BUNCOMBE COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA

 

"Thomas Goanes, 100 acres, 1802," page 115, was included in a "List of Grants for lands in Buncombe County which have been perfected since and including April 1802 to the 1st of June, 1807," according to "Transylvania Beginnings: A History" by Mary Jane McCrary.

                                             ==O==

"William Gonas [Goans], 100 acres, 1802," page 114, was included in a "List of Grants for lands in Buncombe County which have been perfected since and including April 1802 to the 1st of June, 1807," according to "Transylvania Beginnings: A History" by Mary Jane McCrary.

                                             ==O==

Residents of Asheville, North Carolina in September, 1971, according to the telephone directory include: Louis L. Gowan, 322 Riverview Drive; K. A. Gowan, Mt. Carmel Road; Ervin Gowan, 33 Camp Ground Road; and Mrs. Ernest R. Gowan, Leicester Highway.

                                             ==O==

Lon Hugh Gowan, with residence at 21 Fairview Avenue, Biltmore, North Carolina, the address of Mrs. E. U. Gowan, was a sophomore theology student at Southern Methodist University, living at 3409 Binkley, Dallas, Texas, according to the 1959 student directory.  Mrs. E. U. Gowan continued there in 1971, according to the telephone directory.

                                             ==O==

Daniel Gowan, a farmer, appeared as the head of a household in the 1840 census of Buncombe County, page 187.  The family was listed as:

 

     "Gowan, Daniel                                      white male, 50-60

                                                                      white female, 50-60

                                                                      white male, 30-40

                                                                      white female, 20-30

                                                                      white female, 20-30

                                                                      white female, 15-20

                                                                      white male, 10-15

                                                                      white female,  5-10

                                                                      white female,  0-5"

                                             ==O==

Mrs. Kay Lovelace Gowan of Spartanburg was listed as a daughter of Lt. Col. James Hicks Lovelace, 67, and Cecile Coates Lovelace in his obituary published in the January 16, 1979 edition of the “Spartanburg Herald.”

                                             ==O==

William Gowan who was born about 1816 in South Carolina was married in Buncombe County about 1843 to Vina Russell, according to the research of Richard Gosnell of Spartanburg County, South Carolina.  Vina Russell Gowan was born in Tennessee in 1826.  They lived near Warm Springs [now called Hot Springs], North Carolina.

 

Richard Gosnell wrote February 6, 1985, "William Gowan may have possibly been a brother-in-law to Mariah Gowan.  Her son, Robert Vance Gowan [1852-1934] was the grandfather of Burnett Gowan [1903-1935] who married Sue Cummings, sister of my maternal grandfather."

 

Children born to them include:

 

     Daniel N. Gowan              born in 1844

     James H. Gowan               born in 1848

     William R. Gowan           born in 1849

     Martha Gowan                  born in 1852

     John B. Gowan                 born in 1853

     Frank L. Gowan                born in 1859

     Jefferson Gowan               born in 1861

     Sallie Gowan                     born in June 26, 1865

     Alexander Gowan             born in 1867

 

Daniel N. Gowan, son of William Gowan and Vina Russell Gowan, was born in Buncombe County in 1844.  He died in 1898 and was buried in Bonnie Hill Church Cemetery, according to Richard Gosnell.

 

James H. Gowan, son of William Gowan and Vina Russell Gowan, was born in Buncombe County in 1848.  When he died he was buried in Bonnie Hill Church Cemetery.

 

William R. Gowan, son of William Gowan and Vina Russell Gowan, was born in Buncombe County in 1849. 

 

Martha Gowan, daughter of William Gowan and Vina Russell Gowan, was born in Madison County, North Carolina in 1852. 

 

John B. Gowan, son of William Gowan and Vina Russell Gowan, was born in Madison County in 1853.  He was buried in Bonnie Hill Church Cemetery.

 

Frank L. Gowan, son of William Gowan and Vina Russell Gowan, was born in Madison County in 1859.

 

Jefferson Gowan, son of William Gowan and Vina Russell Gowan, was born in Madison County in 1861.

 

Sallie Gowan, daughter of William Gowan and Vina Russell Gowan, was born in Madison County June 26, 1865.  She was married about 1884 to George R. Ellenburg.  She died February 14, 1936 in Spartanburg County, South Carolina and was buried in Cannon's Campground United Methodist Church Cemetery, according to Richard Gosnell.

 

Alexander Gowan, son of William Gowan and Vina Russell Gowan, was born in Madison County in 1867.

                                             ==O==

Linsey Gowen was the head of a household enumerated in the 1880 census of Buncombe County, Enumeration District 28, page 25, Upper Hominy Township, as:

 

     "Gowen,    Linsey                53, born in NC

                Elizabeth            40, born in NC

                       Verges L.              6, born in NC, son

        Cadarate                3, born in NC, daughter”

                                             ==O==

Pleasant Linsey Gowan purchased land jointly with N. B. Gowan in 1890, according to Buncombe County deed records.  Pleasant Linsey Gowan released his 2/3 interest in the land in 1895, and N. B. Gowan sold his land in 1896, according to the research of LaFay E. Gowan of Birmingham, Alabama.

                                             ==O==

Peter B. Gowing lived at 24 Harris Avenue, Asheville, North Carolina, according to the 1871 telephone directory.

 

BURKE COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA

 

Josephus Goings was married March 27, 1861 to Ruthey E. Canipe, according to "Burke County, North Carolina Marriages," record 01028, bondsman Eli Hoyle, bond 000005564.  Children born to Josephus Goings and Ruthey E. Canipe Goings are unknown.

                                             ==O==

Adam E. Goins and his wife, Mary Ross Goins, were residents of Burke County in 1915 and in 1925 when children were born.  Born to them were:

 

              Stella Elizabeth Goins                 born December 20, 1915

     Lucy Goins                                  born about 1917

     Roy Goins                                   born about 1920

     Anna Lee Goins                          born about 1922

     Fred Anderson Goins                  born January 9, 1925

 

Stella Elizabeth Goins, daughter of Adam E. Goins and Mary Ross Goins, was born December 20, 1915.  She died June 19, 1994 in Burke County and was buried in Forest Hill Cemetery in Burke County.

 

Lucy Goins, daughter of Adam E. Goins and Mary Ross Goins, was born about 1917.  In 1994 she continued in Burke County.

 

Roy Goins, son of Adam E. Goins and Mary Ross Goins, was born about 1920.  In 1994 he continued in Burke County.

 

Fred Anderson Goins, son of Adam E. Goins and Mary Ross Goins, was born January 9, 1925.  He served in the U.S. Navy in World War II.  He was married about 1947 to Vera Azalee Stamey.  He was a self-employed automobile mechanic.  He died July 18, 1994 in Burke County and was buried there in Enon Baptist Church Cemetery.

 

Children born to Fred Anderson Goins and Vera Azalee Stamey Goins include:

 

     Carl Lee Goins                        born about 1949

     Fred Anderson Goins, Jr.        born about 1951

     Robert Columbo Goins          born about 1953

     Eugene Goins                          born about 1954

     Susan Goins                            born about 1956

     Debra Goins                            born about 1959

     Sandra Goins                           born about 1963

 

Carl Lee Goins, son of Fred Anderson Goins and Vera Azalee Stamey Goins, was born about 1949.  He was deceased by 1994.

 

Fred Anderson Goins, Jr, son of Fred Anderson Goins and Vera Azalee Stamey Goins, was born about 1951.  In 1994 he continued in Burke County.

 

Robert Columbo Goins, son of Fred Anderson Goins and Vera Azalee Stamey Goins, was born about 1953.  He was listed as a survivor of his father when he died in 1994.

 

Eugene Goins, son of Fred Anderson Goins and Vera Azalee Stamey Goins, was born about 1954.  He was a survivor of his father when he died in 1994. 

 

Susan Goins, daughter of Fred Anderson Goins and Vera Azalee Stamey Goins, was born about 1956.  She was married about 1976, husband's name Berry.

 

Debra Goins, daughter of Fred Anderson Goins and Vera Azalee Stamey Goins, was born about 1959.  She was married about 1979, husband's name Buchanan.

 

Sandra Goins, daughter of Fred Anderson Goins and Vera Azalee Stamey Goins, was born about 1963.  She was married about 1983, husband's name Dale.

 

Anna Lee Goins, daughter of Adam E. Goins and Mary Ross Goins, was born about 1922.  She was married about 1942, husband's name Green.  In 1994 they continued in Burke County.

                                               ==O==

Allen Goins and his wife, Louise Goins were residents of Burke County in 1913 when a daughter was born:

 

          Mary Goins                    born March 30, 1913

 

Mary Goins, daughter of Allen Goins and Louise Goins, was born March 30, 1913 in Burke County.  She was married about 1931 to Clarence Morton Weathers who was born February 14, 1909 to Mark Weathers and Molly Weathers.  She died September 6, 1991, and he died August 23, 1992.  They were buried in Friendly Chapel at Fallston, North Carolina.

 

Children born to them include:

 

     Bud Weathers                   born about 1933

     Kemp Weathers                born about 1935

     John Weathers                   born about 1937

     Sue Weathers                    born about 1940

     Katherine Weathers          born about 1944

 

Edley Grove Goins and his wife Margaret Chapman Goins were residents of Burke County in 1934 when a son was born:

 

     Ralph Kirksey Goins          born September 3, 1934

 

Ralph Kirksey Goins, son of Edley Grove Goins and Margaret Chapman Goins, was born in Burke County September 3, 1934.  He served in the U.S. Army.  He was married about 1957 to Frances Smith.  He died October 23, 1990 and was buried in Pleasant Hill Baptist Church Cemetery.  He was survived by his widow and children and a sister, Bessie Mae Goins Chapman.

 

Children born to Ralph Kirksey Goins and Frances Smith Goins include:

 

     Susan Goins               born about 1959

     Bennie Goins             born about 1963

                                               ==O==

Bernard Deno Goins was born July 30, 1930.  He was married about 1953 to Newell Worley.  He died April 7, 1993 in Burke County and was buried there in Forest Hill Cemetery.  He was survived by his widow and children and a sister Pat Goins Hood.

 

Children born to Bernard Deno Goins and Newell Worley Goins include:

 

     Bill King Goins          born about 1955

     Gary Goins                  born about 1958

     Debbie Goins              born about 1961

     Sheila Goins               born about 1964

                                               ==O==

Henry Gowins was married July 2, 1864 to Elizabeth Bradshaw, according to "Burke County, North Carolina Marriages."  The marriage is confirmed by “North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1741-1868,” record 1029, bondsman James K. Tate, Bond No. 5571.  Of Henry Gowins and Ruthey E. Canipe Gowins nothing more is known.

                                             ==O==

Charles Guinn, Mulatto, son of Champaon Guinn and Dorcas Guinn, was apprenticed to Richard Callaway and Rebeka Hutson May 16, 1791, according to "Burke County, North Carolina Apprentice Bonds and Records, 1784-1873:"

 

"This Indenture made the Sixteenth day of May in the year of our Lord, one thousand Seven hundred and Ninety one Between Champaon Guinn of the Western Territory and County of Washington, farmer of the one Part and Richard Callaway and Rebekah of the other Part Witnesseth the Said Champaon Guinn and Darcas his Wife Do put their Son Charles Guinn, melato Boy, apprintice to Serve the Said Richard Callaway and Rebeka Hutson untill he Shall be of the age of Twenty one years, the said Charles was Born ye 15th Day of Febuary 1788 therefor he, his master and mistres Shall faithfully Serve for the Term of Eighteen Years Which Will End ye 15th Day of Febuary 1809 During Which Time, the said Charles, his master and mistres Shall obay their Councels, Observe and keep as a faithfull aPrintice aught to Do--he Shall not Embazell his masters Goods nor Contract marrag Without their Consent and the Said Richard Callaway Shall find the Sd Boy Charles meet Drink Cloathing Washing and Lodging and Every other thing Needfull for an Apprintice, and the Richard Callaway Shall give the said apprintice one year schooling; and Larne him the art of Aggriculter and when the Said Boy come to the age of 21 years, the Said Richard Callaway Shall Give him a good sute of cloath [to Wit] a Coat Jacot and Britches Two Shirt a Par of shoes and stockins and a hat, a horse Bridle and Sadle.

 

In Witness whereof the Parties to these Presents have hereunto Set their their [sic] hand and fixed their Seals the Dat and Day first above Writen--

 

Witnesses:             Champaon [C] Guinn

                                    Richard [X] Callaway

William [+] Baird

Rebecca [R] Hutson

Ezekiel Baird, Jurat"

                                             ==O==

Ezekiel Inman was born about 1730, place and parents, un-known, according to Patricia Jean Melton, a descendant of Moline, Illinois.  He was married to Henrietta Hardin who was born about 1727 in England.  He died in Rockbridge County, Virginia.

 

Children born to them include:

 

          Shadrach Inman                                       born January 25, 1746

          Susannah Inman                                       born about 1754

 

Shadrach Inman, son of Ezekiel Inman and Henrietta Hardin Inman, was born January 25, 1746.  He was married about 1769 to Mary Jane McPheters, who was born January 7, 1848. Mary Jane McPheters Inman died June 11, 1830.  Shadrach Inman died October 7, 1831.  Willis Finley is descended from them.

 

Children born to them include:

 

          Hannah Inman                                                              born in 1774

 

Hannah Inman, daughter of Shadrach Inman and Mary Jane McPheters Inman, was born in 1774.  She was married Janu-ary 28, 1792 to James M. Campbell who was born about 1772.  She died in 1830, and he died in 1853.

 

Children born to them include:

 

Daniel W. Campbell                       born September 22, 1800

 

Daniel W. Campbell, son of James M. Campbell and Hannah Inman Campbell, was born September 22, 1800.  He was mar-ried August 31, 1819 in Jefferson County, Tennessee to Sus-annah Goins who was also born September 22, 1800.  They removed to McDonough County, Illinois in 1831.  He died in 1843, and she died in 1896.

 

Children born to them include:

 

          Eliza Ann Campbell                                          born in 1820

 

Eliza Ann Campbell, daughter of Daniel W. Campbell and Susannah Goins Campbell, was born in 1820.  She was married November 24, 1842 to Amos Hendrickson who was born June 14, 1820 and died May 30, 1853.

 

Children born to them include:

 

          Abbie Hendrickson                                     born October 19, 1848

 

Abbie Hendrickson, daughter of Amos Hendrickson and Eliza Ann Campbell Hendrickson, was born October 19, 1848.  She was married July 1, 1866 to Peter Cross McIntosh who was born May 11, 1846 and died November 28, 1920.

 

Children born to them include:

 

          John Henry McIntosh                        born August 16, 1886

 

John Henry McIntosh, son of Peter Cross McIntosh and Ann Campbell Hendrickson McIntosh, was born August 16, 1886.  He was married January 20, 1909 to Mary Cecil Harris who was born July 23, 1890.  She died August 22, 1930.  He died March 12, 1950.

 

Children born to them include:

 

          Lillian Louise McIntosh              born January 18, 1916

 

Lillian Louise McIntosh, daughter of John Henry McIntosh and Mary Cecil Harris McIntosh, was born January 18, 1916.  She was married in June 1939 to William James Laurie who was born January 4, 1913.  He died April 18, 1980, and she died December 23, 1999.

 

Children born to them include:

 

          Patricia Laurie                                born February 19, 1950

 

Patricia Laurie, daughter of William James Laurie and Lillian Louise McIntosh, was born February 19,1950.  On April 16, 1966 she was married to Jay Melton who was born November 24, 1947.

 

 

In Oct 1782 Daniel Gowin is indicted as a torie along with Shadrach Inman, his brother-in-law and Charles McPeters, the father-in-law of Shadrach Inman. (9) This is an involved situation. Daniel Gowin was from England and really had no animosity toward the mother country. The taxes and problems that had convinced many Americans that independence was the only answer was not as apparent to the frontiersman that were faced with the problems of survival.

Daniel Gowin along with the Inmans soon left the Catawba country and bought land further inland probably around 1785. Leeper states that the Gowins family "lived on a boundary of land on Long Creek" (10) in Tennessee now Jefferson Co.

To refer again to the letter by Nancy Lavenia she says that "Daniel Goans and Anna Goans sons and daughters were Ezekiel, William, Daniel, Shadrach, Meshach, Abednigo, Jane, Sarah & Daniel. We know of Shadrach and Francis as mentioned in the will of Susannah. (11)

Daniel Gowin's estate is administered by his wife Susannah Goin and the inventory returned 6 Sep 1810. (12) Thus Daniel died some time before that date.

