be buried in the church of St. Dionis, "in the chapel there under the pew where I sit," and that the cost of the funeral should not exceed £100. To my wife Anne, one-third of my estate. To Henry Bressey, my son, and my daughters, Catherine, Anne, and Mary equally, one-third of my estate. "I have paid with each of my daughters £400, not reckoning their apparel nor marriage dinners." "I have advanced my son Ralph Bressie and he is to claim no part of this third." For twenty godly sermons, 30 nobles. To the Haberdashers Company, £10 for a silver cup with my mark. To the marriages of thirty poor maids, 10s each, and another thirty at 6s.8d each. To eighty poor householders, married or widowed, £40. For redeeming honest and godly prisoners in the two Compters, Newgate, Ludgate, Marshalsea, and King's Bench, £20. To Christ's hospital, £10. To St. Bartholomew's, St. Thomas," Bridewell and Bedlam, 5 marks each. To Cambridge, 20 marks. To Oxford, 20 nobles. To my brother Edmund Bressey, £40, and to his two sons Edmund and Isaac, 5 marks each. To my brother Ralph Bressey, if he pay his debts to me, £20, and to his son and two daughters 5 marks each. To my brother Randoll Bressey, £150, he to pay his debts to me, and £50 among his children equally at the age of twenty-one. To my brother Edmund Bressey, £20 for the use of my sister Katherine Biddulphe, and to her husband 20 nobles, if he pay his debts to me, but, if he does not, a statute shall be sued for recovery, in which he was bound to Mr. Milwarde. To my sister Alice Wright, widow, £30, and to her children Roger and Margaret 20 nobles each and to her daughter Marger, 3 marks. To my sister Anne Edgerton, £40; to the marriage of her daughter Anne, 20 marks, and of her daughter Margaret £10; to her children Sarah and Ralph, 5 marks each. To my sister Alice Hill, for her good will to me and my wife £10. To my cousin Mary Carroll, £10, and to her son Thomas, £5; to her sister Anne Maplesden, £5. To Alice Marshe, widow, £10. To Willliam Milwarde, £20, and to his son Thomas, £5. To my servants William and Jeffrye Maises [Massey], £10 each, Thomas Maises 20 nobles, Edward Maises 40s, and I remit to William and Jeffrye a year of their apprenticeship. To my late servant Rowland Haywarde, £5. To my servant Katherine Frannces, 40s at the end of her years. To Mr. Thomas Church, £10. To my son-in-law John Woodwarde, £100. To my daughter Mary, wife of William Walmesley, my leaseholds in Bishopsgate Without. To each of my son Ralph's children, £15 at twenty-one or marriage. To the four children of my daughter Katherine Woodwarde, £15. To the two sons of my daughter Anne, wife of Thomas Garwaye, £15. To the two daughters of my daughter Mary Walmesley, £15. To my wife Anne, my best silver basin and ewer, my two best salts, one nest of best gilt goblets or bowls, one nest of gilt bowls she brought with her, twelve best gilt spoons, two stone pots garnished with silver (one gilt, the other white) and one little pot garnished with silver given her long since. Residue to my wife and sole executrix, for the use of my son Ralph. Overseers: sons-in-law John Woodwarde, Thomas Garwaye, William Walmesley, cousin Robert Carroll, and Mr. William Millwarde, to each of whom, 20 nobles. To my son Ralph and his heirs male, my tenements in Adstone, Leicestershire, bought of the Earl of Huntington, with remainder to my three daughters. Witnesses: Robert Bauckworthe, scriptor, Geoffrey Massie, Thomas Massie. He was sent up to London by his parents and apprenticed to his uncle Hamnet Bressey, through whom ("per Hamlett Bracey") he obtained the freedom of the Haberdasher's Company in 1548 and thereby became a citizen of London. As a city merchant he prospered and acquired considerable wealth. From 1561 until his death he lived in the parish of St. Dionis Backchurch.

Many of Mr. Bressey's apprentices and servants seem to have been young members of his mother's family in Cheshire. In addition to the four named in his will there were Jane Massy and Mary Massy, "servants with Mr. Bracye," who were buried on successive days in 1563 at St. Dionis, probably victims of the plague.

Thomas Bressey and Anne Ober had the following children:

child + 30 i. Ralph7 Bressey.

child 31 ii. Katherine Bressey. Her body was interred 18 November 1613 St. Dionis Backchurch in London, Middlesex, England. She married John Woodward 1 June 1579 St. Dionis Backchurch in London, Middlesex, England. His body was interred 20 November 1601 St. Dionis Backchurch in London, Middlesex, England.

She made a will 14 April 1608. It was proved by her son Sir John Woodward, Kt., on 26 November 1613. He six children were baptized at St. Dionis Backchurch between 1580 and 1590.

child + 32 iii. Henry Bressey was born about 1559.

child 33 iv. Bridget Bressey. Her body was interred 15 April 1571 St. Dionis Backchurch in London, Middlesex, England. She was baptized 26 December 1561 St. Dionis Backchurch in London, Middlesex, England. She was mentioned with her older brother and sister in the will of her great uncle, Robert Barnes, in 1562.

child 34 v. Anne Bressey. She married Thomas Garraway 1583 in Edmundton, Middlesex, England. Her name was given as Agnes. Thomas is the son of Walter Garraway and Katherine Hopton. Thomas Garraway was free of the Drapers' Company by patrimony on 8 July 1576, and, although there is a later note against his name "Deceived in the Country," a Thomas Garraway was warden of the company in 1605 and on the company's court as late as 1613. He was surely living in 1608 when he was mentioned in the will of his sister-in-law, Mrs. Woodward. He and Anne had six children.

She was baptized 12 November 1564 St. Dionis Backchurch in London, Middlesex, England.

child 35 vi. Margaret Bressey. Her body was interred 17 September 1567 St. Dionis Backchurch in London, Middlesex, England. She was baptized 29 June 1566 St. Dionis Backchurch in London, Middlesex, England.

child 36 vii. Mary Bressey. She married William Walmysle 27 January 1588/9 St. Dionis Backchurch in London, Middlesex, England. William is the son of Thomas Walmsley and Margaret Leversedge. He made a will 29 March 1597. The will of William, citizen and draper, of London, was proved 1 August 1597. William was of the parish of St. Bennet Finke and son of Thomas Walmsley of Shelley, Lancashire, and brother of Sir Thomas Walmsley, Kt., Justice of the Common Pleas.

She was baptized 30 August 1567 St. Dionis Backchurch in London, Middlesex, England. She made a will 17 February 1605. Marie Walmsley's will was proved 19 March 1605 and names her five daughters as her chief legatees. It mentioned several of her Bressey, Egerton, and Garraway relations.

17. Edmund6 Bressey (Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born in Bulkeley, Cheshire, England about 1539. This date is based on his having obtained his freedom from the Haberdashers Company at age twenty-one as was customary. Edmund died 7 November 1612 in Nettleden, Buckinghamshire, England. His body was interred in Nettleden, Buckinghamshire, England. He and Lucretia were buried in Nettleden church, under an elaborate mural monument of marble, upon which are the arms of Bressey and Bressey impaling Anderson. Mr. and Mrs. Bressey are depicted facing each other in the attitude of prayer, quite obviously portraits, while their five children appear in smaller scale, on a lower surface. The inscription is as follows: "Here is Entombed the Bodies of Edmund Bressey late of London Esquire the third brother of the Elder House of that name in the Countye Palatine of Chester and Lucretia his Wife Sister to Sr Henry Anderson late of London Kt the ffather of Sr Richard Anderson of Penlee in the County of Hertford Knight they lyved the greatest part of theyr Tyme in London and departed this Life at Nettleden in the County of Buckingham vz Lucretia Bressy the 4th Daye of June Año Dñi 1610. and Edmund Bressy deceased the 7 Daye of Noveber Año Domini 1612. they had Issue foure Sonnes and one Daughter and of them theyr second Sonn Edmund Bressye now alone lyvinge."

He married Lucretia Anderson 1565 in London, Middlesex, England. Lucretia was the daughter of Thomas Anderson and Katherine Hopton. Lucretia died 4 June 1610 in Nettleden, Buckinghamshire, England. Her body was interred in Nettleden, Buckinghamshire, England.

The estate of Edmund was handled in the following manner. Administration on his estate was granted to his son Edmund Bressey on 5 February 1612/13. The administrator was sued by Susan Bressey, a granddaughter of Mr. Bressey, and on 2 December 1614 she was awarded £120 which was still unadministered. Edmund was sent to his older brother Thomas in London and became a freeman in the Haberdashers' Company ("per Thomas Bressie") in 1560. After marriage, he established himself in the parish of St. Dionis Backchurch.

He had a long and apparently profitable business life in London. When his son Edmund was beginning his legal education in 1588 the family had a country residence at Brentford, Middlesex, a favorite district with city merchants.

For some years Bressey was a partner of William Millward, citizen and haberdasher. Millward died within a year of October 1592, when the partnership indentures had been renewed, and Bressey was bound to pay to his estate one-half of the profits of the business for that year. Mrs. Millward, executrix of her husband's estate, married Thomas Gray, a member of the Cordwainers' Company, and Mr. Bressey paid to them over a perior of years the greater part of the sum due. Before making the last payment, however, he withdrew from business and went to live in the country in Kent, and, not being informed of Mrs. Gray's death in London, sent the sum of £35 to Gray on the latter's demand. Thereupon Millward's son, Thomas Millward, gentleman, took out administration on his father's unsettled estate and Bressey was forced to pay the £35 a second time. He sued Gray to recover the first payment in 1609, the result not being known.

Apparently Kent did not suit the Bresseys as a place of retirement and they finally settled on Nettleden, Buckinghamshire, near Mrs. Bressey's family which had established itself at Penley, Hertfordshire.

Edmund Bressey and Lucretia Anderson had the following children:

child 37 i. Thomas7 Bressey. His body was interred 25 June 1573 St. Dionis Backchurch in London, Middlesex, England. He was baptized 26 July 1567 St. Dionis Backchurch in London, Middlesex, England.

child + 38 ii. Edmund Bressey.

child 39 iii. Katherine Bressey. Katherine died before 1591. She was baptized 27 September 1573 St. Dionis Backchurch in London, Middlesex, England.

child 40 iv. Thomas Bressey. Thomas died before 1591. He was baptized 4 April 1574 St. Dionis Backchurch in London, Middlesex, England.

child + 41 v. Isaac Bressey.

18. Ralph6 Bressey (Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) birth date unknown. His body was interred 27 June 1603 in Audlem, Cheshire, England.

He married Ellen Pickering (or Picken). He and his wife lived in Audlem, the parish of his mother's kinsmen, the Masseys. In 1565 he and his brother Randall, or Randolph, were sued by Jeffrey Rownes of Willaston, Cheshire. Rownes stated that the Bresseys wrongfully obtained from his wife Johane £7, claiming it in part payment of a supposed bargain made by her.

Ralph Bressey, his son and two daughters were named in the will of his brother, Thomas, in 1591.

Ralph Bressey and Ellen Pickering (or Picken) had the following children:

child + 42 i. Edward7 Bressey.

child 43 ii. Bressey.

child 44 iii. Bressey.

20. Randall6 Bressey (Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) birth date unknown. Randall died about 1610. An inventory of his estate was filed in that year.

He married Mary Smyth. She was an illegitimate daughter of Capt. George Smyth of Weston who was a younger brother of Sir Lawrence Smyth of Hough, in the parish of Wybunbury, Cheshire, where Randall Bressey also lived. He and his children were legatees of his brother Thomas Bressey of London in 1591, and his wife and son Thomas received gifts by the will of widow Anne Bressey in 1594.

Randall Bressey and Mary Smyth had the following children:

child 45 i. Thomas7 Bressey. He was living in 1594.

child + 46 ii. Lawrence Bressey.

child + 47 iii. Francis Bressey.

child + 48 iv. Anne Bressey.

child + 49 v. William Bressey.

Seventh Generation

21. Thomas7 Bressey (Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1)(3) was born about 1557. He was aged 49 in 1606. Thomas died 31 October 1631. His body was interred in Malpas, Cheshire, England.

He married Amy Booth. Amy is the daughter of Thomas Booth. In Thomas Bowker's will 15 May 1640 Amy was named as an heir.(4) The Bowkers were a Cheshire family. Thomas Bowker of the parish of St. Gregory in London wrote his will, naming his cosen Amy Bressy and her four sons, Thomas, Richard, Hugh, and James Bressey, among many others. The will was proved 2 March 1640/1. She was daughter and co-heiress of Thomas Booth of Cholmondeley, Cheshire, by 1592. She was living in 1631.

He made a will 22 October 1631. It was proved 7 November 1631 in the Public Episcopal Registry at Chester, and mentions the feoffees of his estates, Edward Bressey of Audlem (deceased), Lawrence Bressey of Wybunbury, both of them his nephews, Richard Byrd of Colborne and Randall Bolde. His oldest son, Ralph, who was twenty-one in 1613, and his son William had died. He leaves legacies to his surviving sons, Thomas, Randall, Hugh, James, and his daughters, Alice Herbert, Mary, Frances, and Amy. He also remembered his brothers, George and William Bressey, and his cousin Thomas Bromley. His wife Amy and son James were appointed executors. In the inventory, the following rooms in the house at Bulkley were named: "In the Roofe" (the attic), the Hall, the Parler, the Kitchen, the Loome-house, the Cheezeloft, the testator's chamber, Richard Bressye's chamber, the Gallery, the Little New chamber, James Bressye's chamber, the Blacke chamber, the Chamber over the Hall. He succeeded his father at Bulkley. It was he who entered the pedigree of the family in the visitation of Cheshire of 1613. (Arms: Quarterly, per fesse indented sable and argent, in the first quarter a mallard of the second, beaked and legged gules. Crest: A mallard as in the arms.)

An indenture of settlement of his estates was made 4 June 1623.

Shortly before his death he compounded for knighthood by the payment of £10.

Thomas Bressey and Amy Booth had the following children:

child 50 i. Ralph8 Brassie was born about 1592. He was aged 21 at the Heralds' Visitation of Cheshire in 1613. Ralph died before June 1623. He died without issue.

child 51 ii. Thomas Brassie. Of Nantwich, Cheshire, he was the second son of the family in 1613, but the oldest son in 1623. He was living in 1640.

child + 52 iii. Richard Brassie was born about 1595.

child 53 iv. Hugh Brassie. He was living in 1631 and in 1640.

child 54 v. Randle Brassie. He was living in 1631.

child 55 vi. William Brassie. He was living in 1631.

child 56 vii. James Brassie. He was living in 1631 and in 1640.

child 57 viii. Elizabeth Brassie. She married Anthony Furnivall before 1623. Anthony was of Milne House in Chelford.

child 58 ix. Alice Brassie. She married Richard Herbert before 1631.

child 59 x. Mary Brassie. She was living in 1631.

child 60 xi. Frances Brassie. She was living in 1631

child 61 xii. Amy Brassie. She was living in 1631.

30. Ralph7 Bressey (Thomas6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) birth date unknown. Ralph died by 8 February 1620. Ralph Bressey of Knowle, Warwickshire, gentleman, spoke of his father Ralph Bressey as dead on that date.

He married Joane Doughtie 16 May 1580 St. Dionis Backchurch in London, Middlesex, England. She was of the parish of St. Mary Colechurch. He matriculated pensioner from St. John's College, Cambridge, Easter 1567, and again in 1568, and got his B.A. from Clare College, Cambridge, 1571/2. He was admitted freeman of the Haberdashers' Company by patrimony in 1577.

Ralph Bressey and Joane Doughtie had the following children:

child 62 i. Thomas8 Bressey. He was mentioned in the will of his step-grandmother, Mrs. Anne Bressey, in 1596.

child 63 ii. Anne Bressey. She was also mentioned in the will of her step-grandmother in 1596.

child 64 iii. Ralph Bressey. He was apprenticed to his uncle Thomas Garraway of the Drapers' Company 2 December 1607, and was of Knowle, Warwickshire, in 1620, when he was "greatly impoverished" by supplying the needs of his father. He may possibly be the Ralph Bressey of St. Mary Somerset, London, gentleman, administration of whose estate was granted to his widow, Ann Bressey, on 23 February 1623/4.

32. Henry7 Bressey (Thomas6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born about 1559. Henry died 1624.

He married twice. He married Joyce Blackett. Joyce died before 1605. He married Lucy. He matriculated pensioner, aged ten, at Cambridge from St. John's College at Easter, 1569, and got his B.A. from Clare College in 1577/80. In 1581 he was made a freeman of the Haberdashers' Company by patrimony.

On 15 January 1590/1, an inquest was taken at the Guildhall, London, in which it was found that Henry Bracy, gentleman, "became a lunatic by the visitation of God 2 years ago" but enjoyed lucid intervals. The jury found that he was seized of the reversion of the manor of Oddeston in the parish of Shaxton, Leicestershire, and a water-mill in the parish of Swepton in the same county, as appeared by a deed made by Henry Waver alias Over, late citizen and alderman of the city of Coventry, to Thomas Wheathill, Richard Wheathill, Ralph Egerton, and Simon Wheathill, that he was seized of the reversion of lands held by copy of the court of the manor of Balsall, lying in Escot and Barston, Warwickshire, and that Ralph Bracy, his brother, was his next heir and aged thirty-four years and more.

In a "lucid interval" he had married a daughter of John Blackett of Tring, Hertfordshire, but in February, 1602, he had relapsed into insanity, and another inquisition, similar to the first, was taken at the Guildhall, the jury finding that his next heir was his son Henry Bressey, now aged 2 years and 8 months."

His second wife, Lucy, was "of mean degree and parentage," and was sued by her stepson, Henry Bressey, in 1632 and 1633. She was living in Coventry, Warwickshire, in 1646, "putting out money at interest."

Henry Bressey and Joyce Blackett had the following children:

child 65 i. Mary8 Bressey. Mary died 1629. Administration on her estate was granted to her brother Henry on 14 April 1630.

child 66 ii. Joyce Bressey. She married John Field before 1632. He was of Knowle, Warwickshire.

child 67 iii. Henry Bressey was born 1599. He was of Barston and Estcote, Warwickshire, gentleman, in 1632 and 1633.

Henry Bressey and Lucy had the following children:

child 68 iv. Bressey. She died infancy.

child 69 v. Lucy Bressey. She married Love-in-God Gregory. Love-in-God is the son of John Gregory and Margaret Griswold. The Gregorys were of Stivichall, Warwickshire.

38. Edmund7 Bressey (Edmund6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) birth date unknown. His body was interred 4 November 1617 in Wooten, Beds, Eng.

He married Constance Shepherd 25 December 1595. Constance is the daughter of Thomas Shepherd and Amphyllis Chamberlain, alias Spicer. Her body was interred 1 July 1631 in Wooten, Beds, Eng. She was of Maulden, Bedfordshire.

He was baptized 16 December 1568 St. Dionis Backchurch in London, Middlesex, England. He made a will 30 October 1616. The will of Edmund Bressey of Wooten, gentleman, was proved 26 January 1617/8, in which he willed himself to be buried in Wooten church. To the poor of Wooten, Redbourne, and Nettleden, 11s each. To his wife Constance, his house at Wooten, land and cottages at Kempston, farm stock, all household stuff and plate "to bestow one half among my children at her discretion as they marry." To his sons Thomas and John, the house at Nettleden and £150 each at the age of twenty-three. To his children Lucretia, Robert, Constance, Ralph, and Anne Bressey, £200 each, the daughters at marriage, the sons at twenty-three. To his son Edmund, £50 yearly until he is twenty-six, and 100 marks yearly for three years afterward. To his daughter Katherine, 20 marks yearly while unmarried. His parsonage at Redbourne, Hertfordshire, to his executors for ten years to pay debts and legacies. Residue to his kinsmen Sir Richard Anderson, Knt., and Henry Garroway of London, executors. The executors having renounced, administration was granted to widow Constance Bressey in 1617, and after her death to Thomas Faldo, Esq., with consent of Edmund Bressey, the son, on 1 July 1637. He matriculated at Cambridge as a pensioner from Emmanuel College at Christmas 1586, but did not finish his course, as on 17 May 1588 he was admitted at Gray's Inn, London, as a student of law. He was stated to be from Braynfford (Brentford), Middlesex. He was made a freeman of the Haberdashers' Company by patrimony in 1593.

At first, Edmund and Constance lived at Maulden, Bedfordshire, but then they lived in the neighboring paish of Wooten, Bedfordshire.

Bressey apparently practiced his profession in London while his family remained in Bedfordshire. In 1609 Thomas Bedell of Southove, Huntingtonshire, sued Edmund Bressey of Gray's Inn, gentleman, and Robert Faldo, Esq., of Gray's Inn, charging them with withholding from him part of the purchase money of lands in Wooten and Kempston, Bedfordshire, which he had sold through them as attorneys to Mr. John Harvey of Thurley, Bedfordshire. Faldo was a half-brother of Bressey's wife and the two men were possibly partners.

To him, as "Edmund Bressey, son & heire of Edmund Bressey of Nettledon Com. Bucks, Esq.," Sir William Segar exemplified the family arms, changing the bird in the first quarter from a mallard to a martlet and adding a mullet or for difference, in the 11th year of King James I. (Arms: Quarterly per fess indented sable and argent, in the first quarter a martlet of the second, a mullet for difference or. Crest: Out of a mural crown sable, purfled or, a demi-eagle displayed argent, beaked gold.)

Edmund Bressey and Constance Shepherd had the following children:

child 70 i. Catherine8 Bressey. She married Rev. Robert Risley 21 May 1622 in Kempston, Bedfordshire, England. He made a will 21 February 1622/3. It was proved 11 November 1623. He was vicar of Wilshamstead, Bedfordshire. Rev. Robert Risley and his brother, Rev. Edward Risley, who married Lucretia Bressey, were nephews of James Risley of St. Andrews Holborn, London, gentleman, whose will (1653/4) states that his ancestors were of Risley Hall, Lancashire, that he was born in Oundle, Northamptonshire, and that he owned the "perpetual donation" of the vicarage of Wilshamstead, which he left to Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge.

She was baptized 9 March 1596 in Maulden, Bedfordshire, England. She made a will 2 June 1631. The will of the widow, Catherine Risley of Wilshamstead, was proved 7 February 1633/4, makes provision for her funeral, the minister who shall preach the sermon, and the poor. To my father-in-law, Mr. Martin Fountayne and my uncle Mr. Thomas Shepard, my lands at Wooten, lately purchased from Richard Fookes, for the payment of legacies, my brother, Mr. Edward [sic] Bracy to have first offer for its purchase at £240/ To Mr. Rowland Heylin, alderman, of London and John White of the Middle Temple, Esq., £20 for the furtherance of the preaching of the Gospel, etc. To my mother, Mrs. Constance Fountayne, 30s for a ring. To my brother, Edmund Bracy, and his wife, 20s each for rings. To my brother Thomas Bracy, £40 besides £10 which I owe him, and all my bedding. To my brother John Bracy, £40. To my brother Risley, 20s for a ring. To my sister Risley, £30, to pay for her house, and my two silver salts and a maudlyn pot of silver which she hath of mine in her hands. To my brothers Robert and Ralph Bracy, £25 each, payable to my brother Thomas Bracy, and to be paid to them, together with the increase, at the age of twenty-one. To my sister Constance Bracy, £30. To my sister Amphillis Bracy, £25. To my said sisters, all my linen, a silver tankard and a gilt bowl, to be divided between them by my loving mother. To my sister Frances Fountayne, £5 to buy a piece of plate in remembrance of me. To my cousin Elizabeth, daughter of my brother Edmund Bracy, £20. To my cousin Constance, daughter of my brother Risley, £20, a silver bowl and a gilt spoon, which her mother, my sister, hath of mine. To my cousin Frances, daugher of my brother Risley, £5. To Mr. William Norman of Clapwell, 20s. To his wife, 40s. To their son James Norman, my godson, £5. To the children of my late husband--Anne Risley, £5, James Risley, 40s, John Risley, 20s. To my cousin Mr. Shirley, minister of Hawnes, 20s. To my cousin his wife, my cousin Crannedge and my cousin Wilson, 10s each for rings. If any of my brothers Thomas, John, Robert, or Ralph dies before receiving his legacy, it is to go to the survivors; likewise with my sisters, Constance and Amphillis. Executors and residuary legatees: father-in-law Mr. Martin Fountayne and uncle Mr. Thomas Shepard. Overseer: brother Mr. Edmond Bracy. Witnesses: John Abbot, Michael Sansom, Kinbrow Barrett, Anne Rensmith. The executors named having renounced, administration was granted to "Thomas Bresley, son of Edward Risley," the principal legatee.

child + 71 ii. Edmund Bressey.

child + 72 iii. Thomas Bressey.

child 73 iv. John Bressey. He was baptized 18 December 1603 in Maulden, Bedfordshire, England. He was admitted in 1621/2, at the age of seventeen, as a pensioner at Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge. The university record states that he was a son of Edmund Bressey, gentleman, of Maulden, Bedfordshire, and that he had gone to a private school at Walthamstead, Buckinghamshire. He obtained his B.A. from Cambridge in 1625/6 and an M.A. in 1629.

The year in which John Bressey joined his brother Thomas in New England is not known. In all probability, however, he was the "Mr. Bracie" who took the oath of fidelity in New Haven 1 July 1644 and he was certainly the "Mr. Bracey" who had a place directly behind the governor when the townspeople were seated in the meeting-house in 1646, his wife, her name unknown, being seated in "the first cross seat at the end." Presumably a Puritan in feeling, he may have contemplated being ordained as a clergyman, for Rev. Cotton Mather in his Magnalia gives in his list of clergymen "Mr. Brucy of Brainford," Branford, Connecticut, and later remarks "I say nothing because I know nothing of Mr. Brecy; but this, he also returned to England."

In the New Haven court records, under the dates 3 August and 5 October 1647, are recorded the transfers of Mr. John Bracey's property--about two hundred and twenty-six acres to Mr. Wackman, his house, home-lot and thirty acres to Mr. Kitchell, five acres to Mr. John Evance and nine acres to Goodman Boykin.

In 1649 Bressey was back in England in time to take a hand in the matrimonial affairs of young Henry Bressey, his nephew and the head of the house. In 1650 he witnessed and possibly wrote the will of his cousin, Mrs. Shirley, and in 1651 he was "of London" when he took administration of the estate of his brother Edmund and was sued for an accounting by his nephew Henry. In 1655, "of London, gentleman," he was associated with Thomas Faldo of St. James Clerkenwell, and this is the last record of him thus far found. It would seem that after his return to England he adopted a legal career. A search for his will or the administration of his estate has produced nothing.

child 74 v. Lucretia Bressey. Her body was interred 25 August 1637 in Wilhamstead, Bedfordshire, England. She married Rev. Edward Risley. His body was interred 19 December 1654 in Wilhamstead, Bedfordshire, England. He succeeded his brother as vicar of Wilshamstead 25 May 1624. She and Edward had five children baptized between 1625 and 1634.

child 75 vi. Robert Bressey. He was a minor in 1631, when his sister Katherine Risley made her will.

child 76 vii. Constance Bressey. She was a minor in 1631.

child 77 viii. Ralph Bressey. He was a minor in 1631.

child 78 ix. Amphyllis Bressey. Her body was interred 27 March 1622 in Wooten, Beds, Eng. Called Anne in her father's will, she was a minor in 1631.

child 79 x. Richard Bressey.

