Descendants of William Pink Hudson

Descendants of William Pink Hudson
and
Julia Ann Kettenring-Catron

Early White County, Tennessee Pioneers



1. William Pink Hudson [733] was born 1779 in Montgomery Co., Virginia and died 18 Oct 1840 in Bona, Dade Co., Missouri. He was married on 2 Jul 1801 in Grayson Co., Virginia to Julia Ann Kettenring-Catron [734]. She was born 14 Feb 1789 in Montgomery Co., Virginia and died 25 Mar 1840 near Bona, Missouri. She was a daughter of Johann Jacob Kettenring-Catron [1168] and Elizabeth Gose [1169].

The parents of William Pink Hudson are unknown at this time. The Dunbar Bible gives his birth as 1783 but using the 1800 tax list, William would have to be 21 to be on that list. The next record of William Hudson is his marriage to Julia Ann or "Uley" Catron on 2 July 1801 in Grayson Co., Virginia. Julia Ann is a daughter of Johann Jacob Kettenring-Catron and Elizabeth Goss. Her parents are recorded in the book, "Kettenring Family", by Henry H. Catron. Johann Jacob was born in Scharhof, Germany on 5 November 1756. Julia Ann was born in Montgomery County Virginia, on 14 February 1789 and she died 25 March 1840, in Morgan Township, Polk Co., Missouri. This date recorded in the Dunbar bible.

Father Johann Jacob was listed in the tax lists of Montgomery County, Virginia. Also land records put him in Montgomery County from 1773 on Reed Creek, a branch of the New River. That location would now be in Carroll County. Jacob was a private in the Virginia Militia and listed in Capt. Doack's Company in the American Revolution. Julia Ann had several brothers and sisters. Barbary, who married Ira Bedwell on 7 May 1807 in Grayson County; Elizabeth, who married George Long in Grayson County; Christopher, who married Euphenie "Fanny" Jones on 20 April 1807 in Grayson County; and Solomon, who married Elizabeth Jennings on 31 January 1822 in Lafayette Co., Missouri; and Jacob.

As indicated by numerous land sales, William and Julia Ann Hudson lived in the Elk Creek area of Grayson County up to about 1807. On 25 March 1802 Pink Hudson purchased 172 acres on Elk Creek a branch of the New River (Book 1 page 473, 474 Grayson County deeds). There were several more parcels of land that Pink and Julia Ann purchased and sold (Book 2 pages 19, 21, 140 and 157).

In the spring of 1986, my wife May and I traveled to Grayson County and visited the last place William and Julia Ann owned in Virginia. We left Independence Virginia and went north on U.S. 21 and turned right on R 804 then when R 604 comes in from the left we were at the farm. The area is rolling hills mostly covered with trees. A winding road up the hill until we stopped at the Farm house. The home that is there now is about 100 years old, the man who owns it informed us also that the house incorporates and is built around an old log cabin which could be William and Julia Ann's. William and Julia Ann's first child was born in Grayson County, possibly in this cabin.

William and his family moved to White County, Tennessee. On 10 May 1808 he purchased a parcel of land there. This deed is recorded on Book A page 224 and he sold this parcel on 14 August 1809 (Book B page 117 White County deeds.) This parcel of land sold to Eliza Ward and is located on Cherry Creek a tributary of the Chamberland River. More evidence that William P. Hudson and his family remained in White County, Tennessee for a while is found in the tax list of White County, from 1811 to 1817 where he is recorded to live in the Cherry Creek District during those dates. This is recorded in the White Co., Tennessee taxable and polls 1811 - 1818 (Film 464,154 Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah).

Pink and Julia Ann Hudson left White Co., Tennessee before October 1817. On Book F page 97 of White County deeds is a record of his selling a parcel of land to John Rutlidge. The deed states Pink Hudson "late of White county" meaning he had moved from the area. In the 1820 census of Missouri, Pink Hudson and Solomon Catron, his brother-in-law, were in Howard County, Missouri. Lafayette, Saline and many other counties had not been formed yet and were till part of Howard County, so they were probably in the Lafayette area. In "History of Lafayette and Saline Counties. 997.84 D3p". John Catron, who is the son of Christopher Catron, another brother- in-law to William Hudson, states that his father and William Hudson and the Catron family moved to Saline County for one year then on to Lafayette Co., Missouri.

The first record in Lafayette for William Hudson is found in a land purchase near Lexington, again when he was chosen to be on the Grand Jury, 2nd day of February 1821, again he was on the Grand Jury 8 October 1821. On 12 March 1822 he was charged with having an affray or fight. On 8 July 1822 he was found not guilty on those charges. In 1821 William and others routed a road from Lexington to Jack's ferry. This is recorded in the Historical Review on pages 41, 42. William purchased and sold many parcels of land while in Lafayette Co. area, as did his oldest son Martin. Both the Hudson and Catron families were found in Lafayette County as it was opening up and were among the prominent pioneers who formed the county. Early courts were held outside in some cases because there weren't buildings large enough. William lived near Lexington and also near Higginsville.

On the 2nd of June in 1832 William was charged with trying to sell a parcel of land that Issac Van Derber had a lien on. This was in Jackson County, but the court proceedings were in Lafayette county. Also, William was in court standing up with his son David who charged George W. Ford for trespassing. The fine was one cent. This happened on the 2nd day of April in 1838. While William and Julia Ann were living in Lafayette County William was made Guardian on 15 August 1836 of children born to Ira and Barbary Bedwell when ra died. Recorded 15 August 1836 book 4 page 78. (Barbary is Julia Ann's sister).

The will of Ira was probated in Lafayette County, so they were living there when Ira died. William was released from the guardianship of all of the children by 1839.

William sold all of the parcels of land when he and his family moved from Lafayette County to Polk County 18 November 1837. This deed is recorded in book E page 460. It is also recorded in Dade County History book, in the Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah call Number 997.8745 H2s that William Hudson and his son Thomas were some of the first to buy land in Township 32 Range 25, Dade County. A plat map of Dade County (which was formed in 1841) shows William purchased 80 acres in 1839.

The probate of his will lists as assets another quarter section of land bordering his 80 acres, that he purchased from John Azbill. William Hudson, son of William P. Hudson was the administrator of the estate of His father. William Pink Hudson Estate included several slaves, and were several notes receivable and land which was with all assets in total a very large figure. The heirs requested that the slaves be sold, with the money being divided according to law.

The death of William Hudson on 18 October 1840 and his wife Julia Ann on 25 arch 1840 both occurred in Dade County, both are buried on a 1 acre plot of land owned by David Hudson. When David deeded his 40 acre parcel he set aside one acre for the cemetery of his parents, placing them in the center of that acre. The acre of land is in the center of the 40 acre parcel. This parcel is 1.65 miles south of the town of Bona, Dade County, Missouri.

Children of William Pink Hudson and Julia Ann Kettenring-Catron were as follows:
+ 2 i Martin Hudson [1188], born 24 Jul 1807 in Grayson, Virginia. He married Elizabeth McAlroy 1187].
+ 3 ii Elizabeth Hudson [16109], born 1808 in White Co., Tennessee. She married (1) David Blevins [16110]. She married (2) Robert Sensibaugh [16112].
+ 4 iii Mary Hudson [2194], born 20 Feb 1811 in White Co., Tennessee. She married Alexander Dunbar [667].
+ 5 iv William Hudson [16162], born 10 Jan 1813 in White Co., Tennessee. He married (1) Sarah Ann Smith [6301]. He married (2) Martha Ann Potts [16320].
+ 6 v Thomas Flourney Hudson [1858], born 1818 in Lexington, Lafayette Co., Missouri. He married (1) Emeline Johnson [1569]. He married (2) Mary Catherine (---) [1551].
+ 7 vi David Hudson [16252], born 15 Oct 1820 in Lexington, Missouri. He married Frances Griffith [16257].
+ 8 vii Lucinda Hudson [16239], born 20 Jun 1823 in Lexington, Missouri. She married John York [16276].

Generation 2

2. Martin Hudson [1188] (William Pink), born 24 Jul 1807 in Grayson, Virginia; died 14 Dec 1871 in Los Guilicos, California. He married on 24 May 1832 in Lafayette Co., Missouri, Elizabeth McAlroy [1187], born 15 Apr 1809 in White Co., Tennessee; died 23 Jun 1888 in Santa Rosa, California.

When Martin Hudson was very young he moved to White Co., Tennessee with his parents. Martin was 10 years old when they moved again to Missouri where he grew to an adult. Martin is descended on the maternal side from German ancestry. His grandfather Jacob Catron or Kettenring was born in Germany, but came to America and made his home in Virginia where he reared his family. Jacob Catron also was a Revolutionary Soldier. Through the Catron's, Martin is a distant Cousin of John A. Catron, a U.S. Supreme Court Justice appointed by Andrew Jackson.

In Missouri, Martin purchased land in Lafayette County, and lived here even after his father moved south to Dade County. When his father's estate was probated in 1840, Martin was living in Lafayette.

With his family, Martin left for California May 1848, starting from Missouri and arrived in Sonoma County in the fall of that year 1848, coming across the plains by ox-team via the northern route (over Donner's Pass) accompanied by his wife and five children. At one place on the overland trip the teams had to be lowered from the cliffs by chains, at anther time the oxen stampeded, and the wife and small children had to jump from the rear end of the wagon. The oldest daughters rode bareback, and were told to keep near the others. They strayed away one day and got off the trail. Silently they came upon a group of Indians one of who came toward them clad in a breach cloth and a stove pipe hat. Frightened, the girls rode back to the wagon train as quickly as possible.

After arriving in California Martin and his family stayed the first winter with his brother William Hudson, a pioneer of the earlier date (1845). In the spring they settled in the Los Guilicos Valley purchasing a ranch there. His ranch was originally 2300 acres. Except for a few gold mining trips, Martin remained at home and looked after his interests, cultivating the soil and raising stock the rest of his life.

Children of Martin Hudson and Elizabeth McElroy were as follows:
+   9 i Lydia Lovonia Hudson [16249], born 6 Dec 1835 in Lexington, Missouri. She married William Bend Atterbury [16248].
+ 10 ii Michael E. Hudson [16247], born 5 Jan 1838 in Lexington, Missouri. She married James Polk Clark [16246].
+ 11 iii John William Hudson [1195], born 26 Oct 1840 in Polk Co., Missouri. He married Elizabeth Annette Spurr [4296].
+ 12 iv David Alvin Hudson [16242], born 7 Jul 1843 in Lafayette Co., Missouri. He married Sarah E. Bowers [16244].
+ 13 v Toliafero Flourney Hudson [16243], born 19 Sep 1846 in Dade Co., Missouri. He married Elizabeth D. Ingram [16241].
+ 14 vi Martin Perry Hudson [16307], born 5 Nov 1850 in Santa Rosa, Sonoma Co., California. He married Marie A. Ausser [16259].
+ 15 vii Henry Walker Hudson [16258], born 1853 in Sonoma Co., California. He married Emma Delia Northcutt [16256].

3. Elizabeth Hudson [16109] (William Pink), born 1808 in White Co., Tennessee; died 29 Jan 1846 in Dade Co., Missouri; buried in Bona, Dade Co., Missouri. She married (1) abt. 1822 in Lafayette Co., Missouri, David Blevins [16110], born abt. 1804 in Lafayette Co., Missouri; died 1828 in Lafayette Co., Missouri. She married (2) on 18 Apr 1830 in Lexington Co., Missouri, Robert Sensibaugh [16112], born abt. 1808 in Lexington, Missouri; died in Wise, Texas.

Elizabeth is recorded in Guardian Record for Lafayette County, Missouri, Book Two, page one hundred twenty two, 5 August 1829. Her father (William Pink Hudson) was Guardian of Catherine Blevins, the Daughter of Elizabeth and David Blevins, her first Husband.

Elizabeth married second to Robert Sensibaugh in Lexington, Lafayette County, Missouri and moved south with her new husband and her parents to Dade County, Missouri. After Elizabeth died her husband moved west to Calif. with the rest of the Hudson family. Then went to Wise County, Texas where he died. Both of Elizabeth's daughters went to California in 1845 and stayed.

Elizabeth is buried in a plot near Bona, Dade County, Missouri. This is the same small cemetery set aside by David Hudson for the final resting site of his parents, one acre in the center of his 40 acres is recorded in the deed when he sold the fourty.
Notes for David Blevins

David Blevins is mentioned in the Guardian papers of his daughter Catharine when David died in 1828.

Notes for Robert Sensibaugh
Robert Sensibaugh went to California in 1845 with the Hudson Family but after his family were grown he moved to Wise County, Texas where he died.

Children of Elizabeth Hudson and David Blevins were as follows:
   16 i Catharine3 Blevins [16111], born abt. 1823 in Lafayette Co., Guardian papers of his daughter Catharine when David died in 1828. Her mother Elizabeth is also mentioned in the same guardian papers of Lafayertte County, Missouri.

Children of Elizabeth Hudson and Robert Sensibaugh were as follows:
+ 17 i Lydia M. Sensibaugh [16113], born 20 Sep 1837 in Lexington, Missouri. She married Calvin Chesterfield Griffith [16114].

4. Mary Hudson [2194] (William Pink), born 20 Feb 1811 in White Co., Tennessee; died 16 Dec 1886 in San Luis Obispo, California; buried in Odd Fellow Cem, San Luis Obispo, California. She married on 24 Apr 1835 in Lafayette Co., Missouri, Alexander Dunbar [667], born 1802 in White Co., Tennessee; died 5 Jan 1884 in San Luis Obispo, California; buried in Odd Fellows Cem., San Luis Obispo, California, son of Alexander Dunbar (Sr.) [21964] and Roady Reade [21965].

Mary was a child when her father came to Lafayette Co., Missouri about 1817 and spent her childhood in Lafayette County. Alexander came to Lafayette before 21 July 1823 because he was charged in court, the people against Alexander Dunbar for an affray and assault and battery on that date. Also Alexander was married first to Ann (unknown last name) and and their children were born in Lafayette County. Where or when the first marriage took place is unknown at this time.

HISTORY OF LAFAYETTE COUNTY, MISSOURI
Tax on Bachelors 1821 page 306.

In 1821 the state of Missouri levied a special tax on "unmarried white males above 21 and under 50 years." The first tax list of Lafayette county (then called Lillard) gives the names of the unmarried and includes Alexander Dunbar.

Alexander probably already owned his farm in Lafayette county when he married Mary Hudson. On 11 April 1837 Alexander and Mary sold this farm in Lafayette County but the family did not move south immediately because the April term 1838 court charged Alexander with trespass.

The Dunbar Bible has Julia Ann, the first child of Mary and Alexander, born in Dade County, Missouri, but the above record would indicate that the family did not move to Polk County Missouri until after April 1838. This would also put the birth of Julia Ann Dunbar in Lafayette County, not Polk County. Alexander is listed in Polk County in the 1840 Census. Alexander purchased one parcel of land while it was still in Polk County and then an adjoining parcel 25 March 1845 in Dade County from Thomas Hudson (his brother in law). After 1841 all were in Morgan Township, Dade County, Missouri, because Dade County was formed from Polk County. On 22 November 1848 Alexander sold all of his holdings in Dade County and some time soon left for California, on the Overland trail. Because it was winter they probably didn't leave Missouri until early spring, arriving in Sonoma Co., California in the fall of 1849.