Again, one can only conjecture as to the date of Daniel's birth. If the item is correct involving Samuel Doak then Daniel could have been born in 1735. Susannah's birth is only conjecture. We know her brother Shadrach was born 27 Jan 1747 and Abednego 1 July 1752. I would probably put Susannah's birth as about 1744. Daniel II is listed as the last child in Nancy Lavenia's letter.

 

 

 

Subject:  Re: [NCBurke] daniel goans

 

 

Charlotte:

 

I just read your post concerning Daniel Goin who married Susannah Inman,

sister of Shadrack, Meshack and Abendago, et. al, Inman.  My interest in the Inman

family comes from my research on the McDowell - McPeeters family. Shadrack Inman married Mary McPeeters, the daughter of Charles and Mary McDowell

McPeeters.

 

VA records.  This Samuel Doak appears to

be the elder Samuel who was married to Jane Mitchell, and were parents of the

well known Revolutionary Presbyterian minister, Rev. Samuel Doak.  You may be

aware that Rev. Samuel Doak was noted as giving the invocation at the

gathering at Sycamore Shoals when the "Overmoutain" men gathered prior to the march to

the battle of King's mountain, NC.

 

Daniel Goin is named as a "cited" (suspected) Torie in a summons issued 12

December 1782 by the Clerk of Court of Burke Co., NC.  His name is written as

"Dan'l Gowin"  This court summons sent to the Sheriff to notify the named

suspected Tories in the county to appear the "Third Monday in Janry next" (1783) at

the Court to give reason why they should not have their property confiscated. 

There were 121 men named in the summons, among them were Shadrack Inman

(brother in law of Daniel Goin), Charles McPeters (father in law of Shadrack

Inman), Joseph McPeters (son of Charles McPeters), Jonathan McPeters (son of Charles

McPeters), David Melson (Nelson) - relationship to the family is unclear but

Jonathan McPeters became guardian to David Nelson,Jr., three Hyatt men who are

some way intermarried into the Inman family - Hezekiah Hyatt, Seth Hyatt,

Edward Hyatt, and James Barnes, a nephew of Charles McPeters.

 

I honestly have not been able, as of yet, to completely comprehend why these

men were cited as being suspected Tories or Tory sympathizers, although it is

part of the larger Court martial trial of Gen. Charles McDowell.  (Who was the

first cousin of Charles McPeters wife Mary McDowell McPeters).  It is an

established fact that both Joseph and Jonathan McPeters served as Patriots during

the Revolution from Burke Co., NC, and I can't really make sense of why they

were being cited as Tories at the end of the Revolution, but, perhaps further

research will help clarify this.

Charmaine

 

 

   The bitter animosity engendered during the Revolutionary war between the Whigs and Tories did not subside immediately after the treaty of peace in 1783.  The few of the latter who remained in the country were ever after subjected to social ostracism, and were most fortunate if they escaped personal violence.  The patriotic inhabitants of the frontier could not so soon forget the manner in which their babes had been taken from the cradle and from the breasts of their mothers, and their brains dashed out, by the hated and despised Tories; nor could they blot from their memory the fact that those foes to their country, while professing friendship to the Whigs, acted as spies for the enemy, and secretly joined the predatory bands of Indians in their incursions against their nearest neighbors of the settlements, and shared in the booty while they excelled their savage allies in deeds of inhumanity.  Indeed, this anti-Tory feeling only died out when the last patriot of the Revolution expired.  That there would be numerous collisions between the two factions was to be expected, as that would be no more than the legitimate result of such bitter personal resentment; nor could the wranglings cease except with the death of the parties.

 

Ezekiel Inman was born in Maryland about 1740 to Robert Inman.  In 1774 they lived in Burke County.  They removed to Jefferson County, Tennessee about 1785. 

 

At that time the area was known as Washington District, North Carolina and had the Mississippi River as its western boundary.  The Trans-Blue Ridge community felt isolated and abandoned by North Carolina and organized the Watauga Association to provide their own government and protection.  The North Carolina legislature in 1784 tried unsuccessfully to give the settlement to the federal government, and at that time the Tennesseeans organized their own "Free State of Frank-lin" [at first called Frankland].

 

Daniel Goans arrived just in time to help elect John Sevier governor of the unauthorized new state which petitioned for admission to the United States.  The fledgling state of Franklin was ignored by Congress, and Sevier was arrested for treason.  A friendly jailor allowed Sevier to escape, and he went out to organize a militia.  When the Revolutionary forces needed help in the West, the Americans appointed Sevier a brigadier-general, and his militia soundly defeated the British and the Loyalists in the Battle of Kings Mountain and in the Battle of Cowpens in South Carolina.

 

On May 26, 1790 the federal government accepted Tennessee with a population of 35,691 into the union as the "Territory south of the River Ohio," providing the territory could produce a population of 60,000 people.  In 1795, a territorial census barely reached the prescribed minimum which undoubtedly included Indians [wherever needed.]

 

"Daniel Goen, Ezekiel Goen and William Goen" appeared in the 1800 tax list of Jefferson County, enumerated in Capt. McDonald's Company.  Each was recorded as "one white poll." In addition Ezekiel Goen was assessed taxes on 100 acres of land.  They appeared on the tax rolls of Jefferson County, according to "Jefferson County, Tennessee Tax Roll."

 

Daniel Goans established his family on the north side of the Nolichucky River above the mouth of Long Creek.  "Daniel Goin" died there in 1810.  "Susannah Goin, administratrix" prepared an inventory of his estate which was delivered to the Jefferson County Court September 6, 1810, according to "Jefferson County, Tennessee Will Book 1, 1792-1810."  It was received and recorded by County Clerk Joseph Hamilton September 10, 1810. 

 

On October 9, 1816, "Susannah Goin" wrote her own will.  In it she mentioned "son, Shadrach Goin" and "daughter, Fanny Evins."  Witnesses were Shadrach Inman, John Inman and John Inman, Jr.  The will was presented for probate in the December session, 1816 to the Jefferson County Court, after her death.

 

Children born to Daniel Goans and Susannah Inman Goans, according to a letter written February 15, 1994 by Ib Jensen of San Antonio, Texas, include:

 

Daniel Goans, Jr.           born in 1774

Ezekiel Goans                born about 1776

William Goans               born about 1779

Hannah Goans                born about 1782

Sarah Goans                    born about 1785

Fanny Goans                   born about 1788

Shadrach Goans              born in 1790

Meschack Goans             born about 1793

Abednego Goans             born about 1797

 

Donna Gowin Johnston, Foundation member of Casper, Wyoming, wrote in 1993 that "Daniel Gowin had a grandson, Drury Goin, who was born out of wedlock to Fanny Goin."

 

Daniel Goans, Jr. son of Daniel Goans and Susannah Inman Goans, was born in 1774 in Burke County, North Carolina.  He was married June 27, 1794 to Martha Priscilla Jarnigan, according to the research of Sam Kenneth Goans, a descendant and Foundation Editorial Board Member of Knoxville.  She was born January 26, 1776 in Pittsylvania County, Virginia to Thomas Jarnigan and Mary Witt Jarnigan.

 

The Jarnigan family had removed to Tennessee contemp-oraneously with the Goans and had also settled on the Nolichucky where they erected a large gristmill at Mount Har-mony, Tennessee.  Historian L. L. Powers records that "while Thomas Jarnigan owned several slaves, he was seeking some-one to run the gristmill and placed young Daniel Goans, Jr. in charge."

 

Jarnigan died intestate in 1802, and his estate was divided among his children with Priscilla receiving 338 acres on Richland Creek in adjoining Grainger County as her share of the real estate.  Her share of the distribution of his personal property was valued at $639.  It included a "negro boy named Henry" and a "whiskey still."  Since rye whiskey was declared an official medium of exchange in early-day Tennessee valued at "2s. 6d. per gallon," a still was a valuable piece of property.

 

The couple removed to her inheritance on Richland Creek about 1802, along with her brother Jeremiah Jarnigan.  Her brothers Noah Jarnigan and Chesley Jarnigan had preceded them to the new location.

 

"Daniel Goan white male, 50-60" was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1830 census of Grainger County, page 398.  He was shown as illiterate. The family was composed of eight members:

 

"Goan, Daniel     white male         50-60

                             white female     40-50

                             white male        15-20

                             white female     15-20

                             white male        10-15

                             white male        10-15

                             white male        10-15

                             white male         5-10"

 

He reappeared as the head of a household in the 1840 census of Grainger County.  Martha Priscilla Jarnigan Goans died sometime prior to the enumeration, and he was remarried shortly afterward to Jane Frazier Dyer, according to the research of Willis T. Finley, Foundation Member of Longview, Texas.

 

According to Sam K. Goans, "Daniel Goans, Jr. through curtsy rights had only a life estate in his wife's property, along with a child's share when it was sold.  When he decided to remarry he apparently relinquished his life estate to his children and sold his share to his son Hamilton B. Goans.  All of the property was ultimately acquired by Jeremiah Jarnigan."

 

"Daniel Goins" was recorded as head of a household in the 1850 census of Grainger County, Household 936-126:

 

"Goins,     Daniel          70, born in NC, illiterate

               Jane                43, born in TN

               Calvin            16

               Alsy E.             7

               David               6

               Juliat A. C.      5

               Abner B. F.     2

               Lucy A.      5/12

Dyer,      Eliza             22"

 

 

Eliza Dyer is regarded as the step-daughter of Daniel Goans, Jr.  Calvin Goans may also have been a step-son of Daniel Goans, Jr.  In 1860 Daniel Goans, Jr. was shown at age 86.  He died in Grainger County in 1866 and was buried in the Jarnigan Cemetery at Poss, Tennessee. 

 

Twelve children were born to Daniel Goans, Jr. and Martha Priscilla Jarnigan Goans, including:

 

Mary Goans                      born about 1798

Nancy Goans                    born about 1800

Jeremiah Riley Goans      born about 1803

Martha Goans                   born about 1805

Samuel C. Goans             born about 1808

Pryor L. Goans                 born about 1809

William Goans                 born about 1814

Luke L. Goans                  born about 1815

James R. Goans                born about 1817

Hamilton B. Goans          born about 1819

John M. Goans                 born about 1820

 

Six additional children were reported to Daniel Goans, Jr. and Jane Frazier Dyer Goans:

 

Calvin Goans                    born about 1833

Alsy E. Goans                   born about 1843

David Goans                     born about 1844

Juliat A. C. Goans            born about 1845

Abner B. F. Goans            born about 1848

Lucy A. Goans                  born about 1850

 

Mary Goans, daughter of Daniel Goans, Jr. and Martha Priscilla Jarnigan Goans, was born about 1798.  She was married August 23, 1817 to Drury Goans, believed to be a cousin.  "Drury Gowen" was the bondsman for the marriage of "Nancy Gowen," his sister-in-law to James M. Randolph November 22, 1829 in Grainger County.  Drury Goans removed from Grainger County to Knox County.

 

Drury Goans and Mary Goans Goans were enumerated in the 1850 census of Knox County, Household 379-241:

 

"Goans,     Drury              57, born in TN

                  Mary                52, born in TN

                  Martha            22, born in TN

                  Samuel C.       19, born in TN

                  Priscilla          16, born in TN

                  Manerva A.     15, born in TN

                  Rufus              13, born in TN

                  Mary A.           11, born in TN

                  Pleasant            9, born in TN"

 

Nancy Goans, daughter of Daniel Goans, Jr.  and Martha Priscilla Jarnigan Goans, was born about 1800.  "Nancy Gowen" was married November 22, 1829 to James M. Randolph.  Among their descendants were the founders of the Stokely-Van Camp food empire.

 

Jeremiah Riley Goans, son of Daniel Goans, Jr. and Martha Priscilla Jarnigan Goans, was born about 1803 in Grainger County.  He was married February 28, 1829 to Lavenia Renfro.  Children born to Jeremiah Riley Goans and Lavenia Renfro Goans are unknown.

 

Martha Goans, daughter of Daniel Goans, Jr. and Martha Priscilla Jarnigan Goans, was born about 1805.  She was married January 31, 1825 to Henry Weisnor.  They removed to Overton County, Tennessee.

 

Samuel C. Goans, son of Daniel Goans, Jr. and Martha Priscilla Jarnigan Goans, was born about 1808.  He was married to Mahala Jarnigan November 11, 1842.

 

Samuel C. Goans and Mahala Jarnigan Goans were enumerated in the 1850 census of Grainger County, Eighth Civil District, Household No. 860-893 as:

 

"Goins,     Samuel C.          42, born in TN,farmer

                  Mahala               29, born in TN

                 William P.            5, born in TN

                 Mary E.                 4, born in TN

                 Joseph                  2, born in TN"

 

Pryor L. Goans, son of Daniel Goans, Jr. and Martha Priscilla Jarnigan Goans, was born about 1809 in Grainger County.  He was married March 2, 1831 to Martha Moore.  Pryor L. Goans and Martha Moore Goans removed to Hamilton County, Tennessee.

 

William Goans, son of Daniel Goans, Jr. and Martha Priscilla Jarnigan Goans, was born about 1814 in Grainger County.  He was married to Carolyn Wade May 7, 1840.  William Goans and Carolyn Wade Goans removed to Anderson County, Tennessee.

 

They were enumerated in the 1850 census of Anderson County, Household 355-50:

 

"Goans,      William                 36, born in TN

                   Caroline                30, born in TN

                   James D.                 9, born in TN

                   Eliza J.                    7, born in TN

                  Masy M. E.              4, born in TN

                  Matilda Ann            1, born in TN"

 

Later the family removed to Knox County.

 

Luke L. Goans, son of Daniel Goans, Jr. and Martha Priscilla Jarnigan Goans, was born about 1815 in Grainger County.

 

James R. Goans, son of Daniel Goans, Jr. and Martha Priscilla Jarnigan Goans, was born about 1817 in Grainger County.  He was married about 1839, wife's name Martha.  James R. Goans and Martha Goans are believed to have been enumerated in the 1850 census of Grainger County, District 12, Household 1147-1090:

 

     "Goins,     James P.      33, born in TN, farmer

           Martha         28, born in TN

           Preston F.      9, born in TN

           Mary              6, born in TN

           James C.       5, born in TN

                      John K.         2, born in TN"

 

Hamilton B. Goans, son of Daniel Goans, Jr. and Martha Priscilla Jarnigan Goans, was born about 1819 in Grainger County.  He was married November 29, 1838 to Susannah Inman.  Hamilton B. Goans and Susannah Inman Goans removed to Anderson County and were enumerated in the 1850 census, Household 360-51:

 

"Goans,           Hambleton            32, born in TN

                        Susan                     34, born in TN

                        Abram [twin]         11, born in TN

                        Felix [twin]            11, born in TN

                        Lavaney                  10, born in TN

                        Elizabeth                  8, born in TN

                       Arin                           6, born in TN

                            Mary                          3, born in TN"

 

Children born to Hamilton B. Goans and Susannah Inman Goans include:

 

Abram Goans                        born about 1839

Felix Goans                           born about 1839

Lavinia Goans                       born about 1840

Elizabeth Goans                    born about 1842

Arin Goans                            born about 1844

Mary Goans                           born about 1847

 

Lavinia Goans, daughter of Hamilton B. Goans and Susannah Inman Goans, was born about 1840 in Claiborne County.  She was married about 1848, husband's name Edwards.  Lavinia Goans Edwards wrote a letter dated March 30, 1906 to her granddaughter, Dorothy Reilly.  In the letter she stated that she was also a great-granddaughter of Shadrack Inman who was a brother to Susannah Inman Goans and Abednego Inman, according to I. B. Jensen.

 

John M. Goans, son of Daniel Goans, Jr. and Martha Priscilla Jarnigan Goans, was born about 1820 in Grainger County.  He was married about 1840, wife's name Martha.  They were enumerated in the 1850 census of adjoining Jefferson County, Household 470-722:

 

"Goan,      John M.                 30, born in TN

                  Martha                   28, born in TN

                  James A.                  9, born in TN

                  Daniel                      7, born in TN

                  Mariah E.                 6, born in TN

                  William R.               4, born in TN

                   Sarah Ann               2, born in TN"

 

Shadrach Goans, son of Daniel Goans and Susannah Inman Goans, was born about 1790 in Jefferson County.  He was married January 31, 1809 to Sythey Inman, according to Jefferson County marriage records as transcribed in "Ansearching News," Vol. 29.

