Lt. General Robert C. Richardson

Lt. General Robert C. Richardson

BRIEF HISTORY GENERAL ROBERT C. RICHARDSON, COMMANDER: VII ARMY CORPS, NORTHERN CALIFORNIA DEFENSE SECTOR AND CONNECTION WITH FORT ORD WW2

"General Robert C. Richardson Jr. had a successful and significant career in the United States Army, but is rarely remembered for his contributions".

- Quote: National Register of Historic Places Registration Form for Richardson Theater, Fort Shafter, Hawaii.

The VII Army Corps Headquarters was rushed to the West Coast after the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. Major General Robert C. Richardson, Jr. at the time was commanding the VII Army Corps and was in charge of overseeing the defense of Northern California. He also became the commander of the Northern California Defense Sector of the Western Defense Command. Part of his command was the 7th Division at Fort Ord and included the 74th, 75th, 76th, Field Artillery Battalions, still horse-drawn and the 107th Cavalry (horse/mechanized) who were stationed throughout California protecting our coast and other sensitive areas. Originally the Headquarters of the VII Army Corps and Northern California Sector was established at San Jose, California by the Seventh (7th) Division in accordance with Plan Rainbow No. 5.


Major General Robert C. Richardson Jr., commanded the VII Army Corps and Northern California Sector after the Pearl Harbor attack in December 1941. (1882-1954)

GEN. ROBERT C. RICHARDSON JR.'S OFFICER'S IDENTIFICATION CARD Official War Department identification card issued to Major Gen. Robert C. Richardson on Jan. 2, 1943 while he was commanding general of the VII Corps. Richardson's photo, vitals, and fingerprints appear on the identification, as does his full signature. Somewhat worn and soiled as one would expect, else good condition. Note: This was an auction item.

FOOT LOCKER OF LT. GENERAL ROBERT C. RICHARDSON JR. (NEW ADDITION TO COLLECTION)
The U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group is proud and honored to announce a new addition to our "Horse Soldier" museum collection.


Foot locker and contents of Lt. General Robert C. Richardson, including his West Point text books, most signed and dated and personal contents. Included in the collection is the General's M1904 halter, saddle pommel pockets from WW1, and a 16x20 portrait of Richardson wearing his summer uniform with three stars. I acquired the foot locker from a neighbor in Bath, New Hampshire. Richardson lived across the street after he retired from the Army. His son, Brig. Gen. Robert C. Richardson III was raised in this home and he and his family continued to use it as a family vacation home until it was recently sold. Image Source: U.S. Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group Collection - Greg Krenzelok Director.



National Guard Armory located at 240 North 2nd Street, San Jose, California. Originally built by the WPA in 1933. Major General Robert C. Richardson Jr., commanded the VII Army Corps and Northern California Sector after the Pearl Harbor attack in December 1941. Headquarters for the VII Army Corps and the Northern California Sector was set up at the National Guard Armory located at 240 North 2nd Street, San Jose, California. This building is still there and now privately own. I have contacted the owner and in the process of documenting the building. Image Source: U.S. Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group Collection - Greg Krenzelok Director.

After Pearl Harbor, chance of attack by the Japanese on the West Coast was considered very high. Richardson originally organized the defenses of Northern California Sector. Included under his command was the 107th Cavalry horse/mechanized, attached to the VII Corps troops and Northern California Sector troops: 74th, 75th, 76th Field Artillery Battalions , still horse-drawn and the 7th Division stationed at Fort Ord and throughout Northern California. Richardson was a cavalry man at heart and at West Point chose the cavalry arm of service and had several cavalry commands. You can bet he had a special interest in the horse units when he served on the West Coast, Fort Ord was in his command area.


Major General Robert C. Richardson VII Army Corps maneuvers 1941. Source: Records and Images, Robert Charlwood Richardson papers, Hoover Institution.

Image on the right: General Richardson's paperwork, Subject: Northern California Sector and VII Army Corps, dated March 26, 1942. During the concern of a Japanese attack on the West Coast the War Department and the Western Defense Command worked on coming up with a plan to protect the West Coast and to organized the units assigned to each sector. Once the threat was lowered the new concern was defending the West Coast and at the same time going on the offensive and training the troops for overseas theaters of war. Troop movement was great with a lot of troops coming and going, several plans were organized. In this letter from Richardson are his recommendations for the VII Army Corps and the Northern California Sector and the troops needed. Note: Red dots marks important units to this research. Source: Records, Robert Charlwood Richardson papers, Box no. 38, Hoover Institution Archives.


Western Defense Command and VII Army Corps and Northern California Sector (N.C.S.) stamps used on General Richardson's paperwork. Source: Records and Images, Robert Charlwood Richardson papers, Hoover Institution.


BRIEF HISTORY DEFENSE OF CALIFORNIA 1941-1945 WW2

The VII Army Corps Headquarters was rushed to the West Coast after the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. Major General Robert C. Richardson, Jr. at the time was commanding the VII Army Corps and was in charge of overseeing the defense of Northern California. He also became the commander of the California Defense Sector of the Western Defense Command. Part of his command was the 7th Division at Fort Ord and included the 74th, 75th, 76th, Field Artillery Battalions, still horse-drawn and the 107th Cavalry (horse/mechanized) who were stationed throughout California protecting our coast and other sensitive areas. Originally the Headquarters of the VII Army Corps and Northern California Sector was established at San Jose, California by the Seventh (7th) Division in accordance with Plan Rainbow No. 5.

Note: RAINBOW WAR PLAN: Various plans prepared between 1939 and 1941 to meet Axis aggression involving more than one enemy. Each plan was named with a color; RAINBOW 5 was published in October 1941.