In California, Alexander and Mary Dunbar moved north of San Francisco in the Township of Analy, near the town of Sabastopol. (In the 1850 Census they were living in Analy Township, Sonoma Co., California.) On 16 July 1851 Alexander and Mary's last child was born. There are no records that the DunbarS purchased land while in Sonoma Co., California. Where their residence was near Sabastopol is not known but during the years they lived in this area, Julia Ann Dunbar their daughter married Edward Simpson Emerson on 5 November 1857. Edward's father was Henry Emerson and his mother Sarah Summers.

Some time in 1867 Alexander and Mary moved south to San Luis Obispo, California. Traveling with the DunbarS were Edward Simpson Emerson and Julia Ann Dunbar Emerson with their small family. Also part of this migration included some of the Hudson children, Andrew Jackson Hudson, John William Hudson, and Martin Parry Hudson who first stopped in the San Luis Obispo area.

The Dunbar and Emerson families were registered to vote and are recorded in the Great Register in California of 1868. Alexander purchased 125 acres of land just south of the City of San Luis Obispo in San Luis Obispo County, California, and here he had a very prosperous farm. Both Alexander and Maryare buried in the Odd Fellows Cemetery near their farm.

July term 21 July 1823 Lafayette County Court. Film 959815. April term 2nd day of April 1838 Lafayette Court, Missouri. Marriage certificate of Alexander Dunbar and Mary Hudson. Deed from Dade County, Missouri. Book 2 page 170 25 March 1845 film 932414. Alexander sold all of his land in Missouri 23 November 1845. Part 2 Book 3 page 106 film 932415. Alexander purchased land in San Louis Obispo Township 31 South Range 12 East Part of Section 15. 1860 and 1880 census for California.

MARRIAGE: Marriage records of Lafayette County, Missouri Mo L2c SLC Library Book A page 16 Alexander Dunbar married Polly Hudson 24 April 1835 Recorded 8 May 1835 by William Mc Causland, Jr. Justice of the Pease. Notes for Alexander Dunbar Alexander Dunbar probably the son of Alexander and Roady (Reade) Dunbar. There are records of a number of Dunbar's in Virginia and Tennessee where I believe our Dunbar family came from. The 1880 Census of San Luis Obispo County, California, indicates that our Alexander Dunbar was born in Tennessee and that his father was from Scotland with his mother born in Virginia.

This would indicate that Alexanders' father came to this country a single man and married a young lady from Virginia. There are a number of Dunbar's in Tennessee Tax lists 976.8s 84-1. Of those in the Tax lists one Alexander Dunbar looks promising to be father of our Alexander. This Alexander Dunbar, in the marriage records of Norfolk County, Virginia Book 975.5 V2v page 366. Lists Alexander Dunbar married to Roady Reade the daughter of John Reade of Accomac County, Virginia on 21 August 1795. The next time we find Alexander is in Roane County, Tennessee where he is listed as Free Taxable 1805 Book 978. 884 N2c. On 6 August 1805 Alexander sold a small Colt 2 years old black face and 4 white feet. This record is on Film 560090 page 52 County Court of Roane County, Tennessee. There is no real evidence that this Alexander is the Father of our Alexander Dunbar, except that our Alexander was born in 1802 by his statement in the 1880 Census in Tennessee and his father came from Scotland, but his mother was born in Virginia. Possibly they would have been married in Virginia and then by 1799 moved to Tennessee where our Alexander was born. The Dunbar bible indicates our Alexander's father was killed in the War of 1812, there is a record of an Alexander Dunbar being in that War but enlisted from Virginia, no other information on him. Then our Alexander Dunbar does not show up until 1821 in Lafayette County, Missouri Tax list, "Tax on Bachelors-1821, History of Lafayette County, Page 306. The prevailing migration of that day was from Virginia or Tennessee to Kentucky then to Missouri. So it tends to fallow part of that pattern.

July Term 21 July 1823 Lafayette County Court. Film 959815. April term 2nd day of April 1838 Lafayette Court, Missouri. Marriage certificate of Alexander Dunbar and Mary Hudson. Deed from Dade County, Missouri. Book 2 page 170 25 March 1845 film 932414. Alexander Sold all of his land in Missouri 23 November 1845. Part 2 Book 3 page 106 film 932415. Alexander purchased land in San Louis Obispo Township 31 South Range 12 East Part of Section 15. 1860 and 1880 census for California.

Mary was a child when her father came to Lafayette County, Missouri about 1817 and spent her childhood in Lafayette County. Alexander came to Lafayette before 21 July 1823 because he was charged in court. The people against Alexander Dunbar for an affray and assault and battery on that date. Also Alexander was married first to Ann (unknown last name) and and their children were born in Lafayette County. Where or when the first marriage took place is unknown at this time.

The Dunbar Bible has Julia Ann, the first child of Mary and Alexander, born in Dade County, Missouri, but the above record would indicate that the family did not move to Polk County Missouri until after April 1838. This would also put the birth of Julia Ann Dunbar in Lafayette County, not Polk County. Alexander is listed in Polk County in the 1840 Census. Alexander purchased one parcel of land while it was still in Polk County and then an adjoining parcel 25 March 1845 in Dade County from Thomas Hudson (his brother in law). After 1841 all were in Morgan Township, Dade County, Missouri, because Dade County was formed from Polk County. On 22 November 1848 Alexander sold all of his holdings in Dade County and some time soon left for California, on the Overland trail. Because it was winter they probably didn't leave Missouri until early spring. Arriving in Sonoma Co., California in the fall of 1849.

In California Alexander and Mary Dunbar moved north of San Francisco in the Township of Analy, near the town of Sabastopol. (In the 1850 Census they were living in Analy Township, Sonoma Co., California.) On 16 July 1851 Alexander and Mary's last child was born. There are no records that the Dunbar purchased land while in Sonoma Co., California. Where their residence was near Sabastopol is not known but during the years they lived in this area, Julia Ann Dunbar their daughter married Edward Simpson Emerson on 5 November 1857. Edward's father was Henry Emerson and his mother Sarah Ann Summers.

Some time in 1867 Alexander and Mary moved south to San Luis Obispo, California. Traveling with the Dunbar were Edward Simpson Emerson and Julia Ann Dunbar Emerson with their small family. Also part of this migration included some of the Hudson childran, Andrew Jackson Hudson, John William Hudson, and Martin Parry Hudson who first stopped in the San Luis Obispo area.

The Dunbar and Emerson families were registered to vote and are recorded in the Great Register in California of 1868. Alexander purchased 125 acres of land just south of the City of San Luis Obispo in San Luis Obispo County, California, and here he had a very prosperous farm. Both Alexander and Mary are buried in the Odd Fellows Cemetery near their farm.

In Early Tenn. Tax Lists Call No. 976.8 Si 84-1 Roane County, Tenn. Alexander Dunbar is listed in 1805. This could be our Alexander's father. Also this same Alexander Dunbar is found in the Roane Co., Tenn Pioneers Call No. 976.884 T396 page 18 Alex Dunbar on 1805 tax list.

Children of Mary Hudson and Alexander Dunbar were as follows:
+ 18 i Julia Ann Dunbar [637], born 23 Jun 1837 in Morgan Twp., Dade Co., Missouri. She married Edward Simpson Emerson [636].
+ 19 ii Milley Dunbar [16133], born 23 Apr 1839 in Bona, Polk, Missouri. She married (1) John Green Underhill [16134]. She married (2) James HOWARD [16135].
+ 20 iii William Alexander Dunbar [16143], born 25 Jan 1841 in Bona, Missouri. He married Elizabeth Pennington 16144].
+ 21 iv James Maridith Dunbar [16147], born 4 Dec 1842 in Bona, Missouri. She married Mary Short [16148].
   22 v David Dunbar [18930], born 31 Aug 1844 in Bona, Missouri; died bef. 1935. He married on 25 Sep 1875 in San Luis Obispo, California, Mary D. Nichols [18937]. Information on David came from the Obituary of William Alexander Dunbar his brother.
+ 23 vi Nicholas Johnson Dunbar [16150], born 10 Jul 1848 in Bona, Missouri. He married Sarah Peason [16151].
+ 24 vii John Albert Dunbar [16159], born 16 Jul 1851 in Cayucas, California. He married Margaret Pennington [16160].

5. William Hudson [16162] (William Pink), born 10 Jan 1813 in White Co., Tennessee; died 16 Sep 1866 in St Helena, California. He married (1) on 12 Oct 1832 in Lafayette Co., Missouri, Sarah Ann Smith [16301], died 26 Oct 1856 in Sonoma Co., California. He married (2) on 30 Jun 1857 in Sonoma Co., California, Martha Ann Potts [16320], born 15 Jun 1807 in Kentucky; died 15 Dec 1895 in St Helena, California.

Notes for William Hudson the son of William Pink Hudson and Julia Ann Kettenring.
Marriage certificate of both wives and 1860 Census of Hot Springs Township, Napa County, California.

Our subject is descended on the maternal side from German ancestry, while his father's forefathers were from Holland. His Grandfather Johann Jacob Catron or Kettenring (he used both names) was born and raised in the Fatherland, but came to America and made his home in Virginia where he reared his family. Grandfather Jacob was member of the American Revolution and fought under the command of the newly formed Government.

William Hudson moved to Polk County when his father and the Dunbar family moved there in 1837. He lived here until early in 1845. Then with the John York family, David Hudson and William Elliott families on April 15, 1845 under the Command of Captain John Grigsby and over 100 more men crossed the plains over the northern trail and through the later named Donners Pass to California. (they used basically the same pass as the Donners Party but they were much earlier than the Donners).

In view of that, this group of immigrants that crossed the trackless desert with teams of slow moving oxen drawing the old prairie schooners with their loads of precious human freight, came the Hudson's, York's and many hardy pioneers with them, to share their dangers and successes, their wives and children.

They came to California while it was still Mexican territory. The Grigsby train consisting of 100 men, and was one of first to cross the Sierra Nevada Mountains to California several whole families. Trouble with Indians was always a possibility, but the families came in spite of the danger. Their original destination was Oregon, but learning that California had better and more healthful climate, they decided on locating in California, arriving at Johnsons Ranch October 15th of that same year (1845). The Hudsons and Yorks continued their journey to Napa County, William arrived at Calistoga, then known as the Hot Springs with the above mentioned three families, November 1, 1845.

In the spring of 1846 a Spanish officer in a polite way gave notice to these Americans to leave the Country. Finally General Vallejo came to them, and after staying overnight end being treated kindly, he told them he would like them to leave the Country. They replied that they would not go yet, as they would have to make some preparations for the journey, and would need provisions. In the morning the immigrants put their thoughts together and concluded they would stay and take the whole of California. (the above is the memory of a small boy Andrew Jackson Hudson, the outcome is history) Twenty one immigrants and six of Fremont's men took the town and fort at Sonoma and General Vallejo, and sent him to Sutter's fort for safe keeping. They hoisted a Bear Flag over the town, and fort. It was made of a red flannel shirt (belonging to Miss Elliott of the party) and white cotton cloth on which a bear was painted.

Children of William Hudson and Sarah Ann Smith were as follows:
+ 25 i Andrew Jackson Hudson [16193], born 3 Mar 1837 in , Lafayette Co., Missouri. He married Sarah Burtnet [16328].
+ 26 ii Martin Smith Hudson [16196], born 3 Nov 1839 in Lafayette Co., Missouri. He married Josephine Mills [16269].
   27 iii Julia A. Hudson [16302], born 1841 in Dade Co., Missouri; died bef. 1935.
+ 28 iv Elizabeth Hudson [16300], born 1843 in Dade Co., Missouri. She married Robert Hastie [16299].
+ 29 v Mary J. Hudson [16260], born 12 Jan 1847 in Sonoma, California. She married Henry Mexer McCormick [16308].
   30 vi Spencer Hudson [16251], born 1850 in Sonoma Co., California; died bef. 1938 in St Helena, California.
   31 vii John T. Hudson [16250], born 1856 in Sonoma Co., California; died bef. 1940 in St Helena, California.

6. Thomas Flourney Hudson [1858] (William Pink), born 1818 in Lexington, Missouri; died 8 Nov 1868 in Sonoma Co., California. He married (1) on 24 Nov 1836 in Lafayette Co., Missouri, Emeline Johnson [1569]. He married (2) bef. 1845, Mary Catherine (---) [1551].

Notes for Thomas Flourney Hudson the son of William Pink Hudson and Julia Ann Kettenring.

The information on Thomas was partly taken from the 1850 Census of Sonoma County, California page twenty, family number 3. In the 1950 Census Thomas's wife is listed as Mary Catherin. Also stated in a deed back in Dade county, Missouri, Thomas sold 46 acres of land to Alexander Dunbar and Mary Catherine signed as Wife of Thomas. This was 25 March 1855. This would indicate that the marriage between Emeline Johnson was short lived and that he married Mary Catherine (unknown last name) before 1845.

Thomas with others went west over the Overland trail to California about 1848 and after arriving there, journeyed in and around Sonoma Co., California. Most of his brothers and sisters had come west before, so he probably contacted them when he arrived in California. Thomas became a large land owner in Sonoma Co., before he died in 1868.
Notes for Emeline Johnson

Thomas married Emeline Johnson but before 1845 he was married to Mary Catherine.

Notes: Mary Catherine is mentined as Thomas wife in a land sale to Alexander Dunbar in 1855. and in the 1850 Census of Sonoma Co., California.

Children of Thomas Flourney Hudson and Emeline Johnson were as follows:
  32 i David M. Hudson [1550], born 1839 in Polk Co., Missouri; died bef. 1930 in California. He married on 24 May 1860 in Sonoma Co., California, Cordellia Norris [1549], born 1842 in Iowa; died bef. 1940. Marriage of David M. Hudson from Cerificate of Marriage in Sonoma Co., California.
  33 ii Sarah E. Hudson [1548], born 1843 in Dade Co., Missouri; died bef. 1940. She married on 9 Nov 1859 in Sonoma Co., California, Martin Tarwater [1547]. Certificate of Marriage in Sonoma County, California 9 November 1859. The 1850 Census of Sonoma Courty, California page 401 on film. in the Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah.

Children of Thomas Flourney and Mary Catherine Hudson were as follows:
+ 34 i Mary Ann Hudson [1546], born 1845 in Dade Co., Missouri. She married Charles Sharp [1545].
   35 ii William Thomas Hudson [1544], born Mar 1848 in Dade, Missouri; died bef. 1945 in California. He married on 25 Feb 1888 in Sonoma Co., California, Delonia Adams [1542], died bef. 1940. Certificate of marriage in Sonoma Co., California and the 1850 Census of Sonoma Co., California page 401 on film in the Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah.
+ 36 iii Cornelias Hudson [16245], born 27 Oct 1851 in Sonoma, California. He married Lavina Ellen Butler [16240].
   37 iv Henry T. Hudson [16181], born 1857 in Sonoma Co., California; died bef. 1950. He married on 27 Sep 1884 in Santa Rosa, Sonoma Co., California, Henrietta Herriford [16182], born abt. 1862 in Sonoma Co., California; died bef. 1950.

7. David Hudson [16252] (William Pink), born 15 Oct 1820 in Lexington, Missouri; died 10 Jun 1888 in Lake, California; buried 12 Jun 1888 in St. Helena, Napa, California. He married on 8 Dec 1847 in Santa Rosa, California, Frances Griffith [16257], born 12 Sep 1832 in South Carolina; died 4 May 1923 in Lakeport, Lake, California; buried 6 May 1923 in St Helena, California.

David was born in Lexington, Lafayette County, Missouri 15 October 1820 where he resided with his parents until he was about seventeen years of age. He then moved with his parents to Polk County, which later became Dade County, Missouri, where his parents died in 1840. David remained there engaged in farming and stock raising until 1844, when he returned to Lexington and remained there until May, 1845.