 

"Sytha Goins" in 1822 was a member of the Presbyterian church in Jefferson County.  "Shadrach Goins" was a member of the Presbyterian church in Jefferson County in 1827, according to "Nineteenth Century Tennessee Church Records" by Byron Sistler.  Four of his children were baptized February 2, 1828.  The four were "Anne Shelton Goins, Daniel Hardin Goins, Jane McKinney Goins and John Inman Goins."

 

Shadrach Goan, a farmer, was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1840 census of Jefferson County, page 346, listed as:

 

"Goan,     Shadrach     white male        30-40

                                    white female     30-40

                                    white female     20-30

                                   white female     20-30

                                   white male        15-20

                                   white male        10-15

                                   white female     10-15

                                   white female       5-10

                                   white female       0-5

                                   white female       0-5"

 

In 1850, "Shadrach Goan" was recorded as the head of Household 475-723 in the 1850 census of Jefferson County:

 

"Goan,     Shadrach               60, born in TN

                Scytha                   56, born in TN

                John                      26

                Shadrach               22

                Scytha                   20

                Frances                 18

 

Sythey Goans wrote her will

 

"Last Will and Testament of Sytha Goan, Dcsd.

State of Tennessee

Jefferson County

 

"I Sytha Goan, do make and publish this as my last Will and Testament, hereby revoking and making void all other wills by me at any time made. 

 

First: I desire my body to be decently interred in a manner suitable to my capacity in life by the side of my Dec'd Husband.

 

Second: I direct that my funeral expenses and all my just debt be paid as soon after my death as possible, out of any money that I may die possessed of or may first come into the hands of my Executors.

 

Third: I give and bequeath to my Daughter, Jane, wife of Valentine Ervin my 3 year old red and white heifer."

 

Children born to Shadrack Goans and Sythey Inman Goans include:

 

Anne Shelton Goans                    born about 1811

Daniel Hardin Goans                   born about 1813

Jane McKinney Goans                 born about 1815

John Inman Goans                       born about 1824

Shadrach W. Goan                       born August 22, 1828

Scytha Goans                                born about 1830

Frances Goans                              born about 1832

 

Daniel Hardin Goans, son of Shadrack Goans and Sythey Inman Goans, was born about 1813 in Jefferson County.  "Daniel H. Goan," a farmer, was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1840 census of Jefferson County, page 343:

 

"Goan,     Daniel H.          white male         20-30

                                           white female     20-30

                                           white female       0-5

                                           white female       0-5"

         

"Daniel Goan" was recorded as the head of Household 474-723 in the 1850 census of Jefferson County:

 

"Goan,     Daniel                    37, born in TN

                 Elizabeth               34, born in TN

                 Mary Ann              12

                 Sara J.                    10

                 Orville R.                7

                 Scytha                     6"

 

Orville Goan was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Jefferson County, Enumeration District 174, page 31, Civil District 12.  The household was recorded as:

 

"Goan,          Orville            38, born in TN

                     Mary E.           29, born in TN

                      Dora                 5, born in TN

                      David               1, born in TN

                      Florence     3/12, born in TN

Holloway,     Mary              68, born in TN, mother-in-law”

 

Apparently Orville Goan was married to Mary E. Holloway about 1873.

 

Shadrach W. Goan, son of Shadrach Goans and Sythia Inman Goans, was born August 22, 1828, according to the research of Bonnie Dean Goan Good, a great-granddaughter of Independence, Missouri.  He was married about 1850 to Jane Carden, probably in Jefferson County. 

 

Children born to Shadrach W. Goan and Jane Carden Goan include:

 

     Daniel William Goan      born August 20, 1852

 

Daniel William Goan, son of Shadrach W. Goan and Jane Carden Goan, was born August 20, 1852 in Jefferson County.  He removed to Ray County, Missouri and was married there to Elizabeth Clementine Weiss September 20, 1882.  She was the daughter of William Wiley Weiss and Nancy Emaline Tribble Weiss of Ray County.

 

Daniel William Goan died there 20 years later May 22, 1902 and was buried in Sunshine Community Cemetery with a Woodmen of the World tombstone.  Elizabeth Clementine Weiss Goan survived until February 14, 1923.  She died in Wellington, Missouri and was buried in the City Cemetery there.

 

Children born to Daniel William Goan and Elizabeth Clementine Weiss Goan include:

 

     William Shadrach Goan           born August 2, 1884

 

William Shadrach Goan, son of Daniel William Goan and Elizabeth Clementine Weise Goan, was born August 2, 1884 in the Sunshine Bottoms community of Ray County.  He was married December 7, 1936, at age 52, to Leona Ellen Hufford at Wellington, Missouri in Lafayette County.  She was born October 20, 1914 to Samuel Francis Hufford and Winnie Hendrix Hufford in Wellington.

 

William Shadrach Goan died July 13, 1942 and was buried at Wellington in the City Cemetery.  Leona Ellen Hufford Goan died 40 years later, April 17, 1982 and was buried beside her husband.

 

Children born to William Shadrach Goan and Leona Elloen Hufford Goan include:

 

     Bonnie Dean Goan               born June 9, 1937

 

Bonnie Dean Goan, daughter of William Shadrach Goan and Leona Ellen Hufford Goan, was born June 9, 1937 in Wellington.  She was married April 30, 1955 to Clarence B. Good at Harrisonville, Missouri in Cass County.  In January 1993 they continued at Wellington where she, a member of Gowen Research Foundation, was active in Goan family research.

                                             ==O==

Samuel Goin was listed as the head of a household in the 1800 census of Burke County, page 751.

                                             ==O==

Daniel Goin was listed as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Burke County, Enumeration District 44, page 5, Upper Fork Township enumerated as:

 

"Goin,     Daniel            35, born in NC

               Margaret        27, bon in NC

               Nancy               2, born in NC"

                                             ==O==

Henry Goin was listed as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Burke County, Enumeration District 44, page 4, Upper Fork Township enumerated as:

 

"Goin,     Henry                     35, born in NC

                Elizabeth               45, born in NC, wife

                Mary                      13, born in NC

                J. Alexander          11, born in NC

                William                   9, born in NC

                Rosanna                   8, born in NC"

                                             ==O==

James Going, "a foundling child about 5 or 6 years old and not having parent or friend known to the court to take care of it" was bound to Joseph Dobson to become a shoemaker, by the Burke County Probate Court in April 1804, according to the Burke County Will Book, page 469.

 

Descendant Researchers:

 

Delores Dickson, 47 East South Temple, Salt Lake City, UT, 84150,

     [Argentina Pouch]

Willis T. Finley, 307 Fairview, Longview, TX, 75604, 903/759-0415

Samuel Kenneth Goans, Jr. 5516 Seesaw Road, Nashville, TN, 37211,

     901/824-2288

Bonnie Goan Good, Box 331, Wellington, MO, 64097, 816/934-2503

Ib Jenson, San Antonio, TX,

 

BUTE COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA

 

Bute County was organized in 1765 and discontinued in 1779.

 

CABARRUS COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA

 

Eliza A. Going was married to John Crump December 1, 1866 in Cabarrus County according to “North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1741-1868,” record 1052, bondsman, Henry [X] Phifer , witness J. O. Wallace, Bond No. 7629. 

==O==

Emma Gowan, who was born at Kannapolis, North Carolina, was married to John Henry Gorman.  Children born to the couple include Carson Gorman, Catherine Gorman who married Robert Hayes, Dorothy Gorman, Emma Gorman, and Gracie Gorman.

 

CALDWELL COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA

 

Oscar F. Goins was married about 1934 to Nancy Chandler who was born November 18, 1915.  Nancy Chandler Goins died March 12, 1994 in Caldwell County.

 

Children born to them include:

 

     Alma Goins          born about 1939

 

Alma Goins, daughter of Oscar F. Goins and Nancy Chandler Goins, was born about 1939.  She was married about 1959 to Danny Starnes.  A daughter Karen Starnes was born to them.

 

CASWELL COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA

 

John Goin was married November 24, 1795 to Betsey Hickman, according to "Caswell County, North Carolina Marriages, 1759-1850."  The marriage is confirmed by “North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1741-1868,” record 1108, bondsman Burbage Going, witness William Rainey, Bond No. 15498.  Children born to John Goin and Betsey Hickman Goin are unknown.

                                             ==O==

Alsey Going was married to William Tulloh January 3, 1809, according to "Caswell County, North Carolina Marriages, 1759-1850," record 1312, bondsman John [X] Going, witness Ald Murphey, Bond No. 18687.  Nothing more is known of William Tulloh and Alsey Going Tulloh.

                                             ==O==

Goodrich Going was married to Betsey Matthews September 6, 1791, according to "Caswell County, North Carolina Marriages, 1759-1850."  The marriage is confirmed by “North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1741-1868,” record 01108, bondsman Allen Going, H. Haralson, Deputy Clerk, bond 000015499.  Of Goodrich Going and Betsey Matthews Going nothing more is known.

                                             ==O==

Healy (Heaty?) Going was married July 19, 1803 to William Pryor, according to "Caswell County, North Carolina Marriages, 1759-1850."  The marriage is confirmed by “North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1741-1868,” record 1245, bondsmen Jesse Going and Nathaniel Pass, witness, H. Haralson, Bond No. 7625.

                                               ==O==

Jesse Going was married to Seeley Bairding June 9, 1784, according to "Caswell County, North Carolina Marriages, 1759-1850," record 1108, bondsman John Going, witness Ald Murphey, Court Clerk, Bond No. 15501.  Of Jesse Going and Seeley Bairding Going nothing more is known.

                                             ==O==

Jesse Going was married to Polly Draper November 12, 1807, according to "Caswell County, North Carolina Marriages, 1759-1850."  Vincent Going was bondsman, and Ald Murphy was a witness.  Children born to Jesse Going and Polly Draper Going are unknown.

                                             ==O==

John Going was married to Betsey Hickman in 1795, according to the research of G. C. Waldrep III, Ph.D. of Milton, North Carolina.  Children born to John Going and Betsey Hickman Going are unknown.

                                             ==O==

Lithe Going was married November 10, 1783 to David Loughlin, according to "Caswell County, North Carolina Marriages, 1759-1850."  They were married November 18, 1783 according to “North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1741-1868,” record 01179, bondsman Jesse “Made his Mark” Going, witness Ald Murphey, bond 16605.  Nothing more is known of David Loughlin and Lithe Going Loughlin.

                                             ==O==

Rhoda Going was married to George Stephens July 20, 1806, according to "Caswell County, North Carolina Marriages, 1759-1850." 

                                             ==O==

Sally Going was married to Richard Chapman June 21, 1806, according to "Caswell County, North Carolina Marriages, 1759-1850." 

                                             ==O==

Alexander Gowin was listed in the 1777 tax roll of Caswell County, Richmond District.

                                             ==O==

Richard Gowin was married July 4, 1807 to Polly Bennett, according to "Caswell County, North Carolina Marriages, 1759-1850," record 01110, bondsman James Rainey, witness Ald Murphey, Court Clerk, bond 000015536.  Children born to Richard Gowin and Polly Bennett Gowin are unknown.

                                             ==O==

John Gowing was married February 15, 1828 to Margaret Stacy, according to "Caswell County, North Carolina Marriages, 1759-1850."  Of John Gowing and Margaret Stacy Gowing nothing more is known

                                             ==O==

Vincent Gowing was married to Nancy Reed December 30, 1806, according to "Caswell County, North Carolina Marriages, 1759-1850," Record No. 1110, bondsman Burch Swan, witness Alex Murphey, Deputy Clerk, Bond No. 15537.  Children born to Vincent Gowing, Nancy Reed Gowing and Margaret Stacy Gowing are unknown.

                                             ==O==

Allen Going was the bondsman for the marriage of Ezekiel Mathews to Sarah Cumbo May 7, 1793, according to "Caswell County, North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1778-1868" by Katherine Kerr Kendall.  In December of that year he was a purchaser at the estate sale of Edmund Hendley in Person County.

 

"Allen Gowin" paid tax on one white poll in the 1794 tax list of Person County, St. Lawrence District.

 

"Allen Gowen" was on the 1805 tax list of Person County in Capt. Penicks Company.

                                             ==O==

Alsey Going was married January 3, 1809 to William Tulloh, according to "Caswell County, North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1778-1868."  John Going was the bondsman.

                                             ==O==

Edward Goins appeared in the 1784 tax of Caswell County, St. Luke's District as the owner of 100 acres on Hico Creek.  In 1791 this district was in Person County when the new county was created.

 

"Edward Goine & wife, "blacks" were enumerated about 1787 in Caswell County.

 

"Ed. Goins" paid tax on "two white polls" and 245 3/4 acres of land according to the 1794 tax list of Person County.  "Edward Goins" was a taxpayer in 1795 in Person County.

                                               ==O==

"Gutrich Going" appeared in the 1784 tax list of Caswell County, St. Lawrence District as the owner of 175 acres on Cane Creek. 

 

Gutridge Going, free colored, was listed in the 1786 census of Hillsborough District, Caswell County, St. Lawrence District, page 83 as the head of a household .  Since the household was free colored, no enumeration was made of the individuals in the family.

 

"Goodrich Going" was married to Betsey Matthews in Caswell County September 6, 1791, according to "Caswell County, North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1778-1868" by Katherine Kerr Kendall .  Allen Going was bondsman for the marriage of Gutridge Going and Betsey Matthews Going, posting Bond No. 1549.  H. Harralson was a witness.

 

When Person County was carved from Caswell County in 1791 Gutridge Going found himself in the new county.  He was listed in the 1793 tax list, the earliest one, of Pearson County as the owner of 300 acres of land.  He paid tax on one poll, according to the St. Lawrence District list, page 93.

 

"Guthridge Gowin" paid tax on 213 acres in St. Luke's District, according to the 1794 tax list of Person County.  "Guttridge Goen" reappeared on the 1795 tax list of the county.

                                             ==O==

"Jesse Gowin" was listed on the 1777 tax roll of Caswell County in Caswell District.

 

Haley Going was married July 28, 1806 to William Pryor, according to "Caswell County, North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1778-1868."  Jesse Going was bondsman.

 

Jesse Going was married to Seeley Bairding [Bearden?] June 9, 1784, according to "Caswell County, North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1778-1868."  John Going was bondsman for the marriage of Jesse Going and Seeley Bairding Going, posting Bond No. 15501.  Ald Murphy was a witness.  Another entry in the volume reverses the positions of the groom and the bondsman.  It shows that John Going was the groom and Jesse Going the bondsman.

 

Jesse Going was the bondsman for the marriage of Betsy Gilaspy to Roger Warf January 5, 1802, according to the same volume.

 

Jesse Going was married to Polly Draper November 12, 1807, according to the same volume and “North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1741-1868,” record 1108, Bond No. 15500.  Vincent Going was bondsman for Jesse Going and Polly Draper Going.

                                             ==O==

John Gowin was named executor of the will of John Mann October 30, 1792, according to the will records of Person County.

                                             ==O==

John Goin was married November 24, 1795 to Betsey Hick­man, according to "Caswell County, North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1778-1868."  Allen Going was bondsman for the marriage of John Goin and Betsey Hickman Goin.  Another record shows Burbage Going as bondsman and William Raney as witness.  The marriage is confirmed by “North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1741-1868,” Bond No. 15498.  Nothing more is known of John Goin and Betsey Hickman Harris.

 

"John Going" appeared as the head of a household in the 1810 census of Caswell County, page 477.

                                             ==O==

John Goin, "orphan, now age of 11 years," was bound to Charles Willson in 1827, according to "Caswell County, North Carolina Will Books 1814-1843" by Katherine Kerr Kendall and Mary Frances Kerr Donaldson.

 

On October 14, 1827, John Goin, "child of color, age 15" was bound to Charles Willson.

                                             ==O==

Judrick Going was listed as a taxpayer in Caswell County in 1784, according to "North Carolina Taxpayers" by Clarence E. Ratcliff.

                                             ==O==

Lithe Going was married November 18, 1873 to David Louchlin, according to "Caswell County, North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1778-1868."  Jesse Going was bondsman.

                                             ==O==

"Michile Gowine & wife & sons, Michele & David; daughter, Elizabeth & William Wilson, blacks" were enumerated about 1787 in Caswell County.