The War Department on 17 March 1941, announced the formation of four defense commands within the continental limits of the United State. The Western Defense Command was created, consisted of the States of Washington, Oregon, California, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Arizona and Alaska. Lt. General John L DeWitt Commanding General of the Fourth (4th) Army and first Commanding General of the Western Defense Command, Headquarters: Presidio of San Francisco.

December 7, 1941: Japan makes a surprise attack on the military installations in Hawaii. Rainbow Plan No. 5 become effective, Category "B" in effect. The Northwestern, the Northern California, and Southern California Sectors were established. Auth: (WD Rad #242 to 4A dtd 27 Nov 41)

December 14, 1941 - Category of defense on West Coast changed from Category "B" to Category "C". Auth: (WD Rad #477 to WDC, dtd 14 Dec 1941)

December 19, 1941 - The Southern Land Frontier Sector, Western Theater of Operations, activated under the command of the Commanding General, 3rd Cavalry Brigade. The El-Centro Sub-Sector of the Southern Land Frontier Sector attached to the Southern California Sector.

December 19, 1941 - Commanding General (Richardson) VII Army Corps, designated the Commanding General, Northern California Sector. Auth: GO #8, Hq WDC & 4A, 19 Dec 1941.

20 March 1942 - A War Department letter received clarifying instructions of 11 December 1941. The below is one of the pertinent points:

Point no. 4 - The III and the VII Army Army Corps Headquarters and Corps troops: the 3rd, 7th, and 35th Divisions will pass to control of the Commanding General of Army Ground Forces not later the 15th April 1942. Note: Army Ground Forces was responsible for the organization, training and preparation of the U.S. Army for overseas service.

Auth: (WD AGO ltr AG 381, dtd 11 Mar 42, subj: Defense of Continental U.S. to CG's of Def Comd.)

August 31, 1945 - Northern California Sector was deactivated. Auth: (WDC GO # 15, dtd 19 Aug. 45)

Major General Robert C. Richardson, Jr., Commanded the VII Corps from 21 August 1941 to 1 June 1943.

Lt. General Robert Charlwood Richardson's military career spanned the first half of the 20th Century. After completing high school, he received an appointment to attend the US Military Academy at West Point, New York and graduated in 1904 with a commission as a 2nd lieutenant in the US Cavalry. He was sent to the Philippines where he joined the 14th US Cavalry and saw combat action during the Philippine Insurrection.

Returning to the United States, he was with the 14th Cavalry at the Presidio of San Francisco, California for the 1906 earthquake where led his cavalry troop from the Presidio as part of the Government's response to the earthquake and subsequent firestorm.

During World War I, then (temporary) Major Richardson sailed with General Barry to France from New York December 1, 1917. Fluent in French, Richardson served as Aide and observer with foreign armies until January 9, 1918. On June 14, 1918, he was assigned to the Operations Division, General Staff, AEF as Liaison Officer for G.H.Q Allied Headquarters and with American Armies, Corps, and Divisions, during the combat operations of 1918. He escorted Allied missions in St. Mihiel Offensive. By now a temporary Lt Colonel, Richardson was Liaison Officer with Headquarters, 1st Army for the opening of Meuse-Argonne Offensive and the Operations Officer Representative at Advance G.H.Q. Major Richardson was one of the chief planners of the Saint-Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne offensives, reporting directly to Pershing.

In March 1928 he was assigned to the 13th Cavalry at Fort Riley, Kansas.

By June 1938 he had been promoted to the rank of brigadier general and became commander of the 2nd Cavalry Brigade at Fort Bliss, Texas until February 1939 when he became Commandant of the US Cavalry School at Fort Riley.

Prior to World War II, Richardson commanded the 1st Cavalry Division from 1940-1941. Local Marina Horse Soldier Allen MacDonald (B Troop, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division) was also under the command of Richardson.


President Roosevelt sits with General MacArthur and Admiral Nimitz while Lt. General Robert C. Richardson and Admiral Leahy stand by during 7th Division Review. July 27, 1944. At Schofield Barrack, Hawaii. Source: Image, Robert Charlwood Richardson papers, Box no. 55, Hoover Institution Archives.

Note: Richardson was Commanding General of all Army personnel in the Central Pacific while simultaneously serving as Commanding General of the Hawaiian Department and as Military Governor of Hawaii at the time when the above image was taken.

In August 1943 Richardson had been designated Commanding General of all Army and Air Forces in the Central Pacific Area under Nimitz. General Richardson was the first senior Army general officer to ever serve as Joint forces subordinate commander under a non-Army flag officer, Fleet Admiral Nimitz. Admiral Nimitz was the Commander-in-Chief of the Pacific Ocean Areas and directed the operations of all Army and Air Forces. Nimitz retained also immediate command of the Pacific Fleet, assuming the respective titles of CINCPOA and CINCPAC. On 20 July 1943 Nimitz received a directive from the Joint Chiefs of Staff to assume the offensive. Offensives starting in 1943 under Richardson's command: Gilberts Islands, Tarawa, Makin, Marshall Islands, Roi, Namur, Kwajalein, Engebi, Eniwetok, Truk (by-passed), Marianas, Saipan, Guam, Palau, Pelelieu, Angaur, Ulithi, Yap, Leyte, Ryukyus Islands, Kerama Retto, Okinawa, and le Shima. The ultimate destination, of course, was Tokyo by way of Truk, Saipan, Iwo Jima, Okinawa, or whatever islands were deemed to be the best route. During the last desperate battle at Japan's doorstep all Army commands in the Pacific were placed under General MacArthur. Richardson was on the Missouri (first row of officers), 2 September 1945 at 0900 hours, at Surrendering Ceremony of Japan. Others showing were MacArthur, Stilwell, Percival, Wainwright, etc. Richard in my opinion is one of our great forgotten American generals.