41. Isaac7 Bressey (Edmund6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) birth date unknown.

He married Judith Redman 19 February 1598/9 St. Dionis Backchurch in London, Middlesex, England. Her body was interred 25 September 1605 St. James Clerkenwell in London, Middlesex, England.

He was baptized 19 October 1578 St. Dionis Backchurch in London, Middlesex, England. A year after her husband's death Judith Bressey sued her father-in-law for an accounting, the custody of her child and the return of a trunk filled with clothing. She stated that by her marriage settlement her portion had been £250, part of which had been supplied by her stepfather, Francis Fuller, and that Edmund Bressey had agreed to keep the young couple in his own house for six years, after which he was to settle 1,000 marks on them. This sum was reduced because of Isaac's debts, but £400 was expended on lands which were conveyed to trustees for the use of Isaac and Judith, the rents of which had been retained since Isaac's death. Edmund Bressey answered that part of the rents were allocated to pay other debts which Isaac had contracted, and that the trunk had never been demanded. As to the child, he left it to the court's judgment whether or not its mother was a fit person to have custody inasmuch as she had no fixed place of abode except by the courtesy of her step-father.

In 1624 the trustees conveyed the lands, which were at Hoggesden, Middlesex, to the child, then a married woman, by order of the Court of Chancery. After her death, her cousin Edmund Bressey of Wooten, Bedfordshire, brought suit against the trustees.

Isaac Bressey and Judith Redman had the following child:

child + 80 i. Susan8 Bressey.

42. Edward7 Bressey (Ralph6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1)(5) birth date unknown. His body was interred 22 January 1623/4.

He married Frances Ward about 1599. Frances is the daughter of Hugh Ward. Hugh Ward was of Minishull, Cheshire.

He made a will. The undated will of Edward Bressie of Audlem, gentleman, was proved 26 May 1624, and left all of his movable property to his wife Frances, all money at interest to his daughters Mary, Margaret, and Jane, 10s to his daughter Frances, and the residue to Roger Wright of Nantwich, Cheshire, gentleman, William Boulton of Hankelow, gentleman, and Lawrence Bressey of Cliffe, gentleman, for specified uses. An inventory of the estate was dated 29 January 1623/4, and proved 26 May 1624 at Chester. Their children were baptized in Audlem in between 1601 and 1617.

Edward Bressey and Frances Ward had the following children:

child 81 i. Edward8 Bressey. His body was interred 11 April 1629 in Audlem, Cheshire, England. He made a will 8 April 1629. It was proved 30 May 1629 at Chester and mentioned his grandmother, his mother, his sisters Jane and Frances, and his lands in Audlem, Buerton, and Woodfall.

child 82 ii. Ellen Bressey. Her body was interred 11 March 1604 in Audlem, Cheshire, England.

child 83 iii. Mary Bressey. She was baptized 4 June 1605 in Audlem, Cheshire, England.

child 84 iv. Margaret Bressey. Her body was interred 21 April 1602 in Audlem, Cheshire, England. She was baptized 13 January 1601 in Audlem, Cheshire, England.

child 85 v. Frances Bressey. She was baptized 20 November 1610. She was living in 1629.

child 86 vi. Jane Bressey. She was baptized 8 August 1617 in Audlem, Cheshire, England. She was living in 1629.

child 87 vii. Margaret Bressey. She married John Daxon.

She was baptized 5 August 1607 in Audlem, Cheshire, England.

46. Lawrence7 Bressey (Randall6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) birth date unknown.

He married Margaret. He and his wife lived at The Cliffe, Hough, in the parish of Wybunbury, Cheshire. He was feoffee of the estate of his cousin Thomas Bressey of Bulkley in 1623 and of the estate of his cousin Edward Bressey of Audlem in 1624.

Lawrence Bressey and Margaret had the following children:

child 88 i. Thomas8 Bressey. He was a legatee of his uncle William Bressey in 1646.

child 89 ii. Joseph Bressey.

child 90 iii. Benjamin Bressey. He was legatee of his uncle William Bressey in 1646.

child 91 iv. Daniel Bressey. He was legatee of his uncle William Bressey in 1646.

47. Francis7 Bressey (Randall6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) birth date unknown. Francis died before 1646. His children William Bressey and Mary Bunbury were legatees of his brother William Bressey in that year.

Francis Bressey had the following children:

child 92 i. William8 Bressey.

child 93 ii. Mary Bressey. She married Bunbury.

48. Anne7 Bressey (Randall6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) birth date unknown.

She married Bouchier. She and her daughter were named in the will of her brother William.

Anne Bressey and Bouchier had the following child:

child 94 i. Lydia8 Bouchier.

49. William7 Bressey (Randall6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) birth date unknown.

He married Anne.

He made a will 20 August 1646. The will of William Bressey of St. Brides, London, was proved 10 September 1646. It directs that his son William be paid the legacy of £20 from his late master, Arthur Woolnoth, citizen and goldsmith, and leaves one-third of his estate to his wife Anne, one-third to his four children, Samuel, Thomas, and William Bressey, and Ann Best, and one-third charged with legacies to his brother Lawrence Bressey, his sister Boucher and her daughter Lydia, his daughter Anne, his nephews Thomas, Benjamin and Daniel Bressey (sons of his brother Lawrence), William Bressey and Mary Bunbury (children of his brother Francis, deceased), William and Anne Bressey, his servants, and his friends Mr. John and Mrs. Susan Talbot, the widow Margaret Blayne, Mr. Joseph Parrott. Executors and residuary legatees: wife Anne and son Samuel. Overseers: Mr. Parrott and Mr. Talbot. He was a citizen and merchant tailor of London.

William Bressey and Anne had the following children:

child 95 i. William8 Bressey.

child 96 ii. Thomas Bressey. He made a will September 1668. Thomas was a surgeon of Barbadoes, and left his estate to his friends Mrs. Susanna and Mrs. Florence Elliot, to his brother Mr. William Bressey of London, a goldsmith, to his brother-in-law and sister Mr. Thomas and Mrs. Anne Best. He appointed his friends, Capt. James Elliot and Mr. Francis Bressey of Barbadoes, executors.

child 97 iii. Samuel Bressey.

child 98 iv. Anne Bressey. She married Thomas Best.

Eighth Generation

52. Richard8 Brassie (Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born about 1595. He was aged 68 at the Heralds' Visitation of Cheshire in 1663. He succeeded his father at Bulkley. His body was interred 17 April 1668 in Malpas, Cheshire, England.

He married Eleanor Dutton 15 October 1634 in Bunbury, Cheshire, England. Eleanor is the daughter of Edward Dutton. Her body was interred 16 August 1669 in Malpas, Cheshire, England. She was baptized 11 March 1609 in Waverton, Cheshire, England. The Duttons were of Hatton, Cheshire.

Richard Brassie and Eleanor Dutton had the following children:

child + 99 i. Thomas9 Brassie.

child 100 ii. Mary Brassie. She was baptized 5 November 1636 in Bunbury, Cheshire, England.

child 101 iii. Richard Brassie was born about 1635. He was aged 28 at the Heralds' Visitation of Cheshire in 1663. His body was interred 17 July 1664 in Malpas, Cheshire, England. The eldest son, he died in his father's lifetime.

child 102 iv. Edward Brassie. He married Alice.

He was baptized 11 February 1638 in Bunbury, Cheshire, England. He made a will 24 December 1693. It was proved 10 April 1695 at Chester by his wife.

child 103 v. John Brassie. He was living in 1693.

child 104 vi. Peter Brassie. He was baptized 8 August 1647 in Bunbury, Cheshire, England.

child 105 vii. Elizabeth Brassie. She was baptized 10 September 1643 in Bunbury, Cheshire, England.

child 106 viii. Jane Brassie.

child 107 ix. Amy Brassie. She was living in 1693.

child 108 x. Sarah Brassie. She was baptized 18 August 1650 in Bunbury, Cheshire, England.

71. Edmund8 Bressey (Edmund7, Edmund6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) birth date unknown. Edmund died 10 April 1638. His body was interred 12 April 1638 in Wooten, Beds, Eng.

He married Elizabeth Low 31 August 1620. Elizabeth is the daughter of Reynes Low. Her body was interred 28 April 1636 in Wooten, Beds, Eng. Reynes Low was of Clifton, Buckinghamshire. Elizabeth's sister married Roger Nicholls of the Inner Temple, London, and in 1630, having been made executors of the will of Richard Wake of Hartwell, Northamptonshire, a cousin of their wives, the brothers-in-law sued William Wake, Sir John Wake, Lady (Elizabeth) Wake, and others to recover plate, jewels, etc. which they alleged had been taken from Richard Wake's coffers after his death and before the finding of his will.

The estate of Edmund was settled in the following manner. An inquest post mortem was held on his estate on 5 September 1638 at Ampthill, by which it was found that he died 10 April 1638, and that Edmund Bressey, aged thirteen, was his son and heir. Letters of administration, granted to his son Henry in 1651 were revoked, and administration granted to his brother John on 1 September 1653 for the benefit of his children Constance, Mary, John, Francis, Elizabeth, and Martha.

He was baptized 8 July 1599 in Maulden, Bedfordshire, England. He entered his pedigree, extending back only to his grandfather, in the visitation of Bedfordshire of 1634.

Edmund Bressey and Elizabeth Low had the following children:

child 109 i. Constance9 Bressey. She married Francis Saunders 4 July 1643 All Hallows, Bread Street in London, Middlesex, England.

She was baptized 6 June 1621 in Wooten, Beds, Eng.

child 110 ii. Mary Bressey. She married Waller before 1652.

She was baptized 5 May 1623.

child 111 iii. Edmund Bressey. Edmund died 1641. He was baptized 10 February 1624 in Wooten, Beds, Eng. He was a ward of the Crown on the death of his father, guardianship granted by the Court of Wards to his great-uncle, Thomas Shepard.

child 112 iv. Elizabeth Bressey. She was baptized 24 May 1626 in Wooten, Beds, Eng. She was living unmarried in 1665 when her brother Henry made his will.

child 113 v. Henry Bressey. His body was interred 10 December 1666 in Wooten, Beds, Eng. He married Elizabeth.

He made a will 30 December 1665. It was proved 13 September 1667, and left small legacies to the poor of Wooten and Kempston and to his sister Elizabeth Bressey (£5 for a gown), and named his wife Elizabeth residuary legatee and executrix. He was admitted to Gray's Inn, London, 1 June 1647 as a son and heir of Edmund Bressey, late of Wooten, Esq., At Midsummer, 1649, at St. Peter Paul's Wharf, London, while a minor, he married Elizabeth, widow of Thomas Snelling, Esq., "of good birth and breeding, being by the father's side of the Leas, and by the mother's of the Hales." Ten days after his marriage, he conveyed his Wooten estate to his uncle John Bressey in trust for sixty years, with reversion to himself and his heirs male and remainders to his brothers John and Francis and his uncle John, and went to Holland, having been influenced against his wife, as she alleged, by his uncle. She sued John Bressey on 30 November 1649 to obtain a sufficient allowance and to learn her husband's whereabouts. Henry Bressey returned, and in 1651 sued his uncle for an accounting. In 1652 he sued his great-aunt Margaret Shepard, widow of Thomas Shepard of Maulden, for an accounting of the estate of his elder brother Edmund. She stated in her answer that the book of account, bonds and £400 had been delivered to Mary Waller and Constance Sanders, sisters of the complainant.

child 114 vi. John Bressey. He was living in 1653.

child 115 vii. Francis Bressey. He was living in 1653, and was possibly that Francis Bressey of Barbadoes, who was friend and executor of Dr. Thomas Bressey in 1668.

child 116 viii. Martha Bressey. She was living in 1653.

72. Thomas8 Bressey (Edmund7, Edmund6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1)(6) birth date unknown. Thomas died about 1646 or 1648 in New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut.

He married twice. He married Hannah Hart 30 January 1626/7 in London, Middlesex, England. The license does not give any information about her parentage. Nothing is known about her except that she died within a few years of the marriage.

He married Pheby Bisby 4 August 1631 St. Lawrence Jewry in London, Middlesex, England. Pheby is the daughter of William Bisby. William Bisby was a merchant of the Salters' Company. He was not pleased with either of his daughter's husbands. In a letter to his sister-in-law, Mary Wyllys, wife of George Wyllys, Governor of the Connecticut Colony, dated 11 May 1646, he says of his daughter "shee was rash in her first marryage, & soe in her second." In another letter to Mrs. Wyllys, dated 21 August 1646, he states that Phebe had had £20 each year from him since she went to New England, "which is, I take it, twelve years."

He was baptized 8 November 1601 in Maulden, Bedfordshire, England. After his father's death he was apprenticed, at age eighteen, to John Abbott of London, a member of the Fishmongers' Company, for a term of eight years beginning 6 August 1619, and in 1626 he was admitted to the freedom of the Company by service, the record stating that he was a "son of Edmund Bressey, late of Maulden in the County of Bedford, dec'd." His master, Mr. Abbott, although a member of the Fishmongers' Company, was probably a linen merchant. In 1626/7 Thomas Bracey, linen-draper, was licensed to marry Hannah Hart.

In 1633/4 Thomas was appointed administrator, cum testamento annexo, of the estate of his sister Catherine (Bressey) Risley of Wilshamstead, Bedfordshire.

In 1634 the Bresseys emigrated to New England and went to the new settlement of Ipswich. On 20 April 1635 the town records recite a grant to William White bounded by "the highway that leads to Greate Neck on the West side of Mr. Bressy's land." It is later recorded that a lot conveyed by Thomas Firman to Mr. John Norton was bounded by Mr. John Baker, Mr. Thomas Brecey and the High Street, and in other land grants of the years 1637 and 1638 Mr. Bressey's land appears as a boundary. No deed is recorded in which he appears as grantee or grantor, but in a grant to Mr. John Norton on 12: 2: 1638 the land in question was bounded on the northeast "by a planting lot formerly granted to Mr. John Fawne and by him sould unto Mr. Thomas Brecey and now in his possession." His name disappears from the Ipswich records after 1638.

On 14: 7: 1640 a Mr. Brace was admitted freeman of Rhode Island and the name appears again on a roll of freeman dated 16 March 1641. It is not improbable that these records mark Thomas Bressey's removal from Ipswich.

In 1641 a subsidy of the Livery Companies of London was taken, and among the Fishmongers appears "Thomas Brasey, linen-draper, of New England."

After his stay in Rhode Island, if in fact he was the Mr. Brace of rhe record, Thomas Bressey settled in New Haven, where he was joined by his brother John, and died there, certainly before 1648 and possibly before 1646.

Thomas Bressey and Pheby Bisby had the following children:

child 117 i. Constance9 Bressey. She married John Morey. He was of Wethersfield, Connecticut. In Gov. John Winthrop, Jr.'s, medical journal occurs the entry "Murry his wife of Wethersfield, Mrs. Martin's daughter, being within 2 months of her tyme." In 1661 Mr. and Mrs. Morey quitclaimed to her step-father (Samuel Martin) their interest in the property bought by Mr. Bisby for her mother.

child 118 ii. Phebe Bressey. She married twice. She married Joseph Dickinson. Joseph died 4 September 1675. Joseph was of New Haven, Northfield, and Wethersfield, Connecticut, and was killed in battle in King Phillip's war.

She married John Rose Sr. He was from New Haven. Phebe probated the will of her husband, John Rose, Sr., and entered the inventory of her son Joseph Dickeson in June 1683.

child 119 iii. Thomas Bressey. He married Mary Osborn after 14 November 1672. The following letter was sent by James Osburn to Gov. John Winthrop, Jr.: "From hattfield ye 14: 9: 72 Right worshipfull: after humble service to you with dew respects to yours. these may sertyfy you that I have given leave to Thomas bracy to speak with my dafter Mary: he having a desire to make afinity with her by marriage. these are therefore to desire you to grant him liberty of spech with her: as also if you Can Conveniently spare her I have given him an order to bring her up to Springfield with him but rather then you should be put upon inconveniances I doe desire that she should tary with you longer; ither wile you be otherwise provided or providence so ordering it she have a more nesesary Cale away Thus beging your praiers for us I rest yours in all humble service James Ozburn"

Mary is the daughter of James Osborn. Mary was one of her father's heirs in 1676. He quitclaimed his interest in the property bought by his grandfather Bisby for his mother to his step-father Martin in 1661.

Thomas and Mary lived in Hatfield, and in 1694 the town authorities took his children and placed them to live with other families "to prevent their growing up in idleness."

child 120 iv. Susannah Bressey. She was baptized 5 September 1647 in New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut.

child 121 v. John Bracey(7) was born about 1639. John died 19 January 1708/9 in Wethersfield, Hartford County, Connecticut. He was "aged abt 70 as thought." He married Anne Pearce about 1677. She was of York, Maine. Anne was the daughter of John Pearce.

Anne died before 1696. John Pearce was a York fisherman.

He was baptized 5 September 1647 in New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut. He was apprenticed to one Wheeler, a tailor, who died before 1657, when the New Haven court inquired of Widow Wheeler "how she hath disposed of John Bracy who was prentice to her husband to learn his trade: she said he was yet with her, but she was free to dispose of him wher he might learne his trade, and sent to his brother who is a taylor to take him, but he refused." Some months later when "Goodwife Wheeler was asked how she doth dispose of her apprentize, John Bracie, she said she could not dispose of him" and the Court appointed Thomas Kimberley, Francis Browne and James Russell "who are taylours and can best give light on such matters, to consider of it...and declare to ye Court what they thinke in the case." They concluded that Jno Bracie staye here and be at the Courts dispose and that Mr Stanborough alow 40s towards the buying him cloathes."

After obtaining his freedom young Bracy went to sea, and in 1664 at Wethersfield, his mother's home, giving his age as "twenty-foure yeares or thereabouts" he made a deposition describing a voyage which he made in the ketch "Hope" early in 1663, from the Piscataqua River bound for Milford, Connecticut. The "Hope" ran into a violent storm, sprang a leak and finally, when water and food were nearly exhausted, made port in the island of Nevis, West Indies. During the height of the storm Bracey was "fasned Downe in the Cook roome" by the captain's order and remained there three days.

In 1661 John Bracy sold his interest in the Wethersfield homestead to his mother and step-father, and for 45 years from the date of his "Hope" deposition his name disappears from the Connecticut records. There cannot be the slightest doubt that he is the John Bracy, tailor, who lived during this period at York, Maine, a few miles to the east of the Piscataqua River, where his unfortunate voyage began. His name first appears on the York records in 1673, when the town made him a grant of land, and during the ten preceding years, he may have been at sea.

Bracy's career at York was turbulent and far from creditable. In 1673 he was accused by John Morrall of stealing nails, but was acquitted through lack of evidence. In 1677 he was sued by Thomas Bragdon for shooting a hog and was assessed damages and costs, but upon his petition ten shillings of the costs were remitted by the court. In 1678 he was presented for stealing a pair of shoes, and, ignoring the summons, was admonished and sentenced to sit in the stocks for one hour, which penalty he finally escaped by paying the officers' fees. For "casting severall reflecting speeches upon the Rev. Mr. Dummer" in 1686 Bracy and Sarah Anger were each sentenced to make public acknowledgment of their offense or to receive ten lashes at the whipping-post. He was accused of being a common liar in 1691 by John Penwill, and in 1698, being presented for cursing, he was ordered to be "set in ye Stocks at York" for three hours.

In 1696 "John Bracey of York, Taylor" gave a blanket deed of all his land, housing and personal effects to Mr. Jeremiah Moulton. In spite of his offenses he had received from the town several additional grants of land in 1674 and 1685, one being situated "by John Pearce's home lot." It is a logical conclusion that the deed to Mr. Moulton was made to protect the interests of Bracy's son, William, although the deed does not specifically create a trust. Moulton later disposed of all the land but how he applied the proceeds is not indicated. In 1697 Bracey and Micum McIntire made an agreement dividing the real estate of their father-in-law John Pearce.

John Bracy was being maintained by Thomas Trafton in 1697. The next record of him is in Boston on 2 December 1707, when the town charged the province for "meat drink washing lodging and firing for John Bracee a poor distressed aged man from the Eastward being found in this town liable to perish." Boston "entertained" him for fifty-five weeks, ending 20 June 1708. Finally he made his way to Wethersfield where the death of "Mr. John Bracey, aged abt 70 as thought" was recorded.

child 122 vi. Hannah Bressey was born about 1640. Hannah died 2 September 1682. The court granted her estate to her daughter who agreed to pay her mother's debts. She married Thomas Paine 25 August 1659 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachussetts. They were married by Gov. Endicott. Her name and that of her parents is spelled "Bray" in the records. Paine was a mariner. "Hannah Bracey 18 years old" is mentioned in Gov. Winthrop's medical journal in 1658, and in 1667 there is an entry in the same journal concerning "Hannah Paine 6 years grandchild of Mrs. Martin of Wethersfield."

80. Susan8 Bressey (Isaac7, Edmund6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) birth date unknown. Susan died 1635.

She married John Owfield. He was of Barking, Essex, gentleman.

Susan Bressey and John Owfield had the following child:

child 123 i. Francis9 Owfield. Francis died 1635.

Ninth Generation

99. Thomas9 Brassie (Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) birth date unknown. His body was interred 30 March 1721 in Malpas, Cheshire, England.

He married Elizabeth Bulkeley 18 December 1696 in Madeley, Staffordshire, England. Elizabeth is the daughter of Thomas Bulkeley. She was living in 1720.

He made a will 16 March 1720. The fifth son of Richard and Eleanor, he was of Bulkley and of the township of Buerton in the parish of Aldford in Cheshire. He was living in 1663.

Thomas Brassie and Elizabeth Bulkeley had the following children:

child 124 i. Edward10 Brassie. He was a minor in 1720.

child 125 ii. Richard Brassie. He was a minor in 1720.

child 126 iii. Elizabeth Brassie. She was a minor in 1720.

child 127 iv. Anne Brassie. She was a minor in 1720.

child 128 v. Margaret Brassie. She was a minor in 1720.

child 129 vi. Jane Brassie. She was baptized 6 September 1715 in Aldford, Cheshire, England.

child 130 vii. Martha Brassie. She was baptized 18 November 1717 in Aldford, Cheshire, England.

child + 131 viii. Thomas Brassie was born about 1702.

child + 132 ix. Robert Brassie was born about 1709.

Tenth Generation

131. Thomas10 Brassie (Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born about 1702. He was aged 74 at the time of his death in 1776 (monumental inscription). Thomas died 2 May 1776 in Saighton, Cheshire, England. His body was interred in Malpas, Cheshire, England.

He married Mary Harrison 10 February 1729 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. Mary was born 1711. She was aged 64 at the time of her death in 1776 (monumental inscription). Mary was the daughter of George Harrison.

Mary died 14 May 1776. Her body was interred in Malpas, Cheshire, England. She was baptized 16 June 1711 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. The Harrisons were of Aldford, Cheshire.

He made a will 6 January 1769. A codicil was added 19 January 1775, and the will was proved with the codicil on 29 May 1776 at Chester. He was of Bulkeley and Buerton.

Thomas Brassie and Mary Harrison had the following children:

child 133 i. Richard11 Brassie. His body was interred 4 June 1734 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. He was baptized 5 July 1733 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. He was the eldest son.

child 134 ii. Margaret Brassie. She married Job Watson 28 January 1755 in Aldford, Cheshire, England.

She was baptized 11 April 1734 in Aldford, Cheshire, England.

child 135 iii. Elizabeth Brassie. Her body was interred 11 October 1739 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. She was baptized 21 June 1739 in Aldford, Cheshire, England.

child 136 iv. Frances Brassie. She married Thomas Evison 28 February 1775 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. He was of Bangor, county Flint, Wales.

She was baptized 6 August 1747 in Aldford, Cheshire, England.

child + 137 v. Robert Brassie was born 1737.

child + 138 vi. Thomas Brassie was born 1742.

child + 139 vii. George Brassey was born 1744.

child + 140 viii. Benjamin Brassey was born 1749.

child 141 ix. Mary Elizabeth Brassie was born 1750. She was aged 28 at the time of her death in 1778 (monumental inscription). Mary died 10 November 1778 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. Her body was interred 18 November 1778 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. She married John Palin 3 March 1778 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. John was born 1748. He was aged 85 at the time of his death in 1833 (monumental inscription).

John died 21 July 1833. His body was interred 25 July 1833 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. He was baptized 30 March 1749 in Aldford, Cheshire, England.

She was baptized 22 January 1750/1 in Aldford, Cheshire, England.

132. Robert10 Brassie (Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born about 1709. He was aged 68 at the time of his death in 1777 (monumental inscription). Robert died 3 February 1777 in Waverton, Cheshire, England. His body was interred 6 February 1777 in Waverton, Cheshire, England.

He married Mary. Mary was born about 1716. She was aged 84 at the time of her death in 1800 (monumental inscription).

Mary died 11 March 1800 in Waverton, Cheshire, England. Her body was interred 16 March 1800 in Waverton, Cheshire, England. She made a will 6 December 1799. Described as a widow of the township of Hatton in the parish of Waverton, Cheshire, the will was proved 23 April 1800 in Chester. He was of the township of Hatton in the parish of Waverton, Cheshire. Administration on his estate was granted 22 October 1777 at Chester to his widow Mary.

Robert Brassie and Mary had the following children:

child 142 i. Elizabeth11 Brassie. Elizabeth died 17 October 1767. Her body was interred in Waverton, Cheshire, England. (monumental inscription)

She was baptized 2 June 1737 in Waverton, Cheshire, England. She was coheir with her sisters Mary and Margaret. She did not marry.

child 143 ii. Mary Brassie was born 1739. She was aged 85 at the time of her death (monumental inscription). Mary died 24 October 1824 in Waverton, Cheshire, England. Her body was interred 28 October 1824 in Waverton, Cheshire, England. She married Randle Hewitt 1 February 1760 St. Peter's in Waverton, Cheshire, England. Randle was born 1739. He was aged 56 at the time of his death in 1795 (monumental inscription).

Randle died 12 March 1795. His body was interred 15 March 1795 in Waverton, Cheshire, England. He was of Hatton Hall in the parish of Waverton, Cheshire.