HISTORY OF THE PACIFIC STATES OF NORTH AMERICA
Hubert Howe BANCROFT.
Volume XV California Volume III 1824-1850

Bottom Page 789 Top page 790

HOWARD--Hudson Hudson (A.J.), 1845 at S., Luis Ob. '68-83, S. Luis Ob. Co. Hist., 388, H. (David, 1845, Nat. of Mo., B.'20, overl. immig. of the Grigsby-Ide party, iv. 578, 579, with his brother, Wm. and sister, Mrs York; settled in Napa Val., where but for his service with the Bears, V. 110, later in the Cal.Bat.(v356), and a brief mining experience in the mines'48-he lived till'73. Then he moved to a farm in Coyote Val., Lake Co., where he lived in '81 with wife-Francis Griffith, married in '47-and 6 children, Rodney J. b.'50, Lavonia, Elbert, Ella,Ada.Bertha(died), and Robert L. Prob. still alive in '85.

David with William, and his sister Lucinda and her husband, John York, in May 1845 started across the plains for California, and arrived at Johnsons Ranch October 15th of that year. They arrived in Napa Valley about the first of November, and spent the first winter where Calistoga now stands. In the spring of 1846 he engaged in the Bear Flag War, and then joined the Mexican volunteer service, where he served until 1847. In the spring of that year he returned to Napa Valley and purchased land near St. Helena. He went to the mines in El Dorado County, upon the discovery of gold, where he operated with good success, often digging out $125. worth a day. In the fall of 1848, onaccount of failing health he returned to Napa Valley and settled on land which he had previously purchased, and engaged in farming and stock raising until 1873. He found that his health was failing, his trouble being asthma, hence he moved to Lake County, California and settled, consisting of one thousand two hundred acres, located in Coyote Valley, where he resided until his death. David died in Lake County, California. June 10, 1888. On June 12, 1888 he was buried in St. Helena, Napa County, California.

On 8 December 1847 in Sonoma Co., David married Frances Griffith who was orn in South Carolina on 12 September 1832 and she died in Lakeport, Lake County, California on 4 May 1923. She is buried in St. Helena, Nape County, California on May 6, 1923.

Sources:
1900 Census Lakeport, Lake County, California ED11 Ln 46.Kettenring family by Henry Catron.

History of Kern County, California by Wallace M. Morgan 1914. St Helena Cemetery Sexton Book 979.419/sl V221. 1850 Census Napa County California page 133. 1870 Census Hot Spring Township, Napa County. California page 21. Film 545574

History of the Pacific States by BANCROFT. Volume XV, Vol.III 1825-1840. Court records from Lafayette County, Missouri. Copy of deed setting apart land for his parents graves. Date County, Missouri. 1860 Census St Helena, Napa County. California page 9 Film 803061.

Children of David Hudson and Frances Griffith were as follows:
+ 38 i Rodney James Hudson [16237], born 20 Feb 1850 in St. Helena, Napa, California. He married Panthea B. BOGGS [16234].
+ 39 ii Levonia Hudson [16232], born 20 Nov 1851 in St. Helena, Napa, California. She married William Whitton [16230].
+ 40 iii Elbert Hudson [15365], born 11 Apr 1853 in St. Helena, Napa, California. He married Alice Stark [15364].
   41 iv Luella Hudson [15369], born 15 Oct 1856 in St. Helena, Napa, California; died 28 Dec 1910 in St. Helena, Napa, California. She married on 20 Jun 1878 in St. Helena, Napa, California, Samuel Kenyon [15366], died bef. 1920 in St. Helena, Napa, California.
   42 v Ada Hudson [16233], born Aug 1859 in St. Helena, Napa, California; died bef. 1945 in California. She married on 10 Jul 1911 in Napa, California, Emil Stokes [16231], born abt. 1855; died bef. 1945 in California.
+ 43 vi Robert Lee Hudson [16229], born Feb 1865 in St Helena, Napa, California. He married Annie Rose [16228].
   44 vii Bertha Hudson [16224]

8. Lucinda Hudson [16239] (William Pink), born 20 Jun 1823 in Lexington, Missouri; died 25 May 1905 in St Helena, California. She married on 5 Sep 1841 in Dade Co., Missouri, John York [16276], born 15 Jun 1820 in Granger, Tennessee; died 26 Feb 1919 in St Helena, California.

Lucinda Hudson was born in Lafayette County, Missouri 20 June 1823 and she died in St. Helena, Napa County, California on 25 May 1905. In Dade County, Missouri and on the 5th of September 1841 Lucinda Hudson married John York. John is the son of Enock York and Nancy HILL. John York was born Granger County, Tennessee 15 June 1820. He died 26 February 1919 in St Helena, Napa County, California.

John York lived in Granger County until he was 13 years of age, then moved to Warren County Tennessee where he resided until 1841. then moved to Dade County Missouri where he engaged in farming and of course met and married Lucinda Hudson. In 1845 John and Lucinda sold their Missouri holdings and on April 15 started for California in company with Lucinda's two brothers William and David and also William Elliott and all of their families. There were other who answered the call of the west and the expedition numbered over 100 persons.

In the party was John Grigsby and family. He had charge of the expedition. The journey was no easy matter as there were no roads to follow and some time not even a trail. Suffering the normal hardships the party arrived in California on the 15th of October 1845. The Hudson's York's, and Elliott's left the main expedition and continued on to the Napa Valley, arriving at Hot Springs (Now Calistoga) on the 1st day of November of that same year. The Grigsby's spent the winter of 1845 and 46 in Chiles Valley.

At the opening of the Bear Flag War June 1846 the York, the Hudson and Elliott families moved to Sonoma to secure the protection of government Troops stationed there during the summer of 1846 Lieutenant Rever who was in charge of the forces at Sonoma entrusted Mr. York and Samuel Kelsey with the carrying of the American Flag from Sonoma to Sacramento. This was faithfully performed, delivering the flag into the hands of Capt Sutter at Sutters fort. His wife help to make the Bear Flag, the first for California.

In the fall of 1846 John and Lucinda returned to Calistoga and settled on a farm he purchased from E. E. BAKE. The discovery of gold induced John to prospect and mine for a while in 1848, but in September of the same year he returned to Napa County and purchased a farm inside of what is now the limits of St Helena. Here for nearly 60 years he made his home. When they settled there, there wasn't any St. Helena, and they have seen the forest give way to fields rich in grains and vines, have seen the establishment of the town and watched its growth and development.

Sources:
Data used to compile this family from Ed Leaned
St Helena History Landmarks pages 682
Bankroft Menefee-Sketchbook 67, 167, 212, 471, Bio. 345.
Coast Counties Page 368 History of Napa County, Slocum and Bower. Page 62.
1860 Census, St Helena, Napa County, California Page 8,9 film 803061.
1900 Census Hot Spring, Napa County, California.
Star January 22 1904 Ed Learned. St Helena California.

Two California Pioneers of 1845
From a late 1904 news clipping - St Helena, California

"It was such sturdy men and women as Mr. and Mrs. John York who carved from a wilderness the grand State of California, and on the anniversary of the States Birth, the trials and privations through which they passed in the early days of the 40's and 50's are brought vividly to mind. John York is one of the oldest of the pioneers still living in Napa County. He was born in Tennessee June 15, 1820, and has therefore passed his 84th birthday anniversary. He still enjoys comparatively good health and was able to join with the native sons in the proper observation of the admission of California in to the Union. In 1845, in company with the Grigsbys and Hudson's(names familiar to all old residents of Napa County, in a party of 100 hundred men, the subject of this sketch started on the long and perilous journey across the plains. He came to Napa County, and settled near Calistoga on November 1, 1845. He resided at Calistoga till the Bear Flag War, in June 1846, when, for protection, he moved his family to Sonoma. Lieutenant Revere. commanding a Government vessel at San Francisco, and who took command of the forces in Sonoma, entrusted Mr. York and KELSEY with the important duty of carrying the American flag from Sonoma to Sacramento, and delivering the same to Captain Sutter at his fort, which duty these two brave young men promptly and faithfully carried out. In the fall of 1846 he returned to Calistoga and settled on the farm which was latter owned by Peter Teale.

For sixty-two years this couple has trod the journey of life together, and in prosperity and adversity have been happy in each other's love. When they settled they settled where they now live, there wasn't any St. Helena. and their neighbors were the Majestic oak of a mighty forest and the wild beasts that inhabited it. They have seen the forest give way to fields rich in grain and vines. Have seen the establishment of our town and watched its growth and development. To this onward march they have contributed of their substance and strength, and now in their declining days they watch with ever increasing pride the achievements of a mighty empire, the foundations of which they helped to lay. It is before such pioneers as these, who inherited a wilderness and have given us a Christian State, that we to-day bow in reverence and with grateful hearts renew our loyalty to the grand State of California."

The Bear Flag War
Copied from "History of Kern County - 1884" by Wallace

"In 1846, the American settlers, many of whom had married Spanish ladies, learned that it was the intention of General Castro, then Governor of California, to take measures for the expulsion of the foreign element, and more especially of the Americans. (the above statement is true except the Griggby-Ide part which had just arrived in California were of families looking for new land, not trappers.) Lieutenant John C. Fremont, of the United States Topographical engineers, was then camped at the north end of the Buttes, being on his way to Oregon. The settlers sent a deputation to his, asking him to remain and give them the protection of his presence. He was afraid of a court martial; but they argued with him that if he would take back to Washington his broken Lieutenant's commission in one hand and California in other, he would be the greatest man in the nation. The bait was a tempting one. Fremont hesitated; but they kept alluring him nearer to the scene of action. On the 9th of June, 1846, there were some thirteen settlers in his camp, at the mouth of Feather river, when William Knight, who had arrived in the country from Missouri in 1841, and had married a Spanish lady, came and informed them that Lieutenant Arci had passed his place-now Knight's landing-that morning, going south, with a band of horses, to be used against the Americans in California.

The settlers organized a company with Ezekiel Merritt, the oldest man among them, as captain, and gave chase to Arci. They overtook him on the Cosumne River, and captured him and his horses. The Rubicon was now passed, and there was nothing to do but to go ahead. When they got back to Fremont's camp they found other settlers there. On consultation it was determined to capture Sonoma, the head-quarters of General M. G. Vallejo, the military commander of Northern California. They gathered strength as they marched among, and when they got to John Grigsby's place in Napa Valley. they numbered thirty-three men. Here the company was reorganized and addressed by Dr. Robert Semple, afterwards President of the Constitutional Convention. We gave the account of the capture in General Vallejo's own words, at the Centennial exercises held at Santa Rosa, July 4, 1876."

General Vallejo's Account

"I have now to say something of the epoch which inaugurated a new era for this country. A little before dawn on June 14, 1864, a party of hunters and trappers, with some foreign settlers, (he refers to these men as hunters and trappers but the Hudson and York families were farmers looking for new land) under command of Captain Merritt, Doctor Semple, and William B. Ide. surrounded my residence at Sonoma, and with out firing a shot, made prisoners of myself, then commander of the commander of the northern frontier, of Lieutenant-Colonel Victor Prudon, Captain Salvador Vallejo, and Jacob P. Leese. I should here stated that down to October, 1845, I had maintained at my own expense a respectable garrison at Sonoma, which often in union with the settlers, did gook service in Campaigns against the Indians; but at last, tired of spending money which the Mexican Government never refunded, I disbanded the force, and most of the soldiers who had constituted it left Sonoma. Thus in June, 1846, the plaza was entirely unprotected, although there were ten pieces of artillery, with other arms and munitions of war. The parties who unfurled the Bear Flag were well aware that Sonoma was without defense, and lost no time in taking advantage of this fact, in carrying out their plans.

Years before, I had urgently represented to the Government of Mexico the necessity of stationing a sufficient force on the frontier, also Sonoma would be lost, which would be equivalent to leaving the rest of the country an easy prey to the invader. What think you, my friends, were the instructions sent me in reply to my repeated demands for means to fortify the country? These instructions were that I should at once force the emigrants to recross the Sierra Nevada, and depart from the territory of the Republic. To say nothing of the inhumanity of these orders, their execution was physically impossible-first, because the immigrants came in autumn, when snow covered the Sierras so quickly as to make a return impracticable. Under the circumstances, not only I, but Commandants General Castro, resolved to provide the immigrants with letters of security, that they might remain temporarily in the country. We always made a show of authority, but well convinced all the time that we had no power to resist the invasion which was coming upon us.

With the frankness of a soldier I can assure you that the American immigrants never had cause to complain of the treatment they received at the hands of either authorities or citizens. They carried us as prisoners to Sacramento, and kept us in a calaboose for sixty days or more, until the authority of the United States made itself respected, and the honorable and humane Commodore Stockton returned us to our hearths." (end of General Vallejo's comments)

First Movement for Independence

"On the seizure of their prisoners the revolutionists at once took steps to appoint a captain, who was found in the person of John Grigsby, for Ezekiel Merritt wished not to retain the permanent command. A meeting was then called and the barracks, situated at the north-east corner of the plaza, under the presidency of William B. IDE, Dr. Robert Semple being secretary. This conference Semple urged the independence of the country stating that having once commenced they must proceed, for to turn back was certain death. Before the dissolution of the convention, however, rumors were rife that secret emissaries were being dispatched to the Mexican rancheros, to inform them of the recent occurrences, therefore to prevent any attempt at a rescue, it was deemed best to transfer their prisoners to Sutter's fort, where the danger of such would be less."

Resolved to Establish a government

"Before transferring their prisoners, however, a treaty, of agreement was entered into between the captives and captors, which will appear in the annexed documents kindly furnished to us by General Vallejo, and which have never before been given to the public. The first is in English, signed by the principal actors in the revolution and reads. "We the undersigned having resolved to establish a government upon Republican principals in connection with others of our fellow-citizens, and having taken up arms to support it, we have taken three Mexican officers as prisoners; General M> G. Vallajo, Lieut. Col. Victor Prudon, and Captain D. Salvador Vallejo, having formed and published to the world no regular plan of government, feel it our duty to say that it is not our intention to take or injure any person who is not found in opposition to the cause, nor will we take or destroy the property of Private individuals further than is necessary for our immediate support." "Ezekiel Merritt, William Fallon," "R. Semple, Samuel Kelsey". Gem. Vallajo Carried to Sutter's Fort

The Bear Flag

"On the seizure of the citadel of Sonoma, the Independents found floating from the flag-staff-head the flag of Mexico, a fact which had escaped notice during the hustle of the morning. It was at once lowered, and they set to work to devise a banner which they would claim as their own. They were as one on the subject of there being a star on the groundwork, but they taxed their ingenuity to have some other device, for the "Lone Star" had been already appropriated by Texas.

So many accounts of the manufacture of this insignia have been published that we give the reader that quoted by the writer in the Pioneer:---

"A piece of cotton cloth," says Mr. Lancey, "was obtained, and a man by the name of Todd proceeded to paint from a pot of red paint a star in the corner. Before it was finished Henry L. Ford, one of the party, proposed to paint on the center, facing the star, a grizzly bear. This was unanimously agreed to, and grizzly bear was painted accordingly. When it was done the flag was taken to the flag-staff, and hoisted amid the hurrahs of the little party, who swore to defend it with their lives."

Of this matter Lieutenant Revere says: "A flag was also hoisted bearing a grizzly bear rampant, with one stripe below, and the words, 'Republic of California,' above the bear, and a single star in the union." This is the evidence of the officer who hauled down the Bear flag and replaced it with the stars and stripes on 9 July 1846.