"REVIEW HONORS MAJ. GEN. RICHARDSON" FORT ORD PANORAMA NEWSPAPER 1942


Original image found on the front page of the Friday May 1, 1942 Fort Ord Panorama newspaper: "REVIEW HONORS MAJ. GEN. RICHARDSON". Source: Image, Robert Charlwood Richardson papers, Box no. 38, Hoover Institution Archives.


Major General Robert C. Richardson Jr. Review. Image source of Fort Ord Panorama: Presidio of Monterey, DLIFLC Archives.


BETTER VIEW: General Richardson couldn't see the mounts being loaded into the portees closely enough from the reviewing stand Saturday, so he stepped down from his armored car and walked into the demonstration area. He's shown here with Colonel King, Col. Fitch and other staff officers. (Right) Major General Robert C. Richardson, center. Image source of Fort Ord Panorama: Presidio of Monterey, DLIFLC Archives.

Fort Ord Panorama: Major General Richardson can be found on the front page of the Friday May 1, 1942 Fort Ord Panorama newspaper: "REVIEW HONORS MAJ. GEN. RICHARDSON". General Richardson is reviewing the 107th Cavalry before they lose their horses. It is a great article and tribute to his presence at Fort Ord and California.



(left) Major General Robert C. Richardson Jr. in the left armory car as the 107th Cavalry horse/mechanized pass in review, May 1, 1942 at Fort Ord, California. Source: Image, Robert Charlwood Richardson papers, Box no. 38, Hoover Institution Archives.


"REVIEW HONORS MAJ. GEN. RICHARDSON"

Fort Ord, California, Panorama, Friday May 1, 1942

Note: Because of wartime censors the unit number was not mentioned, but it was the 107th Cavalry.

CAVALRY UNIT IN IMPRESSIVE FIELD DISPLAY
Major General Robert C. Richardson, Jr., commander of VII Army Corps, reviewed what probably was the last formal parade by a cavalry unit stationed at Fort Ord. The event - more colorful than any the unit has conducted since coming to Ord - was a goodbye gesture to the horses which soon will be replaced completely with mechanized equipment. It was staged in the area north of Ord Village.

Following the review a demonstration of loading the remounts into portees, General Richardson spoke to the officers of the unit, complimenting them both the appearance of the men and the equipment. Colonel Roger S. Fitch, Fort Ord Commander, and Colonel Woods King were among those who shared the reviewing car with General Richardson. When the loading demonstration began, General Richardson left his place in the armored car which served as a reviewing stand, and walked to where the horses were being put into the large trucks. The review was not open to the public, although the usual large crowd that gathers on the road west of the area witnessed it.

Besides the cavalry unit, the review also included a mule pack outfit. (Note: possibly the 68th Quartermaster Pack Troop)

Image on page 10 of the above issue of the Fort Ord Panorama shows General Richardson getting close-up look:

BETTER VIEW: General Richardson couldn't see the mounts being loaded into the portees closely enough from the reviewing stand Saturday, so he stepped down from his armored car and walked into the demonstration area. He's shown here with Colonel King, Col. Fitch and other staff officers.



Three Generals observe artillery practice somewhere on the Northern California Coast. They are left to right: Major General Robert C. Richardson, Commander of Northern California Sector; Major General W.H. Simpson, Division Commander; and Brigadier General C.P. George. Location: California West Coast March 22, 1942. Image Source: U.S. Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group Collection - Greg Krenzelok Director.

Note: In the future we will create a tribute and webpage for General Richardson Jr. There is also a great story on how we found the foot locker and its contents.

Greg Krenzelok
U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group


GENERAL ROBERT C. RICHARDSON JR. ESTATE AUCTION 2014

In 2014 General Robert C. Richardson's military collection went to auction. I keep a close eye on the auctions and I documented each auction. Below is the personal collection of General Richardson. It is my hope to collected as many of his personal military items as possible to help us understand his military career to our nation.

Robert C. Richardson Jr. (1882-1954) Career American officer who commanded all Army forces in the Pacific from 1943 to 1946 with the rank of Lieutenant General. Before World War II, Richardson saw action suppressing the Philippine insurrection and served as a military liaison officer during the First World War. At the start of World War II, Richardson commanded the VII Corps and oversaw the defense of California immediately following Pearl Harbor. In 1943, Richardson was appointed Commanding General all Army Personnel in the Pacific while simultaneously serving as Commanding General of the Hawaiian Department and as Military Governor of Hawaii. In those capacitates, Richardson oversaw the administration and training of all Army personnel in amphibious operations and jungle warfare. Richardson was junior only to Admiral Nimitz, who oversaw all tactical operations in the Pacific - the first time a senior Army general officer ever subordinated to a non-Army flag officer.

He retired in October 1946 with 42 years of continuous military service.

He died suddenly while vacationing in Italy at the age of 71. In July 1954 he was posthumously promoted to the rank of Four Star General by a Special Act of Congress.


GENERAL ROBERT C. RICHARDSON JR TIME LINE

1882 - Born, Charleston, South Carolina.

1900-1904 - Cadet, United States Military Academy at West Point (USMA).

Circa 1904-1905 - Served in the 14th Calvary Regiment during the Philippine-American War.

1905 - Wounded in action at Cotta Usap.

1906-1911 - Assistant instructor of modern languages, United States Military Academy at West Point (USMA).

1914-1916 - Assistant professor of English, United States Military Academy at West Point (USMA).

1917 - Aide to Major General T. H. Barry.

1918-1919 - Liaison officer, American Expeditionary Forces.

1919 - Joined Morale Division, War Plans Division, War Department General Staff, Washington DC.