                                             ==O==

Patsey Going was married December 3, 1790 to Patrick Ma­son, according to "Caswell County, North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1778-1868."  Zachary Hill was the bondsman.  The marriage is confirmed by “North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1741-1868,” record 1194, witness H. Haralson, Bond No. 16836. 

                                             ==O==

Richard Gowing was listed as "insolvent" in 1804, according to "Caswell County Will Books 1777-1814" by Katherine Kerr Kendall and Mary Frances Kerr Donaldson.

 

"Richard Gowin" was married July 4, 1807 to Polly Bennett, according to "Caswell County, North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1778-1868."  James Rainey was bondsman for the marriage of Richard Gowin and Polly Bennett Gowin.

                                             ==O==

Rhoda Going was married July 28, 1806 to George Stephens July 28, 1806, according to "Caswell County, North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1778-1868."  Joseph Flippa was bondsman.  The marriage is confirmed by “North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1741-1868,” record 1294, Bond No. 18402.  Nothing more is known of George Stephens and Rhoda Going Stephens.

                                             ==O==

Sally Going was married June 21, 1806 to Richard Chapman, according to "Caswell County, North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1778-1868."  James Vaughn was the bondsman.  The marriage is confirmed by “North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1741-1868,” record 1050, bondsman James Vaughan, witness Ald. Murphey, bond 14583. 

                                             ==O==

"Sythe Gowin & Daniel Gowin" appeared as taxpayers on the 1777 tax roll of Caswell County, Richmond District.  Their assessment of £14, 6 shillings, 8 pence included two tithables.

 

Sythe Going owned 400 acres of land in Pittsylvania County, Virginia in 1782, according to Jack Harold Goins. 

                                             ==O==

Thomas Goins was listed as "insolvent" in 1804, according to "Caswell County, North Carolina Will Books 1777-1814."

 

CATAWBA COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA

 

Spurgeon I. Goins, who was born in 1913 at Brookford, North Carolina, was inducted into the U. S. Army during World War II in San Francisco, California.  His discharge, recorded in Ector County, Texas, showed him to be married and a taxi driver.

 

CHATHAM COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA

 

Rebecca Goin was married to William Dungil October 4, 1837, according to "Chatham County, North Carolina Marriages, 1772-1850."  The marriage is confirmed by “North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1741-1868,” record 01009, bondsman John Dungil, witness N. A. Stedman, bond 000019954.  Nothing more is known of William Dungil and Rebecca Goin Dungil.

                                             ==O==

Lucy Goins (also “Goings”) was married October 22, 1867 to Epraim Nixon, according to “Marriages of Chatham County, North Carolina,” by Brent H. Holcomb, record 2007, witness R. C. Cotton, Bond No. 21099.  The marriage was performed by S. R. Perry, J.P. 

                                               ==O==

William Goins was born between 1810 and 1820.  He, a farmer appeared as the head of a household in the 1840 census of Chatham County, page 186:

 

“Goins,     William          white male        20-30

                                         white female     20-30

                                         white male          0-5

                                         white female       0-5”

                                               ==O==

Leroy J. Gowins was born in Chatham County about 1919.  He died at age 78, October 31, 1997 at the Veterans Administration Hospital in Durham, North Carolina.  His obituary appeared in the “Greensboro News & Record” in its edition of November 3, 1997.

 

“His funeral will be at Evans Chapel A.M.E. Zion Church.  Mr. Gowins was a native of Chatham County and a member of Evans Chapel A.M.E. Zion Church. He was a World War II veteran.  Survivors include wife, Jessie Lee Gowins; sons, Phillip Gowins of Chatham County and Freddy Joe Gowins of Greensboro; daughter-in-law, Carolyn Batts-Gowins. There are seven brothers and seven sisters [unnamed]; three grandchildren, Jonelle, Jessica and Alex; one great-grandchild, Eric, all of Chatham County.”

 

CHEROKEE COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA

 

James R. Goins was married about 1875 to Mrs. Leoni “Nao-mi” Hampton Loudermilk.  She was born in 1844 to George Washington Hampton and Mary Ann Blythe Hampton of Brassville, North Carolina, according to Arlene Hampton.

 

Children born to James R. Goins and Leoni “Naomi” Hamp-ton Loundermilk Goins include:

 

          Albert Goins                                                                 born about 1877

          Thomas Goins                                                              born about 1879

          Mattie Goins                                                                born about 1882

          Marshall H. Goins                                                       born about 1886         

                                             ==O==

John Goins, alias John Welch, was identified in 1908 as the father of Ruby Bird in a statement given by Jinnie Axe, a full-blood Cherokee:.

 

“Miller Application # 8402-Jinnie Axe and 1 grandchild, Tomotla, North Carolina, Admitted

 

Applicant's father is enrolled by Chapman # 829.  Applicant's mother is enrolled by Chapman # 1520. Through interperter Ross Smith:

 

“I am 52 years of age.  Both of my parents were full blood.  My father is dead, but my mother is yet living.  My father died in Polk County, Tennessee when we left there, and that was about 30 years ago.  I was born in Polk County.  My father was born in Jackson County, North Carolina, Aqualla settlement.

 

Te-kah-se-ne-kih, was father's Indian name.  My name was Sah-ke-nih or Sah-kin-no.  My mother's English name was Sallie Catt.  My mother is real old, but I don't know how old. She lives in this county.  My brother's wife is Sallie Catt.  I had a brother named John, but he is dead.  My brother's wife was named Wa-kin-nih. 

 

My oldest sister was An-nih or Annie.  I had a brother called Dau-ne-ta.  My father's father was Wa-sih or We-seh.  My grandmother's name was Ah-wa-ne-kih or Ah-wa-na-skih.  I don't know whether my grandpar-ents were living at the time of the Civil War.  I was just a little girl.  Cau-he-nie was my mother's mother.  My father was Su-saw-la.  I don’t know if he got any mon-ey from the government.  The older ones got land, but I was born since that time. My father was not married more than once.

 

 I am a full blood Cherokee.  My husband is dead, and his name was John Davis Axe.  The Indian is John Def-se.  He was a full blooded Cherokee.  When my father died he was something like 80 years, and that was about 30 years ago.  All I know is that my father spent his life around Ducktown until he died.  My English name is Jane Catt.  My Indian name was Chin-nih. [Hester 928]

 

My father had a sister by the name of Wa-leh-a--English name Betsey.  Wa-leh-a married Jacob Bird.  His Indian name was See-quah-neek.  I have a full sister by the name of Na-ca [?] and she is about one year older than I am.  I have a sister by the name of Stacy Taylor.  Johnson Catt is my full brother.

 

I have a daughter by the name of Polly Bird.  Her father was John Goins--his right name was John Welch.  Polly Bird has a daughter by the name of Margaret Catt, who I am raising.  Polly Bird is about 22 years old."

 

Jinnie Axe,

Murphy, N. C.

July 15, 1908.

Roll P5 #104”

                                             ==O==

Leroy Goins was married about 1842 to Rebecca Cline who was born 1823.  Her sister, Lethia Cline was born in 1821 to Mrs. Sarah Cline, their mother.  Mrs. Sarah Cline was remarried about 1835 to widower John Bailus Standridge of Cherokee County.  Lethia Cline was married to Elisha Roberts in the fall of 1840.

                                             ==O==

John Gowins was married to Jane Gowins November 11, 1862, according to "Chatham County, North Carolina Marriages, 1772-1850."  The marriage is confirmed by “North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1741-1868,” record 2004, witness William F. Foushee, Bond No. 20826.  The marriage was performed by A. McIntyre, J.P.  Children born to John Gowins and Jane Gowins Gowins are unknown.

s

 

CHOWAN PRECINCT, NORTH CAROLINA

 

No Gowens [or spelling variations] were listed in “Chowan County, North Carolina Deed Book W #1” by Margaret M. Hoffman.

                                                      ==O==

Joseph Gowen “alias Smith” of Chowan Precinct was indicted August 2, 1725 for larceny.  He was charged by Patrick Ogilby of Edenton, North Carolina in the theft of a pair of shoes, according to “Colonial Records of North Carolina,” Volume 2, page 591.  The indictment read:

 

“William Little, Esq:  Attorney General comes to prosecute the Bill of Indictment found by the Grand Jury against Joseph Gowen, alias Smith of  Chowan Precinct, Mariner for Larceny in these words, viz:

 

The Jurors of Our Sovereign Lord the King on their Oath doe present that Joseph Gowen alias Smith, not having the fear of God before his Eyes, but moved by the instigation of the Devill in the precinct of Chowan aforesaid on or about the seventeenth day of this instant July in the year of our Lord One Thousand seven hundred & twenty-five by force and armes did fradulently and feloniously Steal, take, and carry away from the house of Patrick Ogilby of Edenton of the Precinct of Chowan aforesayd one payr of shoes of the value of eleven pence against the peace of Our Sovereign Lord the King that now is his Crown and dignity etc.

 

Upon which Indictment the said Joseph Gowen alias Smith was arraigned and upon his arraignment pleaded [Not Guilty] and for tryall thereof put himself upon God and the Country and the said William Little on the behalf of our Lord the King likewise.

 

Whereupon the Marshall was commanded that he should cause to come twelve good and honest men etc…and there came viz:  Capt, John Pettifer, Mr. Thomas Luton, Junr, John Harlee, Thos. Matthews, J. Pratt, Const. Luton, John Lewis, William Benbury, John Adderly, Thos. Stubbs, Edward Patchett and John Ward who being impannelled and sworn etc…do say upon their Oath, ‘Wee of the Jury find the Prisoner Guilty.’

 

Then the sayd Gowen alias Smith being asked if he had anything to say why sente4nce should not pass against him as the Law in that Case has provided and he offering nothing in avoydance thereof, It was then and there Considered and Adjudged that he should be carried to the publick Whipping post and there receive twenty-one lashes on his bare back well layd on & to remain in custody till fees are payd.”

                                             ==O==

Barbara Gowen [Cowen?] was married June 3, 1790 to Denby Ward, according to “Chowan County, North Carolina  Marriages,” page 164.  Humphrey Ward and Joseph Blount were securities for the marriage.

 

CLEVELAND COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA

 

David Goings of Orlando, Florida stated in a letter September 9, 1989 that he was a fifth-generation descendant of John Gowen of Cleveland County.

                                            ==O==

Alfred Newton Goins was serving as a justice of the peace in Cleveland County when he took the acknowledgements of Ebenezer Newton, George Newton and Margaret Newton Goins regarding the Revolutionary service of their father, Capt. Benjamin Newton March 31, 1852:

 

“State of North Carolina

  County of Cleveland

 

On this 31st day of March , 1852 personally appeared before the undersigned Justice of the Peace in an for said Cleveland County and the state of North Carolina George Newton, aged about 60 years, and Ebenezer Newton, aged about 21 years and Mrs. Margaret Goins, aged about [not enstated] all of whom are residents of said county and who on their oath make the following declaration in order to secure from the United States in the rite of their Mother Nancy Newton and the widow of the late Captain Benjamin an allowance of the amount of the pension that was originally allowed to their Mother in 1845, being only forty dollars a year under Act of Congress as of 4th July, 1836 which was allowed to their Mother in rite of their Father, the said Captain Benjamin Newton and affiants would further state—

 

That they always understood from their Father from the earliest recollection that he was in the services of the United States during the Revolutionary War, that he first entered the service as a Private in the early part of the war and served----tours, that he was then promoted to an Ensign, and then was promoted to a Lieutenant, and from Lieutenant he was acting Captain and was acting in this capacity for considerable time.

 

That during all his services he had in Licoln County, North Carolina after he had acted as express rider, he was appointed or elected a Captain and raised a company, which company he continued to command for a six months tour,

 

That they always understood from their Father that he served as Captain the greater part of his time and was and was almost constantly kept in services for nearly the whole of a year Seventeen Hundred and Eighty-one, 1782, and 1783.

 

That he belonged to the Lincoln County Regiment and that he continued to serve until the close of the War in 1783 and therefore believe from what they always understood from that he served as least as much as two years as Captain besides the various tours he served as Private, Ensign, and Leutenant.  Altho they cannot now give the particulars of his service, that they have often heard him say that during the time he was an express rider, he swam the rivers as many as fourteen times and affiants further state that previous to their Fathers death he was an applicant for a pension under the Act of June 1832 in which application they suppose contains in full an account of his service and to which they now refer.

 

They further declare that after the death of their Father, his widow, Nancy Newton applied for a pension in rite of her husband and in 1845 was allowed a pension of forty dollars and that after she had received said pension, she died in the County of Cleveland on the 12th day of May 1845.

 

That on the time of her death she was still a widow of their Father, the said Captain Benjamin Newton and that she left the following named children, to wit:  Jane Queene, formally Jane Newton; Elizabeth McGlamery, Ebenezer Newton, Mary Newton, Margaret Goins, George Newton, Nancy Queen, Sinthia Lewis, all of whom are still living and who are the only surviving children of her, the said Nancy Newton, and that they terefore make this declaration to receive an increase of said pension from the original amount allowed their Mother in that year to the full pay of a Captain of Cavalry as they always understood that he commanded a light horse company.

 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this date above stated.

 

     Alfred N. Goins               J. P. Ebenezer [X] Newton

     George [X] Newton     Margaret [X] Goins

 

I, Alfred N. Goins, a Justice of the Peace in and for the County do hereby certify that I am well acquainted with Ebenezer Newton, George Newton and Mrs. Margaret Goins who have this day appeared and made oath to the above declaration before me, that they are persons of trust and veracity and that full faith and credit is due and ought to be given to these statements, and I further state that they are the children of Nancy Newton, the widow of Captain Benjamin Newton.”

 

Posey E. Downs, writing in “Capt. Benjamin Newton, William Downs and Other Lineages History” stated that Capt. Newton was born February 3, 1748 and was married January 24, 1775 in Orange County, North Carolina to Nancy McCall, daughter of John McCall.  Nancy McCall was born January 22, 1760.  Capt. Newton died February 20, 1835, and his wife died May 12, 1845.  Both were buried in Clover Hill Methodist Church Cemetery.

 

Children born to them include:

 

     James Newton                             born January 17, 1777

     Elizabeth “Betsy” Newton          born November 27, 1778

     Ebenezer Newton                        born November 22, 1780

     Patience “Patsy” Newton            born September 4, 1783

     Mary “Polly” Newton                 born July 2, 1785

     John McCall Newton                  born October 4, 1787

     Margaret ‘Peggey” Newton        born October 19, 1789

     Benjamin Newton, Jr.                born September 28, 1791

     George Newton                          born July 27, 1793

     Nancy McCall Newton              born September 22, 1795

     Cinthy Newton                           born February 12, 179[8?]

     Calvin Newton                           born September 4, 1801

 

Margaret “Peggey” Newton, daughter of Capt. Benjamin Newton and Nancy McCall Newton, was born October 19, 1789.  “Pegay” Newton was married March 3, 1808 in Caswell County to “Robard Goans.”  Robert Goins was identified by Posey E. Downs as the son of Alexander Goins [GOWENMS.096].  William Hunt, bondsman assisted in posting Bond No. 13354.  Dad Hugh was a witness to the ceremony.

 

Children born to Robert Goins and Margaret “Peggey” Newton Goins include:

 

     Patsey Goins                             born about 1810

     Jane Goins                                 born about 1813

     Nancy Goins                              born about 1815

     Alfred Newton Goins                born about 1818

 

Patsey Goins, daughter of Robert Goins and Margaret “Peggey” Newton Goins, was born about 1810.  She was married about 1828 to Charlie Queen.  They removed to McDowell County, North Carolina.

 

Jane Goins, daughter of Robert Goins and Margaret “Peggey” Newton Goins, was born about 1813.  She was married about 1831 to John Aiken, and they lived on the waters of Little Knob Creek in Cleveland County.  No children were born to them.

 

Nancy Goins, daughter of Robert Goins and Margaret “Peggey” Newton Goins, was born about 1815.  She was married about 1835 to Stephen White, “the son of Nathaniel White of Virginia,” according to Posey E. Downs.

 

Children born to them include:

 

     Mary Elmina White             born about 1836

     Sarah M. White                    born about 1837

     Fannie White                       born about 1838

     Elixabeth “Betsy” White     born about 1840

     William White [Sgt.]          born about 1841

     Graham White [Sgt.]          born about 1843

     James White [Sgt.]             born about 1845

     Andrew S. White                born about 1848

     Alfred White                       born about 1851

     Martha White                      born about 1855

 

Alfred Newton Goins, son of Robert Goins and Margaret “Peggey” Newton Goins, was born about 1818.  He was married May 20, 1854 to Martha Jones, daughter of Dr. G. B. Jones.  She was born in Cleveland County in 1839.  Alfred Newton Goins was “a noted surveyor in his day, and it is thought that not many land deeds were made in his general community, without his having written them and done the surveying,” according to Posey E. Downs.