She was baptized 3 April 1739 St. Peter's in Waverton, Cheshire, England. She was coheir with her sisters Elizabeth and Margaret.

child + 144 iii. Margaret Brassie was born 1740.

child 145 iv. Thomas Brassie was born 1743. He was aged 24 at the time of his death in 1767 (monumental inscription). Thomas died 22 October 1767. His body was interred 26 October 1767 in Waverton, Cheshire, England. He was baptized 14 October 1743 in Waverton, Cheshire, England. He did not marry.

Eleventh Generation

137. Robert11 Brassie (Thomas10, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born 1737. Robert died 19 March 1803. His body was interred 22 March 1803 in Christleton, Cheshire, England.

He married Sarah Brooke 6 July 1761 in Malpas, Cheshire, England. The marriage settlement was dated 12 June 1761.

Sarah was born 1737. She was aged 80 at the time of her death in 1817 (monumental inscription).

Sarah died 4 June 1817. Her body was interred 9 June 1817 in Christleton, Cheshire, England. She made a will. Administration with will was granted 10 July 1817 at Chester. She was sister of Ambrose Brooke of the township of Edge in the parish of Malpas, Cheshire.

He was baptized 4 April 1737 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. He made a will 26 January 1788. It was proved 9 July 1803 with administration granted 15 May 1819 at Chester. Of Bulkeley and of Cotton Edmunds in the parish of Christleton, Cheshire, he was the eldest surviving son and heir.

Robert Brassie and Sarah Brooke had the following children:

child 146 i. Thomas12 Brassie. Thomas died in Liverpool, Lancashire, England. He married Elizabeth. Elizabeth was born 1772. She was aged 24 at the time of her death in 1796 (monumental inscription).

Elizabeth died 04 July 1796. Her body was interred 08 July 1796 in Christleton, Cheshire, England. He was of Bulkeley, eldest son and heir, and died without issue.

child 147 ii. Robert Brassie. His body was interred 24 July 1783 in Christleton, Cheshire, England. He was baptized 14 February 1768 in Christleton, Cheshire, England.

child 148 iii. Ambrose Brassie. His body was interred 18 May 1779 in Christleton, Cheshire, England. He was baptized 04 September 1773 in Christleton, Cheshire, England.

child 149 iv. Mary Brassie. Mary died as infant. Her body was interred 22 August 1763 in Malpas, Cheshire, England.

child 150 v. Margaret Brassie was born 1765. She was aged 79 at the time of her death in 1844 (monumental inscription). Margaret died 23 February 1844 in Malpas, Cheshire, England. Her body was interred in Malpas, Cheshire, England. She married William Smith 21 February 1807 in Christleton, Cheshire, England. He was of Milton Brook, Cheshire.

She made a will 27 February 1833. It was proved 15 June 1844 at Chester. She was only surviving daughter and sole heir to her two brothers, Thomas and Richard. She was of Edge House in the parish of Malpas, Cheshire, and a widow when she died without issue.

child 151 vi. Richard Brassie was born 1768. His age was given as 49 at the time of his death in 1817 (monumental inscription). Richard died 06 April 1817. His body was interred 11 April 1817 in Christleton, Cheshire, England. He was baptized 10 April 1769 in Christleton, Cheshire, England. He made a will 28 March 1817. It was proved 28 March 1818 at Chester. He was of Bulkeley and Cotton Edmunds. He did not marry.

138. Thomas11 Brassie (Thomas10, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born 1742. He was aged 73 at the time of his death in 1815 (monumental inscription). Thomas died 10 December 1815. His body was interred 14 December 1815 in Waverton, Cheshire, England.

He married Margaret Brassie 29 June 1766 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. Margaret was born 1740. She was aged 79 at the time of her death in 1820 (monumental inscription). Margaret was the daughter of Robert Brassie and Mary.

Margaret died 21 November 1820. Her body was interred 24 November 1820 in Waverton, Cheshire, England. She was baptized 13 February 1740 in Waverton, Cheshire, England. She was coheir with her sisters Elizabeth and Mary.

He was baptized 16 September 1742 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. He made a will 26 July 1814. It was proved 13 April 1816 at Chester. He was the third son but the second surviving son, and was of the township of Saighton, Cheshire.

Thomas Brassie and Margaret Brassie had the following children:

child 152 i. Margaret12 Brassie. She married twice. She married William Moore. She married Capt. Barber. She was living in 1851.

child 153 ii. Mary Brassie. She married James Rowe 25 March 1799 in Bruera, Cheshire, England. James died 05 January 1834. He was of Lache, Cheshire.

She was baptized 02 January 1776 in Bruera, Cheshire, England.

child 154 iii. Thomas Brassie was born 1766. She was said to be aged 50 (sic) at the time of her death (monumental inscription). Thomas died 06 May 1819. His body was interred 09 May 1819 in Waverton, Cheshire, England. He was baptized 03 December 1766 in Waverton, Cheshire, England. He made a will 31 March 1817. It was proved 3 November 1819 at Chester by his aunt, Mary Hewitt, widow. He was eldest son and heir, and was of Hatton Hall. He died without issue.

child 155 iv. Elizabeth Brassie was born 1768. She was said to be aged 69 at the time of her death in 1838 (monumental inscription). Elizabeth died 25 November 1838. Her body was interred 29 November 1838 in Waverton, Cheshire, England. She married Robert Salmon 17 September 1797 in Waverton, Cheshire, England. Robert was born 1768. His age was given as 75 at the time of his death in 1843 (monumental inscription).

Robert died 20 September 1843. His body was interred 23 September 1843 in Waverton, Cheshire, England. He was baptized 09 May 1768 in Waverton, Cheshire, England. He was of Hatton in the parish of Waverton, Cheshire.

She was baptized 18 December 1768 in Bruera, Cheshire, England.

child 156 v. Robert Brassie was born 1770. She was aged 56 at the time of her death in 1826. Robert died 26 December 1826. His body was interred 29 December 1826 in Waverton, Cheshire, England. He married Elizabeth Arrowsmith 05 March 1810 in Bebington, Cheshire, England. The marriage settlement was dated 24 October 1809.

Elizabeth was born 25 October 1772. Elizabeth was the daughter of John Arrowsmith. The Arrowsmith family was of Great Sutton in the parish of Eastham, Cheshire, and Elizabeth was a widow of Samuel Walton of Grange House Birkenhead, Cheshire. She was living as a widow of Robert Brassie at Boughton near Chester in 1851.

He was baptized 06 January 1771 in Bruera, Cheshire, England. He was of Rough Hill in the parish of St. Oswald, Chester, and died without issue.

139. George11 Brassey (Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born 1744. He was aged 59 at the time of his death in 1803 (monumental inscription). George died 13 November 1803. His body was interred 17 November 1803 in Aldford, Cheshire, England.

He married Elizabeth Jackson 17 February 1768 in Chester, Cheshire, England. Elizabeth was born 1750. She was aged 84 at the time of he death in 1834 (monumental inscription).

Elizabeth died 2 February 1834. Her body was interred 6 February 1834 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. She was of Waverton, Cheshire.

He was baptized 31 May 1744 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. He made a will 26 September 1783. A codicil was added on 14 October 1803, and the will was proved 29 September 1804 at Chester.

George Brassey and Elizabeth Jackson had the following children:

child 157 i. Robert12 Brassey. He was baptized 14 August 1780 in Aldford, Cheshire, England.

child 158 ii. Richard Brassey. He was baptized 21 February 1788 in Aldford, Cheshire, England.

child + 159 iii. George Brassey.

child 160 iv. Thomas Brassey was born 1769. He was aged 74 when he died in 1843 (monumental inscription). Thomas died 12 April 1843. His body was interred 15 April 1843 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. He was baptized 21 March 1769 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. Of Bulkeley and of Hatton, Cheshire, he was eldest son and heir. He died without issue.

child 161 v. Mary Brassey was born 1770. She was aged 43 at the time of her death in 1814. Mary died 6 November 1814. She married William Gaman 29 December 1791 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. William was born 1760. He was aged 63 when he died in 1823.

William died 7 September 1823. He was of Brewers Hall, Cheshire.

She was baptized 9 December 1770 in Aldford, Cheshire, England.

child 162 vi. Margaret Brassey was born 13 December 1773. She married Richard Weaver 21 December 1798 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. Richard was born 11 December 1771. He was of Pool Bank, Tarvin, Cheshire, and was living in 1851.

She was baptized 28 December 1773 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. She was living in 1851.

child 163 vii. Elizabeth Brassey was born 1776. She was aged 66 at the time of her death in 1842. Elizabeth died 15 October 1842. Her body was interred in Farndon, Cheshire, England. She married Paul Miller 4 February 1799 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. Paul was born 1777. He was aged 43 at the time of his death in 1820.

Paul died 18 November 1820 in Farndon, Cheshire, England. His body was interred in Farndon, Cheshire, England. He was of Farndon, Cheshire.

She was baptized 21 July 1776 in Aldford, Cheshire, England.

child + 164 viii. John Brassey was born 19 May 1778.

child 165 ix. George Brassey was born 9 August 1783. George died in Saighton, Cheshire, England. His body was interred 6 September 1844 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. He was baptized 18 February 1784 in Aldford, Cheshire, England.

child 166 x. Benjamin Brassey was born 1785. He was aged 64 at the time of his death in 1849 (monumental inscription). Benjamin died 26 October 1849. His body was interred 31 October 1849 in Christleton, Cheshire, England. He married twice. He married Elizabeth Davies May 1811 in Tarvin, Cheshire, England. Elizabeth was the daughter of John Davies. Elizabeth died 1 March 1815. Her body was interred in Tarvin, Cheshire, England. John Davies was of Tarvin Hall, Cheshire.

He married Esther Evans 4 November 1817 St. Bridget's in Chester, Cheshire, England. Esther was born 16 October 1800. Esther was the daughter of John Evans. John Evans was of the City of Chester.

He was baptized 3 July 1785 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. He was of Foregate Street in Chester.

140. Benjamin11 Brassey (Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born 1749. He was aged 77 at the time of his death in 1826. Benjamin died 1826. His body was interred in Liverpool, Lancashire, England.

He married Mary Bruce 1779 in Weaverham, Cheshire, England. Mary was born 1748. She was aged 57 at the time of her death in 1805.

Mary died 7 August 1805. Her body was interred in Wigan, Lancashire, England. She was of Acton and Tattenhall, Cheshire.

He was baptized 8 July 1749 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. He was a merchant of the City of Chester.

Benjamin Brassey and Mary Bruce had the following children:

child 167 i. Bruce12 Brassey. Bruce died 25 September 1846. His body was interred in Liverpool, Lancashire, England. He was baptized 24 September 1781 St. Peter's in Chester, Cheshire, England. Of Liverpool, Lancashire, he was eldest son and heir. He did not marry.

child 168 ii. Sarah Brassey was born 1783. She married Thomas Dodd. He was of Christleton, Cheshire, and was living in 1851.

She was baptized St. Peter's in Chester, Cheshire, England. She was living in 1851. She had no children.

child 169 iii. John Brassey was born 20 February 1790. John died 19 June 1849. His body was interred in Davenham, Cheshire, England. He married Mary Allman 8 January 1817 in Great Budworth, Cheshire, England. Mary was born 24 October 1784. Mary was the daughter of Ephraim Allman. Ephraim Allman was of Hartford, Cheshire. Mary was living as a widow in 1851.

He was baptized 9 April 1790 St. Peter's in Chester, Cheshire, England. He was of Tattenhall, Cheshire.

144. Margaret11 Brassie (Robert10, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born 1740. She was aged 79 at the time of her death in 1820 (monumental inscription). Margaret died 21 November 1820. Her body was interred 24 November 1820 in Waverton, Cheshire, England.

She married Thomas Brassie 29 June 1766 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. Thomas was born 1742. He was aged 73 at the time of his death in 1815 (monumental inscription). Thomas was the son of Thomas Brassie and Mary Harrison.

Thomas died 10 December 1815. His body was interred 14 December 1815 in Waverton, Cheshire, England. He was baptized 16 September 1742 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. He made a will 26 July 1814. It was proved 13 April 1816 at Chester. He was the third son but the second surviving son, and was of the township of Saighton, Cheshire.

She was baptized 13 February 1740 in Waverton, Cheshire, England. She was coheir with her sisters Elizabeth and Mary.

Thomas Brassie and Margaret Brassie had the following children:

child 152 i. Margaret12 Brassie. She married twice. She married William Moore. She married Capt. Barber. She was living in 1851.

child 153 ii. Mary Brassie. She married James Rowe 25 March 1799 in Bruera, Cheshire, England. James died 05 January 1834. He was of Lache, Cheshire.

She was baptized 02 January 1776 in Bruera, Cheshire, England.

child 154 iii. Thomas Brassie was born 1766. She was said to be aged 50 (sic) at the time of her death (monumental inscription). Thomas died 06 May 1819. His body was interred 09 May 1819 in Waverton, Cheshire, England. He was baptized 03 December 1766 in Waverton, Cheshire, England. He made a will 31 March 1817. It was proved 3 November 1819 at Chester by his aunt, Mary Hewitt, widow. He was eldest son and heir, and was of Hatton Hall. He died without issue.

child 155 iv. Elizabeth Brassie was born 1768. She was said to be aged 69 at the time of her death in 1838 (monumental inscription). Elizabeth died 25 November 1838. Her body was interred 29 November 1838 in Waverton, Cheshire, England. She married Robert Salmon 17 September 1797 in Waverton, Cheshire, England. Robert was born 1768. His age was given as 75 at the time of his death in 1843 (monumental inscription).

Robert died 20 September 1843. His body was interred 23 September 1843 in Waverton, Cheshire, England. He was baptized 09 May 1768 in Waverton, Cheshire, England. He was of Hatton in the parish of Waverton, Cheshire.

She was baptized 18 December 1768 in Bruera, Cheshire, England.

child 156 v. Robert Brassie was born 1770. She was aged 56 at the time of her death in 1826. Robert died 26 December 1826. His body was interred 29 December 1826 in Waverton, Cheshire, England. He married Elizabeth Arrowsmith 05 March 1810 in Bebington, Cheshire, England. The marriage settlement was dated 24 October 1809.

Elizabeth was born 25 October 1772. Elizabeth was the daughter of John Arrowsmith. The Arrowsmith family was of Great Sutton in the parish of Eastham, Cheshire, and Elizabeth was a widow of Samuel Walton of Grange House Birkenhead, Cheshire. She was living as a widow of Robert Brassie at Boughton near Chester in 1851.

He was baptized 06 January 1771 in Bruera, Cheshire, England. He was of Rough Hill in the parish of St. Oswald, Chester, and died without issue.

Twelfth Generation

159. George12 Brassey (George11, Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1)(8) birth date unknown. George died September 1844 in Saighton, Cheshire, England. His body was interred 6 September 1844 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. At burial, his age was given as 61 years, which also seems to be in error.

He married Harriet Chadwick 7 June 1803 St. Chad's in Rochdale, Lancashire, England.(9) Harriet was born about 1784 in Rochdale, Lancashire, England. Harriet died 1862. Her body was interred 1862 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. She was listed as a widow, age 67, in Saighton, in the 1851 census.

He was baptized 5 April 1789 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. The transcript of this record gives his parents' names as George and Phoebe, but the mother's name is thought to be in error.

George was employed as a gamekeeper in Saighton, Cheshire, England 1820-1824. The Register of Gamekeepers of Cheshire, 1711-1949, lists George Brassey, yeoman, of Saighton, as gamekeeper on 31 August 1820, and George Brassey, yeoman, of Aldford, as gamekeeper for the manor of Saighton on 3 February 1824.

George Brassey and Harriet Chadwick had the following children:

child + 170 i. George Betton13 Brassey.

child 171 ii. Thomas Brassey. He was christened 26 October 1826 in Aldford, Cheshire, England.(10)

child + 172 iii. Elizabeth Brassey.

child 173 iv. Robert Brassey. He was baptized 13 November 1805 St. Chad's in Rochdale, Lancashire, England.(11)

child 174 v. John Brassey was born in Aldford, Cheshire, England 27 January 1804. He was christened 9 February 1804 in Aldford, Cheshire, England.(12)

child + 175 vi. Richard Brassey was born about 1808.

164. John12 Brassey (George11, Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1)(13) was born 19 May 1778. He was aged 52 at the time of his death (monumental inscription). John died 28 January 1831. His body was interred 2 February 1831 in Aldford, Cheshire, England.

He married Elizabeth Percival 19 May 1805 in Warmingham, Cheshire, England. Elizabeth was born 14 June 1778. She was aged 62 at the time of her death in 1840 (monumental inscription). Elizabeth was the daughter of Ralph Percival.

Elizabeth died 31 March 1840. Her body was interred 4 April 1840 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. She was baptized 14 July 1778 in Haslington, Cheshire, England. Ralph Percival was of Haslington Hall, Cheshire.

He was baptized 20 July 1778 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. He was of Buerton, Cheshire.

John Brassey and Elizabeth Percival had the following children:

child + 176 i. Thomas13 Brassey was born 7 November 1805.

child 177 ii. Ralph Perceval Brassey was born 26 June 1808. Ralph died 11 July 1830. His body was interred 14 July 1830 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. He was baptized 22 January 1809 in Aldford, Cheshire, England.

child 178 iii. John Brassey was born 29 September 1811. John died 8 April 1829. His body was interred 13 April 1829 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. He was baptized 12 January 1813 in Aldford, Cheshire, England.

child 179 iv. Elizabeth Brassey was born 1813. She was aged 52 at the time of her death. Elizabeth died 30 November 1865 Latchford Parsonage in Latchford, Cheshire, England. Her body was interred 4 December 1865 in Latchford, Cheshire, England. She married Rev. James Wright 13 December 1831 in Bruera, Cheshire, England. James was born 10 August 1795 in Foulksrath Castle, County Kilkenny, Ireland. James was the son of Stephen Wright and Anne Nisbett. James died 22 September 1867 Latchford Parsonage in Latchford, Cheshire, England. His body was interred 25 September 1867 in Latchford, Cheshire, England. He made a will 26 May 1866. It was proved at Chester on 24 October 1867 by James Wright of Latchford, civil engineer, and the Rev. Arthur Wright of Kenyon Terrace, Claughton, Cheshire, his sons, and by Edward Chapman Poore of 42 Castle Street, Liverpool, a son-in-law, who were the executors. Stephen Wright was of Foulksrath Castle, county Kilkenny, Ireland, and Anne Nisbett was a daughter of the Rev. Meade Nisbett, Rector of Borrisokane, county Tipperary, Ireland. James Wright obtained his B.A. from Queen's College, Cambridge in 1831, was incumbent of Latchford, Cheshire, for 33 years.

She was baptized 25 January 1814 in Aldford, Cheshire, England.

child + 180 v. George Brassey was born 19 February 1816.

child 181 vi. Richard Brassey was born 14 June 1818. Richard died 15 January 1836. His body was interred 20 January 1836 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. He was baptized 27 January 1819 in Aldford, Cheshire, England.

child + 182 vii. Robert Brassey was born 10 June 1822.

Thirteenth Generation

170. George Betton13 Brassey (George12, George11, Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) birth date unknown.

He married Mary Carr 30 May 1831 in Aldford, Cheshire, England.

He was baptized 10 April 1809 St. Chad's in Rochdale, Lancashire, England.(14)

George Betton Brassey and Mary Carr had the following child:

child + 183 i. Richard14 Brassey was born 15 February 1832.

172. Elizabeth13 Brassey (George12, George11, Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) birth date unknown.

She was christened 22 October 1826 in Aldford, Cheshire, England.(15) She was probably born much earlier than her christening, since she was almost certainly the mother of Emanuel Brassey, an illegitimate child.

Elizabeth Brassey had the following child:

child 184 i. Emanuel14 Brassey was born about 1834. He was christened 22 June 1834 in Aldford, Cheshire, England.

175. Richard13 Brassey (George12, George11, Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born in Rochdale, Lancashire, England about 1808.

He married Mary Ann Hughes 4 February 1833 in Eastham, Cheshire, England. Mary was born about 1818 in Eastham, Cheshire, England.

He was baptized 10 February 1809 St. Chad's in Rochdale, Lancashire, England.(16)

Richard Brassey and Mary Ann Hughes had the following children:

child 185 i. Robert14 Brassey was born about 1833. He was christened 21 July 1833 St. Peter parish in Liverpool, Lancashire, England.

child 186 ii. Mary Brassey was born in Eastham, Cheshire, England about 1838.

child 187 iii. Margaret Brassey was born in Birkenhead, Cheshire, England about 1840. She was christened 6 September 1840 St. Peter parish in Liverpool, Lancashire, England.

child 188 iv. Harriet Brassey was born in Birkenhead, Cheshire, England about 1843.

child 189 v. Thomas Brassey was born in Birkenhead, Cheshire, England about 1846.

child 190 vi. George Brassey was born in Birkenhead, Cheshire, England about 1849. He was christened 16 November 1851 St. Peter parish in Liverpool, Lancashire, England.

child 191 vii. Sarah Brassey was born about 1850. She was christened 16 November 1851 St. Peter parish in Liverpool, Lancashire, England. She was christened on same day as brother George, but she is not listed in 1851 census.

176. Thomas13 Brassey (John12, George11, Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born in Buerton, Cheshire, England 7 November 1805. Thomas died 8 December 1870 in St. Leonard's-on-Sea, Sussex, England. His body was interred 13 December 1870 in Catsfield, Sussex, England.

He married Maria Farrington Harrison 20 December 1831 in Birkenhead, Cheshire, England. Maria was born 1817. She was aged 60 at her death. Maria was the daughter of Thomas Harrison.

Maria died 3 January 1877 in St. Leonard's-on-Sea, Sussex, England. Her body was interred 6 January 1877 in Catsfield, Sussex, England. Thomas Harrison was of Liverpool.

He was baptized 22 January 1806 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. He made a will 8 July 1854. Five codicils were added on 8 October 1860, 2 February 1864, 24 March 1864, 25 April 1868, and 5 March 1869, and the will was proved (Prin. Reg., 70, 71) on 7 February 1871 by William Wagstaff, gent., and Henry Arthur Brassey and Albert Brassey, his sons, and three of the executors. He was of Bulkeley and of Buerton, and of 56 Lowndes Square, London. He was Land Surveyor at Birkenhead, Cheshire, 1826, and a railway contractor in London, 1836. He constructed railway line from Paris to Rouen 1841-3, and from Rouen to Havre 1843-5. He was contractor for the Great Northern Railway 1847-51, for railways in Italy 1850-3, for the Grand Trunk Railway of Canada 1852-9, and for railways in Australia 1859-63.

Thomas Brassey and Maria Farrington Harrison had the following children:

child + 192 i. Thomas14 Brassey was born 11 February 1836.

child 193 ii. John Brassey was born 1 June 1839. John died 16 June 1839. His body was interred 19 June 1839 in North Waltham, Hampshire, England.

child + 194 iii. Henry Arthur Brassey was born 14 July 1840.

child + 195 iv. Albert Brassey was born 22 February 1844.

180. George13 Brassey (John12, George11, Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born in Buerton, Cheshire, England 19 February 1816. He was aged 65 at the time of his death (monumental inscription). George died 21 July 1881 Cuddington Hall in Malpas, Cheshire, England. His body was interred 26 July 1881 in Bunbury, Cheshire, England.

He married Jane Cawley 25 May 1841 in Burwardsley, Cheshire, England. Jane was born 1809. She was aged 64 at the time of her death (monumental inscription). Jane was the daughter of John Cawley.

Jane died 19 January 1873 Cuddington Hall in Malpas, Cheshire, England. Her body was interred 23 January 1873 in Bunbury, Cheshire, England. John Cawley was of Swandley, Cheshire.

He was baptized 7 July 1816 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. He was of Cuddington Hall, Malpas, Cheshire.

George Brassey and Jane Cawley had the following children:

child 196 i. Mary Cawley14 Brassey was born in Malpas, Cheshire, England. She married Thomas Maddocks 19 June 1873 in Malpas, Cheshire, England. They were married by the Rev. Arthur Wright, Rector of Tilston, Cheshire, assisted by the Rev. Joseph Dobell, Curate of Gresford, county Denbigh, Wales.

Thomas was born 17 March 1846 in Woodlands-in-Wem, Shropshire, England. Thomas was the son of Thomas Maddocks and Mary. He was baptized in Newtown, Shropshire, England. The Maddocks were of Woodlands-in-Wem, Shropshire. The younger Thomas matriculated 19 May 1864, aged 18, Exeter College, Oxford, granted B.A. 1867. He was Justice of the Peace for Shropshire.

She was baptized 29 March 1848 in Malpas, Cheshire, England.

child 197 ii. John Brassey was born 11 April 1842. He died at the age of 7 (monumental inscription). John died 17 August 1849 Cuddington Hall in Malpas, Cheshire, England. His body was interred 21 August 1849 in Bunbury, Cheshire, England.

child 198 iii. Thomas Brassey was born 31 August 1843. Thomas died 9 July 1896 Cuddington Hall in Malpas, Cheshire, England. His body was interred 11 July 1896 in Malpas, Cheshire, England. He made a will 11 July 1894. It was proved at Chester on 13 October 1896 by Richard Brassey, the sole executor.

child 199 iv. George Brassey was born 15 May 1845. George died 30 September 1907. His body was interred 2 October 1907 in Malpas, Cheshire, England. He was baptized 11 June 1845 in Malpas, Cheshire, England.

child 200 v. John Perceval Brassey was born 12 February 1851. John died 8 July 1894. His body was interred 11 July 1894 in Malpas, Cheshire, England. He was baptized 16 April 1851 in Malpas, Cheshire, England. He made a will 8 July 1894. It was proved at Chester 6 September 1894 by Richard Brassey and Robert Parker, the executors.

182. Robert13 Brassey (John12, George11, Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born 10 June 1822. Robert died 10 June 1889 Bulkeley Grange in Malpas, Cheshire, England. His body was interred 14 June 1889 in Bickerton, Cheshire, England.

He married Mary Dutton 15 March 1843 in Malpas, Cheshire, England. Mary was the daughter of Richard Dutton. Mary died 20 March 1891 Bulkeley Grange in Malpas, Cheshire, England. Her body was interred in Bickerton, Cheshire, England. Richard Dutton was of Bickerton, Cheshire.

Administration on the estate of Mary was granted at Chester on 14 July 1891 to Richard Brassey of Egerton Hall, Malpas, her son.

He was baptized 14 July 1822 in Aldford, Cheshire, England. He made a will 31 March 1884. Two codicils were added on 19 April 1889 and 25 May 1889, and the will was proved at Chester 21 August 1889 by Richard Brassey of Egerton Hall, near Malpas, and by Robert Perceval Brassey of Bank House, Cholmondeley, near Malpas, his sons and the executors. He was of Bulkeley Grange, Malpas, Cheshire.