As the compiler of this history I am inserting a note here. Mrs John York obituary "Mrs. York often related the story of how she helped make the original Bear Flag from an old shirt, in the fort at Sonoma, which was raised in 1846". Also the son of John Grigsby made a statement that his mother and Mrs Lucinda (Hudson) York made the Bear Flag that was raised at Sonoma."

Children of Lucinda Hudson and John York were as follows:
+ 45 i William Enock York [16277], born 3 Jun 1843 in Dade, Missouri. He married Fanny Mills [16253].
   46 ii David York [16226], born 13 Sep 1845 in Nevada Sink, Nevada; died 17 Jan 1870 in St Helena, California.
   47 iii Henry Alexander York [16225], born 6 Dec 1847 in Calistoga, Napa, California; died 1 Jan 1910 in St Helena, California. He married Alice Fawcett Cox [16223].
   48 iv John A. York [16218], born 18 Apr 1850 in Sonoma, California; died 1905 in San Jose, California. He married Sarah SPARR [16217]. Napa, California. She married William Newton McCormick [16215].
+ 49 v Nancy Jane York [16216], born 12 Aug 1852 in St. Helena,
   50 vi Pettis Spencer York [16214], born 24 Dec 1855 in St. Helena, Napa, California; died 1923/26. He married Kathryn Sophie (ULN) [16213].
+ 51 vii Charles York [16209], born 3 Mar 1858 in St. Helena, Napa, California. He married Emma Belle FALKENSTINE [16211].
   52 viii Caswell York [16210], born 14 Nov 1860 in St. Helena, Napa, California; died 28 Dec 1894.
   53 ix Frank York [16222], born 21 Jun 1863 in St. Helena, Napa, California; died 19 Dec 1898 in St Helena, California.
   54 x Nellie York [16221], born 13 Feb 1867 in St. Helena, Napa, California; died 28 Dec 1884 in St Helena, California.


Generation 3

9. Lydia Lovonia Hudson [16249] (Martin, William Pink), born 6 Dec 1835 in Lexington, Missouri; died 5 Oct 1924 in Berkeley, California. She married on 9 Feb 1858 in Kenwood, California, William Bend Atterbury [16248], born 13 Aug 1825 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky; died 29 Mar 1911 in Berkeley, California.

Lydia Lavonia Hudson the daughter of Martin Hudson and Elizabeth J. Mc Alroy. Her husband William was in banking and in the 1880 Census was a Banking Cashier.

Children of Lydia Lovonia Hudson and William Bend Atterbury were as follows:
  55 i Evelyn Atterbury [16212], born 1860 in Santa Rosa, Sonoma Co., California; died 1883 in Santa Rosa, California.
  56 ii Martin Atterbury [16227], born 1861 in Santa Rosa, California; died 1870 in Santa Rosa, California.
  57 iii William Benjamin Atterbury [16208], born 1863 in Santa
         Rosa, California; died 1929 in Santa Rosa, Sonoma, California.
  58 iv Elizabeth Hudson Atterbury [16207], born 1865 in Santa Rosa, California; died bef. 1948 in Santa Rosa, California.
  59 v Lydia Atterbury [3720], born 1868 in Santa Rosa, California; died bef. 1955.
  60 vi Helen Conover Atterbury [16334], born 1870 in Santa Rosa, California; died 1958. She married Harry WATSON [16335].
  61 vii Ruth Atterbury [16336], born 1875 in Santa Rosa, California; died bef. 1962.
  62 viii Wayman Atterbury [16337], born 1882 in Santa Rosa, California; died bef. 1980.

10. Michael E. Hudson [16247] (Martin, William Pink), born 5 Jan 1838 in Lexington, Missouri; died 13 Jan 1872 in Santa Rosa, California. She married on 26 Dec 1861 in Sonoma Co., California, James Polk Clark [16246], born 1826 in Tennessee; died bef. 1910 in Santa Rosa, California.

A marriage record for Michael E. Hudson is in the Sonoma Marriage Book page 246.

Children of Michael E. Hudson and James Polk Clark were as follows:
  63 i James M. Clark [16338], born 1862 in Sonoma Co., California; died bef. 1960.
  64 ii Margaret E. Clark [16339], born 1864 in Sonoma, California; died bef. 1960. She married Robert DeVine [16340], died 1927.
  65 iii Frederick M. Clark [16341], born 1866 in Sonoma, California; died bef. 1960.
  66 iv Estella Camellia Clark [16342], born 1868 in Sonoma, California; died bef. 1960. She married William Heffelfinger [16343].
  67 v Gertrude Clark [16344], born 1871 in Sonoma Co., California; died bef. 1970. She married in 1903 in Santa Rosa, Sonoma, California, Charles Town [16345].

11. John William Hudson [1195] (Martin, William Pink), born 26 Oct 1840 in Polk Co., Missouri; died 2 Mar 1922 in Manteca, San Joaquin, California. He married on 24 Oct 1864 in Sonoma Co., California, Elizabeth Annette Spurr [4296], born Aug 1843 in Louisville, Kentucky; died 22 Apr 1926 in Chowchila, San Diego, California.

John William Hudson, the son of Martin Hudson and Elizabeth McAlroy, was born in Lexington, Lafayette County, Missouri on 26 October 1840. On 24 October 1864, in Sonoma Co., California, John William Hudson married Elizabeth Annette Spurr. Elizabeth is the daughter of William P. and Sarah E. Spurr and she was born in Kentucky in August 1843. Recorded in the Great Register of Kern County, 1890 to 1906, John was described as being 5' 8", dark complication, brown eyes, and black hair. John William Hudson died on the 2nd day of March 1922, in Manteca, California near Modesto, while living with his daughter Evaline (Hudson) McMurry. Elizabeth (Spurr) Hudson died on the 21 day of April 1926 while living in Chula Vista, San Diego, California

John's parents were early California Pioneers, coming from Missouri, Morgan Township, Dade County, Missouri in 1848. His father Martin Hudson was born in Grayson Co., Virginia. Moving to White County, Tennessee when only one year old. The family moved again in 1817 to Lafayette County, Missouri before coming west in 1848. They traveled the Northern overland trail through the Donners Pass to Sonoma Co., California. Martin and his family stayed with his brother William's family who had emigrated to California earlier (1845). The Hudson's were farmers and his father made Sonoma their home getting possession of 2,000 acres of land in the Los Guilicos Valley between Sonoma and Santa Rosa. His father Martin lived there the remainder of his life.

Growing to manhood in Sonoma, John William Hudson went to frontier schools of the area and by 1867 was ready to strike out on his own. Alexander Dunbar, Edward Simpson Emerson, and Andrew Jackson Hudson with their families were going south to San Luis Obispo, and John joined the group with his family and in 1867 moved to San Luis Obispo County, California. He first lived in Moro near his cousin Andrew J. Hudson and in the 1870 Census of San Luis Obispo, was recorded there next to his cousins. Then when his brother came to San Luis Obispo in 1873 they moved to Guadalupe in the Santa Maria Valley, settling in the town of Guadalupe.

In Santa Barbara County, John purchased several parcels of property. On 14 August 1873 he purchased lots 13, 14, 16, Block 14 and lots 13, 14, of Block 7, in book N page 589 Santa Barbara County deeds. Then in 3 October 1873 John purchased lot 16 Block 7, recorded in book N page 591. In that same month 25 October 1873 Elizabeth A., John's wife purchased lot 15 Block 7 recorded in Book O page 257. All of these lots are in the town of Guadalupe near Santa Maria. He purchased many other parcels while living in Guadalupe. Guadalupe is part of the Rancho Guadalupe owned by Teodore Arrellanes, John purchased his lots from Lee Roy Teodore. It is in the fertile Santa Maria Valley in the north western part of Santa Barbara County. In October 1873 a thriving settlement sprung up at the site of the old Guadalupe Ranch house. The town in 1873 boasts three stores in that of John Dunbar, Postmaster, A. Blochmanand Co. There is also a saloon, shoemaker's shop, blacksmith and machine shop, hotel, two butcher shops, a harness and saddlery and a livery stable. (Livery owned by John William Hudson called Fashion Stable) His livery was the well known Fashion Stable at Guadalupe.

In 8 September 1883 recorded in book 3 page 358 Santa Barbara County deed, John sold all of his property in Guadalupe, but kept the right to live in the house where they lived on lot 16 Block 14 until he moved. Then in 3 October 1883 Book 3 page 308 John with his brother Martin Parry Hudson, purchased 807 acres of land lot 10 part of the Rancho Tepusquet. Here both families moved and that was where their children went to school. John and Martin Hudson both opened their homes to the school so that their children, Myrtle, Bessie, Percy and Charlie could have the opportunity to go to school. Parry's two children, Tal and Martin, went to school there too. By 1886 with the Emerson family who were living in Josephine near Cambria moved to the Paleto Hills in Kern County, California. In the 1900 Census, John was recorded with his family on the Paleto, living next to the Emerson Bros. ranch. in the 1910 Census John's wife is recorded in the Census living in Santa Barbara City on Orna Street, with her daughter Susan who was a teacher and her son Robert L. Hudson who was an Artist.

Several of the Hudson children stayed in the Paleto Hills and in later years purchased all of the Emerson BROS, ranch.

Sources:
Sold Fashion Stable 8 September 1883 Book 3 page 358.
John purchased Lot #10 807 acres 3 October 1883 book 3 page 308.
Survey made 1904 Paleto area shows what the Hudson and Emerson families owned Township 10 range 23, 24.
Marriage cert. John W. Hudson and Elizabeth Spurr book b page 61 Film 031222 Sonoma Co. California.
1880 Census Santa Barbara County, California Vol 33 Ed 86 Sheet 4 Line 3.
1900 Census 12 Judicial Township, Kern County, California 1910 Census Castoria Township, San Joaquin County, California Ed 114 Sheet 3B.

Children of John William Hudson and Elizabeth Annette Spurr were as follows:
+ 68 i John Beattie Hudson [4173], born 9 Aug 1865 in Sonoma Co., California. He married Henrietta Jobe [16346].
   69 ii Susan A. Hudson [16347], born 1866 in Sonoma Co., California; died bef. 1960. Susan Hudson taught school at the Paleto School in the early 1890's after Elmie Nicholson.
   70 iii Evaline Hudson [16348], born 1869 in San Luis Obispo, California. She married Theodore McMurry [16349].
   71 iv Robert L. Hudson [16350], born 1871 in Moro Township, San Luis Obispo Co., California; died bef. 1970.
+ 72 v Charles Leigh Hudson [4172], born 25 Mar 1874 in Guadalupe, California. He married Ruth May Stubblefield [16351].
+ 73 vi Myrtle Hudson [16352], born 2 Jul 1876 in Guadalupe, California. She married Charles William Smith [16353].
+ 74 vii Percy Floyd Hudson [17128], born 31 Dec 1878 in Guadalupe, California. He married Lorena Myrtle Stubblefield [17129].

12. David Alvin Hudson [16242] (Martin, William Pink), born 7 Jul 1843 in Lafayette Co., Missouri; died 30 Apr 1879 in Santa Rosa, California. He married on 20 Dec 1865 in Santa Rosa, California, Sarah E. Bowers [16244], born 30 Jan 1852 in Pennsylvania; died 8 Feb 1894 in Santa Rosa, California. Notes for David Alvin Hudson David Alvin Hudson the son of Martin Hudson and Elizabeth McAlroy. David was orn in Dade County, Missouri on 7 July 1843 and he died 30 April 1879 in Santa Rosa, Sonoma Co., California. On 20 December 1865 David Alvin Hudson married Sarah Elizabeth Bowers who was born in Penn. on 30 January 1852 and she died in Santa Rosa Sonoma Co., California. 8 Feb 1894

Almost the earliest recollections of David's life were incidents impressed upon his youthful mind connected with the journey across the plains, deserts and mountains on the overland journey made from Missouri to the State of California in 1848. He was only five years old when his father and the rest of Martin Hudson's family crossed the plains.

At the pioneer home established by his father in Los Guilicos Valley, in spring of 1849, his youthful and manhood days were spent in Agricultural pursuits. David Alvin lived with his father. Martin, up to his father's death in 1871. At this time David took over the farm which was about 3,000 acres. After the Estate was settled David seceded to the ownership of the residence. and quite a portion of the original large estate. This ranch was on the Santa Rosa Sonoma road in Los Guilieos Valley, five miles east of Santa Rosa. After David died, Elizabeth married Buchanan MC CLELLAND November 25, 1881. Who was born in Bennett Valley, January 3, 1856. He took over the management of the ranch.

Sources:
History of Sonoma County. Births of early Sonoma Co., Film. 1031206
Marriage Cert. Sonoma Co., California. page 621.
1870 Census Santa Rosa, Sonoma Co., California page 424.
1880 Census Santa Rosa, Sonoma Co., California Ed 124-8-22.

Children of David Alvin Hudson and Sarah E. Bowers were as follows:
+ 75 i Alvin Perry Hudson [17054], born 14 Dec 1869 in Santa Rosa, Sonoma Co., California. He married Katheryn HILLMAN [17055].
+ 76 ii Mary Elizabeth Hudson [17056], born 1872 in Los Guilicos, Sonoma Co., California. She married Don Mills [17057].
   77 iii Meta Fairbanks Hudson [17058], born Jun 1875 in Los Guilicos, Sonoma Co., California. She married John HEISNER [17059].
   78 iv David Hudson [17060], born 3 Dec 1877 in Santa Rosa, Sonoma Co., California
   79 v Lena Hudson [17061], born Dec 1878 in Los Guilicos, Sonoma Co., California. She married in Santa Rosa, Sonoma, California, Jess NEAR [21824].

13. Toliafero Flourney Hudson [16243] (Martin, William Pink), born 19 Sep 1846 in Dade Co., Missouri; died 25 Nov 1932 in Fresno, Fresno, California. He married on 4 Mar 1873 in Santa Rosa, California, Elizabeth D. Ingram [16241], born 1849; died 1903 in Arizona; buried in Santa Rosa, California.

Children of Toliafero Flourney Hudson and Elizabeth D. Ingram were as follows:
   80 i Edwin Hudson [17062]
   81 ii Tallafero Flourney Hudson [17063], born 1875 in Sonoma, California.
   82 iii Edyth Hudson [17064]

14. Martin Perry Hudson [16307] (Martin, William Pink), born 5 Nov 1850 in Santa Rosa, California; died bef. 1935 in Santa Rosa, California. He married on 22 Dec 1872 in Sonoma Co., California, Marie A. Ausser [16259], born Mar 1852 in Santa Rosa, California; died 1932 in Sonoma Co., California.

Martin Parry Hudson, the son of Martin Hudson and Elizabeth McAlroy, was born in Sonoma Co., California on 5 November 1850. He grew to manhood and attended school there, and at the college at Sonoma. He was raised on a farm, became familiar with raising stock of all kinds, and it was but natural that when he started out for himself he should begin raising horses, cattle and hogs. On 22 December 1872 in Sonoma Co., Martin Parry Hudson married Maria A. Ausser, a native of San Jose, and they moved soon after to San Luis Obispo County, California. Parry's father was from Virginia but moved from there when only one year old to White County, Tennessee. His grandfather was William Pink Hudson and his grandmother Julia Ann Catron. His father Martin Hudson moved to California over the Overland trail in 1848 and settled in the Sonoma County area.

Parry with his bride came south to San Luis Obispo County and settled in the vicinity of Guadalupe where his brother John William Hudson had settled about 1873. His brother came earlier but spent some time in Moro before coming to Guadalupe. For ten years, Parry leased land in Guadalupe until he was able to buy his ranch of three hundred twenty acres; and during his residence there he carried on a successful and growing stock business. Parry and his brother John removed to the Rancho Tepusquet and purchaded 807 acres of land. His brother John in 1886 went to the Paleto Hills but Parry remained in Tepusquet Canyon for the remainder of his life.