1920-1923 - Assistant to assistant chief of staff for operations, Headquarters, Philippine Department, Manila.

1924-1926 - Attended Ecole Superieure de Guerre, Paris.

1926-1928 - Military attache, Rome, Italy.

1929-1933 - Commandant of cadets, United States Military Academy at West Point (USMA)

1933 - Attended Army War College, Washington.

1938 - Given command of the 2nd Cavalry Brigade at Fort Bliss, Texas.

1940-1941 - Commanded the 1st Calvary Division Fort Bliss, Texas.

1941 - Director, Bureau of Public Relations, War Department.

1941 - The VII Army Corps Headquarters was rushed to the West Coast after the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. Major General Robert C. Richardson, Jr. at the time was commanding the VII Army Corps and was in charge of overseeing the defense of Northern California. He also became the commander of the Northern California Defense Sector of the Western Defense Command. Part of his command was the 7th Division at Fort Ord and included the 74th, 75th, 76th, Field Artillery Battalions, still horse-drawn and the 107th Cavalry (horse/mechanized) who were stationed throughout California protecting our coast and other sensitive areas. Originally the Headquarters of the VII Army Corps and Northern California Sector was established at San Jose, California by the Seventh (7th) Division in accordance with Plan Rainbow No. 5.

1943 - Richardson was Commanding General of all Army personnel in the Central Pacific while simultaneously serving as Commanding General of the Hawaiian Department and as Military Governor of Hawaii

1954 - Died - He died suddenly while vacationing in Italy at the age of 71. Posthumously promoted to general: four star.


Among his military and foreign decorations and awards include the:

Army Distinguished Service Medal

Navy Distinguished Service Medal

The Silver Star

The Legion of Merit

The Purple Heart

The Philippine Campaign Medal

The World War I Victory Medal (with three campaign stars)

The Army of Occupation of Germany Medal

The American Defense Service Medal

The American Campaign Medal

The Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal

The World War II Victory Medal

The French Legion of Honor (Officer)

The Belgian Order of Leopold (Officer)

The Italian Order of S. Maurice and St. Lazarus (Officer)

The French Croix de guerre (with palm)

And the Panamanian Medal of Solidarity (1918, 2nd class)


Lt. General Robert C. Richardson is buried at United States Military Academy Post Cemetery at West Point, New York. Plot: Section II, Row A, Site 14.


Following is a list of the 57 Lieutenant Generals of the U.S. Army in World War II, in order of seniority:

1. Hugh Aloysius Drum

2. John Lesesne DeWitt

3. Ben Lear

4. Delos Carleton Emmons

5. Walter Campbell Short

6. Lesley James McNair

7. Frank Maxwell Andrews

8. Stanley Dunbar Embick

9. George Howard Brett

10. Signius Wilhelm Paul Knudsen

11. Jonathan Mayhew Wainwright IV

12. Robert Lawrence Eichelberger

13. Millard Fillmore Harmon, Jr.

14. Simon Bolivar Buckner, Jr.

15. Robert Charlwood Richardson, Jr.

16. Lloyd Ralston Fredendall

17. Barton Kyle Yount

18. Ira Clarence Eaker

Note: the list continues but is left off here.


GENERAL ROBERT C. RICHARDSON JR. ESTATE AUCTION 2014


GEN. ROBERT C. RICHARDSON JR. WINTER UNIFORMS AND TRENCH COAT
Pair of regulation Army winter uniforms and pants owned and worn by Gen. Robert C. Richardson during his service in Hawaii as Commander of Army Forces in the Pacific and Military Governor of Hawaii. The earlier uniform, bearing a San Francisco tailor's name, bears a wound stripe and eight overseas service stripes and chevrons representing Richardson's overseas service in both World Wars. At some point in time, Richardson purchased a new uniform from Rogers Peet Co., New York and transferred his service ribbons to it. The service ribbons are complete to the end of Richardson's military career, in October, 1946. Both uniforms bear should patches of the U.S. Army Pacific Command. Finally included is Richardson's government issue trench coat with belt, well-worn at the neck and cuffs, a small paint spot to one lapel.



GEN. ROBERT C. RICHARDSON, JR. WARTIME UNIFORM FROM HAWAII
Summer army uniform worn by Gen. Robert C. Richardson, Jr. during his service in Hawaii as Commander of U.S. Army Forces in the Pacific and Military Governor of Hawaii, and undoubtedly also worn to the Japanese surrender ceremonies in Tokyo Bay on Sep. 2, 1945. The light wool uniform bears a wound chevron on the right sleeve and eight overseas service bars and chevrons on the left sleeve, documenting his service in World War I and the current conflict. A U.S. Army Pacific Command patch is sewn to the left shoulder, and four rows of ribbons have been sewn to his chest, including his Distinguished Service Medal, Purple Heart, Silver Star, Legion of Merit, etc. All original buttons are present, as is the tailor's tag: "N. Mito Tailor Wahiawa, Oahu, T.H." (likely of Japanese descent). The original matching pleated pants with button fly are included. Fine condition. Also included are Richardson's brown cavalry boots and stretchers, well-worn, which his family advises he often wore with his summer uniform. An important Pacific Campaign uniform.



LIEUTENANT GENERAL ROBERT C. RICHARDSON, JR. CERTIFYING PRESENT AT THE JAPANESE SURRENDER ON THE U.S.S. MISSOURI
Incredibly rare card bearing a printed image of the Japanese naval flag, 3 1/2" x 2 1/2", dated Sep. 2, 1945 and signed by Gen. JONATHAN WAINWRIGHT (1883-1953), also signed by Richardson certifying the presence of Richardson aboard the MISSOURI at the formal surrender of the Japanese forces to the Allied Powers.