Robert Brassey and Mary Dutton had the following children:

child + 201 i. Richard14 Brassey was born 20 February 1844.

child 202 ii. Robert Perceval Brassey was born 8 May 1845. Robert died 11 October 1898 Cholmondeley in Malpas, Cheshire, England. His body was interred in Bickerton, Cheshire, England. He made a will 20 November 1885. It was proved at Chester 21 November 1898 by Richard Brassey and Mary Caroline Brassey, the executors.

child 203 iii. Mary Elizabeth Brassey was born in Bulkeley, Cheshire, England 4 May 1848. She married William Mortimer 11 August 1869 in Bickerton, Cheshire, England. William was born 29 December 1840 in Warkleigh, Devonshire, England. William was the son of John Mortimer and Mary Wreford. William died 11 May 1900 in London, Middlesex, England. His death was sudden and unexpected.

His body was interred 16 May 1900 in Bickerton, Cheshire, England. He was baptized in Warkleigh, Devonshire, England. He made a will 18 March 1890. Two codicils were added dated 27 June 1892 and 20 May 1895, and the will was proved at Chester on 12 June 1900 by Charles Reynolds, John Murray, Ernest Morland Crosfield, and Harry Percival Mortimer, the surviving executors. William Mortimer was of Orford, Lancashire, and of Beaconhurst, Frodsham, Cheshire, while John Mortimer was of Morchard Bishop, Devonshire. Mary Wreford was a daughter of George Wreford of Morchard, Devonshire.

William was a Justice of the Peace for Cheshire and Lancashire.

She was baptized in Bickerton, Cheshire, England.

child 204 iv. Catherine Ellen Brassey was born in Malpas, Cheshire, England 16 September 1850. Catherine died 29 April 1907 Edge House in Malpas, Cheshire, England. Her body was interred 2 May 1907 in Bickerton, Cheshire, England. She was baptized in Bickerton, Cheshire, England.

Fourteenth Generation

183. Richard14 Brassey (George Betton13, George12, George11, Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born in Little Sutton, Cheshire, England 15 February 183. Richard died 9 May 1914 in Ipswich, Queensland, Australia. His body was interred 10 May 1914 Ipswich Cemetery in Ipswich, Queensland, Australia.

He married Sarah Ann Walker 31 May 1857 Trinity Church in Lambeth, Surrey, England. Sarah was born 14 August 1829 in Bermondsey, London, England. Sarah was the daughter of Robert Walker and Harriot. Sarah died 20 February 1913 in Ipswich, Queensland, Australia. Her body was interred 20 February 1913 Ipswich Cemetery in Ipswich, Queensland, Australia. She was christened 6 September 1829 St. John Horsleydown in Surrey, England.

He was christened 25 March 1832 in Eastham, Cheshire, England.

Richard Brassey and Sarah Ann Walker had the following children:

child + 205 i. Elizabeth Jane15 Brassey was born 17 November 1858.

child + 206 ii. George Thomas Brassey was born 21 April 1861.

child 207 iii. Richard Robert Brassey was born in Lambeth, Surrey, England 15 February 1863. Richard died 9 November 1864 in Lambeth, Surrey, England.

child + 208 iv. Ernest Emmanuel Brassey was born 10 November 1869.

192. Thomas14 Brassey (Thomas13, John12, George11, Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1)(17) was born in Stafford, Staffordshire, England 11 February 1836. Thomas died 23 February 1918.(18) His long obituary in The New York Times was as follows: LORD BRASSEY, NAVAL EXPERT, DIES AT 82. FORMER CIVIL LORD OF BRITISH ADMIRALTY, AUTHOR, AND YACHTSMAN, SERVED IN DARDANELLES. London, Feb. 23.---The death of Lord Brassey is announced. Lord Brassey, who was well known in this country as a naval authority and the owner of the famous yacht Sunbeam, joined the Royal Naval Division at the outbreak of the war despite his 78 years and later he was ordered to proceed to the Dardanelles. Until that time he had been actively engaged on a hospital ship, making weekly journeys to France, taking stores and repatriating wounded soldiers. Shortly before the war, on June 26, 1914, Lord Brassey took his yacht to Kiel for the regatta week. He left the yacht on the afternoon of June 25 to row around the harbor in a dinghy, and when passing the imperial dockyard a policeman ordered him to stop. He complied with the order and was then arrested by the harbor police as a spy and brought ashore. It took an hour and fifteen minutes for him to establish his identity and obtain his release. On the following day he dined with the Kaiser and was the recipient of imperial apologies. The auxiliary yacht Sunbeam had been called the most famous of the modern wanderers of the sea. She had more than 400,000 knots to her credit, which is the greatest record ever achieved by a ship of her class. Its owner, an expert sailor and shipmaster, had held a sailing master's license since 1872. Lord Brassey was the founder and first editor of The Naval Annual. He was a former Civil Lord of the British Admiralty, and President of the Institute of Naval Architects. He was born Feb. 11, 1836, and was elected to Parliament in 1865. In 1895 he was appointed Governor of Victoria, which office he held until 1900. He was the author of a five-volume work on the British Navy, published in 1881. In addition to his being an authority on maritime affairs, Earl Brassey was also well known for his work in Sociology, having while in Parliament been active in legislative affairs in relation of the labor laws. One of the interesting features of Earl Brassey's Museum, which he formed in his London mansion in Park Lane, is a toy schooner which he picked up while cruising on the Sunbeam in the Southern Indian Ocean, hundred of miles away from steamer lanes. In his museum are Indian gods and South Sea Island idols, gathered on his cruises. Earl Brassey had been Lord Warden and Admiral of the Cinque Ports, and among his predecessors in this position were King Henry VIII, King James II, while he was Duke of York, William Pitt, the Duke of Wellington, the late Marquis of Dufferin, and the late Lord Salisbury. Lord Brassey was a frequent visitor to this country. He is said to have owed his peerage to the nomination of Gladstone. He was twice married. His first wife, who was the author of a book entitled "A Voyage on the Sunbeam," disappeared from the Sunbeam at sea many years ago, while the vessel was between Bombay and Australia. No one saw her fall or throw herself overboard. Earl Brassey's second wife was a sister of Lord Essex.

He married twice. He married Anna Allnutt 9 October 1860 St. George's, Hanover Square in London, Middlesex, England. They were married by the Rev. Thomas William Jex-Blake, Assistant Master of Rugby. Anna(19) was the daughter of John Allnutt and Elizabeth Harriett Burnett.

Anna died 14 September 1887.(20) She died on her husband's yacht, the "Sunbeam," between Port Darwin and the Mauritius, on the way to Mauritius and the Cape of Good Hope, and was buried at sea.

Her obituary in the New York Times was as follows: Lady Ann Brassey, wife of Sir Thomas Brassey and a prominent figure in English social, artistic, and political life, and perhaps the most enthusiastic yachtswoman in the world, died on board her yacht Sunbeam on Sept. 14 from a fever contracted in Australia, and was buried at sea. A dispatch containing intelligence of her death was received in London from Cape Town yesterday. Lady Brassey was married to Sir Thomas Brassey in 1860, and was the constant companion of her husband on his yachting voyages. She was passionately fond of outdoor sports, being a splendid horsewoman, but her tastes were varied, and her receptions during Parliamentary season at her house in Park Lane were always attended by persons prominent in political, artistic, and social circles. She achieved something of a literary reputation by her description, published in book form, of "The Voyage of the Sunbeam," which had been preceded by "The Flight of the Meteor" and "The Voyage in the Eothen," which were printed for private circulation.

She made a will 22 December 1882. Administration was granted (Prin. Reg., 313, 88) 16 April 1888 to Thomas, Baron Brassey, K.C.B., father and guardian of Muriel Agnes Brassey and Marie Adelaide, her minor daughters. Anna was the only child of John Allnutt of 14 Charles Street, Berkeley Square, London, by his first wife, a daughter of John Fassett Burnett of May Place, Crayford, Kent.

She was a Lady of Grace of the Order of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem in England, and was invested by the King of the Sandwich Islands with the Order of Kapiolani.

She was author of "A Voyage on the Sunbeam," Sunshine and Storm in the East," "In the Trades and Tropics," "The Last Voyage," and wrote for private circulation, "The Flight of the Meteor," and "A Voyage in the Eothen."

The following newspaper account in 1885 of a visit to her London home by an American reporter was reported in the New York Times:

AT LADY BRASSEY'S HOUSE. A TALK WITH HER AND A LOOK AT HER TOWN ESTABLISHMENT. HER ENTERPRISES, PETS, AND AMBITIONS---THE MONKEY ROOM AND THE CHINESE BOUDOIR---A DRAWING ROOM DRESS.

London, March 20---Park-lane, just off Picadilly, where it begins, does not look as though it contained a considerable portion of the wealth and aristocracy of the English metropolis. There is an extremely plebeian saddler's shop to begin with, then a horse mart; following which are some dingy-looking houses suggestive of the pinch of poverty. But by the time No. 24 Park-lane is reached everything is changed. The dingy houses are replaced by stately mansions resembling in style those in Fifth-avenue. No. 24 is the home of the energetic Lady Brassey, known to foreigners as the author of the "Voyage of the Sunbeam"; to all rich Englishmen as the wife of Sir Thomas Brassey, member of Parliament; to poor Londoners as a charitable and hard-working lady, shunning the society of those in the higher ranks in order to devote herself exclusively to the lower; to gossips as someone who is uncomprehensible; to scandalmongers as a subject to be treated with contempt, as dull, stale, and unprofitable. Lady Brassey had just returned from her afternoon drive in the park when I called yesterday afternoon. A meeting of the St. John's Ambulance Society was being held in her house, and Lady Emma Baring with a number of other enterprising women, were all hard at work teaching youthful aspirants to Esculapian honors how to manage the sick, with the object of sending forth as many nurses as possible to the relief of the wounded soldiers at the Soudan.

A powdered footman, with an air of mysterious importance, and a placid smile born presumably of satisfactory lunch, preceded me up a wide marble staircase covered with thick Turkey carpets of a warm, deep red hue. The staircase occupied the centre of the imposing entrance hall, which was elaborately hung with bric-a-brac and ancient pictures, collected by Lady Brassey during her journeys round the world. The powdered major domo threw open the door of what he was pleased to call her ladyship's Chinese boudoir and there left me to take in the surroundings amid which I had been placed to await the entrance of Lady Brassey. The Chinese boudoir was a marvel of artistic arrangement. Dainty little knickknacks of unmistakably Celestial origin lurked in every corner. The walls and ceiling were all painted after the Chinese style. Rich gold silk hangings screened a delightful little conservatory, with a quaintly tresselated floor, while a little grotto of ferns and primroses, reflecting themselves coyly into a looking glass, adorned the upper end of the boudoir. It was a thoroughly pleasant little room, and one in which comfort was by no means sacrificed to art.

Presently I heard a scampering sound outside, and the door having been opened, two hideously manipulated French poodles bounded into the room. They were both black, both medium sized, and both undignified in their vigorous entrance. They had hardly settled themselves into that easy position which their athletic movements had undoubtedly earned for them when they were followed by a lady, whom it was easy to recognize as Lady Brassey. She was neither beautiful nor of massive figure. Her face was intelligent, though the features were somewhat plain, and uninteresting, while her erect bearing was decidely masculine and extremely imposing. Lady Brassey wore a dark green velvet dress, with trimmings of gold. An enormous diamond pendant reposed upon her bosom and rings of the same genus scintillated in her ears. Her Ladyship's salutation was as severely conventional as though she had never moved from a drawing room in her life, and as she seated herself upon a chintz-covered lounge with an air of languid indifference I could not help wondering how she managed to rough it on board the Sunbeam. She evidently noticed my look of surprise.

"I do look rather luxurious, don't I," she said, arranging Sir Peter and Lady Teazle, her hideous poodles, in an artistic manner at her feet, and declining to heed the grunt of disapproval those ungrateful animals gave forth. "I like to be cozy when I can. I suppose you find it hard to believe that I have slept in stables, lived in tents, and passed my time in a Bohemian fashion almost impossible to describe. It is quite true, however; isn't it, Lady Teazle?" Lady Teazle was, however, by this time fast asleep, and declined to wake up for interrogation. "You see," said Lady Brassey, "I can accomodate myself to circumstances, and that is the great thing. I hate circumstances when they are monotonous, and should be quite unhappy if I thought I should never rough it again. I shall do so most certainly. It seems so strange to me." She added musingly, "that my 'Voyage in the Sunbeam' was such a literary success and sufficient to give me a name even in America. Of course you know that I wrote it originally simply for my father. It was a diary and nothing more, and I had no intention of publishing it. When I was a child I used to travel a great deal, and always sent my letters to father to read. He sent them rounds to all our friends, and foreign paper being so easily creased the letters got spoiled and I saw no more of them. So when I went out in the 'Sunbeam' I had my letters lithographed, and when I returned I was greeted with urgent demands for their publication.

Lady Brassey gazed complacently at her poodles, and then toyed listlessly with an inlaid Chinese paper knife which adorned the table. "My notes were absolutely unchanged. Of course I suppressed everything of a private nature. My publisher offered me £300 and I took his offer. Since the publication of the 'Voyage in the Sunbeam' it has brougt me £3,000. Neat, isn't it, considering it was written in such a desultory manner. I used to sit down for ten minutes at a time, anywhere you know, and just scribble the facts as I remembered them. Those facts have now been translated into 22 languages. When Longman published his cheap edition for the people it made for a long time a steady income of £1 a day. In America they behaved splendidly to me, instead of pirating the work, as of course in the beautiful condition of international copyright they could have done, the firm which took it up paid me a percentage. I've nothing to complain of with the Americans. When I was in America in 1874 they treated me royally. They have since shown that they have not forgotten me."

"What gave you your taste for travel?" I asked. "I suspect it growed like Topsy," answered Lady Brassey laughing. "I have always led rather an energetic life. I was an only child, and from the time I was 2 years old I used to travel. I lived in Corfu at that time, and it was there that I learned to ride. Horses are my great weakness. I have taught all my children how to ride, and though I say it, I have taught them very nicely. I think they take after their mother, whose greatest happiness is a five-barred gate." The languid figure on the lounge was certainly not suggestive of five-barred gates, but I remembered that Lady Brassey always accomodated herself to circumstances, and supposed that five-barred gates were therein included.

"Every horse in my stable knows me," continued her ladyship. "When I return after a long journey the animals get perfectly frantic. I must say I am very good to them [complacently]. I invariably feed them when I bring them home, no matter at what time. Just after those horrible dynamite outrages in London I went out a great deal and rarely returned before 2 in the morning. I used to stand outside my house in solemn ---ence and feed the horses, watched by detectives and guarded on either side by a policeman. Ha! Ha! what a trouble they took to protect my precious life!" Lady Brassey laughed at the recollection of her humanity under difficulties, and seemed much amused. "It is not only horses that I love and that love me," she went on, with an egotism that was perhaps pardonable, "but dumb things of all descriptions. Look at these lazy animals, [pointing to her dogs.] They are called my familiars, and never leave me. I have a bullfinch which has been with me for 10 years and which I have taken all around the world. He always wakes up when I come in at night and says, 'How do you do.' When I was in the United States I had with me a dear little pug dog. Well, you know how strict they are or were in America prohibiting dogs in railway carriages. I was determined, however, that I would take my pug with me in the cars. So one day I dressed it in baby's long clothes, put a veil over its face, and carried it in my arms. All went well until a woman---well meaning, I suppose, but terribly indiscreet---came up to me. 'What a small baby,' she said. 'You'll smother it in that veil.' Whereupon she attempted to drag away the offending article, and in agony, as teh absurdity of the situation dawned upon me, I gave a scream. The woman walked off scared and angry, I think, to the other end of the car, and never troubled me again. I forgave her."

Lady Brassey talked with much vivacity, and seemed as much amused herself at her reminiscences as she could reasonably expect her listener to be. "Are you writing anything now?" I asked. "Oh, dear me, yes. I'm always writing," was the answer. "Every morning at 5 o'clock when lazy folks are sleeping in their warm beds, I commence work. I write in bed. Take my advice and do the same. It's extremely comfortable. At present I am engaged upon a paper on my experiences of ambulances. It's a hobby with me, and every week the London branch of the St. John's Ambulance Society meets in my house. It is a glorious thing and destined to do much good. The height of my ambition at present is to introduce it into America, where there is splendid scope for such work. A branch has already been started in Canada. You see, I can't endure to be stupid and fashion due, and sit like a dummy in my house, receiving guests and dispensing tea. I have a branch of the National Aid Society on my hands, too, just now. I have two others in town and am sending out stores of paper and books to the troops in the Soudan. I am doing it all by myself," added Lady Brassey with a smile at Lady Teazle and an arch glance at the somnolent Sir Peter, "and I can tell you it takes up a great deal of my time. It will keep me occupied until next year, when I hope to go to India."

But Lady Brassey showed herself decidedly the woman when she invited me up stairs to inspect her court dress worn when she attended the Queen's drawing room last week. It was a very elaborate costume, which my masculine pen could but feebly describe. The train was of salmon-colored satin, lined with yellow and trimmed with ostrich feathers of the same conspicuous hues. The front of the dress was of yellow satin covered with black Brussels lace, while the bodice was cut pointed, and also surmounted with feathers. Lady Brassey declines to patronize the all-absorbing Worth. Whether her ladyship considers the French master hackneyed is a point which we did not discuss, but she strenuously asserted the fact that London dressmakers could not be excelled by their more pretentious French sisters.

Her ladyship then showed me all over her house, of which she is especially proud for the reasons that nothing in it was purchased in the usual legitimate, but prosaic manner, everything having been obtained from foreign countries by Lady Brassey herself. One room in particular was worth seeing. It was called the monkey boudoir, and was fashioned after Marie Antoinette's room in the Trianon at Versailles. Stuffed monkeys swung from the ceiling; on the satin wood of the piano the same interesting animals were painted; the walls harbored monkeys; into the pattern of the carpets monkeys were worked. Darwin would have rejoiced in the monkey boudoir. Her ladyship's bedroom was an exquisite study in the art of being comfortable. A brass bedstead of the most approved hygienic construction was covered by a Chinese quilt of white satin daintily embroidered in blue and gold; the mirrors were framed in plush; writing tables occupied every corner; velvet armchairs of American manufacture yawned to render fatigued humanity happy, and finally an extensive view of Hyde Park was to bee seen from the roomy bay window. The back drawing room was a lesson in subdued tints; the smoking room was an excavation in ebony; the library was a splendid imitation of an old room in the Paris Louvre; the corridors and passages of the house reminded me of the aisles in Westminster Abbey dimly lighted by red glass shades. Lady Brassey spends very little of her time at No. 24 Park-lane. Her magnificent estate at Normanhurst, near Hastings, claims most of her attention, and the good people of Hastings look upon her as their guardian spirit, hovering over all parts but belonging especially to the old town on the Sussex coast.

He married Lady Sybil de Vere Capell 18 September 1890 St. Paul's, Knightsbridge in London, Middlesex, England. Sybil was born 29 November 1858 2 Lyall Street, Belgrave Square in London, Middlesex, England. Sybil was the daughter of Arthur de Vere Capell and Emma Mary Meux. Sybil died 20 February 1934. She was the youngest daughter of Arthur de Vere, Viscount Malden, (the eldest son of Arthur Algernon, 6th Earl of Essex), by Emma Mary, the third daughter of Sir Henry Meux of Theobald's Park, Hertford, first Baronet.

He was baptized 11 February 1836 St. Mary's in Stafford, Staffordshire, England. Thomas appeared in newspaper articles in The New York Times several times between 1873 and 1915.(21) In 1873 it was reported that "Mr. Thomas Brassey, M.P. for Hastings, has just passed the examination of the Local Marine Board of the Port of London, and obtained his certificate of proficiency as a master of the mercantile marine. Mr. Brassey is the first amateur sailor who has obtained such a certificate, which requires a thorough knowledge of practical navigation." In 1877, the headlines were: YACHTING IN EARNEST. A VOYAGE AROUND THE WORLD. PLEASURE TRIP OF AN ENGLISH YACHTSMAN---35,000 MILES IN 46 WEEKS---A COMPREHENSIVE AND VARIED CRUISE. The article began: "Mr. Thomas Bressey has furnished the London Times with the following account of his yacht trip around the world...." Less than a month later, the Times reported: "Mr. Thomas Brassey, an Englishman, who has only recently completed a yachting voyage around the world, has furnished a London newspaper with an article on gun-boats and torpedoes, from which the following is taken...." A year later, the newspaper reported on the new book, Voyage of the Sunbeam, by Mrs. Brassey. It included this information about her husband and father-in-law: "Mr. Brassey, the celebrated railroad contractor, divided his colossal fortune among his three sons, which gave them somewhere about "$500,000 a year apiece. Unlike the sons of so many rich men, they have shown themselves worthy of great wealth, and this especially applies to the eldest, who is a conspicuously useful public man, and almost the first authority in the House of Commons in matters relating to capital and labor." His books, as well as those of his wife, were reviewd in The New York Times: The Naval Annual, 1886 and 1992; Fifty Years of Progress and the New Fiscal Policy, 1904. In 1890, the newspaper ran an article entitled, THE SEA AS A PROFESSION. LORD BRASSEY TALKS OF ITS REWARDS AND JOYS. DIGNITY OF THE SERVICE--SALARY ONE MAY HOPE TO OBTAIN--COMPARED WITH THE CHURCH AND BAR. In 1899, an article based on information from the Naval Annual and on criticism of Brassey by Sir George Willis for revealing the weakness of the defenses of Portsmouth appeared in the Times. In 1905, the headlines read LORD BRASSEY HERE IN YACHT SUNBEAM. YACHTING DEAN DOESN'T THINK HE'LL WIN OCEAN RACE. IN IT FOR THE HONOR ONLY. 70-YEAR-OLD PEER, HIS OWN SKIPPER, ENCOURAGING THE YOUNG FELLOWS, and the article continued, "Lord Brassey, dean of British yachtsmen, arrived in New York yesterday.... The Sunbeam is one of two British yachts that will compete in the forthcoming race across the Atlantic for the cup offered by the Kaiser...."

An extraordinary event occurred in 1914, reported in The New York Times as follows: BRASSEY ARRESTED AS SPY. KIEL HARBOR POLICEMAN TAKES NAVAL EXPERT INTO CUSTODY. Kiel, Friday, June 26---A most extraordinary incident occurred to mar the even-tenor of the Anglo-German naval love feast in the harbor here yesterday. Lord Brassey, who arrived here Wednesday in his famous steam yacht Sunbeam, was arrested by the harbor police late yesterday afternoon on suspicion of espionage. Lord Brassey had left the Sunbeam in a dinghy to go around the harbor. As he was passing near the imperial dockyard he was suddenly accosted by a policeman, who informed him that he was under arrest. Other details at this late hour are unavailable, except that it took Lord Brassey an hour and a quarter to establish his identity and obtain his release. The huge floating dock in the imperial dockyard near which Lord Brassey was arrested, has for several years, since the outbreak of the spy mania in Germany, been adorned by a legend, in letters two feet high and extending the full length of the dock, warning trespassers that they will be punished to the full extent of the espionage law.

The following day, there were more details in the newspaper: LORD BRASSEY TOOK HIS ARREST LIGHTLY. BUT THE KAISER EXPRESSED DEEP ANNOYANCE OVER THE BLUNDER AT KIEL. HOW INCIDENT OCCURRED. BRITISH NAVAL EXPERT SPEAKS LITTLE GERMAN, CAPTOR LITTLE ENGLISH---WAS QUICKLY RELEASED. Kiel, June 26.---... the Kaiser learned of the affair last night in the course of a dinner party given in honor of the officers of the British squadron on his yacht Hohenzollern, and that he laughed heartily at the incongruous idea of one of the most ardent friends of the Anglo-German entent being caught in the meshes of the German secret service net. (The Kaiser expressed great annoyance later in private.)

With the advent of World War I it was reported in 1915 on Lord Brasseys activities to support the war effort: BRASSEY FOR DARDANELLES. AGED BRITISH NAVAL EXPERT ASSIGNED TO NEW DUTIES. London, June 15.-- Earl Brassey, the veteran owner of the famous yacht Sunbeam, who joined the Royal Navy Division at the outbreak of the war, is under orders to proceed to the Dardanelles. Lord Brassey who is 79 years old, told a recruiting meeting at Eastbourne that he expected to start for a new front within a fortnight. Heretofore, he has been engaged on a hospital ship making weekly journeys to France, taking stores and repatriating wounded soldiers. He was educated at Rugby and at University College, Oxford, where he matriculated 30 May 1855, aged 19. He received a B.A. (Bachelor of Arts) in 1859, an M.A. (Master of Arts) in 1864, Hon. D.C.L. (Honorary Doctor of Civil Law) 1888, Hon. LL.D. (Honorary Doctor of Laws) Dublin 1903. He was called to the Bar at Lincoln's Inn 26 January 1866, and was M.P. (Member of Parliament) for Devonport, Devonshire, June to July 1865, and for Hastings, Sussex, 1868-86.

He was President of the Statistical Society 1879-80; a Civil Lord of the Admiralty 1880-84, and Secretary from November 1884 to 1885; served on Royal Commissions on Opium (Chairman) 1893, Unseaworthy Ships, Defence of Coaling Stations, Relief of Aged Poor, and Canals and Inland Navigation. He was a Lord-in-Waiting to Queen Victoria 1893-95; Governor of University College, London; President of the Institution of Naval Architects 1893-95; and an Associate of the Institute of Civil Engineers.

He was Governor and Commander-in-Chief of Victoria, Australia, 1895-1900. He was a Younger Brother of Trinity House, a J.P (Justice of the Peace) and D.L. for Sussex, Hon. Colonel of Cinque Ports Volunteer Militia 12 December 1891, Hon. Commander Royal Naval Reserve, and of Liverpool Brigade Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers. He was a Commander of the Legion of Honour 1889, Grand Cross of the Order of the Crown of Italy 1907, and a Knight of Justice of the Order of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem in England. He was elected Mayor of Bexhill, Sussex, on 9 November 1907, and was Patron of the living of St. Anne's, Birkenhead, Cheshire.

He was created K.C.B. (Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath) 24 May 1881, and G.C.B. (Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath) 29 June 1906, invested at Buckingham Palace on 24 July 1906.

He was created Baron Brassey of Bulkeley, Cheshire, in the Peerage of the United Kingdom on 16 August 1886, and was created Viscount Hythe of Hythe, Kent, and Earl Brassey on 5 July 1911.

He was the author of "Work and Wages," 1872; of "Foreign Work and British Wages," 1879; of "British Navy" (5 vols.), 1881; and of "Sixty Years of Progress," 1904. He was founder and first Editor of "The Naval Annual."