Sources:
1910 Census Township 8 San Luis Obispo County, California.

Children of Martin Perry Hudson and Marie A. Ausser were as follows:
   83 i Martin P. Hudson [17065], born 1874 in San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo, California.
   84 ii Tallafero Flourney Hudson [17066], born 1875 in San Luis Obispo, California.

15. Henry Walker Hudson [16258] (Martin, William Pink), born 1853 in Sonoma Co., California; died 14 Apr 1929 in Santa Rosa, California. He married on 14 Jan 1875 in Santa Rosa, California, Emma Delia Northcutt [16256], born 1853 in Missouri; died 14 Apr 1929 in Santa Rosa, California; buried in Santa Rosa, California, daughter of William Northcutt [21789] and Ann HEDGES [21787]. Henry Walker Hudson the son of Martin Hudson and Elizabeth MC ALROY. Henry Walker was born in the Los Guilicos Valley, Sonoma Co., California in the year 1853. Henry died in Berkeley, California on 14 April 1929. On about 1877 Henry Walker Hudson married Emma Delia Northcutt who was born in Missouri in the year 1858. She is the daughter of William and (Ann Hedges) Northcutt.

Henry grew to manhood in the Valley and passed his early years in farming and stock raising. He was educated at Santa Rosa and at the State University, and in 1873 started out upon a business career as a salesman in the house of Leibman and Company. (the 1880 Census records Henry living with wife, daughter and mother in Santa Rosa on Beaver Street. Working as Dry Food Clerk. After seven years with Leibman and Company and about 1880, Henry with his family, removed to Tombstone, Arizona, and engaged in general merchandising on his own account, remaining over two years. (note: would have been in Tombstone during the time of the Battle of the O.K. Correl). Leaving Tombstone in 1883 Returned to Santa Rosa. Arriving in Santa Rosa January 1883, and in the fall of that year opened a Carpet house on fourth Street, near the Occidental Hotel.

He continued there until December 1886, when S. B. Wright came into the firm, and the partners bought out the furniture stock of B. Cruthers, whose store was on Hinton Avenue, where they moved the Carpet department, and in the fall of 1886 commenced the large building on 'B' Street. They moved into the new building April 1887. The business thrived until after the turn of the century. There is no record of his selling his business but in the Sonoma land Owner Henry W. Hudson is listed as insolvent debtor 19 January 1892 book E Page 304. In the 1910 Census Henry is living with his wife Emma in Alemeda, Berkeley County, California.

While still in Santa Rosa Henry belonged to the Native Sons of the Golden West and First Lieutenant of Company E Fifth Infantry, National Guard. Also a member of the Knights of Pythias.

Sources:
Sonoma Land Owner and early Magazine listing all Delinquent land owners in Sonoma Co., California for that year.

Email letter from Barbara Petty 9/6/1997 at 23:10 (EDT) gives the parents of Emma Delia Northcutt as William Northcutt and Ann Hedges.
Children of Henry Walker Hudson and Emma Delia Northcutt were as follows:
   85 i Ethel Hudson [17067], born 20 May 1878 in Santa Rosa, California. Married (unknown first name) WILLIAMS? [17068].

17. Lydia M. Sensibaugh [16113] (Elizabeth Hudson, William Pink), born 20 Sep 1837 in Lexington, Missouri. She married on 6 Sep 1855 in Napa, California, Calvin Chesterfield Griffith [16114], born 1 Mar 1828 in Chahane, Missouri; died 19 Jun 1907 in Napa, California.

Lydia M. Sensibaugh is recorded in Probate record Book 2 page 122 in Lafayette County Records, in Missouri. Also she is recorded in the "Catron-Kettenring family by H. H. Catron.

Lydia removed with her father to California over the overland trail to California by wagon.

Children of Lydia M. Sensibaugh and Calvin Chesterfield Griffith were as follows:
+ 86 i Clara Anna Griffith [16115], born 21 Jan 1864 in Windsor, Sonoma Co., California. She married William Hunt TAPLIN [16116].

18. Julia Ann Dunbar [637] (Mary Hudson, William Pink), born 23 Jun 1837 in Morgan Twp., Dade Co., Missouri; died 26 Mar 1908 in Maricopa, Kern, Ca; buried 29 Mar 1908 in Union Cem, Bakersfield, Kern. She married on 5 Nov 1857 in Sonoma Co, Ca, Edward Simpson Emerson [636], born 9 Apr 1831 in Howard Co, Mssr; died 27 Aug 1904 in Bakersfied, Kern, Ca; buried 28 Aug 1904 in Union Cem, Bakersfield, Kern, son of Henry Emerson [656] and Sarah Ann SUMMERS [657].

Notes for Julia Ann Dunbar:

Will of Alexander Dunbar, San Luis Obispo, California, in county records. Grave marker Union Cemetery, Bakersfield, Kern County, California. Buried beside her husband Edward Simpson Emerson, in family plot.

Julia Ann Dunbar the daughter of Alexander Dunbar and Mary Hudson. Julia Ann as born in Lafayette County Missouri, on 23 June 1837. She died in Maricopa Kern County, California, 23 March 1908. Julia is buried in the Union Cemetery, Bakersfield Kern County, California. Plot 75 main section. In the Dunbar bible it states that Her father was of Scotch descent, and her grandfather Dunbar was killed in the War of 1812. When Julia Ann was less than a year old her family moved from Lafayette to Polk County Missouri then in 1841 the area Julia lived became Dade County, Missouri. When Julia Ann was 12 year old her family headed for California in a wagon train. As she was older than her other brothers and sisters, she had to walk much of way and drive the oxen some of the time. They came over what was then known as the Northern Route - through Donner Pass and the High Sierras. They arrived in California in 1849.

She met and married Edward Simpson Emerson in Sonoma Co., near Sabastopol, California 5 November 1857. the Valley of the Moon. Edward Simpson Emerson was born in Howard County, Missouri, on April 1831.

As is covered in Edward Simpson Emerson's history they removed south to San Luis Obispo then to Texas and returned. The family moved into the south western corner of Kern County. Where they remained the remainder of ther lives. Notes for Edward Simpson Emerson Edward Simpson Emerson was born in Howard County, Missouri, on April 1831. His father, Henry Emerson, was born in Lexington, Clark County, Kentucky. He was of English parentage. His mother, Sally SUMMERS, was a Grand daughter of General Barker of Revolutionary War fame.

In 1847, at the age of sixteen Edward joined the army as a volunteer teamster, and headed toward Mexico. He served in this capacity through the War with Mexico (1846- 1848). driving a mule team. He had many harrowing experiences with indians, and a great sickness overtook him, caused from not having proper food and, at one time being lost for many days with no food at all. The fist food they had was roasted skunk. cooked by an Indian over a camp fire.

When they reached the Mexican coast at Mazatlan. he sailed for San Francisco in a tramp steamer called the Tennessee landing them 20 May 1851. At that time San Francisco was a small seaport town. Food was scarce, and meat and butter were a dollar a pound. While in San Francisco he learned that his parents had come overland across the plains to now Marysville. The group in the wagon train had become stricken with smallpox on the way and both his Aunt Betzey (BROCKMAN) Emerson and his uncle John Emerson had died, Betzey before they left Missouri and John on the trail and he had been buried along the way.

Their daughters moved in with Henry Emerson family. Mary E. Emerson and Sarah Emerson were the only surviving of the John Emerson family.

The Emerson Family Goes To Texas

Edward Simpson Emerson family goes to Texas. Convinced by their friend the Grandstaffs and the Craddocks and only a few days after Josephine, their youngest daughter, was born the family removed to Abiline, Tayler County, Texas. Arriving there about 1 October 1882. Edward purchased the "New Abiline Hotel" on Oak Street. This was located on Lot 1 Block 13. (the date was 15 November 1882 Bk T Pg 409-10 recorded at Abiline Tyler County. Texas).

When the Emerson's arrived in Abiline the town was only 17 months old. It was created by the Texas and Pacific Railroad Co. to pickup cattle moving up from the Texas plains on there way to the market in the east. Abiline was located on the broad prairie, and there were no roads out of the town. It was about six miles northwest to the old Butterfield trail which had been abandoned with the coming of the railroad.

The first settlers of Abiline had few comforts and no luxuries. It was rightfully called the "Tend City". Saloons gambling houses, restaurants and houses were housed in canvas tents. The Pickadilly, and New Abiline Hotel's were of the few buildings that were constructed of wood, not canvas.

Law enforcement was under the jurisdiction of the Sheriffs department of Taylor County, and the Sheriff usually stayed in Buffalo Gap, Local administration was in the hands of the justice of peace. Pioneer men were independent and self-reliant, and usually had a way of settling disputes at the point of a six-shooter, rather than resorting to the somewhat lengthy channels of law enforcement.

Soon after the Emerson family arrived, in fact 2 January 1883 the town was incorporated. Only a few hundred people lived in Abiline at the time. On 17 April 1883 Edward purchased a parcel of land about 6 miles from Abiline of 202 acres. This was probably for the older sons to run. He also purchased several other lots in Abiline, two on Chestnut street and two on Pecan Street.

Everything seemed to be good for the EmersonS at this point. Then something mysterious happened. Edward sold two lots on Pecan street 26 September 1883 and the Hotel on 4 October 1883, but he took no money for either sale only a lien on both sales, and leaving immediately for California with only a team and a wagon. What caused him to leave without some payment on these two sales?

From California he eventually sold the liens for a small portion of their value, also he sold the 202 acres from California for little of their value. As I stated before there was very little law in Abiline and there could have been a dispute with some one or the law itself. At this point its only speculation. I looked in the Sheriffs department records during that period but very few records of offenses were put down of that early period so the lack of any record dose not mean that some offence did not occur. When arriving in California they needed funds so the parents went to Josephine and the older sons went to Los Angeles. Slowly with the team and wagon started to rebuild their assets. From there they moved to Santa Barbara County, on what was then known as the Sway Place, a few miles from Santa Maria. There they engaged in the dairying industry, shipping butter and cheese to San Francisco.

Edward Simpson and Julia Ann when returning from Texas went to a town called Josephine which I will cover later.

The family hearing of government land in Kern County open for homestead, they oved again, this time traveling up the Cuyama River bottom from Santa Maria to the southwest corner, known as the Paleta district. On this trip of approximately 60 miles they had to cross the river 101 times.

So, in 1866, Edward Simpson Emerson and Julia Ann Dunbar purchased 320 acres rom the Kern County Land Company, and homesteaded and purchased the rest-making a total of over 5,000 acres in the area. Their first home was an old Photographer's tend that they brought with them from Santa Maria. Later homes were built, the lumber being hauled by team from Santa Margarita. The was a trip of at least twelve days with a four horse team.

The nearest town was Bakersfield, only 60 miles away in dry weather, but in wet weather the Buena Vista Lake and Kern Lake extended over a great part of the Valley, so had to be avoided. The trip to Bakersfield always took three days and nights, either on horseback or with team and wagon. The road was no more than a trail, rutted and dusty.

During one of their trips to Bakersfield, they returned with a grapevine slip taken from the John White place near Panama. This was planted at the spring house at the ranch headquarters. It became known as the largest grapevine in the world. The spread has been cut back but the spread did cover 110 feet each way. The trunk is 9 feet in circumference at the base (1987).

The fireplace chimney at the ranch still stands (1987). It was made of rock and brick made in Cuyama Valley by an early settler named Severn Tonneson, and hauled by team. The building is still standing or at least most of if (1987).

Life on the ranch was the usual pioneer life. They raised cattle and farmed the land that was flat enough to be tilled. At on time, the bandits Sontag and Evans stopped. One stood guard nearby, the other came to the ranch for directions through the mountains to Ventura, and demanded food from them of which they gave as they would have for any one in need.

Where is the Town of Josephine?

I spent many hours searching through records and asking questions trying to find out where the town of Josephine was located. The local people didn't seem to know. The reason, of course, is the town has been gone for so many years. I spent much time in trying to locate this little forgotten town because that is where the family was when they returned from Texas. Family history has it that they went to Los Angeles, to the Sway ranch in or near Santa Maria. The older boys did but the parents and daughters went to Josephine. The San Luis Obispo Directory for 1884-1885 records Edward Simpson Emerson family living in Josephine San Luis Obispo County, farming. Also Parry Emerson in a separate household living in Josephine. Parry owned a lot in San Luis Obispo on Isley Street near the corner of Board and Isley. Which had delinquent taxes on it. Also in a book listing people living in San Luis Obispo County, written early in 1886, records Edward Simpson Emerson living in Josephine, farming, but didn't own any land. There are other records which indicate the same conclusion, voter registration etc., that between the time Edward came back from Texas in 1884 and when they migrated to the Paleto Hills in 1886 lived in Josephine waiting for the boys to earn enough to buy land in Kern County.

The official location is Sec 17 Township 27S Range 10 East. From a "Four Wheel" magazine publication in the March 1983 issue the article is included here. "The town of Josephine, San Luis Obispo County." "Some Mexican prospectors found quicksilver ore here and started a mine around 1862. There had been great excitement further north at new Almander California largest mercury producer. Somehow the site was called Josephine. Records show that there was a Post office here, a school, shops, a store and houses". The area also had a school district named after it. Apparently when the mine petered out the Post office was officially closed and the town folded. This happened just before the turn of the century. Where the Emersons lived on the site I could not locate because they own no land there, and there seems not to be a register of citizens for the town of Josephine. One of the HudsonS lived at Josephine in 1892. William Hudson the son of Andrew Jackson Hudson.

1860 Census Sonoma Co., Calif. page 490
Dwelling No. 84
Emerson E. S. age 26 farmer real esae 1200 birthplace Missouri
Julia age 23 female birthplace Missouri
Zaza age 1/12 birthplace California.
Perry age 1 birthplace California.

1870 Census San Luis Obispo township, San Luis Obispo County, California pagew 305.
Emmerson, Edward S. age 37 farmer Real Estate 1200 personal value 955 birthplace Missouri.
Julia A. age 33 Keeping House birthplace Missouri.
Perry age 12 at Home Birth place Calif.
Zaza age 10 at Home birthplace Calif.
Henry A. age 8 at home birthplace Calif.
Charles age 5 at home birthplace Calif.
Elbert T. age 2 Birthplace Calif.
Mollie Lee age 4/12 birthplace Calif.