LIEUTENANT GENERAL ROBERT C. RICHARDSON, JR. PASS TO VIEW THE JAPANESE SURRENDER ON THE U.S.S. MISSOURI
Excessively rare pass issued to Gen. ROBERTSON C. RICHARDSON, JR. to attend the Japanese surrender, a typed card 5" x 3", reads in full: "SURRENDER CEREMONY LT. GENERAL R. C. RICHARDSON, JR. is authorized to board the MISSOURI for the SURRENDER CEREMONY to be held on 2 SEPTEMBER 1945 at 0900 hours...". The card is initialed "H B W" by Col. H. BENNETT WHIPPLE. Whipple was a 31-year-old U.S. Army colonel who was assigned by Gen. Douglas MacArthur to plan the Japanese surrender ceremony formally ending World War II aboard the battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay on Sept. 2, 1945. Later, formal printed "souvenir" cards were given to those who attended, but it is now clear that this pass was the first, original accepted pass. Accompanied by thirteen original 8" x 10" b/w period photographs kept by Richardson with this pass, five showing the proceedings with Richardson in the first row of viewers, others showing MacArthur, Stilwell, Percival, Wainwright, etc., "Instructions For Personnel Attending Surrender Ceremony", 1p. legal folio, Sep. 2, 1945, above Whipple's printed signature; the printed agenda of the ceremony, 1p. legal



LIEUTENANT GENERAL ROBERT C. RICHARDSON, JR. PRESENT AT THE JAPANESE SURRENDER ON THE U.S.S. MISSOURI
Richardson aboard the MISSOURI at the formal surrender of the Japanese forces to the Allied Powers. Note: RED DOT marks General Richardson. Image credit: Carl Mydan photographer

Click on the below link:
americanhistory.si.edu zoomable image



LIEUTENANT GENERAL ROBERT C. RICHARDSON, JR. PRESENT AT THE JAPANESE SURRENDER ON THE U.S.S. MISSOURI
Richardson aboard the MISSOURI at the formal surrender of the Japanese forces to the Allied Powers. Note: RED DOT marks General Richardson. Image credit: Carl Mydan photographer

Click on the below link:
Video: National Museum of the Marine Corps



LIEUTENANT GENERAL ROBERT C. RICHARDSON, JR. POSTION AT THE JAPANESE SURRENDER ON THE U.S.S. MISSOURI
The offical layout on the deck of the U.S.S. Missouri at the Japanese surrender, September 2, 1945. General Richardson's place in marked with a RED DOT.



LIEUTENANT GENERAL ROBERT C. RICHARDSON, JR. POSTION AT THE JAPANESE SURRENDER ON THE U.S.S. MISSOURI
The offical layout on the deck of the U.S.S. Missouri at the Japanese surrender, September 2, 1945. General Richardson's place in marked with a RED DOT.

Click on the below link:
Pacific War Museum.org



GEN. ROBERT C. RICHARDSON JR. LATE WAR/POST WAR SUMMER UNIFORM
Summer uniform owned by Gen. Robert C. Richardson, Jr., certainly worn by him postwar but possibly worn near war's end as well. A U.S. Army Pacific Command patch is sewn to the left shoulder, and four rows of ribbons have been sewn to his chest, including those representing his Distinguished Service Medal, Purple Heart, Silver Star, Legion of Merit, campaign medals, etc. All original buttons are present, as is the tailor's tag from B. Altman, New York. Matching trousers are included. A few light spots here and there and some soiling, still very good.



GEN. ROBERT C. RICHARDSON'S COLLAR INSIGNIA AND BELT BUCKLE
Lot of three items includes a pair of Gen. Richardson's sterling silver three-star lieutenant general's collar insignia, a similar pair of four-star insignia still in the original package, and Richardson's chrome plated belt buckle bearing his initials with three stars affixed above.



GEN. ROBERT C. RICHARDSON, JR. CHEST RIBBONS, INSIGNIA, AND HAT BANDS
Fine lot of about fifty items owned and likely worn by Gen. Richardson at some point in his military career, includes about 25 complete and partial ribbon bars, including an ornate miniature ribbon bar with hanging medals, three U.S. Army Pacific Command shoulder patches and one with brass insert, gold bullion eagle cap insignia, name tag, and 20+ uniform buttons from his days as a cadet at West Point through his career.



GEN. ROBERT C. RICHARDSON, JR. MEDALS AND RIBBONS
Excellent lot of nine medals given to Lt. Gen. Robert Richardson, most in recognition of his service during World War II. Included is his Legion of Merit with chest ribbon and case, Distinguished Service Cross with case (for service during World War I), Silver Star with case, World War I service medal, American Campaign medal, American Defense medal, American Campaign medal, World War II service medal, Army of Occupation medal, two French Croix de Guerre with one star, and an unidentified medal, possibly related to the Civil Order of Bath. Also included are several replacement neck ribbons.