 

Alfred Newton Goins served in Co. E, 32nd North Carolina Infantry Regiment during the Civil War and was stationed at Salisbury North Carolina.  Later he served as justice of the peace in Cleveland County.  Alfred Newton Goins died in Cleveland County in 1901.

 

Children born to Alfred Newton Goins and Martha Jones Goins include:

 

     Sim Goins                    born about 1856

     Thomas Goins              born August 26, 1857

     John Goins                   born about 1859

     Ella Goins                    born about 1861

     Nancy Goins                 born about 1867

     Mary Goins                  born about 1871

 

Sim Goins, son of Alfred Goins and Martha Jones Goins, was born about 1856.  He was married about 1879 to Dovie Queen, daughter of Joe Queen and Margaret Vook Queen.  Sim Goins was buried in Clover Hill Methodist Church Cemetery.

 

Thomas A. Goins, son of Alfred Newton Goins and Martha Jones Goins, was born August 26, 1857 at Shelby, North Carolina in Cleveland County, according to a descendant, Connie Sue Goins Ardrey of Broken Arrow, Oklahoma in a letter written June 4, 1997.  He was married September 14, 1876 in Cleveland County to Roxanna Elizabeth Gantt, daughter of James A. Iley Gantt and Mary D. Ledford Gantt. 

 

Thomas A. Goins removed to Missouri about 1885 and was employed as a miner in the Webb City and Joplin areas, according to the oral history of the family.  He and his older sons were thus employed.

 

The family removed to Oklahoma in the late 1890s, probably during the land rush.  They also lived in Sparks, Lincoln County, Oklahoma area.  Roxanna Elizabeth Gantt died in Okfuskee County, Oklahoma April 17, 1910.  Thomas A. Goins was remarried to a Bertha and then to Alice Sexton.  He died in Oklahoma September 16, 1929.  Both he and Roxanna Elizabeth Gantt Goins were buried in the White Dove Cemetery in Sparks, Oklahoma 

 

Children born to Thomas A. Goins and Roxanna Elizabeth Gantt Goins include:

 

     Esper Goins                      born about 1879

     Asbury Goins                    born about 1881

     Mary Alyce Goins             born December 20, 1890

     Amos Goins                      born July 20, 1893

 

Children born to Thomas A. Goins and Alice Sexton Goins include:

 

     Marie Goins                      birthdate unknown

     Marvin Goins                    born about 1914

     Arvin Goins                       born about 1914

 

Esper Goins, son of Thomas A. Goins and Roxanna Elizabeth Gantt Goins, was born about 1879.  It is believed that he was brought to Jasper County, Missouri by his parents.  He worked in the lead mines there, according to family tradition.

 

Asbury Goins, son of Thomas A. Goins and Roxanna Elizabeth Gantt Goins, was born about 1881.  He was brought to Jasper County, Missouri by his parents.  He returned to Cleveland County on a visit about 1904.

 

Mary Alyce Goins, daughter of Thomas A. Goins and Roxanna Elizabeth Gantt Goins, was born December 20, 1890 at Joplin, Missouri, according to Connie Sue Goins Ardrey

 

Amos Goins, son of Thomas A. Goins and Roxanna Elizabeth Gantt Goins, was born July 20, 1893 in Webb City, Missouri, according to his obituary in the Okmulgee Daily Times” of Okmulgee, Oklahoma in its edition of May 10, 1979:

 

He died in May 1979 at age 85 and was buried in Okmulgee Cemetery.  He died at the Okmulgee Memorial Hospital.  He came to Okfuskee, Oklahoma and was married to Hazel Southwick in 1912.  He was a member of the First Christian Church.  A son, Elmo Lee Goins preceded him in death in 1978.  Survivors include his wife, Hazel Southwick Goins, of the home, 1509 East 10th, Okmulgee and three grandchildren, and six great-grandchildren.

 

Hazel Southwick Goins, died at age 98 in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma April 30, 1992.  She was born on April 8, 1894 at Blackwell, Oklahoma.  She was a member of the First Christian Church. Survivors include: three granddaughters, Linda Goins Rains, Broken Arrow; Karen Goins Howard, Bartlesville; and Connie Goins Ardrey, Broken Arrow; and six great-grandchildren.  She was buried May 4, 1992 in Okmulgee Cemetery.

 

Children born to Amos Goins and Hazel Southwick Goins include:

 

          Elmo Lee Goins            born December 13, 1913

 

Elmo Lee Goins, son of Amos Goins and Hazel Southwick Goins, was born December 13, 1913 in Okfuskee County, Oklahoma and reared in Morris, Oklahoma, according to his obituary in Okmulgee Daily Times” in its edition of October 3, 1978.”

 

He died at age 64 October 1 in a Tulsa hospital.  He was graduated from Morris High School.  He later moved to Okmulgee and was retired from the furniture business and car sales.   He was a member of the Christian Church.  Survivors include his wife, Elsie Goins of the home at Rt. 2, Okmulgee, three daughters, Mrs. Karen Anne Howard, Mrs. Linda Kay Rains; Broken Arrow, and Mrs. Connie Sue Ardrey, Marsascola, Island of Malta, his parents Mr. and Mrs. Amos Goins, Okmulgee, and six grandchildren.

 

Children born to Elmo Lee Goins and Elsie Goins include:

 

          Karen Anne Goins                             born about 1928

          Linda Kay Goins                               born about 1930

          Connie Sue Goins                             born about 1933

 

Marie Goins, daughter of Thomas A. Goins and Alice Sexton Goins, died an infant.

 

Marvin Goins, son of Thomas A. Goins and Alice Sexton Goins, was born about 1914.  He may have moved to California and then to Nevada.  He died in 1987 in Lovelock, Pershing, Nevada.

 

John Goins, son of Alfred Newton Goins and Martha Jones Goins, was born about 1861.  He was married about 1884 to Margaret Hudson and removed to Rutheford County, North Carolina.

 

Children born to John Goins and Margaret Hudson Goins include:

 

     George Goins                   born about 1886.

 

George Goins, son of John Goins and Margaret Goins, was born about 1886.  He was married about 1910 to Manthie Newton, daughter of William Abraham Newton and Nancy Elizabeth Crotts Newton.

 

Ella Goins, daughter of Alfred Newton Goins and Martha Jones Goins, was born about 1861.  She was married about 1880 to W. Pink White.

 

Children born to them include:

 

     Elizabeth “Lizzie” White          born about 1882

     Charlie White                            born about 1883

     Walter White                             born about 1885

     Marvin White                            born about 1887

     Lonie White                              born about 1890

     Fannie White                            born about 1894

 

Nancy Goins, daughter of Alfred Newton Goins and Martha Jones Goins, was born about 1867.  She was married to Joseph Walker about 1886.  They made their home on her father’s farm.

 

Children born to them include:

 

     Vangie Walker                           born about 1888

     Fanny Walker                             born about 1889

     Kenneth Walker                         born about 1890

     Jesse Reton Walker                    born about 1892

     Yates Walker                              born about 1895

     Ezell Walker                               born about 1898

     Norma Lee Walker                     born about 1902

 

Nancy McCall Newton, daughter of Capt. Benjamin Newton, was born September 22, 1795.  She was married about 1814 to Daniel Goins, brother to Robert Goins who was married to her sister, according to “Ancestral Biography” written in 1906 by P. L. Newton.  They were sons of Alexander Goins and Jane Booth Goins.  After the death of Daniel Goins, Nancy McCall Newton Goins was remarried to John Queen.

 

Children born to Daniel Goins and Nancy McCall Newton Goins include:

 

     John B. Goins               born about 1816

     Cynthia Goins               born about 1820

 

John B. Goins, son of Daniel Goins and Nancy McCall Newton Goins, was born about 1816.  He was a justice of the peace March 24, 1853 when he performed the wedding of William Proctor and Nancy Ledford.

 

Cynthia Goins, daughter of Daniel Goins and Nancy McCall Goins, was born about 1820.  She was married about 1839 to John Queen.

 

Children born to them include:

 

     Meredith Queen               born about 1841

     Laban Queen                    born about 1843

     Joe Queen                        born about 1844

     Nancy Queen                   born about 1846

     Jean Queen                      born about 1849

     George Queen                 born about 1851

     Margaret Queen              born about 1854

     William Queen               born about 1857

     Sarah Queen                    born about 1861

==O==

Alexander Goins was married to Jane Booth and they lived in Rutherford and Cleveland Counties, North Carolina.  At least two sons were born to them—Robert Goins and Daniel Goins.  They married sisters—Robert Goins was married to Margaret [Peggy] Newton in 1808 in Caswell County or Cleveland County, North Carolina.  Daniel Goins married Nancy McCall Newton in 1814 in Cleveland County, North Carolina.

 

Two children were born to Daniel Goins and Nancy McCall Newton Goins.

 

Children born to Robert Goins and Margaret [Peggy] Newton Goins include  Patsey Goins, Jane Goins, Nancy Goins and Alfred Newton Goins.  They were all born circa 1810 to 1818.

                                             ==O==

Mrs. Vernie Mae Lovelace Goins, 82 died April 25, 2003 at Cherryville, North Carolina, according to her obituary in theApril 26, 2003 edition of the “Shelby Star” of Shelby, North Carolina:

 

“Mrs. Vernie Mae Lovelace Goins, 82, of 111 Harrel-son Road, formerly of Crouse, died Friday, April 25, 2003, at Carolina Care Center.  She was a native of Cleveland County, born March 10, 1921, the daughter of the late Miller and Myrtle Jane Weaver Lovelace.  She was a homemaker and member of North Brook Baptist Church.  She was preceded in death by her hus-band, Everette Marion Goins.  She is survived by one son, Wayne Goins of Salisbury; five daughters, Frances "Toots" Goins Jones of Statesville, Jean Goins Dellin-ger and Jewel Goins Schronce, both of Lincolnton, Dorothy "Dot" Goinis Russ of Shelby and Jeanette Goins Henley of Cherryville.  The funeral will be Sun-day at 3 p.m. at North Brook Baptist Church with the Revs. W. Ray Pennell and Dr. Vine Hefner officiating.  Burial will follow in the church cemetery.  The family is at the home of a daughter, Jeanette Goins Henley, 208 Tot Dellinger Road, Cherryville, and they will re-ceive friends tonight from 6 to 8 at Carpenter's Funeral Home.”

 

COLUMBUS COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA

 

Jeremiah "Jerry" Goins was a resident of Columbus County, about 1780, according to the research of Mary M. Browder Barr, a descendant of Florence, South Carolina. 

 

“Jerry Goins came from Cumberland County, North Carolina,” according to the testimony of W. W. Goins, a descendant, in a court case tried in adjoining Robeson County, North Carolina in 1915.

 

Prior to his residence in North Carolina Jeremiah “Jerry” Goins lived in Virginia, according to an article in The North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal,” Volume XX, No. 2, May 1994, page 82. 

 

This manuscript traces several Chickasaw Indian traders who lived along the Roanoke River near Plumtree [Mush] Island, the Occoneechee Neck, and Quankey Creek.  Using the names of "Licensed Indian traders," a list of Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina traders was created.  A partial list includes Robert Long, Charles Hicks, John Brown, William Gilchrist, Abraham Colson, James Anderson, William Kemp, James Moore, Richard Hyde, John Sims, William Williams, and John Pettygrew.

 

The Gowen family, in several spelling variations, were associ-ated with the Roanoke River for several generations as it me-andered across southwestern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina for 410 miles.  Members of the family were found in each of the counties in the Roanoke River Basin.  Included were Montgomery, Roanoke, Floyd, Patrick, Henry, Pittsyl-vania, Halifax, Mecklenburg and Brunswick Counties in Vir-ginia and Warren, Halifax, Northampton, Bertie and Washing-ton Counties in North Carolina before the river flowed into Albemarle Sound, past Roanoke Island and out into the Atlan-tic Ocean.

 

The Journal article includes:

 

“One of the first families to live at Sandy Bluff was the Tur-bevilles.  North Carolina records show that between 1713 and 1726, the Turbevilles had lived on the Occoneechee Neck of the Morattuck [Roanoke] River [in present day Northampton County.]  In May of 1726, William and Walter Turbeville moved to Plumbtree Island [now called Mush Island in Hali-fax County].  In addition to the Turbevilles and Colsons, many other families that had previously lived on the Roanoke River moved to Sandy Bluff.  Among them were the Gibsons, Cha-vis [Chavers], Goins [Goings], and Sweets [Sweat].

 

According to Gregg, Gideon Gibson was one of the wealthiest men at Sandy Bluff.  He was also a "Free Man of Color."  So were the Chavis, Goins and Sweat families.  All four families were related by marriage.  The Goins family had originally come from Virginia before migrating to North and South Car-olina.  [Goins Island is located in Lake Gaston on the Roanoke River a few miles up river from Hyde Island and Plumbtree Island.]  Chavis [Chavers], on the other hand, lived on the Quankey Creek, which is below Plumbtree Island.

 

Gideon Gibson had lived near the Occoneechee Neck adjacent to land owned by Arthur Kavanaugh, Ralph Mason, and Rich-ard Turbeville before buying land on Quankey Creek from Robert Long [Lang], a Chickasaw and Cherokee Indian trader. Long also owned land at Elk Marsh and Plumbtree Island. Long had received his land patents at Quankey Creek and Plumbtree Island on 1 March 1719/1720.

 

According to Gregg, Gideon's brother, Jordan, went West with Daniel Boone. Benjamin Cutbirth [also known as Calvert/Col-bert] was also a member of Daniel Boone's entourage.  Robert Long and Gideon Gibson were not the only woodsmen who lived at Quankey Creek in North Carolina.  Joseph Sims and James Moore also lived there.  Like the Colsons and Turbe-villes of Plumbtree Island, these woodsmen traded with the Chickasaws. During the off-season they often rested at Sandy Bluff before returning to North Carolina.

 

In 1732, Joseph Sims and James Moore witnessed the selling of land between two men from Albermarle County, North Carolina, at Quankey Creek.  A third witness was James Lo-gan.  William Williams, a former owner mentioned in the above sale, had traded with the Chickasaw Nations since the early 1720s.  Peter Jones had accompanied Joseph Colson, Robert Hicks, Major Mumford, and William Byrd II during the survey of "Eden."

 

"On the south side of the James below the mountains the fron-tier at this time was represented by the Welsh settlement on the Mcherrin; Col.Byrd's improvements on the Roanoke above Sandy Creek, including the three charming islands, Sapponi, Occoneechee and Totero; Maj. Mumford's Quarter near-by; Col. Byrd's Land of Eden on the Dan and Major Mayo's Sur-vey adjoining; Richard and William Kennon's grant on Cub Creek which supplied farmsteads for John Caldwell's Pres-byterian Colony.

 

Three years later, on 24 June 1724, Joseph Calvert bought an additional 250 acres from John Gray "on Morratuck River and Plumbtree Island adjoining William Green, near Foltera Fort."  The lands bought by Colson/Calvert, and Turbeville on the north side of the Morratuck [Roanoke] River were near an In-dian path leading to the courthouse in Brunswick County, Vir-ginia, and to the plantation of Maj. Robert Mumford.

 

Further research revealed that the Turbevilles, Colsons, and Calverts worked for Major Robert Mumford of Brunswick County, Virginia, and with Thomas Whitmell.  Major Mum-ford was a large land speculator and the descendant of an Indian trading family.  The Mumfords had traded alongside men like Abraham Wood, Benjamin Harrison, Robert Bolling, William Byrd I, Peter Poythress and Robert Hicks since the late 1600s.

 

The Turbevilles learned of the Occoneechee Neck on the Roa-noke through their association with Arthur Kavanaugh and Maj. Robert Mumford.  By 1712, both Kavanaugh and Mum-ford were large landowners in Virginia and North Carolina.  Kavanaugh began selling his North Carolina patents in 1713 and Mumford acted as his attorney.  Thomas Whitmell, the Indian trader, bought six hundred acres from Kavanaugh on the north side of the Morattuck River in 1715. 