1880 Census San Luis Obispo Twp. San Luis Obispo County, Calif. page 14 Ed 76
Emerson Edward S. age 48 Farmer Birthplace Missouri
Julia A. age 48 wife Keeping House Birthplace Missouri
Perry azge 21 son at home birthplace Calif.
Henry A. age 18 son at home birthplace Calif.
Charley age 14 son at home birthplace Calif.
Elbert T age 11 son at home birthplace Calif.
Mollie L. age 9 dau at home birthplace Calif.
Edward age 7 son at home birthplace, Calif.
Robert age 5 son at home birhplace, Calif.

page 29
Emerson, Zaza age 20 at home birthplace Calif.
Zaza living with the Fredrich F White home

Children of Julia Ann Dunbar and Edward Simpson Emerson were as follows:
+ 87 i Perry Emerson [640], born 7 Sep 1858 in Sebastopol, Sonoma, California He married Margaret Gertrude Grandstaff[641].
   88 ii Zaza Emerson [642], born 24 May 1860 in Sebastopol, Sonoma, Ca; died 3 Sep 1940. He married on 3 Nov 1916 in Bakersfield, Kern, California, Dove McCubbin [643], born abt. 1860. Kern County, Hall of Records Book 16 page 297
+ 89 iii Henry Alexander Emerson [2191], born 17 Jan 1862 in Sebastopol, Sonoma, California. He married Elmie Nicholson [627].
   90 iv Harvey Emerson [638], born 12 Mar 1864 in Sebastopol, Sonoma, Ca; died 18 Mar 1864.
   91 v Charles Emerson [639], born 6 Jul 1865 in Sebastopol, Sonoma, Ca; died 8 Nov 1932 in Pattiway, Kern, California. Charles Emerson the son of Edward Simpson Emerson and Julia Ann Dunbar. Born in Sonoma Co., California on 6 July 1865. Charles died in Bakersfield, Kern County, California on 8 November 1932 and is buried in the Emerson family plot in Union Cemetery, Bakersfield. In the southwest corner of Kern county, running up to within one mile of Ventura County, and thousand acres operated by the Emerson Bros. The identification of the family with the ranch dates back to the year 1886, when Edward Simpson Emerson removed to Kern County and Pre-empted and homesteaded land twelve miles south of the present site of Maricopa. For years before coming to this locality he had lived in California and had engaged in ranching. By birth a Missourian, he had engaged in the government service in 1850 and as a teamster had hauled freight to the various government post. During 1851 he sailed from Mexico to San Francisco, thence proceeded to Sonoma County and took up land.. There he married Miss Julia Ann Dunbar and in that county their first five children were born. Removing to San Luis Obispo County, in 1867, he continued to engage in ranching and stock- raising. When he brought his family to Kern County, in 1886 he and his seven sons engaged in ranching in the Paleto country. When his demise occurred in 1904 and that of his wife in 1908, both had attained to the age of seventy-one years. The family of Edward Simpson Emerson comprised nine children are listed at other place in this sketch. Since attaining his majority Charles Emerson has lived in Kern County and has engaged in ranching. With his brothers as partners he usually maintains a herd of about three hundred head of cattle, but at times of little rain they reduce their herd accordingly, these being mostly Durham and Hereford cattle of the finest beef grades. On account of a spring of water on the land taken up by Charles Emerson Messrs. Car and Haggen entered suit against him and attempted to eject him from the holdings. With a rifle Charles ejected Car and Haggen from the property, but spent 30 days in jail for doing it. After many years in court Charles won the case and bought additional land from Carr and Haggen that the spring made useless without the spring water. Charles became well known in this section of the state because of this incident.Charles Emerson never married, his sister Josephine and her husband Marion T. Bush lived on the Paleto Ranch with him until his death. Obituary in The Bakerfield Californian Thur. Nov. 10, 1932. Rites for Emerson are conducted here Funeral rites erer held today at the Doughty Calhoun O'Meara Chaple for Charles Emerson 77, of Cuyama Valley, who died Mondy night. The body was inturred in Union Cem., in the family plot.
+ 92 vi Elbert T. Emerson [644], born 1 Sep 1867 in San Luis Obispo, California. He married May Baum [645].
+ 93 vii Mollie Lee Emerson [647], born 14 Feb 1870 in San Luis Obispo, S-L-Ob, California. She married Clarence Seymore Green [646].
+ 94 viii Edward Elo Emerson [648], born 25 May 1872 in San Luis Obispo, California. He married (1) Fannie Elizabeth BRIANS [649]. He married (2) Lydia B. IRISH [650].
+ 95 ix Robert Lee Emerson [651], born 26 May 1874 in San Luis Obispo, California. He married (1) Cyrena Baum [652]. He married (2) Genie Mayball Ingalls [653].
+ 96 x Josephine Bell Emerson [655], born 20 Sep 1882 in San Luis Obispo, California. She married Marion F. Bush [654].

19. Milley Dunbar [16133] (Mary Hudson, William Pink), born 23 Apr 1839 in Bona, Polk Co., Missouri; died Nov 1915 in Sonoma Co., California. She married (1) on 7 Aug 1855 in Sonoma Co., California, John Green Underhill [16134]. She married (2) on 22 Jun 1898 in San Luis Obispo, California, James Howard [16135].

Notes for Milley Dunbar
Marriage recorded in Santa Rosa, Sonoma Co., California. Birth came from Dunbar Bible, in possession of Florence Art, Bakersfield, California.

Millie Dunbar came west when only 10 years old and crossed the plains with her family, walking most of the way. They settled in the area north of San Francisco, in Sonoma Co., and remained there until her death.

Millie Dunbar the daughter of Alexander Dunbar and Mary D. Hudson. Millie was born in Polk Co., Missouri on 23 April 1839. The Dunbar bible states that Millie was born in Dade County but that county was not formed until 1841.

Although they did not move from Polk County to Dade County, at the time of her birth that portion of Dade County, where they lived was Polk County, in 1839.

On 9 August 1855 in Sonoma Co., California Millie Dunbar married John G. Underhill. In San Luis Obispo County, California.

John G. Underhill, Millie's husband was born in Marshal county, Tennessee, 11 April 1831 where he resided until 1843, when he moved with his parents to Green County, Missouri. Living there until 1852 when he emigrated to California, crossing the plains with an Ox-team, being six months on the road and locating on his present farm in 1863. Mr. Underhill built the first home ever erected in Rincon Valley. This house was constructed for a man by the name of Armsby Elliott in the Winter of 1852. He also planted the first orchard in the Valley. Held the office of School trustee for years.

My original thoughts were that Millie Dunbar after her children were grown had gone south where her parents lived and married a second time in San Luis Obispo, California. I found a marriage recorded in San Luis Obispo, of a Millie Dunbar and thought her to be a daughter of Alexander Dunbar and Mary Hudson. I received a letter from Shirley (Underhill) Petty, a direct descendant of Millie who has convinced me that I was in error. The letter was dated 7 July 1997. I have changed my records to agree with Shirley.

Children of Milley Dunbar and John Green Underhill were as follows:
   97 i William Underhill [16136], born 29 May 1856 in Sonoma, California. He married in 1887, Margaret J. (last name unknown) [21912]. From Barbara Petty Email
+ 98 ii Charles Underhill [16137], born 20 Sep 1857 in Sonoma, California. He married Louise Northcutt [21882].
   99 iii Katie Underhill [16138], born 9 Nov 1858 in Sonoma, California; died 3 Aug 1885. (From Barbara Petty Email letter 9/04/1997 at 23:19 for Birth date and Death date.)
  100 iv Mary Underhill [16139], born 16 Mar 1860 in Sonoma, California. (From Barbara Petty Email letter 9/04/1997 at 23:19 for Birth date.)
  101 v Sarah Underhill [16140], born 7 Oct 1861 in Sonoma, California.
  102 vi John G. Underhill [16141], born 16 Jan 1870 in Sonoma, California. He married abt. 1891, Rose (last name unknown) [21913], born 1864. From Email letter Barbara Petty 9/4/1997 at 23:16EDT
  103 vii Neva Underhill [16142], born 9 Jun 1877 in Sonoma, California. She married abt. 1896, George W. Rogers [21914], born 1866.

20. William Alexander Dunbar [16143] (Mary Hudson, William Pink), born 25 Jan 1841 in Bona, Missouri; died 12 Dec 1897 in San Luis Obispo, California. He married on 18 Jul 1881 in San Luis Obispo, California, Elizabeth Pennington [16144]. Notes for William Alexander Dunbar The Great Voting Register discribes William as follows: 5 foot 8 1/2 inches, fair complexion. Gray hair, and brown eyes. In 1868 the Great Register lists William as 25 and a farmer, also in 1887 is 43 and a farmer. In the Will of William's father Alexander Dunbar gives all of the land to Mary but at the death of Mary all land and assets would go to William Alexander Dunbar.

At William's death his obituary listed a daughter but not her given name and also his brothers and sisters.

Suddenly Passes Away

William A. Dunbar stricken in St. Stephen's Church. another sudden death shocked the community Sunday morning when the dreaded messenger claimed William A. Death was apoplexy. Mr. and Mrs. Dunbar and little daughter were attending services at St. Stephen's church. Rev. E.M. Hills had just entered upon his discourse, when the congregation was startled by a cry from Mrs. Dunbar, directed to her husband. The words were "what is the matter?" No response came from Mr. Dunbar, and a moment later he sank unconscious. In that condition he was carried into the fresh air, and without delay doctor Sinclair and Nichols were summoned, but they found impossible to strengthen the silvery thread of life, which soon snapped. The body was removed to the residence of David Dunbar, a brother of the deceased. The deceased was been a resident of this county for the past twenty-nine years. He came to California in 1849 from the place of his birth, Dade County, Missouri. At the time of his death he was 56 years, 10 months and 17 days of age. He leaves three brothers and two sisters to morn his lose, J. M. Dunbar, J. A. Dunbar and David Dunbar, all of this city, Mrs. E. S. Emerson of Kern County, and Mrs. E. S. Underhill of Santa Rose. To the sorrowing wife and daughter the sympathy of the entire community is extended.

Children of William Alexander Dunbar and Elizabeth Pennington were as follows:
  104 i Arthur Dunbar [16145], born 22 Apr 1882 in San Luis Obispo, California; died 16 Apr 1884 in San Luis Obispo, California.
  105 ii (Unknown first name) Dunbar [16146], born 1884 in San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo, California. Newspaper article of the Obituary of William Dunbar.

21. James Maridith Dunbar [16147] (Mary Hudson, William Pink), born 4 Dec 1842 in Bona, Missouri; died 30 May 1913 in Bakersfield, California; buried in Odd Fellows Cem, San Luis Obispo, California. She married in 1871 in San Luis Obispo, California, Mary Short [16148], died bef. 1872.

Notes for James Maridith Dunbar
James Meredith Dunbar the son of Alexander Dunbar and Mary Hudson. James was born in Dade County, Missouri on 4 December 1842 and he died in Bakersfield, Kern County, California on 30 May 1913, and is buried in the Odd Fellows Cemetery. The grave marker is missing but the cemetery sexton has a record of the burial and a location in the cemetery. About 1871 James Meredith Dunbar married Mary Short the daughter of Moses and Margaret Short. In the great register of San Luis Obispo County, James was listed in 1869 as 26, a farmer and in 1890, James was listed as 48 and a laborer. Mary, John's wife must have died soon after their child was born because, James is listed in many records of San Luis Obispo area but always seems to be single. Also in the 1880 Census Albert Dunbar, James and Mary's child was living with his grandfather, Moses Short. which could indicate that the mother was deceased because she was not living in their household. James in the 1880 Census was living in San Simion Twp., working as a woodcutter and Mary was not there. Moses Short was also living in San Simion Township. In the San Luis Obispo County, Directory listed James Meredith Dunbar, living in Cambria and was a laborer.

Odd Fellows Cemetery in San Luis Obispo have a record but there is no grave marker.

Notes for Mary Short

Mary not in 1880 Census also her son was living with her father Moses Short. in San Simion California.

Children of James Maridith Dunbar and Mary Short were as follows:
  106 i Albert Dunbar [16149], born 1872 in San Luis Obispo, California; died 23 Apr 1884 in San Luis Obispo, California. Mary not in 1880 Census also her son was living with her father Moses Short. in San Simion California. Buried in the Odd Fellows Cemetery San Luis Obispo, California.

23. Nicholas Johnson Dunbar [16150] (Mary Hudson, William Pink), born 10 Jul 1848 in Bona, Missouri; died 5 Mar 1885 in San Luis Obispo, California; buried in San Luis Obispo, California. He married on 1 Jan 1870 in Santa Rosa, California, Sarah Peason [16151], born 1852; died 1940 in Santa Rosa, California; buried in Santa Rosa, California.

Nicholas Johnson Dunbar the son of Alexander Dunbar and Mary Hudson was less the one year old when the family left Missouri for California, then the family moved to San Luis Obispo in 1867 from Sonoma Co., California. Nicholas stayed on in Sonoma Co., for he was married there to Miss Sarah Pearson. Then shortly after his first child was born in 1871 they moved to San Luis Obispo, California and their second child Carrie was born. This is all recorded in Sonoma County and San Luis Obispo Counties.

Notes for Sarah Peason After Nicholas Sarah's husband died she removed to Santa Rosa and died there.

Children of Nicholas Johnson Dunbar and Sarah Peason were as follows:
+ 107 i Charles Oliver Dunbar [16152], born 24 May 1871 in Glen Ellen, Sonoma Co., California. He married (1) Frances Reynolds [16153]. He married (2) Mabel A. Paterson [16154]. 108 ii Carrie D. Dunbar [16156], born in San Luis Obispo, California. She married Arthur G. Jenkins [16157].
   109 iii Herbert F. Dunbar [16158], born in San Luis Obispo, California.

24. John Albert Dunbar [16159] (Mary Hudson, William Pink), born 16 Jul 1851 in Cayucas, California; died 24 Jul 1935 in San Luis Obispo, California; buried in Odd Fellows Cem., San Luis Obispo, California. He married on 31 Mar 1872 in San Luis Obispo, California, Margaret Pennington [16160].

John Albert Dunbar the son of Alexander and Mary (Hudson) Dunbar, John was born after the family arrived in California from Missouri in Sonoma Co., California on 16 July 1851 and he died in San Luis Obispo County, California, on 24 July 1935. He is buried in the Odd Fellows Cemetery, San Luis Obispo, California. On 31 March 1872 in San Luis Obispo, California John Albert Dunbar married Margaret Pennington the daughter of John and Maria Pennington.

Mr. Dunbar is from an early pioneer family who came to California in 1849. John migrated to San Luis Obispo with his parents when only 17. John Dunbar was one of the organizers of San Luis Obispo's first volunteer fire fighters over 60 years before his death. Tiger Hook and Ladder Company No. 1, and Goodwill Hose Company were the pioneer organizations. Among their leaders besides John Dunbar were El Sanborn, Jake Bump, Gus Ogiesby and Alf Walker.

Among John Dunbar's early day associates were Walter Murray, editor of the Weekly Tribune, and latter District Judge; also his brother Alic Murray, Postmaster in the old adobe building on Monterey and Morro Streets. John was for many years City Marshal.

In 1867, John as a 17-year-old boy made his entrance into San Luis Obispo, together with Jeff Anderson's two brothers, Ned and Luis, driving a bunch of cattle and horses down Monterey street which was then only a wagon road. They were trailing along behind their parents, who had come down from the north to settle in this old cow-town.

In late 1867, the only hotel here was the Eagle, at Monterey and Osos Streets. It was run by Patsy Dunn, a Jolly Irish landlord. Here the Dunbar and Anderson families put up preparatory to getting settled. Their horses and cattle were fed in the livery stable and stock yards of Ed Smith; across the street. John lived in San Luis Obispo all of his life and was a well respected man and officer of the law.

Children of John Albert Dunbar and Margaret Pennington were as follows:
  110 i Sarah Helen Dunbar [16161], born 1877 in San Luis Obispo, California; died 25 Feb 1890 in San Luis Obispo, California; buried in Odd Fellows Cem., San Luis Obispo, California. Recorded in the Odd Fellows Cemetery Records.

25. Andrew Jackson Hudson [16193] (William, William Pink), born 3 Mar 1837 in Lafayette Co., Missouri; died 27 Sep 1908 in Templeton, California. He married in 1863 in Lake, California, Sarah Burtnet [16328], born 1847 in Ill; died 1899 in Templeton, California.