LT. GENERAL ROBERT C. RICHARDSON, METALS, CITATIONS, AND AWARDS
The Hall of Valor Project
Click on the below link:
Website: The Hall of Valor Project, Richardson



WORLD WAR I CAVALRY CAMPAIGN HAT OF GEN. ROBERT C. RICHARDSON, JR.
Campaign hat owned and worn by future Gen. Robert C. Richardson during his service with the A.E.F., made by John B. Stetson with leather imprinted sweatband and gold bullion braided cord and knots. The cord has oxidized a bit but would clean up nicely. No moth damage whatsoever. On July 9, 1917 Richardson was appointed Aide to Major Gen. T. H. Barry whom he helped in the rapid buildup and training of the A.E.F. Richardson served as Aide and observer with foreign armies until January 9, 1918. On June 14, 1918, he was assigned to the Operations Division, General Staff, AEF as Liaison Officer for G.H.Q Allied Headquarters and with American Armies, Corps, and Divisions during the combat operations of 1918, and he escorted Allied missions in St. Mihiel Offensive. By now a temporary Lt Colonel, Richardson was Liaison Officer with Headquarters, 1st Army for the opening of Meuse-Argonne Offensive Note: General Richardson also had a campaign hat during his service from the 1920's to the 1940's. Look at the images of General Richardson wearing this campaign hat near the top of this webpage. - Greg Krenzelok



TWO PAIR MEN'S U.S. ARMY CAVALRY BOOTS, c. 1930. Both brown with trees, probably English made: One pair field boots, the tree set stamped "LT. COL. ROBERT C. RICHARDSON JR". 10 3/34 x 3 3/4 x 19 1/4 high. Note: This was on a different online auction in 2012.



PISTOL HOLSTERS AND BELTS OF GEN. ROBERT C. RICHARDSON, JR.
Pair of revolver pistol holster owned and used by Gen. Robert C. Richardson during his service in the cavalry and during World War II. Included is a M-1904 Rock Island Arsenal flap pistol holster used in the cavalry service, along with Richardson's 1917 R.J.M. flap holster with 1936 hanger. This holster was used by Richardson during his service in World War II, according to his grandson. Also included are four pistol belts, two made by Peale & Co., London, sword hanger, and several belt attachments.



GEN. ROBERT C. RICHARDSON, JR. DRESS MESS JACKET WITH TAILS AND PANTS
Gen. Robert C. Richardson, Jr.'s dress mess coat with tails, dark blue wool with four buttons plus chained two-button closure, gold bullion snap-on shoulder knots, with matching wool dress pants bearing two gold metallic thread stripes along pants edge. Sleeve insignia, held by snaps, are not present. Maker's label reads: "The Cadet Store West Point". This is the uniform Richardson wore while serving in the Pacific during World War II. Very fine condition with no damage evident.



GEN. ROBERT C. RICHARDSON, JR.'S DRESS UNIFORM
Present is Richardson's heavy wool dress tunic and trousers, shoulder straps bearing two stars and denoting his rank as lieutenant colonel. Matching gold metal thread rank insignia are applied at the end of each sleeve. The tunic bears four straight-flap buttoned pockets and a four button front closure, and all of the original buttons are present. Richardson's matching wool dress trousers bearing two gold metallic thread stripes are also present. The tunic bears the original label from "The Cadet Store" at West Point.



GEN. ROBERT C. RICHARDSON, JR. GOLD SILK DRESS BELT
Gold silk dress belt worn by Gen. Robert C. Richardson, Jr. with his dress uniform, most likely pre-war, 36" long", 2 3/4" wide, bearing two fringed tassels suspended at front. The belt was stored by Richardson with a note in his hand (included): "Gold Silk Belt for Full Dress Blue uniform Do Not Open 4/7/43".



PROMOTION OF ROBERT C. RICHARDSON SECOND LIEUTENANT CAVALRY DEC 20, 1904
Washington, Dec. 20, 1904, the promotion of Robert C. Richardson to serve as "Second Lieutenant of Cavalry". Co-signed by Secretary of War and future president WILLIAM H. TAFT. Two areas of paper loss to the left of Taft's signature have been professionally repaired and the loss affected only two words of text and grazed Taft's signature. Engrossment just a tad light, margins toned, but completely cleaned, stabilized and encapsulated, with report. ROBERT C. RICHARDSON, JR. (1882-1954) served as a senior staff officer in the A.E.F. and during World War II was appointed commanding general of U.S. Army forces in the Pacific Ocean Areas and Military Governor of Hawaii.

Signed by Theodore Roosevelt (1858 - 1919) Twenty-sixth President of the United States who started the Panama Canal, settled the Russo-Japanese War, broke up Standard Oil and encouraged conservation. Important partly-printed D.S.as President, 1p. folio parchment.



PROMOTION OF ROBERT C. RICHARDSON, JR. 1ST LIEUTENANT CAVALRY 1911
Washington, June 10, 1911, the appointment of future general Robert C. Richardson, Jr. to the rank of First Lieutenant of Cavalry. Co-signed by ROBERT SHAW OLIVER as Acting Secretary of War. Taft's last name a tad light, else fine.

Signed by President William H. Taft (1857 - 1930) Twenty-seventh President of the United States and Supreme Court Chief Justice.



PROMOTION OF ROBERT C. RICHARDSON, JR. TO THE RANK OF FIRST LIEUTENANT OF INFANTRY 1913
Washington, Mar. 3, 1913, the promotion of future general Robert C. Richardson, Jr. to the rank of First Lieutenant of Infantry. Co-signed by HENRY L. STIMSON as Secretary of War.

Signed by William Taft (1857 - 1930) Twenty-seventh President of the United States and Supreme Court Chief Justice. Important partly-printed D.S. as President, 1p. folio parchment



PROMOTION OF ROBERT C. RICHARDSON JR. RANK OF COLONEL OF CAVALRY 1935
Washington, July 18, 1935, the appointment of Robert C. Richardson, Jr. to the rank of "Colonel of Cavalry" Robert C. Richardson, Jr (1882-1954) would later serve as a senior staff officer in the A.E.F. and during World War II was appointed commanding general of U.S. Army forces in the Pacific Ocean Areas and Military Governor of Hawaii.

Signed by George H. Dern (1872 - 1936) Secretary of War (1933-36) and Governor of Utah. Important partly-printed D.S. as Secretary of War, 1p. folio parchment.