He was succeeded by his only son. _______________________________________________________

The following biographical article was one that was published about Past Presidents in the Transactions for the Institution of Naval Architects:

THE RIGHT HON. EARL BRASSEY, G.C.B., D.C.L.,

President of The Institution of Naval Architects 1893-1896

Although his actual occupation of the Presidential Chair was cut short by his appointment to an important Government post abroad, his connection with the Institution far exceeded in period of membership that of any other President. He was among those who joined, as an Associate, when the Institution was founded in 1860, and his name, " T. Brassey, jun.," appears in the first list of Members and Associates printed in our Transactions. His interest in the proceedings of the Institution may in part be gauged by some of his contributions to the Transactions, but in a larger measure-and of this the records are less accessible-by the part he played in the management and policy of the Institution, on the Council of which he served continuously for over forty years.

Of the subjects dealt with in the papers which he read at our meetings the policy of warship construction was the most prominent, and of this policy the question of the utilisation of national resources to the best advantage was that which perhaps appealed to Lord Brassey most strongly. His principal contributions, outside his Presidential and other addresses, were:-

" On Unarmoured Vessels," read in 1876. " The Future Policy of Warship Building " (1891). " Merchant Cruisers Considered with Reference to the Policy of Maintaining a Reserve of Vessels by Annual Subvention to Shipowners " (1893). " Mercantile Auxiliaries " (1901). "The Conversion and Re-armament of Ships on the Effective List " (1901). "Merchant Cruisers and Steamship Subsidies " (1904). "Types of Warships Omitted in Recent Programmes of Naval Construction " (1909).

It will be seen from this list how much the thought of utilising merchant cruisers for the protection of our overseas commerce occupied Lord Brassey's mind. Indeed, it may be said that his writings and speeches contributed materially to the adoption of a, definite merchant cruiser policy by the Government and laid the foundation of the noble part played in the present war by our mercantile fleet auxiliaries. His many voyages to the confines of the Empire had created in him an ardent desire to see extended and adequately protected the great arteries of British commerce. The need for more cruisers for this particular service was an insistent one, and the expedient of utilising merchant ships, selected and adapted for this purpose, appealed strongly to a nature inclined to utilise existing resources rather than spend unlimited sums on the more direct side of naval defence.

Lord Brassey's paper on " Mercantile Auxiliaries " to which allusion has been made above was read at the Glasgow Summer Meeting of 1901, and it led to an interesting discussion on the protection of our trade routes, in the course of which Admiral Sir J. Dalrymple Hay proposed that the Government should be urged to build and subsidise high-speed merchant vessels that would be of service in war time as naval auxiliaries. Lord Brassey returned to the subject again in 1904 in a paper on "Merchant Cruisers and Steamship Subsidies," in which he urged a more liberal expenditure on subsidies for fast ocean services to provide the fleet with a reserve of ships for scouting purposes. A Committee had meanwhile been formed by the Council of the Institution to press the matter on the notice of the Government. In April, 1902, a "Mercantile Cruisers Committee" was appointed by Government to consider the question, Professor Biles being, named to represent the Institution. The Committee reported the following July, and one result of their deliberations was the building, of the Mauritania and Lusitania whose high speed and great size won back for us once again the " blue ribbon of the Atlantic."

In matters of shipbuilding policy Lord Brassey, while ardently desiring that we should maintain a powerful fleet for the defence of Imperial interests, was inclined to shrink from the formidable programmes of naval construction which these responsibilities involved. His second paper of 1901 on " The Conversion and Re-armament of Ships on the Effective List " is an example of this trend-of thought. Inspired by the example of the French, who had converted and re-armed obsolete and adolescent warships in place of building further new ones, he advocated that we should proceed on similar lines. But, for a country whose naval interests are almost limitless and whose sea-borne commerce, if undefended, invites attack, it is not possible with safety to substitute antiquated weapons (even though renovated) for the best modern appliances which naval construction can produce. In this regard Lord Brassey suffered from the defaut de ses qualites, and being himself devoid of ostentation or personal extravagance, he sought to model his naval similar lines. The naval administration to which he belonged was largely coloured policy on by these views, and when in 1889 Lord George Hamilton introduced his great programme of construction under the Naval Defence Act it was the just recognition of the fundamental principle that, for a great sea power, its maintenance must be adequate to its needs. The pendulum once more had swung in the direction from which it had too long been withheld.

The late Earl Brassey was born in 1836, being the eldest son of Thomas Brassey, the great railway contractor, among whose many works were part of the South-Western Railway and the first railway to be built in France, connecting Paris with Havre. Coming as he did from a stock that had by sheer hard work and enterprise, successfully carried through great public undertakings, Lord Brassey fully realised the importance of the part played by labour in the development of a nation's resources. "Work and Wages," which he first published as a sequel to the biography of his father by Sir Arthur Helps, was reprinted in later years with additions dictated by matured experience. The welfare of the working classes and the share to which they are entitled in the profits due to increased efficiency and output were strongly advocated in "Work and Wages." "From the inexhaustible fountain of labour, " he wrote, " springs all that constitutes the wealth of nations." The case for labour could not be put more strongly or concisely. The eternal labour question "which confronts our industrial community constantly engaged his thoughts and attention, and many were the addresses which he rave on these social problems and their solution. The broad views of a mind fitted by nature to touch the sympathy and understanding of his fellow-men were a good foundation upon which to build in setting out to solve these thorny and difficult problems. Towards seamen in particular his sympathies were drawn by the common bond of sea service. The bluejacket, the man before the mast, the yacht hand, and the fisherman were to him all fellow-craftsmen whose outlook on life could be appreciated because it was understood.

Lord Brassey was long impressed by the want of system in the training of boys for the position of officers in the mercantile marine. Education in stationary vessels such as the Worcester. and the Conway having come to an end, boys had to pick up their practical knowledge as best they could in sea-going, vessels of all kinds. Being convinced of the desirability of giving the boys further education and systematic training on board ocean-going sailing-ships, Lord Brassey, with this object in view, inaugurated ,a scheme in 1890, in conjunction with Messrs. Devitt and Moore, Becoming part-owner of the Hesperus and Harbinger, large vessels trading to Australia. On board these ships, and others subsequently acquired, hundreds of cadets have for many years been carried, the greater number of whom, after acquiring, a good preliminary knowledge of seamanship navigation, have passed the Board of Trade examination and obtained berths in well-known liners.

The political side of Lord Brassey's life, which constitutes what may be termed his professional career-using that term in its best sense-does not concern us so closely, but is nevertheless of interest to the Institution in so far as it relates to naval matters, and it was principally with these that Lord Brassey concerned himself both on the floor of the House of Commons and later in the Upper House. His training had been well chosen to fit him for his life's work. He was educated at Rugby and University College, Oxford, where he took honours in Law and Modern History. In 1861 Lord Brassey (at the age of twenty-nine) unsuccessfully contested the Parliamentary borough of Birkenhead in the Liberal interest, Four years later he was elected member for Devonport, and sat for a few months until the dissolution of Parliament. The following year, at the general election, he was defeated by a narrow majority as candidate for Sandwich, and in 1868 was elected for Hastings, which borough he represented continuously for eighteen years. From 1880 to 1885 he served in Mr. Gladstone's Government, first as Civil Lord of the Admiralty and afterwards as Parliamentary Secretary of that Department.

In 1882-3 Lord Brassey published a comprehensive work in five volumes on " The British Navy : its Strength, Resources, and Administration," which dealt with the material side of the Navy, its ships, its dockyards, and its seamen. So great was the value of this publication that the author decided a few years later to issue a Naval Annual, and this publication, edited first by him and subsequently by his son (the Hon. T. A. Brassey, afterwards Lord Hythe), has now become a standard work with which his name will always be connected. The Naval Annual includes Particulars, not only of the British but of all the principal foreign navies, and upon it have been modelled numerous similar publications at home and abroad.

The "one clear call" which, above all others, predominated in his versatile nature was undoubtedly the call of the sea. From earliest boyhood it had exercised its fascination upon him, and when in later years the opportunity arose for yachting on the grand scale, it was the Sunbeam that became, not only his floating home for many a long and happy month and the nursery of his children's early years, but it was the means of gratifying that love of travel and adventure which lie shared with all the members of his family. The yachting habit had, however, been acquired long before the advent of the Sunbeam on the scene. As far back as 1855 while still at Oxford, Lord Brassey had successively owned two cutters, the Zillah and Cymba, in which the first lessons of the sea were learnt with all the enthusiasm and glamour of ambitious youth.

Next followed the Albatross, an iron-hulled schooner of 120 tons, in which a voyage to the Mediterranean was undertaken with not entirely happy results; for the prevalence of adverse winds and the difficulties of navigation, unaided by steam, were such that no further ventures were made in pure sailing yachts. It was it this time (1859) that, the proud owner of this 120-tonner was elected to the Royal Yacht Squadron, of which he lived to be the oldest member. After the Albatross came the Meteor, a good-sized auxiliary schooner in which he undertook, as his own master and pilot, the difficult navigation to the Baltic, until the fogbound coast of Sweden made the services of a pilot indispensable. Lord Brassey was the first amateur yachtsman to obtain by examination a Board of Trade master's certificate, and it is a proof of his undaunted courage, not unalloyed with some of the rashness of youth, that he forthwith undertook a task from which many a more experienced master might have shrunk.

The last vessel which he owned before the Sunbeam, was the Eothen, a steam yacht of 350 tons, in which in 1872 he crossed the Atlantic and navigated the St. Lawrence, where he was joined by Lady Brassey and his young family. The auxiliary three-masted schooner Sunbeam, which now displaced all other vessels in her owner's affection, was designed to his order by Mr. St. Clare Byrne (Assoc. I.N.A.) and built on the Mersey, where she was launched in January 1874. Her hull was built on the composite system, and although some prejudice existed against this form of construction for yachts, the Sunbeam’s long record of successful sailing and steaming in all weathers has more than justified her hull construction. Her leading particulars were: Length (O.A.), 181 ft.; beam (extreme), 27 ft. 6 in.; displacement 565 tons; registered tonnage, 334; sail area, 9,200 sq. yards. The engines (compound), built by Lairds, were of 350 1.H.P., giving a speed of 10 knots on the measured mile, or 8 knots sea speed (and upwards) in fine weather, on an average daily coal consumption of 4 tons. On this consumption 20 days' fuel could be carried. She was fitted with a Bevis' patent feathering screw with two blades, the feathering being worked from inside the vessel through a hollow shaft.

The classic "Voyage in the Sunbeam Round the World (1876-7), by the first Lady Brassey, which was translated into nearly every language in Europe, and reached an enormous public, tells its own tale of voyage and adventure, and brought a rich reward of experience and of lasting friendships. Tangible records were seen in the collections that soon grew into a veritable museum of souvenirs, of produce and workmanship in the hospitable mansion at Park Lane and the spacious rooms of Normanhurst. In both these homes Lord Brassey delighted in showing to all and sundry the treasures that had been thus brought together, and with a charm of manner which all who knew him will recall he would make the glass cases tell their own tale of far-off lands and bygone times. His final presentation of the Sunbeam to the Indian Government as a hospital ship in the second year of the war (March 1916) was a happy and generous token of unselfish patriotism. No more fitting use could have been found for the later days of that noble ship, whose long record of 500,000 nautical miles under sail and steam, in fair weather and foul, was one of which he was justly proud. In a volume published only last year the life-story of this famous ship was again given to the world as a fitting sequel to the earlier work by his first wife.

Lord Brassey served on numerous and important Government Commissions, among which mention may be made of those on " Unseaworthy Ships " (1875), " Defence of Coaling Stations," " Canals and Inland Navigation," and the Royal Commission on Opium, over which he presided in 1895. All of these have exercised powerful influences for good on the statecraft of our country. An indefatigable worker, his mind and interests ranged over a wide field of subjects, but neither time nor distance was ever allowed to weaken the strength of his associations with men and matters. To the Institution of Naval Architects his devotion never flagged, and as the years wore on, and other claims pressed themselves upon his attention, he still kept in close touch with the developments of naval architecture and with the leaders of thought and progress in that branch of science.

The first Lady Brassey, whom he married in 1860, was the only daughter and heiress of Mr. John Allnutt, of Charles Street, Berkeley Square. Three years after her death, in 1887, Lord Brassey married the Hon. Sybil de Vere Capel, daughter of Viscount Malden, and granddaughter of the sixth Earl of Essex. He was in both cases fortunate in finding that harmony of tastes in common which doubles the joys and halves the sorrows of those who are happily married. He had also in each case the advantage of a hostess capable of dispensing, hospitality with ease and charm. The doors of their house in Park Lane were always ready to be thrown open when there was need to bring together representative men on any call of public interest, and many were the occasions when distinguished visitors from overseas were made welcome in this manner and brought into touch with those whom they most wished to meet.

As an Empire-builder Lord Brassey will always rank among those who, while not advocating a policy of limitless annexation, was heart and soul for the legitimate expansion of Imperial aims and ideals. He strove for a closer union between the Mother Country and her overseas dominions, while realising to the full the justice of their legitimate ambitions for self-government. Nor were his energies in the direction of closer union confined to our overseas possessions. His sympathies extended widely to citizens of other nations. " Live and let live " was with him a real objective. He was one of the pioneers of the Entente movement for a better understanding with our neighbours across the Channel, and he strove long and earnestly to build up that mutual esteem and goodwill which now unite the peoples of France and England against the common foe.

During his presidency of the Institution a summer meeting was held in Paris, in 1895-the first of those international gatherings of naval architects to be held abroad. It was an unqualified success and, in the opinion of Lord Brassey's French admirers, had an important bearing on the course of our international relations with their country, which had previously been seriously jeopardised through a variety of unfortunate incidents. In the words of his French biographer "he was a man of single purpose who remained throughout faithful to his high ideals; he thus realised the highest objective of a happy life."

The honours that fell to his lot were many and well deserved. In 1881 he was created a K.C.B., and after the close of his career in the House of Commons, when he had unsuccessfully contested one of the divisions of Liverpool, he was raised to the peerage as Baron Brassey. He was made a Lord-in-Waiting to the late Queen Victoria, and in 1895 his appointment to the post of Governor of Victoria (which caused him to vacate the office of President of the Institution) called him away from home to serve his country for the next five years in Australia. His Governorship of Victoria terminated in 1900, and he was subsequently appointed Lord Warden of Cinque Ports. The Grand Cross of the Bath was conferred upon him in 1906, and five years later he was created an Earl.

It has only been possible to give a brief sketch of the late Lord Brassey's varied and in many ways remarkable career. Stress has been laid more upon his character than upon his achievements, for it was this more than aught else that struck those who were privileged to know him, and which produced that combination of constancy and tact too rarely found in the political atmosphere of the present day. These were the qualities which, combined with an innate love of good and a desire to further the betterment of mankind, enabled him to achieve many of his ideals and to create in others a love of useful activity and of interesting pursuits.

Advancing years brought with them the trials inseparable from old age, but these he bore without murmur or complaint. He would not allow his bodily infirmities to triumph over the energy of his spirit, and long after walking had become for him an intolerable effort he managed to get exercise and enjoyment by sculling whenever water and a boat were available. In this connection an incident, amusing as it was characteristic, occurred at Kiel, whither Lord Brassey had gone to attend the Imperial Regatta, just prior to the outbreak of the war. Having left the Sunbeam for a short row alone in the dinghy, he unwittingly ventured beyond the limits prescribed for visitors into regions verboten by the Imperial Command. No sooner had he crossed the frontier of the forbidden waters than he was incontinently detained by the Kaiser's harbour police, and it was some little time before he could establish his identity and secure release.

He passed away on February 23, 1918, after a brief illness, in his eighty-third year, at 24 Park Lane, leaving to ' mourn him a wide circle knit by ties of kinship or friendship, and a name justly honoured in all parts of the Empire. In the words of Lord Durham, " his services, his friendship, and his love for this Institution will be an abiding memory to all who knew him. He was the personification, the admirable type of a generous, large-hearted, and undaunted Englishman-game to the last, loyal and true as steel to his native land and to the British Empire. That Empire knew him well and honoured him."

Thomas Brassey and Anna Allnutt had the following children:

child 209 i. Thomas Allnutt15 Brassey was born in Beauport, Sussex, England 7 March 1863. Thomas died 12 November 1919 in London, Middlesex, England.(22) The obituary in The New York Times obviously confused the second Earl Brassey with his father who had died just 21 months earlier. Under the headline, LORD BRASSEY DIES OF INJURIES AT 83. EDITOR OF THE NAVAL ANNUAL WAS OWNER OF THE FAMOUS YACHT SUNBEAM, was the announcement: London, Wednesday, Nov. 12---Earl Brassey, who was knocked down by a cab a few days ago, died here today from his injuries.

Lord Brassey was actually only 56 years old. In the biographical information which the Times included in the announcement, the deceased was identified as Thomas Allnutt Brassey, which was correct. Indicating that he was created Earl in 1911, that fact actually related to his father, but they continued, correctly: "He retired from the West Kent Yeomanry, in which he was Lieutenant Colonel, in May, 1914." "Earl Brassey held posts in Government departments for a number of years, having been editor of the Naval Annual since 1906, Assistant Private Secretary to Earl Spencer when First Lord of the Admiralty, and Assistant Secretary to the Royal Commission on Opium in 1894."

Then again they mistakenly referred to his father in giving his date of birth as "March 7, 1836," and continued relating facts which applied to his father as follows: "His yacht Sunbeam has been famous for many years, largely through the classic book of travel, 'The Cruise of the Sunbeam,' written by his first wife. In June preceding the outbreak of the world war Lord Brasey was arrested as a spy while he was out for an early morning constitutional in his dingy in Kiel Harbor. The incident was never treated seriously after his speedy release."

This confusing obituary concluded with the following: "During the war he served on a hospital ship in spite of his age. His town house was at 24 Park Lane and his country estate, Chapelwood Manor, Nutley, Sussex. His clubs included Brooks's and the Athenaeum.

He married Lady Idina Mary 27 February 1889 in Eridge Green, Sussex, England.

Idina was born 5 May 1865 Hope Hall in Tadcaster, Yorkshire, England. Idina was the daughter of Sir William and Caroline Vanden-Bempde-Johnstone. Idina died 21 February 1951. Sir William was the 1st Marquess of Abergavenny, K.G., J.P., and his wife Caroline was the eldest daughter of Sir John Vanden-Bempde-Johnstone of Hackness Hall, Yorkshire, 2nd Baronet.

Idina Mary was appointed a Lady of Grace of the Order of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem in England on 6 December 1906. He was of Park Gate, Battle, Sussex, and was educated at Eton and at Balliol College, Oxford, where he matriculated 17 October 1882, aged 19. He received a B.A. (Honours: 2nd History) in 1886, an M.A. in 1902, and was elected Hon. Fellow in 1907.

He was Lieutenant of West Kent (Queen's Own) Yeomanry Cavalry 19 December 1891, Captain 19 January 1898, Major 22 November 1901, 2nd in Command 1906, and Hon. Lieutenant Royal Naval Artillery Volunteers (London Brigade) 1888-92. He served in the South African War in 1900 in command of the 69th Sussex Company Imperial Yeomanry (which he raised), in action near Pretoria (medal with four clasps), and was first Acting Civil Commissioner for H.M. Government in Pretoria in 1900.

He was Assistant Private Secretary to Earl Spencer when he was First Lord of the Admiralty in 1892-95, was Assistant Secretary to the Royal Commission on Opium in 1894, was a Member of the Council of the Royal Colonial Institute and of the Institute of Naval Architects, and Associate of the Institution of Civil Engineers, and Chairman of the Committee of Agricultural Organisation Society. He was J.P. for Sussex: F.R.G.S.; was appointed a Knight of Grace of the Order of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem of England 6 December 1906, and was a Commander of the Order of the Crown of Italy.

He succeeded his father as the second Earl Brassey in 1918, and died without issue, leaving the titles extinct.

He was Editor of "The Naval Annual," 1890-1907, and was author of "Problems of Empire."

child 210 ii. Mabelle Annie Brassey was born in London, Middlesex, England 8 June 1865. It was her grandfather's residence. Mabelle died 18 February 1927. She married Charles Augustus Egerton 17 April 1888 in Catsfield, Sussex, England. They were married by the Rev. Charles Page Eden, assisted by the Rev. the Hon. Charles William Alexander Fielding.

Charles was born 24 August 1846 Hertford Street, Mayfair in London, Middlesex, England. Charles was the son of Edward Christopher Egerton and Lady Mary Frances Herbert. Charles died 13 October 1912. He was baptized 11 October 1846 in Rostherne, Cheshire, England. He was of Mountfield Court, and of The Banks, Robertsbridge, Sussex, and was the eldest son of Edward C. Egerton of Mountfield Court, M.P. for Macclesfield, by his wife, the eldest daughter of Charles Herbert, 2nd Earl Manvers. Charles Agustus was educated at Harrow and at Christ Church, Oxford; he matriculated 18 May 1864, aged 17, and received his B.A. in 1870. He was a Student of the Inner Temple, and J.P. and D.L. for Sussex. She was L.J.St.J. (Lady of Grace of the Order of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem in England ), and C.B.E. (Commander of the Order of the British Empire) 1918.

child 211 iii. Constance Alberta Brassey was born in Beauport, Sussex, England 18 February 1868. Constance died 24 January 1873 Normanhurst Court in Battle, Sussex, England. Her body was interred 27 January 1873 in Catsfield, Sussex, England.

child 212 iv. Muriel Agnes Brassey was born in London, Middlesex, England 21 April 1872. Muriel died 8 August 1930. She married Gilbert George Reginald 4 August 1891 St. George's, Hanover Square in London, Middlesex, England. Gilbert was born 22 March 1869 17 Upper Grosvenor Street in London, Middlesex, England. Gilbert died 16 December 1915. Gilbert was divorced from Muriel Agnes Brassey 1902. He was educated at Charterhouse; was Major 2nd Cinque Ports Artillery Volunteers 9 March 1901; and served in the South African War 1900, as Captain in Bethune's Mounted Infantry, when he was wounded at Vryhead when carrying dispatches on 20 May 1900. He was J.P., County Alderman and D.L. for Sussex. He succeeded his father as the 8th Earl De La Warr on 5 January 1896.

Muriel was divorced from Gilbert George Reginald 1902. She was of The Old Lodge, Ashdown Forest, and The Manor House, Bexhill, both in Sussex.

child 213 v. Marie Adelaide Brassey was born in London, Middlesex, England 24 March 1875. Marie died 30 January 1960. She married Freeman Freeman-Thomas 20 July 1892 St. Paul's, Knightsbridge in London, Middlesex, England. Freeman was born 12 September 1866 in Ratton, Sussex, England. Freeman was the son of Frederick Freeman Thomas and Mabel. Freeman died 12 August 1941. He was baptized 4 November 1866 in Willingdon, Sussex, England. Freeman Freeman-Thomas, of Ratton and Yapton, Sussex, assumed by Deed Poll, "Times" 20 August and 18 November 1892, the additional name of Freeman before that of Thomas. He was the only son of Frederick F. Thomas of Ratton and Yapton, J.P., by his wife, the Hon. Mabel, third daughter of Henry, first Viscount Hampden, G.C.B. and formerly Speaker of the House of Commons.

He was educated at Eton and at Trinity College, Cambridge. He was a Captain (Hon. Major 1901) in Sussex Artillery (Militia), Eastern division of Royal Artillery from 27 February 1892 to 1901, and a Major in Sussex Imperial Yeomanry from 1901. He was A.D.C. (Aide de Camp) to Lord Brassey (Earl Brassey) when he was Governor of Victoria, Australia, 1897-1900. He was J.P. for Sussex, and M.P. (Member of Parliament) for Hastings, Sussex from 2 October 1900 to January 1906. He was appointed Junior Lord of the Treasury December 1905, and elected M.P. for Cornwall (Bodmin division) on 25 July 1906.

He was 1st Marquess of Willingdon, P.C., G.C.S.I. (Knight Grand Commander Order of the Star of India), G.C.M.G. (Knight Grand Commander Order St. Michael and St. George), G.C.I.E. (Knight Gand Commander Order of the Indian Empire), and G.B.E. She was C.I. 1917, G.B.E. (Dame Grand Cross of the British Empire)1924, D.J.St.J., Order of Mercy, Kaiser-i-Hind Gold Medal.

Thomas Brassey and Lady Sybil de Vere Capell had the following child:

child 214 vi. Helen de Vere Brassey was born in London, Middlesex, England 4 September 1892. She married Lt.-Col. Sir John Murray 16 August 1916. John was the son of John Murray. John died 6 October 1967. He was K.C.V.O. (Knight Commander of the Royal Victorian Order), held the D.S.O. (Distinguished Service Order), T.D., and D.L. of Folla, Rothienonran, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, and was son of Sir John Murray, K.C.V.O., F.S.A., D.L. J.P.

She was baptized 13 October 1892 in Catsfield, Sussex, England.

194. Henry Arthur14 Brassey (Thomas13, John12, George11, Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1)(23) was born 14 July 1840. Henry died 13 May 1891 Preston Hall in Aylesford, Kent, England. His body was interred 17 May 1891 in Aylesford, Kent, England.

He married Harriet Anna Stevenson 14 June 1866 Holy Trinity in Upper Chelsea, Middlesex, England. The were married by the Rev. Thomas Horace Cookes, Fellow of Worcester College, Oxford, and uncle of the bride.

Harriet was born 1845. She was aged 53 at the time of her death in 1898. Harriet was the daughter of George Robert Stevenson.

Harriet died 15 July 1898 24 Grosvenor Square in London, Middlesex, England. Her body was interred 19 July 1898 in Aylesford, Kent, England. She made a will 12 July 1898. It was proved (Prin. Reg., 896, 98) 18 August 1898 by Henry Leonard Campbell Brassey, her son and sole executor. George Robert Stevenson was of Tongswood, Hawkhurst, Kent, and was a Major of West Kent Militia, formerly of the 7th Dragoon Guards. He was of Preston Hall, Aylesford, Kent. He matriculated University College, Oxford, 29 March 1859, aged 18, and received his B.A. 1863, M.A. 1865; and was a Student of Lincoln's Inn 1867. He was M.P. for Sandwich 1868-85, J.P. and D.L. for Kent, High Sheriff 1890.