Andrew Jackson Hudson the son of William Hudson and Sarah Ann Smith. Andrew as born in Lafayette County, Missouri on 3 March 1837 and he died near Templeton, San Luis Obispo County, California on 28 September 1908. In the year 1863 at Napa County, California Andrew Jackson Hudson married Sarah Burtnet the daughter of Peter Burtnet who was born in Ill. in the year 1847 and she died at Templeton, San Luis Obispo County, in 1899.

Andrew migrated to California in 1845 with his parents when only 8 years old. California was then Mexican Territory. His train, consisting of 100 men was one of the early emigrants trains that crossed the Sierra Nevada Mountains, and they had considerable trouble with the Indians. When they started their destination was Oregon, but learning that California had a better and more healthful climate they decided to locate in California. In the spring of 1846 a Spanish Officer went to them and in a polite way gave them notice to leave the country. Finally General Vallejo came to them, and after staying with them over night and being treated kindly, he told them he would like them to leave the country. They replied that they would not go yet, as they would have to make some preparations for the journey, and would need provisions. In the morning the immigrants got together and concluded they would stay and take the country. Twenty-one immigrants and six of Fremont's men took the town of Sonoma and General Vallejo, and sent him to Sutter's Fort for safe keeping. They hoisted the Bear Flag over the town, it being made of red flannel skirt, belonging to Miss Elliott of the party, and white cotton cloth, on which a bear was painted. Mr. Hudson'S family remained in Sonoma six months until peace was declared, and the Bear Flag party accepted the situation with joy.

In 1849 Andrew Hudson's family moved to Guilicos Ranch, and his father bought 2,500 acres. There they were engaged in raising wheat and stock. Andrew J. Hudson grew to manhood amid the trying times of the frontier when there were lawless bands roving all around the settlers and the rich portions of the state. Andrew was educated in the primitive schools of the early day. In 1854 they moved to Napa County, joining the town of Saint Helena, and bought 200 acres of land which he fenced. He planted an orchard and vineyard, and built and managed a stock ranch until 1866, when his father died and the estate was divided. In 1867, Andrew Hudson came to San Luis Obispo, and settled near the town. Before 1870 Andrew moved with his family to Morro and purchased a lot on Fifth Street. During this period Andrew was a butcher. In 1872 Andrew Hudson purchased land in Cayucas area, also 1876 he purchased land in Cambrea and moved there. He continued in the Cambrea area until after 1800 when he returned to Lake County for a short stay. When Andrew returned he purchased land near Templeton, part of the Rancho Paso De Robles. The Paso Robles Creekpasssed through the center of his large farm. This he did before 1884 because Andrew was in the San Luis Obispo Directory living in Paso Robles then which took in Templeton. Here he was engaged in stock-raising, and built a fine house, where he stayed until his death in 1908.

Sources:
1870, 1880, 1900 Census of San Luis Obispo Co., California. History of San Luis Obispo County, California. Obituary of Andrew Jackson Hudson. Land records of San Luis Obispo County, Calif. Vital records of San Luis Obispo County, Calif.

Children of Andrew Jackson Hudson and Sarah Burtnet were as follows:
+ 111 i William Hudson [16189], born 20 Sep 1866 in Napa, California. He married Laura Eva Kemp [17076].
+ 112 ii John Hudson [17069], born 28 Aug 1870 in Cayucas, California. He married Effie J. Kemp [17077].
   113 iii Harry Hudson [17070], born Nov 1872 in San Luis Obispo, California.
   114 iv Tina Hudson [17071], born Dec 1874 in San Luis Obispo, California.
   115 v Emma Hudson [17072], born Jan 1877 in San Luis Obispo, California; died Apr 1914 in San Luis Obispo, California. She married on 29 Apr 1907 in San Luis Obispo, California, Thomas Gates [17078].
   116 vi Bert Hudson [17073], born Dec 1879 in San Luis Obispo, California.
   117 vii Carol Hudson [17074], born Dec 1884 in San Luis Obispo, California. She married on 26 Aug 1909 in San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo, California, John L. Reynolds [17079].
   118 viii Ernest Hudson [17075], born Oct 1890 in San Luis Obispo, California; died 10 Aug 1916.

26. Martin Smith Hudson [16196] (William, William Pink), born 3 Nov 1839 in Lafayette Co., Missouri; died 5 Dec 1920 in St Helena, California. He married on 3 Aug 1863 in St Helena, Napa, California, Josephine Mills [16269], born 8 Feb 1846 in Pena, IL; died 24 May 1926 in St Helena, California.

Martin Smith Hudson The son of William Hudson and Sarah Ann Smith. Martin was born in Lexington, Lafayette County, Missouri, on 3 November 1839, and he died 5 December 1920 in Napa County, California. On 3 August 1863 Martin Smith Hudson married Josephine Mills who was born in Peoria, Ill. on 8 February 1844 and she died in St. Helena Napa County, California on 24 May 1926.

Martin Smith Hudson migrated to California in 1845 with his parents when only six years old, walking most of the way trying to make the oxen go. This group of immigrants (including Martin's parents) that crossed the trackless desert with teams of slow moving oxen drawing the old prairie schooners with their loads of precious human freight, became one of the first groups containing families. They came to the state of California while it was Mexican territory. This train, consisting of 100 men, along with their wives and children. They had trouble with Indians along with cholera. Death came quickly with very little protection against decease. With all this in mind imagine a six year old boy crossing the plains with this wagon train. When the Group started, there destination was Oregon, but learning that California had better and more healthful climate then decided to locate in California. arriving on October 15th 1845 in Sonoma Co., when by 1 November 1845 they continued on to Napa County, California.

The Spanish ask the party to leave California, so the group took up Arms and held their community against the spanish in what was to become the Bear Flag War, flying the Bear Flag which they made. Martin's uncle, David Hudson was an officer in the militia that held the area until peace was declared.

Young Martin settled in the Napa County area where he raised his family. He was in both the 1880 and 1900 Census in Napa County, Hot Springs Township where he died.

1910 Census of St Helena Township, Napa County, California Ed 83 Sheet 17a Line 12. Martin and two children living in household.

Notes for Josephine Mills
1910 Census for St. Helena Township, Napa County, California Ed 83 sheet 17a Line 12. Martin his wife and two children living at home.

Children of Martin Smith Hudson and Josephine Mills were as follows:
+ 119 i Parry C. Hudson [17084], born 19 Jan 1865 in Napa, California. He married Mary C. Shepard [17090].
   120 ii Ralph C. Hudson [17085], born 20 May 1869 in St Helena, Napa, California; died 18 Sep 1938 in St Helena, Napa, California. (1910 Census for St. Helena Township, Napa County, California Ed 83 sheet 17a Line 12. Martin his wife and two children living at home.)
   121 iii Carrie Hudson [17086], born 4 Nov 1874 in St Helena, Napa, California; died 28 Feb 1935 in St Helena, Napa, California. Carrie Hudson the daughter of Martin Hudson and Josephine Mills. Never married. She committed suicide. (1910 Census for St. Helena Township, Napa County, California Ed 83 sheet 17a Line 12. Martin his wife and two children living at home.)
   122 iv William Henry Hudson [17087], born 6 Apr 1884 in St Helena, California.
+ 123 v Leland F. Hudson [17088], born 6 Jan 1888 in St Helena, California. He married Blance Christianson [17089].

28. Elizabeth Hudson [16300] (William, William Pink), born 1843 in Dade, Missouri; died bef. 1935 in St Helena, California. She married on 5 Aug 1861 in St Helena, Napa, California, Robert Hastie [16299], born 1832 in Scotland.

Children of Elizabeth Hudson and Robert Hastie were as follows:
   124 i Ernest Hastie [17080], born 10 Mar 1863 in Napa, California; died 1 May 1908 in Napa, California; buried in St Helena, California.
   125 ii Willie Hastie [17081], born 1865 in St Helena, California; died 6 Dec 1908 in Ukiah, California; buried in St Helena, California.
   126 iii Alexander Hastie [17082], born 1866 in St Helena, California.
   127 iv Sally Hastie [17083], born 1869 in St Helena, California.

29. Mary J. Hudson [16260] (William, William Pink), born 12 Jan 1847 in Sonoma Co., California; died 8 Sep 1905 in St Helena, California. She married on 21 Jun 1866 in St Helena, California, Henry Mexer McCormick [16308], born 19 May 1839 in Marion, Missouri; died 18 Sep 1879 in St Helena, California.

Children of Mary J. Hudson and Henry Mexer McCormick were as follows:
   128 i Chalmers McCormick [17091], born 12 Jul 1867 in St Helena, Napa, California; died 5 Jun 1942 in St. Helena, California.
   129 ii Hugh McCormick [17092], born 20 Mar 1869 in St Helena, California.
   130 iii John McCormick [17093], born 23 Apr 1871 in St Helena, California; died 24 Jul 1963.
   131 iv Annie May McCormick [17094], born 10 Oct 1873 in St Helena, California; died 19 Mar 1969.
   132 v Arlington M. McCormick [17095], born 19 Sep 1877 in St Helena, California; died 7 Dec 1919 in St Helena, Napa, California.

34. Mary Ann Hudson [1546] (Thomas Flourney, William Pink), born 1845 in Dade Co., Missouri; died bef. 1940 in California. She married on 30 May 1864 in Santa Rosa, Sonoma Co., California, Charles Sharp [1545], born 1847 in Missouri; died bef. 1940 in California.

Notes for Mary Ann Hudson
Certificate of marriage Sonoma Co., California. Mary was only three years old when her parents removed to California. Her father with his family and Mary's uncle Martin and his family formed with others into a group to cross the plains from Missour to California. In the spring of 1848 they left for California by ox-team along the northern route through Donner's Pass. When they arrived in the fall of 1848. The families locating William Hudson, Thomasand Martin's brother, and the group located with William in Sonoma County for the winter Soo Thomas removed on his own farm in Sonoma and became a large land owner in Sonoma County.

Here in Sonoma Mary grew to an adult and was educated in the local schools. It was also Sonoma where she met and married Charles Sharp. On a farm in Sonoma County, Charles and Mary raised their family. Mary,s father died young and for a while her mother lived with them. At least in 1880 the Census records Mary Catherine Hudson living with the Sharps. Also next to the Sharps farm Mary Sharps brothers wer living.

Notes for Charles Sharp
Certificate of marriage Sonoma Co., California

Children of Mary Ann Hudson and Charles Sharp were as follows:
   133 i Albert Sharp [1543], born 1866 in Santa Rosa, Sonoma, California.
   134 ii Arthur4 Sharp [1620], born 1869 in Santa Rosa, Sonoma, California; died bef. 1960.
   135 iii William Sharp [2809], born 1872 in Santa Rosa, Sonoma, California; died bef. 1970. 1880 Census of Sonoma Co., Santa Rosa Township, Ed 124-3
   136 iv John Henry Sharp [16316], born in Santa Rosa, Sonoma, California. 1880 Census of Sonoma Co., Santa Rosa Township, Ed 124-3
   137 v Mary C. Sharp [16264], born 1873 in Santa Rosa, Sonoma, California; died bef. 1970. 1880 Census of Sonoma Co., Santa Rosa Township, Ed 124-3
   138 vi Laura A. Sharp [16267], born 1879 in Santa Rosa, Sonoma, California; died bef. 1975. (1880 Census of Sonoma Co., Santa Rosa Township, Ed 124-3)

36. Cornelias Hudson [16245] (Thomas Flourney, William Pink), born 1851 in Sonoma Co., California; died 6 Sep 1924 in Calistoga, Napa, California. He married on 25 Nov 1873 in Santa Rosa, Sonoma Co., California, Lavina Ellen Butler [16240], born Nov 1858 in Missouri; died 21 Jun 1950 in Santa Rosa, California.

Cornelious (Neil) Hudson son of Thomas F. Hudson and Mary Catherine (unknown last name). Born in California on 27 October 1851 and he died in Calistoga, California on 6 December 1924. On 25 November 1873 Cornelious Hudson married Lavina Ellen Butler who was born November 1859 in Missouri and she died in Santa Rosa, Sonoma County 21 June 1950 and is buried with her husband in St Helena Cemetery, Napa County, California.

Cornelious was educated in the local Sonoma County schools and grew to manhood there. Sonoma is where he met and married his wife Lavina. His father was an early pioneer who removed to California in 1848. Thomas and Martin his brother crossed the plains from Missouri to California starting in the spring of 1848 and arrived in the fall of that same year and looked up their brother William Hudson who had come across earlier and settled in Sonoma. Thomas settled in Sonoma County, and became a large land owner. Cornelious also raised his family there.

Children of Cornelias Hudson and Lavina Ellen Butler were as follows:
   139 i Alice Hudson [17096], born 19 Mar 1875 in Sonoma, California. She married on 28 Nov 1894, Wilson Ebenezer Finley [17102].
   140 ii Dennis Burtnett Hudson [17097], born 12 Nov 1877 in Porter Creek, Sonoma Co., California.
   141 iii Edward Lawrence Hudson [17098], born 13 Dec 1880 in Sonoma Co., California.
   142 iv George Hally Hudson [17099], born 3 May 1882 in Sonoma, California; died 10 Dec 1886 in Sonoma Co., California.
   143 v Pleasant Ernest Hudson [17100], born 26 Jan 1886 in Sonoma Co., California; died 21 May 1888 in Sonoma Co., California.
   144 vi Charles Cornelious Hudson [17101], born 26 Mar 1887 in Sonoma Co., California; died 17 Sep 1949.
   145 vii Lavina Gladis Hudson [17103], born Apr 1890 in Sonoma, California.
   146 viii Elmer Valentine Hudson [17104], born 26 Mar 1894 in Sonoma Co., California. He married on 9 Jun 1931 in Sonoma Co., California, Gertrude WINSLOW [17106].
   147 ix Geneva Celestine Hudson [17105], born Apr 1897 in Sonoma Co., California; died 29 May 1924 in Sonoma Co., California. She married in Sonoma Co., California, Persse Niel BENNETT [17107]. 1900 Census Sonoma Co., California, Kights Valley Township Vol 45 Ed 159 Sheet 1 Line 78 Cornelious Family.

38. Rodney James Hudson [16237] (David, William Pink), born 20 Feb 1850 in St Helena, California; died 27 Nov 1918 in Bakersfield, Kern, California; buried in St Helena, California. He married on 26 Apr 1881 in St Helena, Napa, California, Panthea B. BOGGS [16234], born Dec 1858 in Lake, California; died bef. 1950.

Judge Rodney James Hudson the son of David Hudson and Frances Griffith. Rodney was born at St. Helena, Napa County, California February 20, 1850. Judge Hudson springs from a fine family, his father being a scion of the well known and highly esteemed Catron family of Tennessee, one of whom, for a period of thirty years, was a highly distinguished Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. His mother was a native of North Carolina, and is allied by blood to one of its best families. Young Hudson grew up at his birthplace, and made the best of the imperfect advantages for obtaining a primary education, which the then inefficient conditions of the schools offered. At the age of fifteen he entered an academy at Sonoma, which was conducted under the auspices of the Presbyterians, where Latin and the higher mathematics were taken up. At the end of the term he wrote and delivered his maiden oration, which was highly complimented by the Professors of the Academy, and served to show clearly the bent of the boy's mind, the latin powers that lay within him awaiting proper development.