 

Before moving to North Carolina, the Turbevilles sold land they owned in Prince George County, Virginia, to Peter Mit-chell, an Indian trader and land speculator.  Mitchell lived high on the Roa-noke River near the Caldwells and James Logan.]  Anderson was also an Indian trader and land specu-lator who worked with Mumford.  Prior to 1722, Anderson lived with his family on the Occoneechee Neck of the Roan-oke River. Before mov-ing to the Roanoke River and the Oc-coneechee, Anderson had lived in Prince George County, Virginia.  Prince George County records reveal that in the 1740 "Rent Roll of all the Lands held in the County," the fol-lowing names were listed: Jno. Anderson, Lewis Green, Peter Jones, Peter Mitchell, Hu-bert Gibson, Col. Bolling, Col. Har-rison, Arthur Kavanaugh, Francis Poythres, Sr, Dan'l Hickdon [Higdon], Col. Byrd, Rob't. Hix, Robt. Munford, Rich'd. Tur-berfield, and Wm. Eppes.

 

In 1722, Maj. Mumford and John Anderson were the first in-dividuals to apply for a patent in present-day Mecklenburg County in Virginia.  It was for "2811 acres in the fork of Cock's [now Poplar] Creek" and the Roanoke River.  When Richard Turbeville and his family moved to North Carolina, they lived on the Occoneechee with other Chickasaw traders and next to Anderson, Colson, Pace, Mason, Gibson, Lang [Long] and Thomas Whitmell.

 

On March 1, 1720, the Lords Proprietors of North Carolina issued patents to Plumbtree Island and on the south side of Plumbtree Swamp abutting the island.  These patents went to Thomas Whitmell, William Green, John Cotton, John Geddes, William Reeves, Barnaby Milton, and Robert Lang [Long].”

 

Jeremiah "Jerry" Goins was married about 1788 to Edie Lucas, described as a Catawba Indian who could speak the language by Charles James McDonald Furman, a newspaper columnist.  He wrote that Edie Lucas Goins' father was an Indian who was killed during the Revolutionary War and her mother a white woman.  Jeremiah "Jerry" Goins was described as a "cousin of Tom Burbage, a Baptist preacher over at Wasamasaw and Patsy Burbage who married a Dutchman.  He was also related to the Stapletons, Locklears and Cripses."  Some descendants regard Jeremiah "Jerry" Goins, Jr. as a Lumbee.

 

Charles James McDonald Furman was described as an avid history enthusiast with a taste for ethnology and anthropology in a collection housed in the University of South Carolina, South Caroliniana Society Manuscripts Collections:

 

McDonald Furman papers

 

Charles James McDonald Furman [1863-1904], a great-grand-son of the Rev. Richard Furman, was an avid history enthusi-ast with a taste for ethnology and anthropology. Regarded as an eccentric by contemporary South Carolinians, he was held in high regard by the Smithsonian Institution Bureau of Ethno-logy and by bureau members Albert Gatschet and James A. Mooney. Furman's research into the history and culture of South Carolina blacks and Indians fascinated these noted ethnologists.

Furman's work is not easily accessible to the modern reader and researcher. He never published a book or even a lengthy article, and declared that his aim was "every now & then, to write short and pointed articles about some historical subject." Most of his contributions appeared in the “Sumter Watch-man and Southron”, “The Columbia State,” and the News & Courier.”  Today they are scattered through microfilmed news-papers and archival collections of clippings.

Furman's papers in the South Caroliniana Library are among its earliest and most interesting accessions.  The four hundred twenty-four manuscripts include his diary from 1878 until 1903, and photostats and original drafts of a number of his articles.  Two boxes of correspondence reflect his lifelong interest in all facets of South Carolina history and politics. They include letters such as those from William A. Courtenay and Edward McCrady concerning preservation and publication of the state's colonial records and financial backing for Mc-Crady's “History of the American Revolution.”

Scattered holdings of Furman material relating to his interests in blacks and Indians can also be found in the Smithsonian In-stitution's National Anthropological Archives. They appear in the papers of ethnologists he corresponded with, notably those of Albert S. Gatschet.

The South Caroliniana Library has recently acquired one hun-dred thirty-three Furman letters and newspaper clippings relating to the Sumter County "Redbones" or "Old Issues."  These strange people fascinated him for many years and the new material includes both letters and articles he produced in his attempts to track down their history. The Redbones lived in Privateer Township not far from Furman's home, Cornhill plantation, and as he explained to his newspaper audience, "They are a mixed race and have never been slaves. They are supposed to be descendants of Indians and negroes, but noth-ing is definitely known of their origin."

"It seems the irony of fate," he continued, "that we should have cyclopaedias giving accounts of races in which we are not interested, and with which we will never come in contact, when right here in our State we have a peculiar race about which comparatively little seems to be known, and yet it is a race which is worthy of ethnological research."

The manuscripts record Furman's investigations of common Redbone family names like Goins, Chavis, and Oxendine, and his correspondence with authorities on similar and possibly re-lated ethnic groups.  Hamilton McMillan of Red Springs, N. C, sent material concerning the Croatan (Lumbee) Indians, and Dr. Swan Burnett [husband of the children's writer Fran-ces Hodgson Burnett] sent an article from American Anthro-pologist dealing with the Melungeons of East Tennessee.  One of Furman's clippings recounted James Mooney's theory of possible Portuguese ancestry for the Pamunkeys, Croatans, Melungeons, and other groups.

Some items are of outstanding historical value. On 27 May 1897, The State published Furman's biographical sketch of Redbone patriarch James Edward Smiling, a Sumter County legislator in the radical General Assembly from 1868 to 1870. Information on Reconstruction figures like Smiling is often difficult to find.

On 17 May 1893, Bennettsville historian J.A.W. Thomas sent Furman four pages of detailed information on mixed breeds in Marlboro County. "Of course the people of `mixed breed,' that we have among us in Marlborough," Thomas wrote, "are not known as `Redbones,' and not until recently have they been called `Croatans,' a name which some of them are now adopt-ing. For generations they have claimed to have been of `Portu-gese' extraction, while more commonly the white people have thought them Mulattoes." Some families among them had rendered distinguished service during the Revolution and won the respect of the white people. "And the consequence has been," Thomas explained, "that their complexion, their cir-cumstances and general characteristics wonderfully improved, until now they are scarcely recognized as having `mixed blood' in their veins."

Often, however, Furman's search for information on mixed breed families yielded evidence of criminal activity. His news-paper clippings contained frequent references to murders and lynchings, and sometimes they related bizarre prosecutions under the miscegenation laws of the Jim Crow era.

The Bureau of Ethnology told Furman that if he would write his research as a monograph and supply photographs of the Sumter County Redbones, the bureau would solicit the publi-cation money to print it. But when Furman died in 1904, his best printed summary of his findings was a 27 May 1896 art-icle in the “Sumter Watchman and Southron” titled "The Privateer Redbones."  James Mooney thought the piece sig-nificant and inserted a notice of it in the July 1896 number of American Anthropologist.”

"While these people are classed with the negroes," Furman concluded, "their features & color as a race show unmistake-able evidence of white or Indian blood, or both.  They are certainly an isolated people & I repeat here what I said in a communication to the “News & Courier” & the “Columbia State” a few months ago—that as a people, they are, if any-thing, more apart to themselves than are the Hebrews of our State."

 

"Jerry Goins, a yellow man," and his wife Edie Lucas Goins were early residents of Sumter County and Williamsburg County, South Carolina.  It is believed that he died during the 1820s.  During an interview with James Edward Smiling August 1, 1889, Charles James McDonald Furman recorded his statement, “Jerry Goins got burnt up back of where Nettles' Store now is.  I was born about two miles above Sumter.  I am now 69 years old.” 

 

Edie Lucas Goins, a "free colored female, age 36-55," appeared living alone in the 1830 census of Sumter County, page 98.  Her enumeration was in a consecutive entry with that of Levicy Goins, her daughter-in-law.  Edie Lucas Goins did not reappear in the 1840 census of Sumter County as the head of a household.  Carolyn Moore of Salem, Missouri who abstracted data on the Goins family members and their kinsmen from the Furman columns, reported that Edie Goins in her later years lived in the home of Tom Gibbes, Jr.

 

Children born to them, according to the research of Mary M. Browder Barr include:

 

Frederick Goins                     born about 1790

Mary “Polly” Goins               born about 1795

 

Frederick Goins, son of Jeremiah “Jerry” Goins and Edie Lucas Goins, was born about 1790.  He was married about 1810 to Levicy Gibbes, daughter of Thomas Gibbes and Sarah Brown Gibbes, according to Carolyn Moore.

 

She was born about 1794, according to a letter written July 3, 1991 by a g-g-granddaughter, Mary M. Browder Barr.  She wrote, "I found her grave marker, and it states that she was about 93 years old when she died in 1887." 

 

On June 8, 1820 "Levisa Goens" upon payment of $150 received a deed from Moses Timmons "of Cleramont County, Sumter District to land containing 50 acres lying on the Charleston Road & down said road till cornering to Isaac Gideon's line and then to run said line till cornering to Jesse Timmons 236 acres of land, then to run on his line till cornering to Charleston Road again being a part of a tract of land of 300 acres granted to Peter Kelly by his Excellency William Moultrey," according to Sumter County deed records.  Willis Hudnall, Hiram Wilder and Robert Hudnall were witnesses to the deed which was recorded June 19, 1829.

 

Frederick Goins and Levicy Gibbes Goins transferred land in 1827, but he is not found in the records of the county after that date.

 

Levicy Gibbes Goins, a "free colored female," headed up a household in the 1830 census of Sumter County, also page 98, adjoining Edie Lucas Goins.  The household was rendered as:

 

"Goins, Levicy     free colored female       24-36

                              free colored male          10-24

                              free colored male          10-24

                             free colored female         0-10

                             free colored male            0-10

                             free colored male            0-10

                             free colored male            0 10"

 

The household of Levicy Gibbes Goins reappeared in the 1840 census of Sumter District as:

 

"Goins, Levicy     free colored female      36-55

                             free colored female       10-24

                             free colored male          10-24

                             free colored male          10-24

                             free colored male          10-24

                             free colored male          10-24

                             free colored male          10-24

                             free colored female       0 10

                             free colored female       0 10

                             free colored female       0 10"

 

Four members of the household were engaged in agriculture.  One member, was engaged in "manufacturing and trades."

 

Mrs. Barr considers Levicy Gibbes Goins a member of the Redbones, a tri-racial isolated group of people who lived in the Williamsburg County and Sumter County area from the time of the Revolutionary War.  She bases her belief on the research conducted by Charles James McDonald Furman and a group of associates who researched the origin of the Redbones for 27 years before his death in 1904.  Furman wrote:

 

"It is my opinion that over half of the 70-80 Redbones are descended from a "yellow man," Jerry Goins and his wife Edie Goins.  Edie Goins was a mixed blood Indian woman who was a well-known fortune teller in her day.  Their daughter-in-law, Vicey Goins lived to be a great age and died in 1887.  Her son Wade Goins is one of the old people among the Privateer Redbones.  He is an interesting character and is considerably mixed with Indian.  He is as straight as an arrow, his skin is decidedly copper colored, and his face, I think, looks more like that of an Indian or white man than a Negro.  He is now an old man, aged about 70 or 72 and is one of the deacons of Bethesda Church.

 

Another descendant of the first Goins couple is Tom Gibbes, pastor of the little church in southeastern Privateer which is attended by the Redbones people and which, I may remark, is a member of the colored Wateree Baptist Association, Lower Division.  He also shows his Indian blood.

 

It is interesting to see over what a large area the name Goins is found.  This name is found among that peculiar people, the Croatans of North Carolina, which unique race is believed by historical investigators to be the descendants of Sir Walter Raleigh's famous "lost colony."  It is possible that the "old issues" or properly speaking, Redbones are in part a branch of the Croatans.

 

Redbones are found in Louisiana.  In the spring of 1893 I wrote to one of the parish officials about them.  I received an interesting reply.  Among the Redbones mentioned in Louisiana was the Goins family.

 

In a magazine article last summer, Mr. James Nomey, one of the leading ethnological writers in the United States, gave an account of two Goins brothers he knew in Indiana, 'who although associating by necessity with Negroes, always insisted that they were not of that race or of slave ancestry.  They had the appearance of half-blood Indians.'"

 

Children born to Frederick Goins and Levicy Gibbes Goins include:

 

Jonathan Goins                 born about 1822

Wade Goins                      born in 1824

Matilda Goins                   born about 1825

Madrey Goins                   born in October 1827

James Goins [twin]          born about 1829

Thomas Goins [twin]       born about 1829

Henry Goins                     born about 1831

Washington Goins           born about 1835

 

An unidentified lady known as the “Umbrella Lady” wrote November 13, 2001:

 

“I am seeking info on the family of Lavincy Goins and Fred Gibbs.  I think they lived in Williamsburg County, SC.  They had the following children:

 

Julia Gibbs

Levina Gibbs, born in May 1872.   I think she was my grandfather Sam Barrineau's mother.  And she was married to Tom Barrineau. I can't seem to find anything on this wo-man.

Georginia Gibbs, born in  June 1873

Gilliana Gibbs

Ada Ann Gibbs.

 

e-mail; umbrellaservice@aol.com”

 

Jonathan Goins, son of Frederick Goins and Levicy Gibbes Goins, was born about 1822.  He was married about 1847 to Jane Winkles, "a white woman," according to Carolyn Moore.  Children born to Jonathan Goins and Jane Winkles Goins in-clude.

 

          John Henry Goins                                        born about 1850

 

John Henry Goins, son of Jonathan Goins and Jane Winkles Goins, was born about 1850.  He was married about 1873 to Cynthia Timmons.  Children born to John Henry Goins and Cynthia Timmons Goins include:

 

          Mattie Goins                                                            born about 1876

 

Wade Goins, son of Frederick Goins and Levicy Gibbes Goins, was born in 1824.  He was married about 1847 to Abigail Avin, "a white woman," according to Carolyn Moore.  Abigail Avin is believed to be an older woman with a young daughter, Mary Avin.

 

Later he was remarried to Susan Atkinson, "a white woman."  He lived in the "Chavis Settlement" in Williamsburg County about 1880.

 

Children born to Wade Goins, Abigail Avin Goins and Susan Atkinson Goins include:

 

     Mary Avin Goins          born about 1834

 

Mary Avin Goins, daughter of Abigail Avin Goins, was born about 1834.  She was married "on the 2nd inst. [December 2, 1852 by T. H. Osteen, Esq. to Mr. Charles M. Corbett.  Miss Mary, daughter of Mrs. Abigail, wife of Mr. Wade Goins, is of this district," according to a newspaper report dated December 7, 1852.  This item appeared in the "South Carolina Magazine of Ancestral Research."

 

Matilda Goins, daughter of Frederick Goins and Levicy Gibbes Goins, was born about 1825.  She was married to James Edward Smiling in 1841.  He was "called James Johnson prior to 1838," according to Carolyn Moore.  James Edward Smiling, "free person of color" was a member of the South Carolina State Legislature during the Reconstruction Period.

 

Charles James McDonald Furman interviewed James Edward Smiling August 1, 1889 and recorded Smiling's statement:

 

"I was born about two miles above Sumter. I am now 69 years old.  In 1838 I went to the house carpenters' trade; two years before that I was at the wheelwright and blacksmith's trade.  I joined the Providence Church, then when the Mizpah Church was formed, joined there.  It was from this church that I received my license to preach.  In July 1868, I was elected a member of the legislature.  I was a magistrate under Gov. Scott and was trial justice for about four years. 

 

I was the first chairman of the Republicans of Privateer Precinct.  I have been land assessor and often manager at elections. 

 

At the outset of the war I furnished a horse, bridle, saddle and spur for Nettle's Company.  This horse went through the war.  My full name is James Edward Smiling.

 

Jerry Goins had no Negro blood in him.  I have seen him.  He looked like he was mixed with Indian.  I suppose he died full fifty years ago.  Old Mr. Joe Gist[?] who was a Revolutionary soldier, has told me that he saw Edie Goins' father shot down in the war.  Edie's father was an Indian.  Jerry Goins got burnt up back of where Nettles' Store now is.  Edie died about 1862 or 1863.  She was called a fortune teller.  She and Jerry had only two children.  Her son was named Frederick; the daughter was Polly.  She married James Gibbes.  Jerry Goins and his wife lived not more than two or three miles from Nettles' Store.