Henry Arthur Brassey and Harriet Anna Stevenson had the following children:

child 215 i. Arthur Albert15 Brassey was born in Newbold Comyn, Warwickshire 4 March 1868. Arthur died 1 January 1869 in Newbold Comyn, Warwickshire.

child 216 ii. Ethel Anna Maria Brassey was born in Newbold Comyn, Warwickshire 4 March 1869. Ethel died 24 August 1880 17 East Cliff in Dover, Kent, England. Her body was interred 28 August 1880 in Aylesford, Kent, England.

child + 217 iii. Henry Leonard Campbell Brassey was born 7 March 1870.

child 218 iv. Florence Maud Brassey was born in Aylesford, Kent, England 25 April 1871. Florence died 15 June 1875 6 Cromwell Houses, S. Kensington in London, Middlesex, England. Her body was interred 18 June 1875 in Aylesford, Kent, England. She was baptized 17 May 1871 in Aylesford, Kent, England.

child 219 v. Hilda Madeleine Brassey was born in London, Middlesex, England 16 June 1872. She married Charles Henry 8 June 1893 St. Paul's, Knightsbridge in London, Middlesex, England. Charles was born 30 December 1870 2 Lyall Street, Belgrave Square in London, Middlesex, England. Charles was the son of Charles Henry. Charles died 7 May 1935. He was Earl of March, Darnley and Kinrara, M.V.O., D.S.O., and later 8th Duke of Richmond and Gordon, the eldest son of Charles Henry, 7th Duke of Richmond. He entered the Army as 2nd Lieutenant Irish Guards 15 August 1900, Lieutenant 6 October 1900, Captain 19 February 1901, A.D.C. to Field-Marshall Lord Roberts, Commanding the Forces in South Africa 23 December 1899 to 2 January 1901, served in South African War 1899-1900, on Staff. He was at operations in the Orange Free States February to May 1900, including operatioins at Paardeberg 17 to 26 February, actions at Poplar Grove and Dreifontien (mentioned in dispatches "London Gazette." 16 April 1901, Queen's medal with five clasps, D.S.O. 29 November 1900. He was created M.V.O. (4th class) 13 August 1905.

child 220 vi. Evelyn Mildred Brassey was born in Aylesford, Kent, England 17 September 1873. Evelyn died 4 December 1948. She married Granville Charles Gresham Leveson-Gower 3 February 1894 St. Paul's, Knightsbridge in London, Middlesex, England. Granville was born 25 September 1865 Titsey Place in Surrey, England. Granville was the son of Granville William Gresham Leveson-Gower and Sophia. Granville died 18 April 1957. He was baptized 29 October 1865 Titsey Place in Surrey, England. He was educated at Eton and at Balliol College, Oxford, matriculated 22 January 1885, aged 19, B.A. 1890. He was Lieutenant Hants Carabineers Yeomanry Cavalry, and J.P.

His father was of Titsey Place, Surrey, M.P., J.P. and D.L. The Hon. Sophia was youngest daughter of Chandos, 1st Lord Leigh.

She was baptized 15 October 1873 in Aylesford, Kent, England.

child 221 vii. Gwendoline Brassey was born in London, Middlesex, England 4 May 1876. She married Philip Blencowe Cookson 29 May 1902 St. Paul's, Knightsbridge in London, Middlesex, England. Philip was born 30 October 1871. Philip was the son of John Blencowe Cookson and Constance Jane Fenwick. Philip died 27 February 1928. John B. Cookson was of Meldon Park, Northumberlandshire. His wife, Constance Jane, was second daughter of George Fenwick of Bywell Hall, Northumberlandshire.

Philip entered the Army from Militia as 2nd Lieutenant 1st Life Guards 18 April 1894, Lieutenant 14 March 1896, Adjutant 1 June to 27 October 1899, and 6 December 1900 to 5 September 1902, Captain 9 October 1899. He served on the North-West Frontier of India 1897-98 as Orderly Officer (medal with clasp), in the South African War on Special Service 28 October 1899 to 4 February 1900 (Colonel and Regiment Brabant's Horse, at operations in Orange Free State February to May 1900, including defence of Wepener, in the Transvaal, East of Pretoria July to November 1900, including action at Belfast (26 and 27 August), in Orange River Colony May to 29 November 1900 including actions at Bethlehem (6 and 7 July), Wittebergen (1 to 29 July), and in Cape Colony, South of Orange River, 1899-1900 (Queen's medal with four clasps).

child + 222 viii. Harold Ernest Brassey was born 20 March 1877.

child + 223 ix. Edgar Hugh Brassey was born 6 April 1878.

child 224 x. Beatrice Mary Brassey was born in London, Middlesex, England 23 May 1879. Beatrice died 2 April 1940. She married Thomas Stacey 20 April 1899 St. Paul's, Knightsbridge in London, Middlesex, England. Thomas was born 5 August 1873 Tockington House in Tockington, Gloucestershire, England. Thomas was the son of John Thomas Cyril Stacey and Emilia Blanche Tyler. Thomas died 2 April 1940. Thomas Stacey of Castle Fields, Buckingham, Buckinghamshire, was the second son of the Rev. John T.C. Stacey of Wessington Court, Herefordshire, and his wife Emilia Blanche, the daughter of the Rev. R. Tyler of Llantrythid, county Glamorgan, Wales.

Thomas was educated at Eton and at Merton College, Oxford, where he matriculated 22 October 1891, aged 18

child 225 xi. Henrietta Brassey was born in Aylesford, Kent, England 27 December 1880. Henrietta died in Aylesford, Kent, England.

child 226 xii. Edwin Perceval Brassey was born in Aylesford, Kent, England 2 October 1882. He was baptized 12 November 1882 in Aylesford, Kent, England. He was educated at Eton and Sandhurst, and entered the Army as 2nd Lieutenant 7th (Queen's Own) Hussars 18 January 1902, Lieutenant 18 January 1905, Captain, Lt.-Col. Coldstream Guards, Gloucestershire High Sheriff 1946, M.C., D.L. (1956).

child 227 xiii. Ruby Mabelle Brassey was born in Aylesford, Kent, England 10 October 1887. She married William Gibbs 22 July 1911. William was the son of Antony Gibbs. William died 25 January 1963.

She was baptized 20 October 1887.

195. Albert14 Brassey (Thomas13, John12, George11, Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1)(24) was born in Rouen, Seine-Maritime, France 22 February 1844. Albert died 7 January 1918.

He married Hon. Matilda Marie Helena Bingham 12 January 1871 in Ardrahan, County Galway, Ireland. They were married by the Rt. Rev. the Hon. Charles Brodrick Bernard, Bishop of Tuam, assisted by the Rev. William Nugent, the Rector.

Matilda was born 27 April 1850 in Moyode Castle, County Galway, Ireland. Matilda was the daughter of John Charles Robert Bingham and Sarah Selina Persse. Matilda died 16 July 1943. John Charles Robert Bingham was 4th Baron Clanmorris of Creg, county Galway, Ireland, and of Newbrook, county Mayo, Ireland. His wife was the fourth daughter of Burton Persse, D.L., of Moyode Castle, county Galway, Ireland.

Matilda Maria Helena was O.B.E. (Dame of the Order of the British Empire). He was of Heythrop Hall, Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire, of Charlton Park, Gloucestershire, and of 29 Berkeley Square, London. He was educated at Eton and at University College, Oxford, where he matriculated 18 October 1862, aged 18. He received his B.A. 1867, M.A. 1899. He entered the Army as Cornet 14th (The King's) Hussars 21 August 1867, was Lieutenant 3 April 1869, Lieut.-Col. Oxfordshire (Queen's Own Oxford Hussars) Yeomanry Cavalry 21 April 1892, and retired 19 December 1894.

He was J.P. for Oxford, High Sheriff 1878, Master of Heythrop Hounds 1873, and M.P. for North Oxfordshire (Banbury Division) 1895-1906.

Albert Brassey and Hon. Matilda Marie Helena Bingham had the following children:

child 228 i. Lillian Maude15 Brassey was born in Adlestrop, Gloucestershire, England 20 October 1871. Lillian died 31 August 1952. She married Richard Alexander Scott 6 December 1898 in Heythrop, Oxfordshire, England. They were married by the Rev. Canon Teignmouth Shore, assisted by the Rev. Arthur William Beaty Marshall, the Rector.

Richard was born 17 May 1856 in London, Middlesex, England. Richard was the son of William Scott and Selina Erskine. Richard died 20 September 1942. He was baptized St. Mary's, Bryanston Square in London, Middlesex, England. Richard Arthur Scott was of Lasborough, Gloucestershire, while his father, William Scott was of Charlton Park, Kent, a J.P. and Captain of the 6th Dragoon Guards. The latter's wife, Selina, was daughter of Alexander Erskine of Balhall, county Forfar (county Angus), and of Longhaven, county Aberdeen, Scotland.

He entered the Army as Sub-Lieutenant (unattached) and the 30th (The Cambridgeshire) Regiment of Foot 28 April 1875, was made Lieutenant 28 April 1876, Lieutenant 18th Hussars 12 June 1878, Captain 1 January 1885, Captain 2nd Dragoon Guards (Queen's Bays) 28 October 1885, Adjutant Oxfordshire (Queen's Own Oxford Hussars) Yeomanry Cavalry 1 June 1888 to 31 May 1893, Major 2nd Dragoon Guards 2 May 1894, retired 10 March 1897.

She was baptized 14 November 1871 in Adlestrop, Gloucestershire, England.

child 229 ii. Rose Zara Maria Brassey was born in Adlestrop, Gloucestershire, England 29 October 1872. Rose died 21 January 1949. She married Hon. Denis St. George Daly 2 May 1896 in Heythrop, Oxfordshire, England. They were married by the Rev. Canon Teignmouth Shore, Chaplain-in-Ordinary to Queen Victoria, assisted by the Rev. Arthur William Beaty Marshall, the Rector. Daly was of Dunsandle, county Galway, Ireland, and of Over Norton Park, Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire.

Denis was born 5 September 1862. Denis was the son of Denis St. George Daly. Denis died 16 April 1942. The younger Denis St. George was educated at the Royal Academy, Gosport, and in Germany. He joined the Galway Militia in 1879, was appointed Lieutenant 18th Hussars 21 May 1884, Captain 14 August 1889, Adjutant Yeomanry Cavalry 1 January 1892, Captain Yorkshire Hussars Yeomary Cavalry 19 May 1894, Major 8 May 1901 (retired). He succeeded jointly with his brother, William Daly, to all the estates of the elder Denis St. George, 2nd Baron Dunsandle, who died 11 January 1893.

He was D.L., J.P. of Over Norton Park, Oxfordshire.

She was baptized 26 November 1872 in Adlestrop, Gloucestershire, England.

child 230 iii. May Eleanor Annie Brassey was born in Adlestrop, Gloucestershire, England 8 October 1874. May died May 1941. She married Robin Kenrick Price 2 March 1905 in Heythrop, Oxfordshire, England. They were married by the Rev. John Erasmus Philipps, formerly Vicar of Enstone, Oxfordshire, assisted by the Rev. Henry Jubb, the Rector, and the Rev. Richard Owen, Rector of Llfar Bala, county Flint, Wales.

Robin was born 3 June 1870 in London, Middlesex, England. Robin was the son of Richard John Lloyd Price and Evelyn Hopwood. Robin died 19 July 1927. He was baptized in Brompton, Middlesex, England. Robin was of Weston Hall, Towcester, Northamptonshire, and an only son of Richard J.L. Price of Rhiwlas and Rhiwaedog, county Merioneth, Wales, who was J.P. and D.L., High Sheriff 1869, and J.P. for the counties of Carnarvon and Denbigh, Wales. His mother, Evelyn, was the youngest daughter of Captain Hopwood of Hopwood Hall, Lancashire.

Robin was educated at Eton and at Sandhurst. He was Captain East Kent (The Buffs) Regiment of Foot, Adjutant 2nd Volunteer Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers, J.P. and D.L. of Rhiwlas and Rhiwaedog, county Merioneth, Wales, 1892.

She was baptized 12 November 1874 in Adlestrop, Gloucestershire, England.

child + 231 iv. Robert Bingham Brassey was born 18 October 1875.

child 232 v. Percy Frederick Brassey was born in Heythrop, Oxfordshire, England 10 December 1876. Percy died 16 February 1901 in Kimberley, South Africa. He was baptized in Heythrop, Oxfordshire, England. He was educated at Eton and at New College, Oxford, and obtained a B.A. July 1898. He was 2nd Lieutenant First (Oxford University) Volunteer Battalion Oxfordshire Light Infantry 23 March 1898; entered the Army as 2nd Lieutenant 9th Lancers September 1899; served in the South African War 1899-1900; advance on Kimberley, including actioins at Belmont, Enslin, Modder River and Magersfontein; killed at Macfarlane Farm, near Kimberley.

child 233 vi. Violet Catherine Brassey was born in Heythrop, Oxfordshire, England 27 November 1878. Violet died 20 February 1963. She married John Peter Arkwright 18 October 1906 in Heythrop, Oxfordshire, England. They were married by the Rev. Samuel Davies Lockwood, Vicar of Kingham, Oxfordshire, assisted by the Rev. Henry Trethewy, Vicar of Hatton, Warwickshire, and the Rev. Cecil Graham Moon, the Rector.

John was born 21 May 1864. John was the son of John Thomas Arkwright and Laura Willes. John died 18 November 1931. John Thomas Arkwright was D.L., J.P. of Hatton Hall, Warwickshire, was married to Laura, eldest daughter of the Rev. Edward Willes, Rector of Hamstall Ridware and of Yoxall, both in Staffordshire.

John Peter Arkwright was educated at Eton, and J.P.

child 234 vii. Iris Hermione Brassey was born in Heythrop, Oxfordshire, England 10 November 1880. She married Malcolm Orme Little 7 July 1903 St. George's, Hanover Square in London, Middlesex, England. They were married by the Rev. John Erasmus Philipps, Vicar of Enstone, Oxfordshire, assisted by the Rev. Henry Jubb, Rector of Heythrop, and the Rev. David Anderson, the Rector.

Malcolm was born 29 November 1857 15 Sussex Square, Hyde Park in London, Middlesex, England. Malcolm was the son of Archibald Little and Jane Orme. Malcolm died 1 February 1931. Malcolm Orme Little was a son of General Sir Archibald Little, Colonel 9th Lancers, Knight Grand Cross Order of the Bath, and Jane Orme was daughter of Malcolm Orme.

He was educated at Wellington College, and entered the Army as 2nd Lieutenant 17th Lancers 11 May 1878, transferred to 9th Lancers 19 October 1878, was made Lieutenant 25 February 1880, Captain 20 October 1886, Major 5 September 1894, Lieut.-Col. 15 March 1900, Brevet Colonel 29 November 1900. He was A.D.C. (Aide-de-Camp) to Lord Houghton, Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland, 3 October 1892 to October 1894; Brigadier-General Cavalry Brigade, South Africa, 15 July to 23 November 1900; Brigadier-General South Africa, 8 April to 9 July 1902. He served in the Afghan War 1878-80, in the expedition to Maidan, and subsequent operations around Kabul, the march from Kabul to the relief of Kandahar, and the battle of 1 September (mentioned in dispatches, "London Gazette," 3 December 1880, medal with two clasps, bronze star). He served in the South African War 1899-1902 and was severly wounded. He was in command of the 9th Lancers until 15 July 1900, afterwards on the Staff; involved in the advance on Kimberley, including actions at Belmont, Enslin, Modder River, and Magersfontein; relief of Kimberley; operations in the Orange Free State from February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg, actions at Poplar Grove and Karee Siding; in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill; in the Transvaal, West of Pretoria, July to November 1900; in the Orange River Colony to November 1900, including actions at Bethlehem and Wittebergen. At operations in the Orange River Colony from March to 31 May 1902 (mentioned in dispatches, "London Gazette," 16 March 1900, 8 February 1901 and 29 July 1902) he was given brevet of Colonel, Queen's medal with seven clasps, and King's medal with two clasps).

He was create C.B. (Companion of Order of the Bath) 24 June 1904, and C.B.E. (Commander Order of British Empire).

She was baptized in Heythrop, Oxfordshire, England.

child 235 viii. Ralph Albert Brassey was born in Heythrop, Oxfordshire, England 2 October 1883. Ralph died 28 November 1905 in Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire, England. He died from injuries received from the fall of his mount, "Carrick Town," in the Cambridge University Steeplechase at Huntingdon. His body was interred 7 December 1905 in Heythrop, Oxfordshire, England.

He was baptized in Heythrop, Oxfordshire, England. He was educated at Eton, and obtained a B.A. at New College, Oxford. He did not marry.

201. Richard14 Brassey (Robert13, John12, George11, Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born in Bulkeley, Cheshire, England 20 February 1844. Richard died 17 June 1904. His body was interred 21 June 1904 in Bickerton, Cheshire, England.

He married Prudence Mary Lightfoot 12 June 1872 in Handley, Cheshire, England. Prudence was born 18 March 1851 in Aldersey, Cheshire, England. Prudence was the daughter of George Lightfoot and Frances Dutton. She was baptized 27 April 1851 in Coddington, Cheshire, England. George Lightfoot was of Handley, Cheshire, and his wife Frances was a daughter of Richard Dutton of Bickerton, Cheshire.

He was baptized in Bulkeley, Cheshire, England. He made a will 17 September 1902. It was proved at Chester 22 July 1904 by Herbert Bruce Brassey and Harry Perceval Mortimer, the executors.

Richard Brassey and Prudence Mary Lightfoot had the following child:

child 236 i. Herbert Bruce15 Brassey was born in Malpas, Cheshire, England 30 March 1873. He was baptized 2 April 1873 in Malpas, Cheshire, England. He was educated at Whitchurch Grammar School, and was of Bulkeley Grange.

Fifteenth Generation

205. Elizabeth Jane15 Brassey (Richard14, George Betton13, George12, George11, Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1)(25) was born in Lambeth, Surrey, England 17 November 1858. Elizabeth died 8 November 1910 in Goomeri, Queensland, Australia.

She married Thomas Maudsley 30 September 1880 in Ipswich, Queensland, Australia. Thomas was born 30 November 1852 in Halton with Aughton, Lancashire, England. Thomas died 7 April 1924 in Goodna, Queensland, Australia.

Elizabeth Jane Brassey and Thomas Maudsley had the following children:

child 237 i. Richard Brassey16 Maudsley was born 1881. Richard died 1972.

child 238 ii. Agnes Maudsley was born 1883. Agnes died 1966.

child 239 iii. George Booker Maudsley was born 1885. George died 1976.

child 240 iv. Thomas Maudsley was born 1887. Thomas died 1931.

child 241 v. Ernest Roger Maudsley was born 1890. Ernest died 1972.

child 242 vi. William Josiah Maudsley was born 1891. William died 1968.

child 243 vii. Henry Gordon Maudsley was born 1893. Henry died 1967.

child 244 viii. John Booker Harling Maudsley was born 1896. John died 1955.

child 245 ix. Ivy Brassey Maudsley was born 1901. Ivy died 1987.

206. George Thomas15 Brassey (Richard14, George Betton13, George12, George11, Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1)(26) was born in Lambeth, Surrey, England 21 April 1861. George died 28 September 1941 in Ipswich, Queensland, Australia.

He married Elizabeth Ann Palmer 12 November 1881 in Teviotville, Queensland, Australia. Elizabeth was born 9 February 1861 in Queensland, Australia. Elizabeth died 1 June 1940 in Ipswich, Queensland, Australia.

George Thomas Brassey and Elizabeth Ann Palmer had the following children:

child 246 i. Sarah Ann Maud16 Brassey was born 1882. Sarah died 1964.

child 247 ii. George Thomas Brassey was born 1884. George died 1908.

child 248 iii. Ethel Norma Brassey was born 1885. Ethel died 1940.

child 249 iv. Arthur Richard Brassey was born 1887.

child 250 v. Ernest Emanuel Brassey was born 1889. Ernest died 1916.

208. Ernest Emmanuel15 Brassey (Richard14, George Betton13, George12, George11, Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born in Allora, Queensland, Australia 10 November 1869. Ernest died 10 December 1951 in Ipswich, Queensland, Australia.

He married twice. He married Charlotte Silverthorne 19 September 1891 in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Charlotte was born 1870 in Queensland, Australia. Charlotte died 21 April 1894 in Queensland, Australia. He married Emma Auguste Stenzel 29 October 1896 in Fassifern District, Queensland, Australia. Emma was born 14 June 1872 in Fassifern District, Queensland, Australia. Emma died 9 July 1958 in Queensland, Australia.

Ernest Emmanuel Brassey and Charlotte Silverthorne had the following child:

child 251 i. Lillian May16 Brassey was born 1893. Lillian died 1893.

Ernest Emmanuel Brassey and Emma Auguste Stenzel had the following children:

child 252 ii. Gladys May Brassey was born 1897. Gladys died 1972.

child 253 iii. Lillian Eleanor Brassey was born 1899. Lillian died 1977.

child 254 iv. Richard Ernest Brassey was born 1901. Richard died 1985.

child 255 v. Victor Charles Brassey was born 1904. Victor died 1973.

child 256 vi. Violet Grace Brassey was born 1906.

child 257 vii. Myrtle Eileen Brassey was born 1908. Myrtle died 1992.

child 258 viii. Frank Gordon Brassey was born 1910.

217. Henry Leonard Campbell15 Brassey (Henry Arthur14, Thomas13, John12, George11, Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born in Newbold Comyn, Warwickshire 7 March 1870. Henry died 22 October 1958. He was succeeded by his eldest surviving son.

He married Lady Violet Mary Gordon-Lennox 30 June 1894 St. Paul's, Knightsbridge in London, Middlesex, England. Violet was born 15 January 1874 2 Lyall Street, Eaton Square in London, Middlesex, England. Violet was the daughter of Charles Henry Gordon-Lennox and Amy Mary Ricardo. Violet died 19 November 1946. Charles Henry was the 12th Duke of Richmond and Gordon. His first wife, Amy Mary, was daughter of Percy Ricardo of Bramley Park, Surrey. He was of Apethorpe Hall, Northamptonshire and of 40 Upper Grosvenor Street, London. He was educated at Eton and at Christ Church, Oxford, matriculated 1 June 1888, aged 18. He was Lieutenant Queen's Own West Kent Yeomary Cavalry, afterwards Lieutenant 3rd Battalion Royal Sussex Regiment (Militia) 2 July 1892-93, Captain Queen's Own West Kent Yeomanry Cavalry 4 November 1899, Major 22 November 1901-05. He was J.P. for the counties of Kent (1893) and of Northampton (1904). He was High Sheriff 1907, M.P. North Northampton Jan. 1910-18, and for Peterborough Division 1918-29. He was Major Northamptonshire Yeomanry.

He was created a Baronet 29 November 1922, and raised to the peerage as Baron Brassey of Apethorpe, of Apethorpe, Northamptonshire, on 26 January 1938.

Henry Leonard Campbell Brassey and Lady Violet Mary Gordon-Lennox had the following children:

child 259 i. Julia16 Brassey. She married Michael Dawnay 30 March 1938 St. George's Hanover Square in London, Middlesex, England.(27) As reported in the New York Times: The marriage of Miss Julia Brassey, adopted daughter of Sir Leonard and Lady Violet Brassey, to Flight Lieutenant Michael Dawnay, youngest son of the late Major, the Hon. Hugh and Lady Susan Dawnay, took place Wednesday at Saint George's Hanover Square. After a reception held by Lady Violet, the couple left for southern France. Michael is the son of Hugh Dawnay and Susan. She was adopted.

child 260 ii. Ronald Henry Brassey was born in London, Middlesex, England 21 May 1895. Ronald died 30 May 1895. His body was interred 1 June 1895 in Aylesford, Kent, England.

child 261 iii. Cecil Henry Brassey was born 3 October 1896. Cecil died 11 September 1949. He died without issue. He married Hon. Victoria Ivy Louise Spencer 10 November 1920. She was eldest daughter of 1st Viscount Churchill.

He was baptized 15 November 1896 in Aylesford, Kent, England. He was J.P. Wiltshire, Captain Reserve of Officers, Life Guards.

child 262 iv. Gerard Charles Brassey was born 28 December 1898. Gerard died 27 August 1918. He was baptized 7 February 1899 in Boxgrove, Sussex, England. He was Lieutenant Coldstream Guards, killed in action.

child 263 v. John Leonard Brassey was born in London, Middlesex, England 9 January 1903. John died 9 March 1903. His body was interred 11 March 1903 in Aylesford, Kent, England.

child + 264 vi. Bernard Thomas Brassey was born 15 February 1905.

child + 265 vii. Peter Esme Brassey was born 5 December 1907.

222. Harold Ernest15 Brassey (Henry Arthur14, Thomas13, John12, George11, Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born in Copse Hill, Gloucestershire, England 20 March 1877. Harold died 16 July 1916. He was killed in action.

He married Lady Norah Hely-Hutchinson 25 July 1906. Norah was born 26 February 1880 in Knocklofty, County Tipperary, Ireland. Norah was the daughter of John Luke George Hely-Hutchinson and Frances Isabella Stephens. Norah died 2 August 1964. John Luke George was 5th Earl of Donoughmore, K.C.M.G., and his wife, Frances Isabella, was daughter of General Stephens of the Hon. East India Company's Service. He entered the Army as 2nd Lieutenant Royal Horse Guards 8 September 1897, Lieutenant 9 October 1899, Captain 23 September 1904, Lt.-Col. He served in the South African War 1899-1900, operations in Orange River Colony May to November 1900 (Queen's medal with three clasps).

Harold Ernest Brassey and Lady Norah Hely-Hutchinson had the following children:

child 266 i. Oonagh Evelyn16 Brassey. She married twice. She married Michael Thomas Henderson 14 January 1929. The marriage was dissolved by divorce in 1948. After her second marriage she reverted to her former married surname by Deed Poll dated 12 September 1961.

Michael died 19 November 1953. He was Lt.-Col. 16/5th Lancers (Reserve), the second son of Lt.-Col. Harold Greenwood Henderson.

She married Vernon Motion 21 December 1949. They were divorced in 1948.

child 267 ii. Honora Mary Brassey.

child 268 iii. Nancy Elizabeth Brassey. She married twice. She married Reginald Frederick Stuart Leslie 16 July 1935. Reginald died 1943. He was killed in action.

She married William Antony Younger 25 July 1945. William was the son of Sir William Robert Younger. William died 13 February 1961.

223. Edgar Hugh15 Brassey (Henry Arthur14, Thomas13, John12, George11, Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born in Aylesford, Kent, England 6 April 1878. Edgar died 11 April 1946.

He married Margaret Harriet Trefusis 26 January 1911. Margaret was the daughter of Walter Trefusis. Margaret died 2 November 1966.

He was baptized 3 May 1878 in Aylesford, Kent, England. He was 2nd Lieutenant 1st (Oxford University) Volunteer Battalion Oxfordshire Light Infantry 23 March 1898, entered the Army as 2nd Lieutenant 1st Life Guards 25 January 1899, Lieutenant 7 March 1900, Adjutant 6 September and Captain 16 September 1905, Lt.-Col. 1st Life Guards, High Sheriff Wiltshire 1927.