He then returned to his father's farm, but books has a much greater attraction for him than the humdrum, prosocele avocation of tramping up and down a furrow behind a plow, and a book was generally carried to the field, which received much more attention than the work on hand. He then spent three years in attendance at the St. Helena public schools, which were then of high grade, and here he learned to read Latin fluently and made considerable progress in the higher mathematics. During his attendance at this school, and while yet only eighteen years of age, he made his debut into the political arena. In 1868, Footnote during the campaign of Seymour and Blair on the one side and Grant and Wilson on the other, a political meeting was held in St. Helena. The late Hon. W. W. Pendegast was the speaker of the evening, and among those present were young Hudson and his father and mother. At the close of Mr. Pendegast's speech the audience began to call loudly for Rodney Hudson, whose abilities as an orator were even then well known among his friends and acquaintances, and by then fully recognized. When the calls for the young man became so persistent that it became evident that the crowd would not hear a refusal, he father departed, either thinking that his presence would embarrass the boy, or not desiring to be present to witness what he considered inevitable failure. His mother, too, felt that a crisis in the boys life was just at hand, and with her womanly sensitiveness shrank instinctively from witnessing it. But the father's flight and the mother's fears were unnecessary, for the youthful orator was equal to the occasion, and for the space of half an hour he held the audience with his fluent and graceful oratory, and surprised even his best friends by his knowledge of the political issues of the day. Owing to his youth, the effort was regarded with a great deal of favor by all who heard it, and created quite a sensation, and from that time on he has always sustained a high reputation as of public speaker.His next move was to take charge of the St. Helena public schools, having a scholarship of about two hundred, and two assistant teachers. In 1869 he entered the University of Michigan. In a short time his health failed, and he was forced to quit school and return to California. He then entered the Law Office of Thomas P. Stoney, then County Judge of Napa County, as a student, where he remained for one year. On the occasion of the Fourth of July celebration at St. Helena in 1872, young Hudson, then only twenty-two years of age, was called upon to deliver the oration for the occasion. An extract from the Napa Register, then edited by G.W. Henning, will give an idea of the merits of the effort produced by Mr. Hudson on that occasion: "The oration was by Rodney J. Hudson, whom St Helena may be flattered to call her 'boy'. Rodney--he will excuse the familiarity--looks the orator. He has a talent which, if cultivated, will place him in the very front rank of public speakers. His personality and the fact that he was their own, created an interest in him which was not diminished in the least by his finely turned and patriotic periods. We hope he will not go into politics. There is a crown awaiting him in his legitimate professional career which will set more lightly and gracefully upon his head than ever politician's will."

In the fall of 1872 he entered the Law School at Lebanon, Tennessee, than presided over by the venerable Judge Carothers. While there he delivered an oration of Washington, which was complimented very highly by the Nashville Union, and extract from which we included in this connection: "His audience was thrilled with delight, excited alike by the spirit and eloquence of his words. The Golden State may well be proud of her representative in the Law School of the University."

He graduated at this school and returned to California in 1873. In 1874 he formed a law partnership with the leading practioner in the southern part of the state. After having been there for four or five months he was called upon to make a Fourth of July address, of which the Los Angeles Star says:"The oration was the most superb effort of the kind ever made in Los Angeles.

It was beautiful inn all its points, and may be considered an oratorical gem of the first water. We have heard the oration spoken of everywhere as excellent, but not more so than its delivery, which was very fine." In 1875 he was nominated and elected by the Democratic party to the position of District Attorney of Los Angeles County. His first case was for murder, andthe was defended by Col. J.G. Howard, confessedly the abient criminal lawyer in Southern California. The accused was convicted, and when the District Judge came down from the bench he said: "Mr Hudson, you have conducted this case as well as any lawyer.". He retained the office for two years, when, on account of failing health, He came to Lake County and opened a Law Office.

Here he began at one t build up and maintain a good practice, rarely losing a case before a jury. Mr. Hudson sprang boldly and nobly into the great fight made for the new Constitution, urging its adoption by the people with the greatest vigor and eloquence. He took the field and made several brilliant and telling speeches, and was called the captain of the new Constitution forces in Lake County. In 1878 he was put in nomination for the position of Superior Judge of Lake County. It was a matter of serious doubt with his best friends whether or not he could win in the contest, his youth and limited acquaintance militating much against his chances of success. As for himself, he saw that only energy and determination could make success possible, and he made a thorough out and personal canvass of the count, and then just upon the eve of the election addressed the people of the county in almost every voting precinct, which was evidently the great element of his success, as he was able to bring out the merits of his own case with a mater hand. He was elected by a large plurality, showing that good work had been accomplished. Once elected, the problem of convincing the people of his judicial fairness and integrity confronted him. Upon taking the bench he announced to the bar that he would endeavor to be impartial and upright, and that he knew that he would be independent, as he did not owe his election to any corporation or powerful influence, but to the people. That he has kept his promise is attested by all the bar of Lake County. He has the reputation of observing a uniform courtesy to the bar while presiding, of being positive in his rulings, and swift to retreat when shown to be in error. Of Judge Hudson the Bulletin of Lake County says:"His rulings exhibit fine legal acumen, and he is one of the best judges in California, and after a while Lake County will be proud to help place him in Congress, where his singular abilities as orator may have a fitting field in which to display their powers." Rodney J. Hudson is the youngest, but one, of the Superior Judges in this State: and who has climbed up the ladder, round by round, until he reached that high position when only twenty-nine years of age.

When he retired from the judicial connections he removed to Hanford, Kings County Footnote where he engaged in practice for six years, coming from there on 1911 to Bakersfield, Kern County, California, where he was a member of the law firm of Emmons and Hudson with office in the Producers Back Building.

On 26 April 1881 in Napa County, California Rodney James Hudson marriedPanthea B. BOGGS the daughter of A. G. BOGGS. Rodney James Hudson died in Bakersfield, Kern County on 27 November 1918 and is buried at St. Helena Napa County, California.

Sources:
History of Napa and Lake County, California 979.41 h2n.
1860 Census Napa County, California page 9 film 803061.
1900 Census Hanford, Lucerne Township, Kings County, Ed 37 Sheet 16 Line 70
Rodney Hudson living in Hanford with his wife and two sons. Film 1240088.
History of Kern County, California by Wallace M. Morgan 1914.
Kettenring Family by Henry H. Catron.
Rodney was only 18 when made this important speech and brought to the attention of many important people his ability to speak.

Children of Rodney James Hudson and Panthea B. BOGGS were as follows:
   148 i Howard Hudson [17108], born 3 Feb 1882 in Lake, California.
   149 ii Marshall Hudson [17109], born 14 Feb 1886 in Lake, California.
39. Levonia Hudson [16232] (David, William Pink), born 20 Nov 1851 in St. Helena, Napa, California; died bef. 1945 in Lakeport, Lake, California. She married on 2 Jul 1873 in St Helena, California, William Whitton [16230], born 24 Jul 1842; died 2 Jan 1904 in Lakeport, Lake, California.

Children of Levonia Hudson and William Whitton were as follows:
   150 i Willie T. Whitton [17110], born 17 Oct 1875 in LakeCo., California; died 31 Dec 1946. She married on 17 Oct 1898 in Napa, California, Fred Lincoln COLES [17114].
   151 ii Mabel Whitton [17111], born 29 Aug 1877 in Lake Co., California; died 19 Mar 1886.
   152 iii Bertha Whitton [17112], born 27 May 1882 in Lakeport, Lake, California. She married on 25 Oct 1903 in Napa, California, R. E. HENDRICKS [17115].
   153 iv Wilburn Whitton [17113], born 9 Jan 1885 in Lakeport, Lake, California; died 3 Aug 1892.

40. Elbert Hudson [15365] (David, William Pink), born 11 Apr 1853 in St. Helena, Napa, California; died bef. 1945 in Napa, California. He married on 20 Nov 1879 in St Helena, California, Alice STARK [15364], died bef. 1945 in California.

Elbert Hudson the son of David Hudson and Frances Griffith. Elbert was born and raised in the Napa Valley going to limited pioneer schools that were available, and growing to manhood in St Helena. In 1875 Elbert with his family removed to Lake County, California there raised his family In 1880 Elbert Hudson was living in Coyote precinct, Lake County California very near his father David. From the 1880 Census for Coyote Precinct, Lake County, California Ed. 50 Sheet 24 line 22.

Children of Elbert Hudson and Alice Stark were as follows:
   154 i Alice Grace Hudson (Twin to Harold) [17116], born 16 Feb 1881 in Lake Co., California.
   155 ii Harold Elbert Hudson (Twin to Alice) [17117], born 16 Feb 1881 in Lake Co., California.

43. Robert Lee Hudson [16229] (David, William Pink), born Feb 1865 in St Helena, Napa, California; died bef. 1955 in Winters, California. He married on 25 May 1897 in Lakeport, Lake, California, Annie Rose [16228], born 1873 in California; died bef. 1966 in Winters, California. Notes for Robert Lee Hudson 1900 Census of Lake County, California Ed 46 Sheet 10 Line 77 Township 4. 1910 Census for Abbey Street in Winters City, Yolo Co., California. Ed 180 Sheet 5 Line 30. Robert Lee Hudson living in Winters California in 1910 with his wife Annie and five of his children.

Children of Robert Lee Hudson and Annie Rose were as follows:
+ 156 i Hazel Dell Hudson [17118], born 17 Feb 1892 in Lakeport, California. She married John Murray [17123].
   157 ii Charles Hudson [17119], born Mar 1894 in Lakeport, California.
   158 iii Frances Hudson [17120], born May 1896 in Lakeport, California.
   159 iv Percy Hudson [17121], born 1 Jun 1909 in Lakeport, California; died 13 Oct 1968.
   160 v Robert Lee Hudson (Jr.) [17122], born 1902 in Lakeport, California.

45. William Enock York [16277] (Lucinda Hudson, William Pink), born 3 Jun 1843 in Dade Co., Missouri; died 18 Oct 1923 in St Helena, Napa, California. He married on 21 Feb 1867 in St Helena, California, Fanny Mills [16253], born 13 Jan 1848; died 22 May 1922 in St Helena, Napa, California.

William Enock York the son of John York and Lucinda Hudson, was only 2 year old when his parent came to California from Missouri over the overland trail through the pass which became knonw as the Donners Pass. They were one of the first wagon train to cross the plain with families. When they arrived in California the Spanish ask them to leave which resulted in the Bear Flag War so that they could remain in California.

1910 Census for York Ave. St Helena, California Ed 83 Sheet 12 Line 63.

The earliest recollections of William Enoch York are associated with California, for he was little more that an infant when the family settled in this state. As a boy he assisted on the home farm. When he started out for himself he bought thirty-five acres from his father and this he improved and developed, devoting it largely to a vineyard. He has served as town trustee. For some years he was treasurer of the cemetery association. By his marriage to Fannie Mills he had five children, but one son and two daughter died in infancy. Two survived. John T.; and Clara Jane, who married Charles E. Palmer.

Children of William Enock York and Fanny Mills were as follows:
   161 i Clara J. York [17124], born 1876 in St Helena, California. She married Charles E. PALMER [17127].
   162 ii John Taylor York [17125], born 26 Mar 1869 in St Helena, California; died bef. 1960. He married on 24 Nov 1891 in St Helena, California, Lina J. King [17126].

Taken from the History of Coast Counties of California.

The only surviving son of William Enoch York, John T. York, was born at St. Helena, Napa County, California on March 26, 1869, and received his early education in the St. Helena grammar school, after which he attended the Oakland High School for a year. Later he took a business course at St. Helena and was then graduated from Oakmound College in Napa. In 1892 he completed the course in Hastings Law College at San Francisco and received the degree of L.L. B. January 13, 1891, he was admitted to practice before the supreme court of the state. For three years he was engaged as law clerk with the firm of Tilden and Tilden, prominent attourneys of San Francisco, his connection with them having occupied his leisure hours during the grogress of his college course. The fall of 1892 found Mr. York in Napa, where he formed a partnership with Hon. Dennis Spencer. After the death of Mr. Spencer in 1895 he engaged in practice alone until 1902, when he became a member of the firm of Bell, York and Bell, one of the most influential law firms in this part of the state. In 1894 he was chosen city attorney of Napa, and this office he has since filled. besides which he has acted as town attorney of St. Helena. He served as secretary one year and since 1895 has served as chairman of the Democratic county central committee, and been active in the work at the conventions of the party. He is a member of the board of library trustees and officiated as its president about one year. In the incorporation of the Evans Shoe Manufacturing Company he took a leading part and for four years was one of its trustees, besides which he has been a director of the Napa Navigation Company. His fraternal associations are numerous and important. In the Knights of Pythias he is past chancellor and captain of the Uniform Rank. The Napa Lodge, I.O.O.F. numbers him among its leading members, with the office of past grand, and he is also past chief patriarch of the Live Oak Encampment, besides being identified with the Order of Rebekahs. Other organizations of which he is a member are the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Native Sons of the Golden West, in which latter body he is past president.

49. Nancy Jane York [16216] (Lucinda Hudson, William Pink), born 12 Aug 1852 in St Helena, California; died 20 Feb 1937 in St Helena, California. She married on 26 Sep 1870 in St Helena, California, William Newton MC CORMICK [16215], born 1845 in Arizona; died 1923 in California.

Notes for Nancy Jane York
Records of York Family and Cencus records from Napa County, Calfironia.

Name : HFA Records-Jane Martin Bertino McCormick (HFA 307).
Birth Date: HFA Records-Jane Martin Bertino McCormick (HFA 307).
Death Date: HFA Records-Jane Martin Bertino McCormick (HFA 307).
Father : HFA Records-Jane Martin Bertino McCormick (HFA 307).
Mother : HFA Records-Jane Martin Bertino McCormick (HFA 307).

Notes for William Newton McCormick
Name : HFA Records-Jane Martin Bertino McCormick (HFA 307).
Birth Date: HFA Records-Jane Martin Bertino McCormick (HFA 307).
Death Date: HFA Records-Jane Martin Bertino McCormick (HFA 307).
Father : HFA Records-Jane Martin Bertino McCormick (HFA 307).
Mother : HFA Records-Jane Martin Bertino McCormick (HFA 307).

Children of Nancy Jane York and William Newton McCormick were as follows:
+ 163 i Charles Edwin McCormick [21876], born 1878 in Napa, California. He married Eva Lina Bradbury [21877].

51. Charles York [16209] (Lucinda Hudson, William Pink), born 3 Mar 1858 in St. Helena, Napa, California; died Apr 1949. He married on 24 Dec 1891 in St. Helena, California, Emma Belle Falkenstine [16211], born 1866 in California.

Notes for Charles York
1910 Census St. Helena Township, Napa Co., California Ed 83 sheet 11B line 36 living on spring Mountain Road.

Notes for Emma Belle Falkenstine
1910 Census St. Helena Township, Napa Co., California Ed 83 sheet 11B line 36 living on spring Mountain Road.
Children of Charles York and Emma Belle Falkenstine were as follows:
   164 i Herbet L. York [18182], born 1898 in St Helena, California; died bef. 1990. 1910 Census St. Helena Township, Napa Co., California Ed 83 sheet 11B line 36 living on spring Mountain Road.
+ 165 ii Lucy Marie York [17179], born 23 Jan 1900 in St Helena, California. She married Lloyd Edward Tebbott [17180]. 166 iii Charles C. York [18128], born 1905 in St. Helena, California; died bef. 1990. (1910 Census St. Helena Township, Napa County, California Ed 83 sheet 11B line 36 living on spring Mountain Road.)
   167 iv Helen Mae York [17182], born 25 Feb 1909 in St Helena, California. She married on 29 Aug 1931 in St Helena, California, Covell Richardson [17183], born 4 Apr 1907 in Alameda, California; died 30 Dec 1972 in Vallajo, California. (1910 Census St. Helena Township, Napa County, California Ed 83 sheet 11B line 36 living on spring Mountain Road.)


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Uploaded 26 January 1998 by Allen Donald Tallman .