COMMISSION ROBERT C. RICHARDSON, JR. TO BRIGADIER GENERAL 1938
Robert C. Richardson Jr. (1882-1954) American Army general, Commanding General of the Hawaiian Department, Military Governor of Hawaii, and commander of all Army personnel in the Pacific Ocean Areas and Mid-Pacific. During World War I, Richardson served as Liaison Officer for G.H.Q Allied Headquarters and with American Armies, Corps, and Divisions during the combat operations of 1918. Richardson was one of the chief planners of the Saint-Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne offensives, reporting directly to Pershing. Important D.S., 1p. folio parchment, Washington, June 1, 1938, Richardson's promotion to serve as "Brigadier General in the Regular Army", signed by Secretary of War HENRY H. WOODRING. Very good. At the time, Richardson was commanding the 5th Cavalry at Fort Clark, Texas.



COMMISSION ROBERT C. RICHARDSON, JR. TEMPORARILY LIEUTENANT GENERAL 1943
Commission as "temporarily, a Lieutenant General", to be effective from June 1, 1943, 1p. folio parchment, Washington, June 28, 1945, signed by Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson.



COMMISSION ROBERT C. RICHARDSON, JR. TO THE COMMAND HAWAIIAN DEPARTMENT 1943
Robert C. Richardson appointment "to the command of the Hawaiian Department" effective from June 1, 1943, 1p. folio, Washington, June 1, 1943, signed by Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson.

Robert C. Richardson (1882-1954) served as a senior staff officer in the A.E.F. and during World War II was appointed commanding general of U.S. Army forces in the Pacific Ocean Areas and Military Governor of Hawaii. He also developed training programs and facilities in Hawaii that essentially trained every Army soldier in the theater for jungle combat and beach landings.




GUIDONS AND BANNER FROM COMMANDS OF GEN. ROBERT C. RICHARDSON, JR.
Fine lot of three banners and flags from commands once held by Gen. Robert C. Richardson, Jr. Includes two single-sided silk swallowtail guidons from the 5th Cavalry Regiment which Richardson commanded from Dec. 20, 1935 to June 1, 1938, each about 16" x 22 1/2", and a small hanging banner from the 2nd Cavalry Brigade, 14" x 10", which he commanded from Sep. 6, 1938 to Feb. 2, 1939. Fine condition.



LT. GEN. ROBERT C. RICHARDSON, JR. HAWAIIAN HEADQUARTERS FLAG
Large wool 48-star American flag flown at the Fort Shafter Headquarters of the U.S. Army commander of American Forces in the Pacific, Gen. Robert C. Richardson, Jr. The wool flag measures 5' x 9' 6" with a white canvas hoist with and lead eyes, with separately-sewn stripes and stars. In overall near fine condition.



LT. GEN. ROBERT C. RICHARDSON JR.'S AMERICAN FLAG AND U.S. ARMY PACIFIC FLAG HAWAII HQ
Important group of two flags from the wartime service of Gen. Richardson, includes a 33" x 52" wool banner, navy blue field with insignia of the Unites States Army Pacific at center bearing an embroidered design which is affixed to both sides of the banner, with the banner looped at top for suspension from a horizontal bar. Also present is Richardson's silk American flag, 40" x 50" with yellow fringe on three sides, the hoist likewise configured for suspension from a horizontal support. Both flags were displayed in Richardson's Hawaii Fort Shafter Headquarters during the war, and very likely travelled with him on his many trips to the front. The flags remain in the same box in which Richardson stored them in 1950, his typed label attached and with a copy of a second descriptive label typed by him mentioning the contents and dated 1950.



GEN. ROBERT C. RICHARDSON JR.'S LIEUTENANT GENERAL'S THREE-STAR BANNER
Red silk banner with three white stars, 40" x 52" overall, three sides trimmed in yellow cloth fringe, with the top looped to provide insertion of a pole to suspend the banner. This banner, representing the rank of a lieutenant general, was used in Gen. Richardson's office during his service in in World War II, at his headquarters in Hawaii and it very likely travelled with him in his many trips to battle area. In very fine condition, with a label typed by the general: "June 16th. 1950 This box contains...a Large Red Silk three-star General Officer's flag...". The same box contained Richardson's 48-star national colors and Army Pacific administrative flag. Of course, flags of lieutenant generals of such importance rarely appear on the market.



GEN. ROBERT C. RICHARDSON, JR. FOUR-STAR GENERAL'S FLAG Four-star full-general's flag, 38" x 51", a two-sided hanging banner with gold fringe, each side bearing four large stars sewn thereto. Fine condition. Richardson was promoted to full general posthumously, thus this flag was likely present at his funeral.





GEN. ROBERT C. RICHARDSON SAMURAI SWORD No.1
Japanese katana sword kept by Gen. Robert C. Richardson as a souvenir of his service in the Pacific, 38 1/2" overall, 28 1/4" blade (to hilt), the blade faultless but for one tiny nick. The tank bears no signature, and the bamboo securing pin is missing, otherwise all original parts are present including original black wood scabbard. In overall very good condition. Sold with a period carbon of a report sent to Richardson from Okinawa, June 30, 1945, a translation of a prisoner's account of the suicide deaths of Japanese generals Ushijima and Cho near the end of the battle for the island. Whether this sword belonged to either of those men is pure speculation.







GEN. ROBERT C. RICHARDSON, JR. SAMURAI SWORD No.2
Japanese katana sword kept by Gen. Robert C. Richardson as a souvenir of his service in the Pacific, 36 3/4" overall, 27" blade (to hilt), the blade bearing very small areas of oxidation and some running marks but overall very good. The tang bears no signature, and the bamboo securing pin is missing, otherwise all original parts are present including original leather scabbard marked twice with owner's name: Matsushita".