Edgar Hugh Brassey and Margaret Harriet Trefusis had the following children:

child + 269 i. Marjorie Eva16 Brassey.

child + 270 ii. Hugh Trefusis Brassey was born 5 October 1915.

231. Robert Bingham15 Brassey (Albert14, Thomas13, John12, George11, Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born in Heythrop, Oxfordshire, England 18 October 1875. Robert died 14 November 1946.

He married three times. He married Violet Edith Lowry-Corry 20 July 1904 St. Paul's, Knightsbridge in London, Middlesex, England. They were married by the Rev. Prebendary Henry Montagu Villiers, the Vicar, assisted by the Rev. the Chaplain of the Guards' Chapel, Wellington Barracks, London, and the Rev. Henry Jubb, Vicar of Heythrop.

Violet was born 20 July 1880 Stanford Hall in Nottinghamshire, England. Violet was the daughter of Armar Henry Lowry-Corry and Alice Margaret Greg. Violet died 9 March 1919. She was baptized 11 August 1880 in Stanford-on-Soar, Nottinghamshire, England. Armar Henry Lowry-Corry was of Forest Lodge, Windsor Forest, Berkshire. His wife, Alice Margaret, was an only child and heir of Thomas Richard Greg of Ballymenoch House, county Down, Ireland, J.P.

He married Dorothy Alice Margaret Augusta Grosvenor 16 March 1920. The marriage was dissolved by divorce in 1927. She was formerly married to Lord Dalmeny, later 6th Earl of Rosebery. Dorothy was the daughter of Henry George Grosvenor.

Dorothy died 11 January 1966. He married Constance Marion Britten 8 November 1927. She was formerly married to a Bennett. Constance is the daughter of Thomas Britten. Thomas Britten was of Johannesburg, South Africa.

He was baptized in Heythrop, Oxfordshire, England. Of Marston Trussel Hall and of Cottesbrooke Hall, both in Northamptonshire, he was educated at Eton. He was D.L., J.P. 1919 Oxfordshire.

He entered the Army as 2nd Lieutenant (from Militia) 17th Lancers (Duke of Cambridge's Own) 1 December 1897, was made Lieutenant 14 February 1900, Captain 29 November 1904, A.D.C. (Aide-de-Camp) to Major-General Sir John Ramsey Slade, K.C.B., R.A., commanding in Egypt (Cairo), Captain Reserve of Officers 4 November 1905. He served in South African War 1900-01, operations in the Orange Free State February to May 1900, including actions at Vet River 5 and 6 May, and Zand River, was in the Transvaal May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria, and Diamond Hill 11 and 12 June. He was in the Transvaal, West of Pretoria July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Elands River 4 to 16 August, in the Orange River Colony May to 29 November 1900, including actions at Bethlehem 6 and 7 July, Wittebergen 1 to 29 July and Caledon River 27 to 29 November, in Orange River Colony 30 November to December 1900, in Cape Colony December 1900 to September 1901 (Qeen's medan with four clasps).

He was M.P. for Banbury Division of Oxfordshire January to November 1910.

Robert Bingham Brassey and Violet Edith Lowry-Corry had the following children:

child 271 i. Thomas16 Brassey was born in Edinburgh, Scotland 10 July 1905. Thomas died 23 July 1905. His body was interred 26 July 1905 in Heythrop, Oxfordshire, England.

child 272 ii. Moira Violet Brassey was born in Marston Trussel, Northamptonshire, England 23 December 1906. She married John Edward O'Brien 27 July 1928. They were divorced in 1940.

She was baptized 10 February 1907 in Heythrop, Oxfordshire, England.

child + 273 iii. Hugo Bulkeley Brassey was born 5 March 1910.

child 274 iv. Pamela Rachael Brassey was born 4 December 1911. She married Duncan Mackinnon 20 January 1932. Captain Duncan Mackinnon was of Swinbrook House, Burford, Oxfordshire, and 23 Hyde Park Place, London, and a son of William Mackinnon of Ballinakill, county Argyll, Scotland.

child + 275 v. Diana Brassey was born 7 July 1914.

Sixteenth Generation

264. Bernard Thomas16 Brassey (Henry Leonard Campbell15, Henry Arthur14, Thomas13, John12, George11, Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born in London, Middlesex, England 15 February 1905. Bernard died 28 June 1967.(28) His obituary in the New York Times was as follows:

LORD BRASSEY DEAD AT 62; DEVELOPED HOVERCRAFT KITS

London, June 30 (AP)---Lord Brassey, developer of the sport of small hovercraft racing, died Wednesday. He was 62 years old. Lord Brassey directed Hoverair, Ltd., a concern making small hovercraft kits, and was president of the Hovercraft Club of Great Britain. One of his craft won first prize at the first European Hoverrally last year. His work with air-cushioned vehicles that skim over land or water earned him the nickname "Lord Hovership." He was a former parliamentarian and army officer. Lord Brassey leaves his second wife, Barbara, and a son, Maj. David Henry Brassey, who succeeds to the title.

He married twice. He married Crystal Gloria Gore 14 April 1931. Crystal was the daughter of Frances William George Gore. Crystal died 15 March 1962. He married Barbara Jorgensen 4 April 1963.

He was baptized 22 March 1905 in Apethorpe, Northamptonshire, England. He was educated at Eton. He succeeded his father as 2nd Baron Brassey of Apethorpe, M.C., T.D., D.L. (1958) Northamptonshire. He was Lt.-Col. commanding Leicesteshire Yeomanry (T.A.)(T.D. 1945), served in World War II 1939-45 (wounded, M.C. 1945), hon. Col. Leicester and Derbyshire Yeomanry.

Bernard Thomas Brassey and Crystal Gloria Gore had the following children:

child + 276 i. David Henry17 Brassey was born 16 September 1932.

child + 277 ii. Thomas Ian Brassey was born 14 June 1934.

265. Peter Esme16 Brassey (Henry Leonard Campbell15, Henry Arthur14, Thomas13, John12, George11, Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born 5 December 1907.

He married Lady Romayne Elizabeth Algitha Cecil 12 December 1944. She was a younger daughter of the 5th Marquess of Exeter. He was educated at Eton and Magdalene College, Cambridge, and was D.L. (1961-67) Northamptonshire, D.L. (1965) Huntingdonshire and Peterborough, J.P. (1947) Peterborough, High Sheriff of Huntingdonshire and Peterborough 1966, Barrister-at-law, Inner Temple 1930, Lt.-Col. Northamptonshire Yeomanry, served in World War II 1939-45 (wounded). He was Chairman Southend Waterworks Company.

Peter Esme Brassey and Lady Romayne Elizabeth Algitha Cecil had the following children:

child 278 i. Rowena Jane17 Brassey was born 6 November 1945. Rowena was in the news on 21 March 1974.(29) The account in the New York Times was headlined:

PRINCESS ANNE AND HER HUSBAND ESCAPE KIDNAPPNG ATTEMPT AS CAR IS FIRED ON. 4 HURT IN ATTACK NEAR PALACE--SUSPECT DETAINED AT SCENE. By Allen Schuster. Special to The New York Times.

London, March 20.-- (The long account of the incident includes the information that) There were five persons in the car. In addition to their bodyguard and driver, Princess Anne and Capt. Phillips were accompanied by Rowena Brassey, the Princess's lady in waiting.

On 15 August 1974 the New York Times reported the honors which the Queen bestowed as a result of the incident:

ANNE, 24, HONORED FOR BRAVERY IN KIDNAPPING ATTEMPT

On the occasion of turning 24 yesterday, Princess Anne was honored by her mother, Queen Elizabeth II, for her bravery and calmness in the face of adversity. The Queen appointed Anne a Dame Grand Cross of the Royal Victorial Order, and made the Princess's husband, Capt. Mark Phillips, a commander of the same order. Appointed a member of the order was Rowena Brassey, the Princess's lady in waiting. All this was a reward growing out of the attempted kidnapping of Princess Anne near Buckingham Palace last March. Capt. Phillips and Miss Bracey were with the Princess at the time.

child 279 ii. Henry Charles Brassey was born 22 July 1947.

child 280 iii. Richard Edwin Brassey was born 8 October 1949.

269. Marjorie Eva16 Brassey (Edgar Hugh15, Henry Arthur14, Thomas13, John12, George11, Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) birth date unknown.

She married Hugh Myddelton Peacock. Hugh is the son of Hugh Peacock. The elder Hugh Peacock was of Greatford, Lincolnshire.

Marjorie Eva Brassey and Hugh Myddelton Peacock had the following children:

child + 281 i. Idina Caroline17 Peacock was born 23 November 1933.

child + 282 ii. Susan Margaret Peacock was born 14 June 1938.

child 283 iii. Michael Hugh Peacock was born 2 August 1946.

270. Hugh Trefusis16 Brassey (Edgar Hugh15, Henry Arthur14, Thomas13, John12, George11, Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born 5 October 1915.

He married Joyce Patricia Kingscote 18 July 1939. Joyce is the daughter of Maurice John Kingscote. Captain Maurice John Kingscote of the Berkshire Yeomanry was of Kingscote, Tetbury, Gloucestershire. He was educated at Eton and Sandhurst. He was O.B.E. 1958, M.C., D.L. 1956, J.P. (1951) Wiltshire, High Sheriff 1959, Vice-Lieutenant from 1968, Lt.-Col. Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry 1955-58, Brevet-Col. formerly Major The Scots Greys, served in World War II (Croix de Guerrre, Exon of The Queen's Body Guard of the Yeoman of the Guard from 1964, A.D.C. (T.A.) to H.M. The Queen 1964-69. He was Chairman of Chippenham Conservative Association 1951-53 and 1966-68, President 1968, President Wiltshire Association of Boys Clubs.

Hugh Trefusis Brassey and Joyce Patricia Kingscote had the following children:

child 284 i. Fiona Gillian17 Brassey was born 31 January 1942. Fiona died 26 February 1958.

child 285 ii. Antony Hugh Owen Brassey was born 5 January 1945. He was educated at Eton and served in the Royal Scots Greys 1964-67.

child 286 iii. Jane Margaret Brassey was born 8 May 1946.

child 287 iv. Sarah Patricia Brassey was born 20 July 1949.

child 288 v. Kim Maurice Brassey was born 27 March 1955.

273. Hugo Bulkeley16 Brassey (Robert Bingham15, Albert14, Thomas13, John12, George11, Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born 5 March 1910. Hugo died 24 December 1963.

He married twice. He married Baroness Christa von Bodenhausen 27 July 1935. The marriage was dissolved by divorce in 1938.

He married Barbara Frederica de Roll Peacocke. He was educated at Eton and Sandhurst, served in World War II.

Hugo Bulkeley Brassey and Barbara Frederica de Roll Peacocke had the following children:

child 289 i. Sarah Jane17 Brassey was born 11 March 1951.

child 290 ii. Thomas Noel Bingham Brassey was born 21 April 1952.

275. Diana16 Brassey (Robert Bingham15, Albert14, Thomas13, John12, George11, Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born 7 July 1914.

She married Humphrey William Lloyd 18 January 1938. He was Lt.-Col., J.P., of Fosseway House, Stow-on-the-Wold, Gloucestershire, and 2nd son of Brig.-Gen. Arthur Henry Orlando Lloyd, C.B., C.M.G., M.V.O., T.D., of Leaton Knolls, Shrewsbury, Shropshire.

Diana Brassey and Humphrey William Lloyd had the following children:

child 291 i. John Humphrey17 Lloyd was born 21 July 1940.

child 292 ii. David Arthur Lloyd was born 25 February 1945. He married Jessica Jane Fowler 24 August 1968. Jessica is the daughter of Bryan John Fowler. Bryan John Fowler was of Rabinston, Enfield, county Meath, Ireland.

Seventeenth Generation

276. David Henry17 Brassey (Bernard Thomas16, Henry Leonard Campbell15, Henry Arthur14, Thomas13, John12, George11, Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born 16 September 1932.

He married Myrna Elizabeth Baskervyle-Glegg 15 October 1958. Myrna is the daughter of John Baskervyle-Glegg. Sir David Henry Brassey of Apethorpe, Northamptonshire, was educated at Stowe, and made Baronet. He succeeded his father as 3rd Baron Brassey of Apethorpe.

David Henry Brassey and Myrna Elizabeth Baskervyle-Glegg had the following child:

child 293 i. Edward18 Brassey was born 9 March 1964.

277. Thomas Ian17 Brassey (Bernard Thomas16, Henry Leonard Campbell15, Henry Arthur14, Thomas13, John12, George11, Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born 14 June 1934.

He married Valerie Christine Finlason 28 September 1960. Valerie is the daughter of Alan David Finlason and Frederick Frances. He was educated at Stowe, served as Lieutenant Grenadier Guards 1952-57.

Thomas Ian Brassey and Valerie Christine Finlason had the following children:

child 294 i. Miranda18 Brassey was born 25 February 1963.

child 295 ii. Louise Brassey was born 27 October 1964.

281. Idina Caroline17 Peacock (Marjorie Eva16 Brassey, Edgar Hugh15, Henry Arthur14, Thomas13, John12, George11, Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born 23 November 1933.

She married James William Gordon Pirie 27 September 1957. James is the son of G.M. Pirie.

Idina Caroline Peacock and James William Gordon Pirie had the following children:

child 296 i. James Hugh18 Pirie was born 15 December 1959.

child 297 ii. Amanda Caroline Pirie was born 10 June 1962.

282. Susan Margaret17 Peacock (Marjorie Eva16 Brassey, Edgar Hugh15, Henry Arthur14, Thomas13, John12, George11, Thomas10 Brassie, Thomas9, Richard8, Thomas7 Bressey, Richard6, Ralph5, Thomas4, Thomas3, William de2 Bresey, Hamon le1) was born 14 June 1938.

She married Michael Andrieus Jones 15 September 1964.

Susan Margaret Peacock and Michael Andrieus Jones had the following children:

child 298 i. Phillip Andrieus18 Jones was born 19 January 1966.

child 299 ii. Idina Maria Jones was born 8 January 1968.

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Notes and References


1. Walter Goodwin Davis, "Ancestry of Thomas Bressey of New Haven, Connecticut," New England Historical and Genealogical Register 112 (January 1958): 27-44 (hereafter cited as Ancestry of Tho Bressey, Walter G. Davis); and This is source of information for the family of Thomas Bressey and Margaret Hassall and their descendants, except as otherwise subsequently noted.
2. Frederick Arthur Crisp, ed., Vistation of England and Wales (1915), page 89 (hereafter cited as Crisp, Vis. Eng. & Wales, v. 2); and Crisp gives his given name as Roger; Davis gives his given name as Henry(?).
3. Crisp, Vis. Eng. & Wales, v. 2, pages 87-92; and Information on family of Thomas Brassie and Amy Boothe, and their descendants, is from this source, except as subsequently or otherwise noted.
4. Genealogies of Virginia Families (from the Virginia Magazine of History & Biography), 5 Vols. (Baltimore, 1981), page 449-451. The text of the will is as follows: Thomas Bowker in the parish of St. Gregories, London. Will 15 May 1640: proved 2 March 1640/1. I commend my spirit into the handes of Jesus Christ my Saviour, faithfully beleeving he will, after this life is ended make me partaker of his everlasting kingdome. As for the worldly riches wherewith yt hath pleased God of his goodness to enrich me, I devise in manner following: I will that my nephue John Bowker shall enjoy my tenement in Bickerton, wherein John Russell lately dwelled, for soe many yeares as he may live, with remainder during the terme, to his sonne John, to Thomas, my late brother William's sonne, and to his brother William, for soe longe as they shall live successfully. To my nephew John Bowker's sonne John £100 when he cometh to the age of 16 yeares. To Thomas my brother William's sonne my lease which I hold of the Right Honourable Robert, Viscount Cholmely in Minshull, in the tenure of Arthur Warburton, and I will that the said Thomas shall pay 2s yearly to the said Viscount besides the rent of 18s a yeare reserved in the said lease. To William Bowker, his brother £200. To my said nephues Thomas and William £220 to see it bestowed to the best proffitt of their sister Dorothie in respect of her marriage. I give £50 more to my nephues to bestowe on their sister Anne to her best benefitt. To their mother £10. To my nephue John Bowker's wife £20, and unto his mother £5. To my cosen Amy Bressy £6. 13s. 4d., and the like summe to her son Hugh Bressy. To every other of her foure sonnes Thomas Bressy, Richard, Hugh, and James, 40s apiece to buy them ringes. To my cosen Randall Palyn of Eaton, £6. 13s. 4d. To his brother Thomas Nettles 50s. To my loving friend Edward Bosdon of the Middle Temple, London, esquire, £6. 13s. 4d. To my loving friendes Mr. John Povall and his sonne £6. 13s. 4d. half to the father and the other half to the sonne, to buy them ringes. To my cosen Thomas Buckly and to my cosen Randle Palyn of Bicker 50s apiece to buy them ringes. To my cosen Robert Buckly and his brother William £6. 13s. 4d. to be devided betwixt them. To my cosen Richard Heath 50s to buy him a ringe, and unto Anne his wife £5 to buy her a silver bolle. To my cosen William Dodd, my table diamond ring, and unto Anne his wife, 50s to make her another ring, to his sonne John and his wife £20. To my cosen Thomas Cowper 40s and I remit the debts he oweth unto me. To my cosen Calcott of Calcott, 40s to make him a ringe. To every child of old John Maddocke of Agton, and of Thomas Maddocke, his brother which are nowe living 20s. To the poore of Malpas, Bickerton and Hartill, to each towne £3. 6s. 8d. To my loving frend John Minshill of Minshull, esquire, the Author uppon the five bookes of Moses and Doctor Case uppon Aristotles Phisickes and Ethickes. To the young Mr. Thomas Cholmely of Vale Royall my Alphonsus Testatus workes being thirteene volumes to begin a library at the place aforesaid. Item, I give unto Thomas Bowker of Buckley £5. To my nephue Thomas Bowker my seale ringe. To his brother William my rubie ringe. I hereby constitute my said three nephues John, Thomas and William Bowker my executors. To them I devise all my tenement in Wimbersley and Church Minshull, which I late purchased from Thomas Cotton of Cotton esquire, and Thomas Wilkinson and Elizabeth his wife, to be sould for the better performance of this my last will. All the rest of my goods to be divided equally among my executors, according to the likeing and allowance of John Minshull, Thomas Cholmely the father and Edward Bosden aforesaid esquires, whom I appoint overseers of this my last will. Published in the year abovesaid in the presence of us, Gilbert Gayne, Willm Sommer, James Ely. 31st July. Proved by the executors named. Evelyn, 32. (hereafter cited as Virginia Families, Va. Mag. Hist. & Biog).
5. Crisp, Vis. Eng. & Wales, v. 2, page 89; and Additional information on Edward Bressie of Audlem and on his family taken from this source.
6. Walter Goodwin Davis, The Ancestry of Sarah Stone, Wife of James Patten of Arundel, Maine (Portland, Maine: The Southworth Press, 1930), pages 103-112 (Bracey) (hereafter cited as Davis, W.G., Sarah Stone); and Information on Thomas Bressey, his family and descendants, is taken from this source unless subsequently otherwise noted.
7. Franklin Bowditch Dexter, ed., Ancient Town Records. Vol. I: New Haven Town Records, 1649-1662 (New Haven: New Haven Colony Historical Society, 1917), pages 312 & 325 (hereafter cited as Dexter, New Haven Records).
8. E-mail message with attached MS Word file (brassey.doc), From: Pam Cooper, To: Ed Dunn, 2 October 1998, Internet, pcooper@st.net.au. (hereafter cited as Pam Cooper, E-mail, 2 Oct. 1998); and information on George Brassey, his family and descendants is from this source unless otherwise noted.
9. E-mail message, From: Pam Cooper, To: Ed Dunn, 31 March 2000, Internet, pcooper@st.net.au. (hereafter cited as Cooper to Dunn, E-mail, 31 Mar. 2000).
10. Ibid.
11. Ibid.
12. Ibid.
13. Frederick Arthur Crisp, ed., Visitation of England and Wales (1906), pages 60-68 (hereafter cited as Crisp, Vis. Eng. & Wales, v. 14); and Information on the family of John Brassey and wife Elizabeth Percival, and their descendants, is from this source, except as will be subsequently noted.
14. Cooper to Dunn, E-mail, 31 Mar. 2000.
15. Ibid.
16. Ibid.
17. "The Right Hon. Earl Brassey, G.C.B., D.C.L., President of The Institution of Naval Architects 1893-1896." From: Transactions of the Institution of Naval Architects, 1918, p. 221. http://www.rina.org.uk/institut/pastpres/brassey.htm (7 March 2000) (hereafter cited as Earl Brassey, Biographical article, INA); Peter Townsend, ed., Burke's Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage (London: Burke's Peerage Limited, 1970), pages 339-340 (hereafter cited as Townsend, P., Burke's Peerage); and Additional information on him and his children from this source.
18. Obituary of first Earl Brassey (Thomas Brassey), New York Times, New York, New York (24 February 1918), Section I, page 18 (hereafter cited as First Earl Brassey obit., New York Times).
19. Account of Visit To Lady Brasseys London House, New York Times, New York, New York (12 April 1885), page 6 (hereafter cited as Lady Brassey's House, New York Times).
20. Obituary of Lady Ann Brassey, New York Times, New York, New York (13 October 1887), page 13 (hereafter cited as Lady Brassey obit., New York Times).
21. Thomas Brassey passes Marine Board exam, New York Times, New York, New York (6 Oct. 1873), page 5 (hereafter cited as Brassey passes exam, New York Times); Yachting Account of Thomas Brassey, New York Times, New York, New York (16 June 1877), page 6 (hereafter cited as Yachting account, New York Times); Article by Brassey on Gunboats, New York Times, New York, New York (9 July 1877), page 2 (hereafter cited as Article on Gunboats, New York Times); New Publication: Voyage of Sunbeam, New York Times, New York, New York (7 July 1878), page 10 (hereafter cited as Voyage of Sunbeam, New York Times); New Books: Naval Annual, New York Times, New York, New York (23 March 1887), page 9 (hereafter cited as Naval Annual, New York Times); Review of Brassey's Naval Annual, New York Times, New York, New York (19 June 1892), page 20 (hereafter cited as Brassey Naval Annual, New York Times); Review of New Book, Fifty Years of Progress, New York Times, New York, New York (20 August 1904), page 558 (hereafter cited as 50 Years of Progress, New York Times); Article on the Sea as a Profession, New York Times, New York, New York (10 August 1890), page 16 (hereafter cited as Sea as Profession, New York Times); Lord Brassey criticized for revealing weakness of defenses, New York Times, New York, New York (18 August 1899), page 2 (hereafter cited as Weakness of Portsmouth, New York Times); Brassey visits US, New York Times, New York, New York (7 May 1905), page 12 (hereafter cited as Visit to US, New York Times); Brassey arrested at Kiel, New York Times, New York, New York (26 June 1914), page 1 (hereafter cited as Brassey arrested, New York Times); Brassey released, Kaiser amused, New York Times, New York, New York (27 June 1914), page 3 (hereafter cited as Brassey released, New York Times); and Lord Brassey ordered to Dardanelles, New York Times, New York, New York (16 June 1915), page 3 (hereafter cited as Brassey to Dardanelles, New York Times).
22. Earl Brassey (Thomas Allnutt Brassey) obituary, New York Times, New York, New York (14 November 1919), page 13 (hereafter cited as Earl Brassey obit, New York Times).
23. Townsend, P., Burke's Peerage, pages 339-340; and Additional information on Henry Arthur Brassey and his family and descendants is from this additional source.
24. Townsend, P., Burke's Peerage, pages 339-340; and Additional information on Albert Brassey, children and grandchildren from this source.
25. Pam Cooper. "[Brassey]." 15 August 1998. http://www.st.net.au/~pcooper/brassey.htm (27 September 1998) (hereafter cited as Pam Cooper, web page); and information on Elizabeth Jane Brassey and family from the above source.
26. Pam Cooper, web page; and information on family of George Thomas Brassey is from the above source.
27. Julia Brassey marriage announcement, New York Times, New York, New York (3 April 1938), Section VI, page 4 (hereafter cited as Julia Brassey marriage, New York Times).
28. Bernard Thomas Brassey obituary, New York Times, New York, New York (1 July 1967), page 23 (hereafter cited as B.T. Brassey obit., New York Times).
29. Attempt to kidnap Princess Anne, New York Times, New York, New York (21 March 1974), page 1 (hereafter cited as Kidnapping attempt, New York Times); and Queen gives honors after kidnapping attempt, New York Times, New York, New York (15 August 1974), page 34 (hereafter cited as Queen honors, New York Times).

horizontal rule


Index

(-----)

Alice (marriage to Edward Brassie) (i8068)

Allman

Allman, Mary (marriage to John Brassey) (i8132), b.1784-

Allnutt

Allnutt, Anna (marriage to Thomas Brassey) (i8192), d.1887

Amice

Amice, Roger (marriage to Margaret Bressey) (i7893), d.1574

Anderson

Anderson, Lucretia (marriage to Edmund Bressey) (i7930), d.1610

(-----)

Anne (marriage to William Bressey) (i7977)

Arkwright

Arkwright, John Peter (marriage to Violet Catherine Brassey) (i8232), b.1864-d.1931

Arrowsmith

Arrowsmith, Elizabeth (marriage to Robert Brassie) (i8113), b.1772-
Arrowsmith, Elizabeth (marriage to Robert Brassie) (i8113), b.1772-

Barber

Barber, Capt. (marriage to Margaret Brassie) (i8119)
Barber, Capt. (marriage to Margaret Brassie) (i8119)

Barnes

Barnes, Robert (marriage to Bressey) (i7895)

Baskervyle-Glegg

Baskervyle-Glegg, Myrna Elizabeth (marriage to David Henry Brassey) (i8354)

Best

Best, Thomas (marriage to Anne Bressey) (i7982)

Biddulphe

Biddulphe, (marriage to Katherine Bressey) (i7927)

Bingham

Bingham, Hon. Matilda Marie Helena (marriage to Albert Brassey) (i8218), b.1850-d.1943

Bisby

Bisby, Pheby (marriage to Thomas Bressey) (i8035)

Blackett

Blackett, Joyce (marriage to Henry Bressey) (i7947), d.1605

Booth

Booth, Amy (marriage to Thomas Bressey) (i7909)

Bouchier

Bouchier, (marriage to Anne Bressey) (i7974)
Bouchier, Lydia (i7975)

