Greene - pafn692 - Generated by Personal Ancestral File

Selected Families and Individuals

Notes


Seigneur Billung I von Stubeckeshorn

[INDIV2.DAT]

Seigneur of Stubenskorn. Founder of the Billung dynasty.
Source: Ahnentafel for Edward III of England; Jones Family of Prince George Co., VA Entries: 44874 Updated: Sat Feb 21 22:19:25 2004 Contact: Randy Jones Home Page: ROOTS http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~randyj2222/index.html


Aeda Ferdurunda d'Italia Caroling

[INDIV2.DAT]
Surname from second source.
Source: Ahnentafel for Edward III of England; Steiner/McCall Genealogy Entries: 28757 Updated: Thu Aug 15 19:53:22 2002 Contact: Jill S. McCall Home Page: Steiner/McCall Genealogy http://www.steinermccall.homestead.com; blumberg -dehoney Entries: 36348 Updated: Tue Feb 17 11:47:04 2004 Contact: tom blumberg


Wratislaw II Premyslide Duke of Bohemia

[INDIV2.DAT]

King of Bohemia

Source: Ahnentafel of Edward III, King of England;
[kinfolk2.GED]; Susan Shannon, [email protected]; http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/s/n/a/susan-h-shannon/


Arabona Premyslide?

[INDIV2.DAT]

Source: Ahnentafel of Edward III, King of England; Ahnentafel for President
John Adams


Wratislaw II Premyslide Duke of Bohemia

[INDIV2.DAT]

King of Bohemia

Source: Ahnentafel of Edward III, King of England;
[kinfolk2.GED]; Susan Shannon, [email protected]; http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/s/n/a/susan-h-shannon/


Zuatava Lambert

[INDIV2.DAT]

Source: Ahnentafel of Edward III, King of England


Bretislaw I Achilles Premyslide Duke of Bohemia

[INDIV2.DAT]

Source: Ahnentafel of Edward III, King of England
[kinfolk2.GED]; Susan Shannon, [email protected]; http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/s/n/a/susan-h-shannon/


Judith von Schweinfurt

[INDIV2.DAT]

Sister to Albert Otto III
Source: Ahnentafel of Edward III, King of England
[kinfolk2.GED]; Susan Shannon, [email protected]; http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/s/n/a/susan-h-shannon/


Governor Helgaud I de Ponthieu

Source: Early New England Ancestors Entries: 23315 Updated: Sun Nov 3 20:41:22 2002 Contact: Susan Shannon


Bertha de Ponthieu

Source: Pitt County Families Entries: 52000 Updated: Mon Dec 16 09:25:32 2002 Contact: Lisa Wallendorf Scarola


Count Hildouin I de Montdidier

[INDIV2.DAT]

Count Montdidier; Seigneur de Romeru
Source: Ahnentafel for Edward III of England; Sims2001 Entries: 62571 Updated: Sat Nov 17 14:19:10 2001 Contact: Mary Shaffer


Countess Hersinde de Romeru Dame de Ramerupt

[INDIV2.DAT]

Countess Arcis-sur-aube, Dame de Romeru. Living in 970
Source: Ahnentafel for Edward III of England


Inge I Stenkilsson King of Swedes

[INDIV2.DAT]

King of Sweden (1079-1084) with his brother Hallsten.
Inge den Aldre Stenkilsson. (Inge the Elder)
He assumed the throne of Sweden together with his brother, Hallsten in 1079. His brother died and he was driven from the throne by the pagans in 1084. He was returned to the throne in 1087 after the death of Blot Sven.
King of Sweden (1087-1110)

Source: Valerio Lucchinetti, [email protected]; http://www.millcomm.com/~gary983/Swkonger.htm; Ahnentafel for Edward III of England; FamilySearch™ Ancestral File v4.19


Helena Torildsdatter Blot-Sven Queen of Swedes

[INDIV2.DAT]

Source: Ahnentafel of Edward III, King of England; Family Tree - Newell, Stanley, Dryak, Guyon, Rogers, Ely, Lewis Entries: 54402 Updated: Thu Nov 13 16:43:20 2003 Contact: J. K. Loren; FamilySearch™ Ancestral File v4.19


Count Siegbert II Saargau Saarbrucken

[INDIV2.DAT]
Saarbrücken is the capital of the Saarland, Bundesland in Germany. Geographical location 49°15' N 6°58' E. Population 209,104.
The city is the industrial and transport centre of a great coal basin; factories here produce iron and steel, sugar, beer, pottery, optical instruments, machinery, and construction materials.
Historic landmarks in the city include the stone bridge across the Saar (1546), the Gothic church of St Arnual, the 18th century Saarbrücker Schloss (castle) and the old part of the town, the St. Johanner Markt. In 1815 Saarbrücken came under Prussian control, and for two periods in the 20th century (1919-1935 and 1945-1957) it became part of the Saar territory under French administration. For this reason, coupled with its proximity to the French border, it retains a certain French influence.
The Saar area was incorporated into the Roman Empire in the 1st century BC, and later came under control of the Franks. In 925 it became part of the Holy Roman Empire, but a strong French influence continued. From 1381 to 1793 the counts of Nassau-Saarbrücken were the main local rulers. Often a prize contended for by its stronger neighbours, the area came under French domination in the 16th century and was incorporated into France in the 1680s. France was forced to relinquish the Saar in 1697, but from 1793 to 1815 regained control of the region. After 1815 much of the area was part of the Prussian Rhineland Province. During the 19th century the coal and iron resources of the region were developed.
Under the Treaty of Versailles (1919) the Saar coal-mines were made the exclusive property of France for a period of 15 years as compensation for the destruction of French mines during the war. The treaty also provided for a plebiscite, at the end of the 15-year period, to determine the territory's future status, and in 1935 more than 90 per cent of the electorate voted for reunification with Germany. The Saar subsequently rejoined Germany.
Heavily bombed in World War II and made part of the French Zone of Occupation in 1945, the area was made a separate zone in 1946. Throughout the late 1940s and early 1950s, the French tried to make the Saar a separate state. In 1956 the area requested early incorporation into Germany, and on January 1, 1957, the Saar, under the name Saarland, became a state of the Federal Republic of Germany.
The city suffered severe damage in World War II. Parts of Saarbrücken were flooded following record rainstorms in December 1993.
The city is served by Saarbrücken-Ensheim Airport (SCN) and is also the home of the Saarland University (Universität des Saarlands).
Some of the closest big cities are Trier, Luxembourg, Nancy, Metz, Karlsruhe and Mannheim. Saarbrücken is also connected by the city's public transport network to the town of Sarreguemines in France, allowing easy crossing of the border between one country and the other. It is also connected to the satellite town of Völklingen, where the old steel works were the first industrial monument to be declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1994 - the Völklinger Hütte.
Nowadays, the Saarland's industrial legacy is belied by its wonderfully green scenery and natural serenity.

The source lists him as "Siegbert II Saargau"
Source: Ahnentafel for President John Adams; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saarbrucken


von Eppenstein

[INDIV2.DAT]

Source: Ahnentafel for President John Adams


Peter d'Avignon Amic

[INDIV2.DAT]

Source: Ahnentafel for Edward III of England


Agnes Amic?

[INDIV2.DAT]

Occurred. 1113 [?]
Source: Ahnentafel for Edward III of England


Amic d'Avignon

[INDIV2.DAT]

Occurred. 1019-1036
Source: Ahnentafel for Edward III of England