 

Fred Goins, who was son of Jerry & Edie, married Levici Gibbes.  They had the following children: James & Thomas who were twins; Jonathan, Matilda, Wade and Madry.  Besides these, Levici Goins had the following children after Fred's death: Henry, Washington and Debretta [Deborah.]

 

Levici's children married as follows:  Jim Goins married first Martha Gibbes; she was the daughter of James Gibbes who married Polly Goins.  Jim Goins had about seven children, among them Manning Goins and Solomon Goins.  Jim Goins second wife was Mahala Chavis who was a daughter of Tom Chavis who married Elvira Winkles. 

 

Thomas Goins married Elizabeth Chavis, daughter of Bill Chavis, and among his children was Williams Emons Goins who is now a preacher.  Jonathan Goins married Jane Winkles.  His children are all down in Williamsburg.

 

Matilda Goins married me.  My children are Mary Magdalen who married Nelson Chavis, Henry who married Harriet Chavis, Jim who married Fannie Knight, Alice Matilda who married Lorenzo Chavis, Augustus Whitfield who married Fannie Thompson from Richland, Angeline who married Leonard Sweat, Shack who married Mary Knight and Cinthia Ann who was the first wife of Ruben Goins, son of Tom Goins.

 

Wade Goins married Abigail Aven and Susan Atkinson.  Madry Goins married Lavina Tucker, and his children are down in Williamsburg.  Henry never married.  Washington married Agnes Bryant, and his children live in Williamsburg.  Debietta [Deborah] married Jackson Chevis.  Of the above, Jonathan, Wade, Madry and Wash married white women.

 

Old Tom Gibbes served in the Revolution.  He lived right about here and is buried in my field near my house.  All this land through this country was his, several thousand acres, and he also had several black people, and some of them died in this section of the country.  His sons, Tom and Jim, staid around here, and he had three daughters that staid in this section of the country; Levici, Workey and Lucy.  Levici was the one who married Fred Goins, and Lucy was the mother of West Sweat, [married about 1830 Tom Sweat from Richland].

 

Tom Gibbes' son, Tom married a woman named Betsy Perry; she was a white woman.  He afterward lived with Jerry Goins' widow, Edie.  I don't know as he ever had any children living around here.  Jim Gibbes married Polly Goins and had several children, among whom are Tom & John.  Tom married my sister [Harriet Johna Smiling?]

 

John Chavis married one of Tom Gibbes daughters who was named Polly [Mary].  He lived about Barnwell, but his family moved about here about 60 years ago.  Those of his children that I knew were Billy Chavis who is the father of Betsy Goins; Tom Chavis who married Elvira Winkler; Lucy who never married, she was Jackson Chavis's mother; Levici who never married; Jimmy Chavis who married Elizabeth Hair, has no children around here.

 

West Sweat's father came from over in Richland; his name was Tom.  He came here about the thirties.  [Angeline Smiling married Leonard Sweat, son of Wesley, son of Tom who married Lucy Gibbes.]"

 

Furman wrote, "Albert Chavis gave me this information August 30, 1889:

 

"My grandfather fought in the Revolution.  His name was John Chavis.  He came from North Carolina, from Roanoke, I think.  He lived in Barnwell and Orangeburg.  I don't think he ever came here to settle.  He married Polly Gibbes.  He was always free. 

 

From what I have heard, I don't think Jerry Goins had any Negro blood.  I served as a cook in the War, didn't carry any arms.  John Gibbs served in the fortifications down in Charleston, and all the Goinses as was able to go, served.  Elisha and Elija Chevis served on the fortifications.  Caldwell Chavis served as hostler.  Highie Oxendine went to serve at Ft. Sumter, he never came back.  He lived in Timmonstown. [He married Maria Goins, daughter of Tom Goins and Betsy Chavis Goins.]"

 

Furman recorded, "Tom Gibbes gave me this information September 13, 1889:"

 

"Bethesda is a branch of Providence.  Rev. David Cuttino dedicated it.  Mr. Cuttino, Mr. Hughson and Mr. Graham has preached there for us as pastors.  I have been pastor about 8 years.  Jim Smiling was pastor before me.  Not more than two late freedmen are members of this church, there are about 50 standing members.  I think my grandfather was a Revolutionary pensioner.  I don't know what year he moved here.  He was a boss carpenter."

 

Furman wrote, "Mrs. Harriet Gauley gve me this information February 1, 1890:"

 

"I have heard Mother say that the oldest Gibbes of all was mixed with Indian.  Edie Goins was a great old talker and said she came from the Catawba tribe.  Her hair was straight.  She would say, 'Honey, I am an Indian, there ain't no Nigger in me.'  She had keen looking eyes.  I have seen her many a time."

 

Furman recorded, "Joseph [Halca] Jacobs told me on August 8, 1890:"

 

"I was born in the edge of North Carolina.  My family was free, they got a bounty for fighting in the Revolution.  I was a small boy when I came from North Carolina.  My mother was a Wheeler, her mother, they tell me, was white and was raised over in Richland [died in 1902].

 

"Becca Jacobs, same date, told me: [Rebecca Chavis married Joseph Jacobs]

 

"Nancy Oxendine came from North Carolina [to Richland County].  She was deeply mixed with Indian.  She was a Goins."

 

Furman wrote in his notebook, "Wade Goins gave me this information March 11, 1892:"

 

"They said Jerry Goins was a Dutchman.  I think Edie Goins was a Tobias [Catawba].  She was a full Indian.  I don't know where she came from.  I don't think we are any relation to the Goinses in North Carolina.  Old man Gibbes was a Revolutionary soldier.  He was appreciated by the whites.  I don't think he had any Indian in him."

 

Furman recorded an interview with J. E. Smiling, April 2, 1892.

 

"Edie Goins was a Lucas before she married Jerry Goins.  The old woman had to appearance of a full Indian, if she was not that, she must have been near about it.  My mother was raised in Barnwell, her mother's name was Patsy Burbage.  Her husband was a Dutchman, Tom Burbage, a Baptist preacher over at Wasamasaw, was my grandmother's brother.  Jerry Goins and my mother were cousins.  I never heard any one speak of old Tom Gibbes having Indian blood.  I used to hear my mother speak of the Stapletons, the Locklears and Cripses who were her relations."

 

On April 26, 1893 Mrs. M. A. Hughson told Furman in an interview that she remembered Edie Goins as a fortune teller. 

 

On April 25, 1893 Tom Gibbes [b1835, son of James Gibbes] was interviewed by Furman:

 

"Our church has 51 or 52 members. Before we had a church, my people attended Providence.  Edie Goins is buried near the church.  I have been preaching there about 15 years.  J. E. Smiley, Jared Chavis and I were the only ones of my people who have been pastors.  Mr. Graham, Mr. Cuttino, Mr. Hughson used to preach for us.  Rev. D. W. Cuttino organized the church.  My uncle, Tom Gibbes said the Gibbses had Indian blood.  No late freedmen, except June Stokes' son, is a member of our church.  I am living on a portion of my father's land, am about 58 years old.  My mother was Edie Goins' daughter.  Our church has always been Baptist and is named Bethesda.  Vicey Goins was my aunt."

 

J. E. Smiling gave a statement to Furman April 25, 1893:

 

"Our church has always been called Bethesda and was organized in 1866.  It was dedicated by Rev. Davy Cuttino and other white ministers.  Mr. Noah Graham was the first minister who preached for us after the church was built.  Mr. Davy Cuttino was the next.  Preacher Nichols was the next; Mr. Hughson came next.  These were supplies.  After these men, I was a supply there, after which the Rev. Thomas Gibbes was pastor of the church.  I don't think Jared Chavis was ever pastor of the church.  This church has never had but two buildings.  The present church building, I think, is on the same grounds where the old Ebenezer Church was.  [Elizabeth Smiling, granddaughter of J. E. S. was born August 14, 1829.]"

 

John Goins gave a deed September 26, 1887 to Ebenezer Free Will Baptist Church and to its members to one acre of land to be used as property for a church building and a one-room school building.  The land was located in Williamsburg Coun-ty at Greeleyville, South Carolina.  Dr. William Moreau Go-ins, Foundation member of Columbia, South Carolina, photo-graphed the segregated school building which was still stand-ing in 2002 and the deed which has never been recorded in the Williamsburg County Court-house, but was retained in the homes of the members for over a century.

 

“Most of my people joined at Providence before Bethesda was formed.  Old Bethesda Church was built where it now stands, a good half mile from where the present Bethesda stands.  It was the old church that Mr. Cuttino and the other white ministers dedicated.  The new church has never been dedicated.  Tom Goins and myself were the leaders in having the old Bethesda Church built, and it was built as a place for us to have worship in on Sunday afternoons.  It was used also as a school-house, and two white men, John Ridgell and Daniel Kelly, taught for us.  As our families increased, we formed a church there as a branch of Providence and got our letters from that church.  John, Madry, Wash and Wade, sons of Vicy Goins are all legally married to their white wives.  Vicey Goins was a member of Bethesda at her death.  Old Tom Gibbes is mentioned in a life of Marion.  The land where the present Bethesda is built belonged to Vicey Goins."

 

Mrs. Harriet Gauley gave an interview to Furman May 29, 1893 in which she stated:

 

"Edie Goins said she was a Lucas before her marriage.  My mother said old Gen. Sumter would go to see old Tom Gibbes, the Revolutionary soldier, and would not let him suffer for anything.  Mother said Gibbes was a faithful soldier."

 

Nelson Chavis [son of Thomas Chavis] was interviewed by Furman June 24, 1893:

 

"My grandmother was [Mary] Polly Gibbes, and her father, Tom Gibbes, was the one mentioned in Book D in the Sumter courthouse.  My father, Thomas Chaves, was the one who told us this.  My grandfather, John Chavis who married Polly Gibbes, fought through the Revolutionary War.  My father told me that John Chavis came from Roanoke, near a little town call Halifax.  My mother was Elivra Winkles, a clear blooded white woman.  Three of my brothers married white women--Albert, Caldwell and Lige.  Betsy Goin's father was my uncle, William Chavis was his name.  Mr. Davy Cuttino was the one who organized and named Bethesda Church."

 

Mrs. Cynthia Hodge was interviewed by Furman August 5, 1893:

 

"Edie Goins told me that her mother was a white woman, and her father was an Indian.  Jerry Goins was a yellow man.  Edie never did tell me that I remember what her father and mother's names were.  Edie said she could talk Indian, but I never heard her.  I heard that old Tom Gibbes was a mighty good soldier."

 

Betsy [Chavis] Goins was interviewed August 12, 1893:

 

"John Chavis was the first one I know of.  He was free-born, and he and old Tom Gibbes fought through the Revolutionary War.  John Chavis settled over Black River.  He married Polly Gibbes, old Tom Gibbes daughter.  Tabitha Edey comes in here somewhere.  My great-grandmother was named Sallie Gibbes [Sarah Brown].  My father was Billy Chavis, John Chavis' son.  My father was married twice.  His first wife was Nancy Griffin.  She was a clear-blooded white woman and came from Richland.  My father's second wife was Miranda Pane; her mother was Lucy Gibbes.  [Lucy Gibbes married Sweat first and then Pane.]  Miranda Pane was West Sweat's half-sister.  I and Beccie Jacobs were by the first marriage of my father; Ervin Chavis and Wakey [Chavis] Goins were by my father's second wife.  My mother had two sons named Griffin; they didn't live around here.  I married Tom Goins.  Granny [Edie] Goins had the Indian blood as sure as you are born.  Jerry Goins died when I was a baby.  Uncle Jim Gibbes married his daughter.  My older daughter was Maria Goins; she married Hughie Oxendine.  He and his mother came from Richland, his mother was Nancy Oxendine who said she was a Goins.  They said Hughie Oxendine got destroyed in Ft. Sumter."

 

Furman wrote in his notebook, "Pres. Michen gave me this information August 14, 1893:"

 

"John Chavis came from Roanoke, Virginia, so they tell me.  He fought in the Revolution.  I have heard my mother say that the old Gibbes fought at Eutaw Springs.  My mother used to pass for a white woman, until my birth.  Edie Goins could talk Indian.  The whole of my people spring from Tabitha Edey [mother of Sarah Brown].  I have heard that John Chavis had Indian blood.  My mother was a kind of red looking woman."

 

Furman recorded, "Jackson Chavis told me this on August 19, 1893:

 

"My grandmother was a [Mary "Polly"] Gibbes and married a Chavis.  They lived over Vance's Ferry, so I have heard my great aunt [Vicia] say.  My mother was Lucy Chavis [daughter of John Chavis].  I was a teamster in the War, fought for about two months and was in the same company that Mr. Frank Folsome was in.  The first of my people to serve in the jury, to my recollection, was Lorenzo Chavis.  The next were John Gibbes and Wade Goins."

 

Furman recorded, Debrietta [Deborah] Chavis told me this on August 19, 1893:

 

"My mother gave the land where Bethesda stands.  I can't tell you what year she gave it.  I was her youngest child.  Tabitha Edey was my mother's grandmother.  I have heard my mother say that she heard Edie Goins say that her name was Edie Lucas before her marriage.  My grandmother Gibbes was named Sallie [Sarah], I think.  I always heard my mother say that she was the youngest child of my grandfather.  Jim Gibbes, Tom Gibbes' father, was the next youngest to her.  I don't know anything about my grandfather having Indian blood."

 

Mary Browder Barr, Foundation researcher of Florence, South Carolina wrote that she discovered a letter written in 1903 by Charles James McDonald Furman.  It revealed that Lavina Tucker Goins told Furman that she was the daughter of Jeb Tucker, an Englishman and Ocenee Gayo, a Red Stick woman from Baton Rouge, Louisiana.  Jeb Tucker fought with the British and Red Sticks in the War of 1812 and was considered a traitor.  So he and his new wife removed to Sumter County, South Carolina where Lavina Tucker was born.  Lavina was described by Furman as a "small dark-skinned woman with black hair, but with blue eyes, therefore she could pass as a white woman."  After Lavina was married to Madry Goins, her mother felt free to go back to Baton Rouge to be with her people.

 

Children born to James Edward Smiling and Matilda Goins Smiling include:

 

Mary Magdalen Smiling          born about 1842

Henry Smiling                          born about 1843

James Edward Smiling, Jr.      born about 1845

Alice Matilda Smiling             born about 1847

Augustus Smiling                    born about 1849

Angeline Smiling                     born about 1852

Shack Smiling                          born about 1855

Cynthia Ann Smiling               born about 1859

 

Mary Magdalen Smiling, daughter of James Edward Smiling and Matilda Goins Smiling, was born about 1842.  She was married about 1861 to Nelson Chavis.

 

Henry Smiling son of James Edward Smiling and Matilda Goins Smiling, was born about 1843.  He was married about 1866 to Harriet Chavis.

 

James Edward Smiling, Jr, son of James Edward Smiling and Matilda Goins Smiling, was born about 1845.  He was married about 1866 to Fannie Knight, daughter of Alexander Knight, "freedman, son of Fannie Hill of Society Hill, North Carolina and Mary Hair Knight of Rockingham County, North Carolina," according to Carolyn Moore.  The mother of Mary Hair Knight was a white woman.

 

Alice Matilda Smiling, daughter of James Edward Smiling and Matilda Goins Smiling, was born about 1847.  She was married about 1866 to Lorenzo Chavis.

 

Angeline Smiling, daughter of James Edward Smiling and Matilda Goins Smiling, was born about 1852.  She was married about 1870 to Leonard Sweet. 

 

Shack [Meshach?] Smiling, son of James Edward Smiling and Matilda Goins Smiling, was born about 1855.  He was married about 1880 to Mary Knight, regarded as a sister to Fannie Knight.

 

Cynthia Ann Smiling, "youngest" daughter of James Edward Smiling and Matilda Goins Smiling, was born about 1859.  She was married about 1877 to Ruben Goins as his first wife.

 

Madrey Goins, son of Frederick Goins and Levicy Gibbes Goins, was born in October 1827 in Williamsburg County, according to Mary M. Browder Barr.  He was married to Lavinia Tucker who was born in South Carolina in March 1835.  Mrs. Barr wrote, "I have a 98-year-old cousin who knew my great grandfather, Madrey Goins before he died in 1910."  She states that he was a Confederate veteran and drew a South Carolina pension for a disability received in a leg wound.

 

Madrey Goins lived in the Chavis Settlement about 1880, according to Carolyn Moore.  He was buried in Goins Cemetery at Greeleyville, South Carolina.  When Lavinia Tucker Goins died, she was buried beside her husband.