Bracey

Bracey, John (i8046), b.1639-d.1709

Brassey

Brassey, Albert (i8191), b.1844-d.1918
Brassey, Antony Hugh Owen (i8302), b.1945-
Brassey, Arthur Albert (i8269), b.1868-d.1869
Brassey, Arthur Richard (i8497), b.1887-
Brassey, Beatrice Mary (i8275), b.1879-d.1940
Brassey, Benjamin (i8109), b.1749-d.1826
Brassey, Benjamin (i8140), b.1785-d.1849
Brassey, Bernard Thomas (i8336), b.1905-d.1967
Brassey, Bruce (i8130), d.1846
Brassey, Catherine Ellen (i8183), b.1850-d.1907
Brassey, Cecil Henry (i8333), b.1896-d.1949
Brassey, Constance Alberta (i8203), b.1868-d.1873
Brassey, David Henry (i8347), b.1932-
Brassey, Diana (i8261), b.1914-
Brassey, Edgar Hugh (i8274), b.1878-d.1946
Brassey, Edward (i8356), b.1964-
Brassey, Edwin Perceval (i8277), b.1882-
Brassey, Elizabeth (i8144), b.1776-d.1842
Brassey, Elizabeth (i8157), b.1813-d.1865
Brassey, Elizabeth (i8463)
Brassey, Elizabeth Jane (i8479), b.1858-d.1910
Brassey, Emanuel (i8474), b.1834-
Brassey, Ernest Emanuel (i8498), b.1889-d.1916
Brassey, Ernest Emmanuel (i8482), b.1869-d.1951
Brassey, Ethel Anna Maria (i8267), b.1869-d.1880
Brassey, Ethel Norma (i8496), b.1885-d.1940
Brassey, Evelyn Mildred (i8271), b.1873-d.1948
Brassey, Fiona Gillian (i8304), b.1942-d.1958
Brassey, Florence Maud (i8270), b.1871-d.1875
Brassey, Frank Gordon (i8508), b.1910-
Brassey, George (i8100), b.1744-d.1803
Brassey, George (i8139), b.1783-
Brassey, George (i8158), b.1816-d.1881
Brassey, George (i8171), b.1845-d.1907
Brassey, George (i8458), d.1844
Brassey, George (i8472), b.1849-
Brassey, George Betton (i8460)
Brassey, George Thomas (i8480), b.1861-d.1941
Brassey, George Thomas (i8495), b.1884-d.1908
Brassey, Gerard Charles (i8334), b.1898-d.1918
Brassey, Gladys May (i8502), b.1897-d.1972
Brassey, Gwendoline (i8273), b.1876-
Brassey, Harold Ernest (i8307), b.1877-d.1916
Brassey, Harriet (i8470), b.1843-
Brassey, Helen de Vere (i8198), b.1892-
Brassey, Henrietta (i8276), b.1880-
Brassey, Henry Arthur (i8190), b.1840-d.1891
Brassey, Henry Charles (i8340), b.1947-
Brassey, Henry Leonard Campbell (i8268), b.1870-d.1958
Brassey, Herbert Bruce (i8181), b.1873-
Brassey, Hilda Madeleine (i8272), b.1872-
Brassey, Honora Mary (i8317)
Brassey, Hugh Trefusis (i8286), b.1915-
Brassey, Hugo Bulkeley (i8253), b.1910-d.1963
Brassey, Iris Hermione (i8227), b.1880-
Brassey, Jane Margaret (i8305), b.1946-
Brassey, John (i8131), b.1790-d.1849
Brassey, John (i8137), b.1778-d.1831
Brassey, John (i8156), b.1811-d.1829
Brassey, John (i8169), b.1842-d.1849
Brassey, John (i8189), b.1839-d.1839
Brassey, John (i8464), b.1804-
Brassey, John Leonard (i8335), b.1903-d.1903
Brassey, John Perceval (i8176), b.1851-d.1894
Brassey, Julia (i15669)
Brassey, Kim Maurice (i8303), b.1955-
Brassey, Lillian Eleanor (i8503), b.1899-d.1977
Brassey, Lillian Maude (i8221), b.1871-d.1952
Brassey, Lillian May (i8501), b.1893-d.1893
Brassey, Louise (i8353), b.1964-
Brassey, Mabelle Annie (i8202), b.1865-d.1927
Brassey, Margaret (i8143), b.1773-
Brassey, Margaret (i8469), b.1840-
Brassey, Marie Adelaide (i8205), b.1875-d.1960
Brassey, Marjorie Eva (i8287)
Brassey, Mary (i8142), b.1770-d.1814
Brassey, Mary (i8468), b.1838-
Brassey, Mary Cawley (i8172)
Brassey, Mary Elizabeth (i8184), b.1848-
Brassey, May Eleanor Annie (i8223), b.1874-d.1941
Brassey, Miranda (i8352), b.1963-
Brassey, Moira Violet (i8251), b.1906-
Brassey, Muriel Agnes (i8204), b.1872-d.1930
Brassey, Myrtle Eileen (i8507), b.1908-d.1992
Brassey, Nancy Elizabeth (i8318)
Brassey, Oonagh Evelyn (i8316)
Brassey, Pamela Rachael (i8259), b.1911-
Brassey, Percy Frederick (i8225), b.1876-d.1901
Brassey, Peter Esme (i8337), b.1907-
Brassey, Ralph Albert (i8228), b.1883-d.1905
Brassey, Ralph Perceval (i8155), b.1808-d.1830
Brassey, Richard (i8141)
Brassey, Richard (i8160), b.1818-d.1836
Brassey, Richard (i8177), b.1844-d.1904
Brassey, Richard (i8461), b.1808-
Brassey, Richard (i8475), b.1832-d.1914
Brassey, Richard Edwin (i8341), b.1949-
Brassey, Richard Ernest (i8504), b.1901-d.1985
Brassey, Richard Robert (i8481), b.1863-d.1864
Brassey, Robert (i8138)
Brassey, Robert (i8159), b.1822-d.1889
Brassey, Robert (i8467), b.1833-
Brassey, Robert (i16564)
Brassey, Robert Bingham (i8224), b.1875-d.1946
Brassey, Robert Perceval (i8182), b.1845-d.1898
Brassey, Ronald Henry (i8332), b.1895-d.1895
Brassey, Rose Zara Maria (i8222), b.1872-d.1949
Brassey, Rowena Jane (i8342), b.1945-
Brassey, Ruby Mabelle (i8278), b.1887-
Brassey, Sarah (i8134), b.1783-
Brassey, Sarah (i8473), b.1850-
Brassey, Sarah Ann Maud (i8494), b.1882-d.1964
Brassey, Sarah Jane (i8258), b.1951-
Brassey, Sarah Patricia (i8306), b.1949-
Brassey, Thomas (i8136), b.1769-d.1843
Brassey, Thomas (i8154), b.1805-d.1870
Brassey, Thomas (i8170), b.1843-d.1896
Brassey, Thomas (i8188), b.1836-d.1918
Brassey, Thomas (i8250), b.1905-d.1905
Brassey, Thomas (i8462)
Brassey, Thomas (i8471), b.1846-
Brassey, Thomas Allnutt (i8201), b.1863-d.1919
Brassey, Thomas Ian (i8348), b.1934-
Brassey, Thomas Noel Bingham (i8257), b.1952-
Brassey, Victor Charles (i8505), b.1904-d.1973
Brassey, Violet Catherine (i8226), b.1878-d.1963
Brassey, Violet Grace (i8506), b.1906-

Brassie

Brassie, Alice (i8061)
Brassie, Ambrose (i8126)
Brassie, Amy (i8065)
Brassie, Amy (i8077)
Brassie, Anne (i8084)
Brassie, Edward (i8067)
Brassie, Edward (i8081)
Brassie, Elizabeth (i8059)
Brassie, Elizabeth (i8075)
Brassie, Elizabeth (i8083)
Brassie, Elizabeth (i8091), d.1767
Brassie, Elizabeth (i8104)
Brassie, Elizabeth (i8115), b.1768-d.1838
Brassie, Frances (i8064)
Brassie, Frances (i8105)
Brassie, Hugh (i8055)
Brassie, James (i8058)
Brassie, Jane (i8076)
Brassie, Jane (i8086)
Brassie, John (i8069)
Brassie, Margaret (i8085)
Brassie, Margaret (i8095), b.1740-d.1820
Brassie, Margaret (i8102)
Brassie, Margaret (i8117)
Brassie, Margaret (i8128), b.1765-d.1844
Brassie, Margaret (marriage to Thomas Brassie) (i8095), b.1740-d.1820
Brassie, Martha (i8087)
Brassie, Mary (i8063)
Brassie, Mary (i8074)
Brassie, Mary (i8092), b.1739-d.1824
Brassie, Mary (i8120)
Brassie, Mary (i8127)
Brassie, Mary Elizabeth (i8107), b.1750-d.1778
Brassie, Peter (i8070)
Brassie, Ralph (i8050), b.1592-d.1623
Brassie, Randle (i8056)
Brassie, Richard (i8052), b.1595-
Brassie, Richard (i8066), b.1635-
Brassie, Richard (i8082)
Brassie, Richard (i8097)
Brassie, Richard (i8125), b.1768-d.1817
Brassie, Robert (i8079), b.1709-d.1777
Brassie, Robert (i8098), b.1737-d.1803
Brassie, Robert (i8112), b.1770-d.1826
Brassie, Robert (i8124)
Brassie, Sarah (i8078)
Brassie, Thomas (i8051)
Brassie, Thomas (i8071)
Brassie, Thomas (i8088), b.1702-d.1776
Brassie, Thomas (i8094), b.1743-d.1767
Brassie, Thomas (i8096), b.1742-d.1815
Brassie, Thomas (i8111), b.1766-d.1819
Brassie, Thomas (i8122)
Brassie, Thomas (marriage to Margaret Brassie) (i8096), b.1742-d.1815
Brassie, William (i8057)

Bresey

Bresey, Hamon le (i16570)
Bresey, William de (i16567)

Bressey

Bressey, (i7886)
Bressey, (i7887)
Bressey, (i7953)
Bressey, (i7984)
Bressey, (i7985)
Bressey, Alice (i7902)
Bressey, Alice (i7917)
Bressey, Amphyllis (i8017)
Bressey, Amy (i7918)
Bressey, Anne (i7903)
Bressey, Anne (i7916)
Bressey, Anne (i7937)
Bressey, Anne (i7960)
Bressey, Anne (i7973)
Bressey, Anne (i7981)
Bressey, Benjamin (i7967)
Bressey, Bridget (i7936)
Bressey, Catherine (i8009)
Bressey, Constance (i8015)
Bressey, Constance (i8022)
Bressey, Constance (i8038)
Bressey, Daniel (i7968)
Bressey, Edmund (i7904), b.1539-d.1612
Bressey, Edmund (i7997)
Bressey, Edmund (i8010), d.1638
Bressey, Edmund (i8026), d.1641
Bressey, Edward (i7983)
Bressey, Edward (i7988)
Bressey, Eleanor (i7915)
Bressey, Elizabeth (i7888)
Bressey, Elizabeth (i8027)
Bressey, Ellen (i7989)
Bressey, Frances (i7992)
Bressey, Francis (i7969), d.1646
Bressey, Francis (i8031)
Bressey, George (i7914)
Bressey, Hamnet (i7883)
Bressey, Hannah (i8048), b.1640-d.1682
Bressey, Henry (i7935), b.1559-d.1624
Bressey, Henry (i7949), b.1599-
Bressey, Henry (i8028)
Bressey, Hugh (i7912)
Bressey, Isaac (i8000)
Bressey, James (i7882)
Bressey, Jane (i7993)
Bressey, John (i8012)
Bressey, John (i8030)
Bressey, Joseph (i7966)
Bressey, Joyce (i7951)
Bressey, Katherine (i7906)
Bressey, Katherine (i7934)
Bressey, Katherine (i7998), d.1591
Bressey, Lawrence (i7963)
Bressey, Lucretia (i8013)
Bressey, Lucy (i7954)
Bressey, Margaret (i7885)
Bressey, Margaret (i7938)
Bressey, Margaret (i7991)
Bressey, Margaret (i7994)
Bressey, Martha (i8032)
Bressey, Mary (i7939)
Bressey, Mary (i7950), d.1629
Bressey, Mary (i7971)
Bressey, Mary (i7990)
Bressey, Mary (i8024)
Bressey, Phebe (i8040)
Bressey, Ralph (i7881), b.1500-d.1561
Bressey, Ralph (i7905)
Bressey, Ralph (i7911)
Bressey, Ralph (i7933), d.1620
Bressey, Ralph (i7961)
Bressey, Ralph (i8016)
Bressey, Randall (i7907), d.1610
Bressey, Richard (i7898), b.1525-
Bressey, Richard (i8018)
Bressey, Robert (i7884)
Bressey, Robert (i8014)
Bressey, Samuel (i7980)
Bressey, Susan (i8002), d.1635
Bressey, Susannah (i8045)
Bressey, Thomas (i7876), b.1475-
Bressey, Thomas (i7877)
Bressey, Thomas (i7901), b.1527-
Bressey, Thomas (i7908), b.1557-d.1631
Bressey, Thomas (i7959)
Bressey, Thomas (i7962)
Bressey, Thomas (i7965)
Bressey, Thomas (i7979)
Bressey, Thomas (i7996)
Bressey, Thomas (i7999), d.1591
Bressey, Thomas (i8011), d.1646
Bressey, Thomas (i8043)
Bressey, William (i7913)
Bressey, William (i7970)
Bressey, William (i7976)
Bressey, William (i7978)

Bret

Bret, Margaret le (marriage to William de Bresey) (i16568)

Britten

Britten, Constance Marion (marriage to Robert Bingham Brassey) (i8248)

Brooke

Brooke, Sarah (marriage to Robert Brassie) (i8099), b.1737-d.1817

Bruce

Bruce, Mary (marriage to Benjamin Brassey) (i8110), b.1748-d.1805

Bulkeley

Bulkeley, Elizabeth (marriage to Thomas Brassie) (i8072)

Bulkley

Bulkley, Elizabeth (marriage to Richard Bressey) (i7899)

Bunbury

Bunbury, (marriage to Mary Bressey) (i7972)

Burghaugh

Burghaugh, Thomas (marriage to Anne Bressey) (i7921)

Capell

Capell, Lady Sybil de Vere (marriage to Thomas Brassey) (i8195), b.1858-d.1934

Carr

Carr, Mary (marriage to George Betton Brassey) (i8465)

Cawley

Cawley, Jane (marriage to George Brassey) (i8165), b.1809-d.1873

Cecil

Cecil, Lady Romayne Elizabeth Algitha (marriage to Peter Esme Brassey) (i8339)

Chadwick

Chadwick, Harriet (marriage to George Brassey) (i8459), b.1784-d.1862

(-----)

Charles Henry (marriage to Hilda Madeleine Brassey) (i8324), b.1870-d.1935

Cookson

Cookson, Philip Blencowe (marriage to Gwendoline Brassey) (i8308), b.1871-d.1928

Daly

Daly, Hon. Denis St. George (marriage to Rose Zara Maria Brassey) (i8238), b.1862-d.1942

Davies

Davies, Elizabeth (marriage to Benjamin Brassey) (i8148), d.1815

Dawnay

Dawnay, Michael (marriage to Julia Brassey) (i15670)

Daxon

Daxon, John (marriage to Margaret Bressey) (i7995)

Dickinson

Dickinson, Joseph (marriage to Phebe Bressey) (i8041), d.1675

Dodd

Dodd, Thomas (marriage to Sarah Brassey) (i8135)

Doughtie

Doughtie, Joane (marriage to Ralph Bressey) (i7958)

Dutton

Dutton, Eleanor (marriage to Richard Brassie) (i8053)
Dutton, Mary (marriage to Robert Brassey) (i8167), d.1891

Egerton

Egerton, Charles Augustus (marriage to Mabelle Annie Brassey) (i8206), b.1846-d.1912
Egerton, Ralph (marriage to Anne Bressey) (i7926)

(-----)

Elizabeth (marriage to Henry Bressey) (i8029)
Elizabeth (marriage to Thomas Brassie) (i8123), b.1772-d.1796

Evans

Evans, Esther (marriage to Benjamin Brassey) (i8150), b.1800-

Evison

Evison, Thomas (marriage to Frances Brassie) (i8106)

Field

Field, John (marriage to Joyce Bressey) (i7952)

Finlason

Finlason, Valerie Christine (marriage to Thomas Ian Brassey) (i8349)

Forset

Forset, Richard (marriage to Margaret Bressey) (i7892), d.1561

Fowler

Fowler, Jessica Jane (marriage to David Arthur Lloyd) (i8265)

Freeman-Thomas

Freeman-Thomas, Freeman (marriage to Marie Adelaide Brassey) (i8210), b.1866-d.1941

Furnivall

Furnivall, Anthony (marriage to Elizabeth Brassie) (i8060)

Gaman

Gaman, William (marriage to Mary Brassey) (i8147), b.1760-d.1823

Garraway

Garraway, Thomas (marriage to Anne Bressey) (i7943)

Gibbs

Gibbs, William (marriage to Ruby Mabelle Brassey) (i8279), d.1963

(-----)

Gilbert George Reginald (marriage to Muriel Agnes Brassey) (i8209), b.1869-d.1915

Gordon-Lennox

Gordon-Lennox, Lady Violet Mary (marriage to Henry Leonard Campbell Brassey) (i8329), b.1874-d.1946

Gore

Gore, Crystal Gloria (marriage to Bernard Thomas Brassey) (i8343), d.1962

Gregory

Gregory, Love-in-God (marriage to Lucy Bressey) (i7955)

Grosvenor

Grosvenor, Dorothy Alice Margaret Augusta (marriage to Robert Bingham Brassey) (i8246), d.1966

Hadley

Hadley, Isabella de (marriage to Hamon le Bresey) (i16571)

Harrison

Harrison, Maria Farrington (marriage to Thomas Brassey) (i8161), b.1817-d.1877
Harrison, Mary (marriage to Thomas Brassie) (i8089), b.1711-d.1776

Hart

Hart, Hannah (marriage to Thomas Bressey) (i8034)

Hassall

Hassall, Margaret (marriage to Thomas Bressey) (i7879)

Hely-Hutchinson

Hely-Hutchinson, Lady Norah (marriage to Harold Ernest Brassey) (i8311), b.1880-d.1964

Henderson

Henderson, Michael Thomas (marriage to Oonagh Evelyn Brassey) (i8322), d.1953

Herbert

Herbert, Richard (marriage to Alice Brassie) (i8062)

Hewitt

Hewitt, Randle (marriage to Mary Brassie) (i8093), b.1739-d.1795

Hughes

Hughes, Mary Ann (marriage to Richard Brassey) (i8466), b.1818-

Jackson

Jackson, Elizabeth (marriage to George Brassey) (i8101), b.1750-d.1834

Jones

Jones, Idina Maria (i8299), b.1968-
Jones, Michael Andrieus (marriage to Susan Margaret Peacock) (i8297)
Jones, Phillip Andrieus (i8298), b.1966-

Jorgensen

Jorgensen, Barbara (marriage to Bernard Thomas Brassey) (i8345)

Kerison

Kerison, John (marriage to Eleanor Bressey) (i7920)

Kingscote

Kingscote, Joyce Patricia (marriage to Hugh Trefusis Brassey) (i8300)

(-----)

Lady Idina Mary (marriage to Thomas Allnutt Brassey) (i8213), b.1865-d.1951

Lawrence

Lawrence, Agnes (marriage to Thomas Bressey) (i7924)

Leslie

Leslie, Reginald Frederick Stuart (marriage to Nancy Elizabeth Brassey) (i8319), d.1943

Leveson-Gower

Leveson-Gower, Granville Charles Gresham (marriage to Evelyn Mildred Brassey) (i8326), b.1865-d.1957

Lightfoot

Lightfoot, Prudence Mary (marriage to Richard Brassey) (i8178), b.1851-

Little

Little, Malcolm Orme (marriage to Iris Hermione Brassey) (i8229), b.1857-d.1931

Lloyd

Lloyd, David Arthur (i8264), b.1945-
Lloyd, Humphrey William (marriage to Diana Brassey) (i8262)
Lloyd, John Humphrey (i8263), b.1940-

Low

Low, Elizabeth (marriage to Edmund Bressey) (i8020)

Lowry-Corry

Lowry-Corry, Violet Edith (marriage to Robert Bingham Brassey) (i8243), b.1880-d.1919

(-----)

Lucy (marriage to Henry Bressey) (i7948)

Luther

Luther, John (marriage to Alice Bressey) (i7922)

Mackinnon

Mackinnon, Duncan (marriage to Pamela Rachael Brassey) (i8260)

Maddocks

Maddocks, Thomas (marriage to Mary Cawley Brassey) (i8173), b.1846-

(-----)

Margaret (marriage to Lawrence Bressey) (i7964)
Mary (marriage to Robert Brassie) (i8080), b.1716-d.1800

Massey

Massey, Margaret (marriage to Ralph Bressey) (i7890)
Massey, William (marriage to Margaret Bressey) (i7894)

Maudsley

Maudsley, Agnes (i8485), b.1883-d.1966
Maudsley, Ernest Roger (i8488), b.1890-d.1972
Maudsley, George Booker (i8486), b.1885-d.1976
Maudsley, Henry Gordon (i8490), b.1893-d.1967
Maudsley, Ivy Brassey (i8492), b.1901-d.1987
Maudsley, John Booker Harling (i8491), b.1896-d.1955
Maudsley, Richard Brassey (i8484), b.1881-d.1972
Maudsley, Thomas (i8487), b.1887-d.1931
Maudsley, Thomas (marriage to Elizabeth Jane Brassey) (i8483), b.1852-d.1924
Maudsley, William Josiah (i8489), b.1891-d.1968

Miller

Miller, Paul (marriage to Elizabeth Brassey) (i8145), b.1777-d.1820

Moore

Moore, William (marriage to Margaret Brassie) (i8118)
Moore, William (marriage to Margaret Brassie) (i8118)

Morey

Morey, John (marriage to Constance Bressey) (i8039)

Morgan

Morgan, (marriage to Elizabeth Bressey) (i7889)

Mortimer

Mortimer, William (marriage to Mary Elizabeth Brassey) (i8185), b.1840-d.1900

Motion

Motion, Vernon (marriage to Oonagh Evelyn Brassey) (i8323)

Murray

Murray, Lt.-Col. Sir John (marriage to Helen de Vere Brassey) (i8199), d.1967

O'Brien

O'Brien, John Edward (marriage to Moira Violet Brassey) (i8252)

Ober

Ober, Anne (marriage to Thomas Bressey) (i7923)

Osborn

Osborn, Mary (marriage to Thomas Bressey) (i8044)

Owfield

Owfield, Francis (i8004), d.1635
Owfield, John (marriage to Susan Bressey) (i8003)

Paine

Paine, Thomas (marriage to Hannah Bressey) (i8049)

Palin

Palin, John (marriage to Mary Elizabeth Brassie) (i8108), b.1748-d.1833

Palmer

Palmer, Elizabeth Ann (marriage to George Thomas Brassey) (i8493), b.1861-d.1940

Peacock

Peacock, Hugh Myddelton (marriage to Marjorie Eva Brassey) (i8288)
Peacock, Idina Caroline (i8291), b.1933-
Peacock, Michael Hugh (i8290), b.1946-
Peacock, Susan Margaret (i8292), b.1938-

Peacocke

Peacocke, Barbara Frederica de Roll (marriage to Hugo Bulkeley Brassey) (i8255)

Pearce

Pearce, Anne (marriage to John Bracey) (i8047), d.1696

Percival

Percival, Elizabeth (marriage to John Brassey) (i8152), b.1778-d.1840

Pickering (or Picken)

Pickering (or Picken), Ellen (marriage to Ralph Bressey) (i7929)

Pirie

Pirie, Amanda Caroline (i8296), b.1962-
Pirie, James Hugh (i8295), b.1959-
Pirie, James William Gordon (marriage to Idina Caroline Peacock) (i8293)

Povey

Povey, (marriage to Bressey) (i7896)

Price

Price, Robin Kenrick (marriage to May Eleanor Annie Brassey) (i8240), b.1870-d.1927

Redman

Redman, Judith (marriage to Isaac Bressey) (i8001)

Risley

Risley, Rev. Edward (marriage to Lucretia Bressey) (i8033)
Risley, Rev. Robert (marriage to Catherine Bressey) (i8019)

Rose

Rose, John, Sr. (marriage to Phebe Bressey) (i8042)

Rowe

Rowe, James (marriage to Mary Brassie) (i8121), d.1834
Rowe, James (marriage to Mary Brassie) (i8121), d.1834

Salmon

Salmon, Robert (marriage to Elizabeth Brassie) (i8116), b.1768-d.1843
Salmon, Robert (marriage to Elizabeth Brassie) (i8116), b.1768-d.1843

Saunders

Saunders, Francis (marriage to Constance Bressey) (i8023)

Scott

Scott, Richard Alexander (marriage to Lillian Maude Brassey) (i8235), b.1856-d.1942

Shepherd

Shepherd, Constance (marriage to Edmund Bressey) (i8005)

Silverthorne

Silverthorne, Charlotte (marriage to Ernest Emmanuel Brassey) (i8499), b.1870-d.1894

Smith

Smith, William (marriage to Margaret Brassie) (i8129)

Smyth

Smyth, Mary (marriage to Randall Bressey) (i7928)

Spencer

Spencer, Hon. Victoria Ivy Louise (marriage to Cecil Henry Brassey) (i8338)

Stacey

Stacey, Thomas (marriage to Beatrice Mary Brassey) (i8281), b.1873-d.1940

Stenzel

Stenzel, Emma Auguste (marriage to Ernest Emmanuel Brassey) (i8500), b.1872-d.1958

Stevenson

Stevenson, Harriet Anna (marriage to Henry Arthur Brassey) (i8216), b.1845-d.1898

Trefusis

Trefusis, Margaret Harriet (marriage to Edgar Hugh Brassey) (i8284), d.1966

von Bodenhausen

von Bodenhausen, Baroness Christa (marriage to Hugo Bulkeley Brassey) (i8254)

Walker

Walker, Sarah Ann (marriage to Richard Brassey) (i8476), b.1829-d.1913

Waller

Waller, (marriage to Mary Bressey) (i8025)

Walmysle

Walmysle, William (marriage to Mary Bressey) (i7940)

Ward

Ward, Frances (marriage to Edward Bressey) (i7986)

Watson

Watson, Job (marriage to Margaret Brassie) (i8103)

Weaver

Weaver, Richard (marriage to Margaret Brassey) (i8146), b.1771-

Woodward

Woodward, John (marriage to Katherine Bressey) (i7946)

Wren

Wren, (marriage to Amy Bressey) (i7919)

Wright

Wright, Henry(?) or Roger (marriage to Alice Bressey) (i7925)
Wright, Rev. James (marriage to Elizabeth Brassey) (i8162), b.1795-d.1867

Wrono

Wrono, Margery (marriage to Thomas Bressey) (i7878)

Younger

Younger, William Antony (marriage to Nancy Elizabeth Brassey) (i8320), d.1961


© 2000 Edwin C. Dunn


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