 

Children born to Madrey Goins and Lavinia Tucker Goins include:

 

     Ceny Goins          born July 15, 1875

 

Ceny Goins, daughter of Madrey Goins and Lavinia Goins, was born at Greeleyville, South Carolina July 15, 1875.  She was married about 1900 to Jessie Benjamin Browder who was born September 9, 1878 in Clarendon County, South Carolina to Adam Browder and Margaret A. McCall Browder.  In 1903 they lived at Greeleyville.  She died in Florence County, South Carolina March 26, 1932, and he died there March 31, 1942.  She was buried in Garden of Memories Cemetery, and he was buried in Bethel Church Cemetery, Olanta, South Carolina.

 

Children born to Jessie Benjamin Browder and Ceny Goins Browder include:

 

     William Benjamin Browder     born July 23, 1903

 

William Benjamin Browder, son of Jessie Benjamin Browder and Ceny Goins Browder, was born July 23, 1903 at Greeleyville.  He was married September 4, 1925 in Florence County to Ozella Barineau who was born there October 4, 1903 to Sanders Barineau and Mary Lundy Barineau.  William Benjamin Browder died there August 6, 1965 and was buried in Garden of Memories Cemetery.  She died November 10, 1974 and was buried in Mt. Elon Cemetery.

 

Children born to them include:

 

     Mary M. Browder          born April 12, 1928

 

Mary M. Browder, daughter of William Benjamin Browder and Ozella Barineau Browder, was born April 12, 1928.  She was married secondarily August 6, 1964 to W. Cooper Barr who was born April 22, 1944 in Florence.  They continued there in 1991.

 

Mary M. Browder Barr has done extensive research on her Goins family and supplied the data on them for the manuscript.  She wrote,

 

"I have found documents on my branch of the family which have recorded the surname as Gowens, Goens, Gowins, Goings, Goan, and Goins.   To further com-plicate the matter, the family lived in the community populated by the mixed-race Redbones.  Charles James McDonald Furman, author and lecturer [1863-1904] spent many years researching the origin of this mys-terious, isolated people whose history parallels that of the Melungeons.  He referred to them as a 'mixed breed people who were never slaves and who had Indian blood in their veins.'  He considered them to be a branch of the Croatans and perhaps descendants of the lost colony of Sir Walter Raleigh."

 

James Goins, twin son of Frederick Goins and Levicy Gibbes Goins, was born about 1829.  He was married about 1850 to his cousin, Martha Gibbes, daughter of James Gibbes and Polly Goins Gibbes.  Following her death, he was remarried to Mahala Chavis, daughter of Tom Chavis and Elvira Winkles Chavis.

 

Seven children were born to James Goins, Martha Gibbes Goins and Mahala Chavis Goins, including:

 

Manning Goins          born about 1852

Solomon Goins          born about 1855

 

Thomas Goins, twin son of Frederick Goins and Levicy Gibbes Goins, was born about 1829.  He was married about 1850 to Elizabeth Chavis.

 

Maria Goins               born about 1849

William Goins          born about 1850

 

Maria Goins, daughter of Thomas Goins and Elizabeth Chavis Goins, was born about 1849.  She was married about 1866 to Hughie Oxendine, son of Nancy Oxendine, a North Carolinian who stated that she was a Goins descendant, according to Furman who described her as "Indian." 

 

William Goins, son of Thomas Goins and Elizabeth Chavis Goins, was born about 1850.  He became a preacher.  He is identified as "the ancestor of the Goins brothers who filed a lawsuit at Pembroke" by Carolyn Moore.  The reference pertains to an Indian school in Robeson County, North Carolina, near the South Carolina state line.

 

Evelyn McKinley Orr wrote of the school at Pembroke:

 

"The early Lumbees used the term "Melungeon."  An instance of their probable ties to the Sumter County Redbones appears in the 1915 North Carolina Supreme Court case of "W. B. Goins et al vs. the Board of Trustees, Indian Normal School."  Children of the Redbones Goins families had been denied entrance into the Indian Normal School for Croatan/Cherokee [now called Lumbee] Indians in Pembroke, North Carolina.  The Goins families claimed they were sometimes called Redbones sometimes called Croatan Indians.  They were asked to prove that they were "not of Negro blood to the fourth generation.

 

Harold McMillan, a former North Carolina state senator and Lumbee historian, was called to testify in the case.  He had written and introduced the legislation in 1887 which provided for the "establishment of a school for the people who descended from the tribes on Croatan Island."  In 1885 he had written the legislation which gave the Indians living near Lumberton, North Carolina the official name of Croatan.  Prior to that legislation, they called themselves Malungeans.  The term Malungean was also used to describe a member of the Redbone Goins family in the transcript."

 

Tim Hashaw wrote March 9, 2002,

 

The book "Lumbee, Indian Histories; Race, Ethnicity, and Indian Identity in the Southern United States" by Gerald M. Sider, Cambridge University Press reveals much.  The au-thor has very esteemed credentials and you may come to the understanding that the so-called "Indians" known as Croatans and Lumbees, are in fact, early Melungeons.

 

Sider presents evidence that Lumbees, Smilings, Croatans of the Carolinas first called themselves "malungeans" before claiming to be Indians.  To begin the story I quote:

 

"In 1913, three brothers, A. A. Goins, W. W. Goins and W. D. Goins who were born and lived in Sumter County, South Carolina before moving to Robeson County about 1907 sought to enroll their children in the Indian normal school.  Their sis-ter had gone to this school and was teaching in an Indian grad-ed school in the county.

 

Despite their sister's position and personal history, their own children were denied admissions by the Indian school commit-tee and the case went to the superior court where they won.  The normal school committee then appealed to the state su-preme court.  The following excerpts from the case records bring to the foreground how history was involved and how it became crucial to the construction of what was called a "pedi-gree" - a genealogy of social and ethnic relations as well as relatives.

 

"Plaintiff's petition, superior court:

 

10.  That the order denying admission adopted by the defend-ant board of trustees was upon the alleged ground that the plaintiffs had not proved their "Pedigrees" meaning thereby that they had not establised to the satisfaction of the said trus-tees that they were of "pure" Indian blood . . . that the plaintiff W. W. Goins, at said time went to Sumter County from which place he had removed to Robeson County, and secured docu-mentary evidence... "

 

A white man named Dr. Furman had worked up W. W. Goins' ancestry purportedly showing their Indian ancestry:

 

"He traced up our origin and found out that our parents went from North Carolina, some of  the older ones, and there were a lot of names--Oxendine, Hunt, Chavis and Goins--he having traced them up first give me a little light and that was what I found out about it."

 

W. W. Goins testified:

 

“I am a brother of W. D. Goins.  I was born and raised in Sumter County, South Carolina.  My Mother is there.  I have been living in Robeson County, North Carolina for the past eight years.  I have one child of school age.

 

Dr. Furman traced up our origin and found out that our parents went from North Carolina.  Some of the older one, and there were a lot of names—Oxendine, Hunt, Chavis and Goins.  Names of the families in the Indian families down there were Smilings, Chavis and Goins.  The Oxendines are dead. 

 

Old Bill Chavis, my great-grandfather, went from this [Robe-son] County.  Tom and Bill Chavis came from Robeson County, and old man Goins came from Cumberland County, North Carolina.  My wife’s name was Pauline Epps.  Her father’s name was Edward Epps, and her mother was Adeline Epps.  Her mother was supposed to be half white and half Indian.”

 

Counsel then calls Fannie Chavis, the sister who had gone to the Lumbee Normal school.  She was requested to look at the certificate from Sumter County which said:

 

"I, L. I. Parrott, clerk of the court for Sumter county, said state, do hereby certify that the families of Smilings and Goins of this county have been known as ‘Red Bones’ ever since I have been acquainted with the people.  Mr. McDonald Fur-man, now deceased, took a great deal of trouble several years ago to establish the fact that they were of the Indian race.  They are looked upon as a separate race, neither white nor Negro."

 

Thereafter several Lumbee Indians of Robeson County with names like Chavis, Locklear, Bell, etc. and even a state legis-lator who testified he had gone down to Sumter County South Carolina to investigate the Goins' claims.  They had question-ed several neighbors, old timers etc., learning of their past and how they were traditionally viewed.   The Lumbee, as Lock-lear testified:

 

"I know William Goins, father of these parties. I visited them in South Carolina once about 6 years ago.  The general reputa-tion I got down there was that they were Indian people.  They were supposed to be Indians.  I have lived in Robeson County all my life, and I am perfectly familiar with the Indian people up here from my association, being in the home of old man Goins and his family and from the investigation I have made of the people there.  My opinion is that on the mother's side plaintiffs are Indians and on the father's side Malungeans.  The Rev. William Goins is not a typical indian by feature, he is a mixture between white and Indian."

 

Another witness, Lizzie Brown was called.  Brown had been accepted as a Lumbee even though she had come from Carolina Melungeon people

 

"I am a sister of the plaintiffs.  I have been living at Pates in Robeson County for five years.  I was raised in Sumter Coun-ty, South Carolina. sc.  My boy goes to the public Indian school at Pates.  He has also gone to the normal school.  We are Indians in the North, but they gave us the name of ‘Red Bones’ down here."

 

Finally we come to Hamilton McMillan, witness for the defendants:

 

"I am a resident of Robeson County.  I am now 78 years of age.  I represented Robeson County in the state legislature in 1885 and 1887.  I am familiar with the Act of 1885 designat-ing certain Indians of Robeson County as Croatan Indians; I introduced the bill myself.  I was acquainted with the Indians of Robeson County at the time the Act of 1885 was passed de-signating them as Croatan Indians. 

 

I had been investigating their history for several years before that.  I have given them the designation of Croatan Indians in the Act.  I wanted to give them some designation. There was a tribe known as Croatan tribe on Croatan Island.  It was an honorable name and it was a complete designation. 

 

The Indians designated as Croatan Indians were living in Robeson County.  None of them lived in Sumter County, South Caroliina as far as I know.  I had the Act of 1887 passed to establish a normal school for the Croatan Indians of Robe-son County.

 

"Question by the court to McMillan:  Do these people here call themselves Croatans?

 

Answer: No sir, they call themselves Malungeans.

 

Question: Were they never called Croatans until this Act was introduced in here?

 

Answer: No sir.

 

Question: Where were they from anyway?

 

Answer: The traditions all point to the residence west of Pamlico Sound, beyond Cape Hatteras [in the northern part of North Carolina].

 

"The plaintiffs won- they were Indians of Robeson County in the eyes of the court, but the county replied by building them a separate school: an Indian school in the midst of the ‘settle-ment’ area but a school for ‘different Indians.’

 

"Further complexities in the role of Whites in the social con-struction of Indian separateness and the accompanying his-tories, are suggested in the testimony of Hamilton McMillan, who as senator in the state legislature of 1885 sponsored the legislation that accorded the Indian people of Robeson County legal recognition as Indians and also provided--actually in-vented--as Whites have invented all "tribal" names for Native Americans--their first official name: Croatan.  The name was a transformation of what he claimed they called themselves [both Croatan and Melungean refer to a prior intermixture with Whites, the first specific, the second [Melungeon general.]"

 

So, we have people intermarrying with Lumbees who prior to 1885 referred to themselves generally as Melungeons in North and South Carolina.

 

The migration trend was from the Carolinas into Tennessee and Kentucky, not vice versa.  Here is an implication that these people had been known in the Carolinas as Melungeons for a time prior to 1885.  A generation would require they were known as Melungeons in the Carolinas at least by 1810 and likely earlier.

 

Later on Siler writes about the need to deny the "black" ances-try in the red-white-black mix among these people in the Car-olinas.

 

"Both this ‘Indian removal’ and the disfranchisement of free persons of color happened in a context where one's ‘racial’ identity played a crucial role in the reproduction over time of the social relations of production.  To be Black, or Indian, or White or less specifically but no less significantly, one of the multiple different socially recognized mixes: a mustee [mixed Indian and Black]; a mulatto [mixed Black and White]; a mes-tizo, or more commonly a ‘half breed’ or ‘half blood’ [mixed Indian and White]; or Melungeon [mixed Indian, white and black] plus the legal categories ‘free persons of color’ [which included all the above and more] and ‘free Negro’-- all meant a great deal, not just in terms of political rights and pro-tections, but in terms of the kinds of positions one could and could not have in the processes of production and the kinds of returns for one's labor one might reasonably expect."

 

Henry Goins, son of Frederick Goins and Levicy Gibbes Goins, was born about 1831.

 

Washington Goins, son of Frederick Goins and Levicy Gibbes Goins, was born about 1835.

 

Frederick "Fed" Goins, son of Jeremiah "Jerry" Goins, was born about 1780.  He was married about 1800 to Lavicia Gibbs, daughter of Thomas Gibbs.

 

Children born to Frederick "Fed" Goins and Lavicia Gibbs Goins, according to Mary M. Browder Barr, include:

 

     Thomas Goins [twin]          born about 1802

 

Polly Goins, daughter of Jeremiah "Jerry" Goins and Edy Lucas Goins, was born about 1795.  She was married about 1815 to James Gibbes, son of Thomas Gibbes and Sarah Brown Gibbes, according to Carolyn Moore.

 

Children born to them include:

 

     Martha Gibbes               born about 1830

 

Martha Gibbes, daughter of James Gibbes and Polly Goins Gibbes, was born about 1818.  She was married about 1837 to a cousin, James Goins, twin son of Frederick Goins and and Levicy Gibbes Goins.  For details of her life, see his account.

 

Mary “Polly” Goins, daughter of Jeremiah “Jerry” Goins and Edie Lucas Goins, was born about 1795.  Of this individual nothing more is known.

==O==

Second Lt. B. A. Gowan, Fifty-first North Carolina Infantry Regiment of Columbus County was among the prisoners of war at Morris Island in the harbor of Charleston, South Carolina from September 7 to October 21, 1864.

 

The Federal troops used the prisoners of war as a human screen so that any incoming shells from the Confederate batteries on the shore would have to pass over the heads of their fellows to strike the Union position.

 

Whiteville, North Carolina [Columbus County] was the residence of Lt. B. A. Gowan, according to "North Carolina Regiments," Volume 4.

                                             ==O==

A negro family headed by Christian Gowan also lived in Fair Bluff Township, Enumeration District 51, page 34 of the 1880 census of Columbus County.  The family was recorded as:

 

"Gowan,     Christian         32, born in NC

                    Ervin               13, born in NC

                   Mary                12, born in NC

                   Eliza T.           10, born in NC

                   Joshua               6, born in NC

                   James M.           3, born in NC"

                                             ==O==

Pvt. Henry F. Gowan of Columbus County enlisted in Con­federate service prior to March 26, 1864 and served in Company K, Thirty-sixth North Carolina Infantry Regiment and in the Second North Carolina Artillery Regiment.  He was captured at Ft. Fisher January 15, 1865 and was confined in Federal prison at Point Lookout, Maryland.  He took the oath of allegiance to the Union June 27, 1865 and was released.

                                             ==O==

Samuel Gowan, a Georgian, was the head of a household listed in the 1880 census of Columbus County, Enumeration District 51, page 7.  The family living at Fair Bluff, North Carolina, was recorded as:

 

"Gowan,     Samuel                   40, born in GA

                   S. Elizabeth            36, born in NC

                   Joseph R.                12, born in NC

                   Robert D.                11, born in NC

                   Vance E.                   7, born in NC, daughter

                   Nimpa J.                   5, born in NC, daughter

                   Sam H.                      3, born in NC"

                                             ==O==

John Gowens was listed as the head of a household in the 1820 census of Columbus County, page 15, according to Dorothy Williams Potter in "Index to the 1820 census of North Carolina."

                                             ==O==

Elias Gowins, owner of four slaves, was the head of the only household of interest to Gowen chroniclers in the 1840 census of Columbus County, page 62.  He was born between 1800 and 1810.  His household was enumerated as:

 

Gowins,     Elias     white male         30-40

                                white female      10-15

                                white female      10-15

                                     white female       5-10"

 

Descendant Researchers:

 

          Samuel Kenneth Goans, 2919 Walnut Creek Drive, Antioch, TN, 37013,

615/366-0639

          Willis T. & Rachel Finley, 307 Fairview Lane, Longview, TX, 903/759-0415,

willis.rachel.finley@worldnet.att.net

          Patricia Melton, 1515 45th St, Moline, IL, 61265, 309/797-4427,

mjayspat@mchsi.com

 

 

 

 

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