B-24 BOMBER "SWIFT ARROW" PERSONAL AIRCRAFT OF LT. GEN. ROBERT C. RICHARDSON
Description: ARCHIVE OF "SWIFT ARROW" - PERSONAL AIRCRAFT OF LT. GEN. ROBERT C. RICHARDSON Fine group of items related to the converted B-24 "Swift Arrow" used by Gen. Richardson for travel between Hawaii, Washington, many battle areas in the Pacific, and finally to Tokyo for the Japanese surrender ceremonies on the USS MISSOURI.

This impressive lot includes two log books, each bearing a hand-drawn illustration of the aircraft, maps of every trip, crew and passenger lists, airfields used, flight times, distances flown, etc.

One log covers the dates Aug. 29, 1944 to Sep. 4, 1945, the second log, lacking spiral binding but complete, covering the dates May 17, 1942 to Sep. 4, 1945 and includes the flight which carried Richardson to Tokyo for the surrender ceremonies on Tokyo Bay.

Among Richardson's many stops were Okinawa, Kwajalein, Saipan, Iwo Jima, Australia, Manila, Tinian, Guadalcanal, Tarawa, Midway, and other scenes of some of the war's heaviest fighting.

Also present are fifteen 8" x 10" and larger photos of the aircraft showing interior, exterior, crew, plane in flight, and so on.

There are also typed lists containing the same information from these flights as appears in the logs, and approx. 40pp. of flight extracts with comments covering flights in a trip between Dec. 26, 1944 and Jan. 10, 1945.

Also included is a set of Richardson's personal monthly flight records from June, 1943 to December, 1945 during which the general flew a variety of aircraft including Lodestars, Liberators, PBYs, DC-3s, etc.

Overall, very good



LETTER TO LT. GENERAL RICHARDSON FROM GEORGE C. MARSHALL
George C. Marshall (1880-1959) American general and statesman, Roosevelt's Army Chief of Staff during World War II and author of the Marshall Plan which sustained eastern Europe after the war. Fine content and association war-date T.L.S. on his personal letterhead, 1p.4to., Washington, December, 1944 to Lieut. Gen. ROBERT C. RICHARDSON, JR., Commanding General of U.S. Army Forces in the Pacific and Military Governor of Hawaii. Marshall commends Richardson for the: "...excellent job that has been done in the Pacific Ocean area...". He adds: "...As we prepare for the direct assault against Japan, I feel confident that nothing will be left undone in preparing our forces for the final operation...". File holes and a staple stain at top, ink docket at bottom, else very good. Richardson would be front and center at the Japanese surrender in Tokyo Bay.

"GENERAL OF THE ARMY" GEORGE C. MARSHALL
George C. Marshall (1880-1959) was one of the most decorated military leaders in American history. ... Named chief of staff when World War II began in 1939, Marshall was responsible for exponentially increasing the size of the U.S. Army, and he helped devise Operation Overlord in 1944. As Chief of Staff, Marshall organized the largest military expansion in U.S. history, and received promotion to five-star rank as General of the Army. Marshall coordinated Allied operations in Europe and the Pacific until the end of the war. In addition to accolades from Churchill and other Allied leaders, Time magazine named Marshall its Man of the Year for 1943. Marshall retired from active service in 1945, but remained on active duty, as required for holders of five-star rank.


GENERAL ROBERT C. RICHARDSON JR. ESTATE AUCTION 2014
Note: There was many more of the general's personal items included in this auction, mostly his paperwork collection that did not go to the Hoover Institution Archives. I have documented these items. I have decided not included the auction selling prices, respecting the buyer's privacy.


THE PURCHASE OF THE FOOT LOCKER OF LT. GENERAL ROBERT C. RICHARDSON JR. (NEW ADDITION TO OUR COLLECTION)
The U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group is proud and honored to announce a new addition to our "Horse Soldier" museum collection. In January of 2016 I purchased the footlocker.


Foot locker and contents of Lt. General Robert C. Richardson, including his West Point text books, most signed and dated and personal contents. Included in the collection is the General's M1904 halter, saddle pommel pockets from WW1, and a 16x20 portrait of Richardson wearing his summer uniform with three stars. Image Source: U.S. Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group Collection - Greg Krenzelok Director. Image credit: copyrighted Greg Krenzelok, all rights reserved.


January 21, 2016 - I received General Richardson's foot locker with it's contents. John, who I purchase the footlocker from had a very unexpected find under a false bottom in the footlocker. A picture portrait of the general signed by the photographer. There's also a large seating chart from a dinner he hosted with some high-profile generals attending. Note: I framed these two items to help preserve them. The dinning chart was original on the wall of the Post Commander's quarters at his office at Fort Shafter, Hawaii. He ran his whole operation from Fort Shafter, Palm Circle, and a series of buildings that were called the Pineapple Pentagon. Image credit: copyrighted Greg Krenzelok, all rights reserved.


THE PURCHASE OF THE FOOT LOCKER OF LT. GENERAL ROBERT C. RICHARDSON JR. (NEW ADDITION TO OUR COLLECTION)
The U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group is proud and honored to announce a new addition to our "Horse Soldier" museum collection.

The story on how I purchased General Richardson's footlocker is quite interesting. And I am always surprised that something was such great historical significance ended up in my collection. General Richardson's time in California and defending the west coast after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor is mostly forgotten when remembering General Richardson's military history and how his personal footlocker escaped the auction to me is unbelievable. His footlocker saw a lot of action! I am so pleased to have it and its contents as a major part of the Fort Ord Station Veterinary Hospital collection and I hope someday it will be proudly displayed in our museum. - Greg Krenzelok - Director - U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group.

January 21, 2016 - I received General Richardson's foot locker with its contents from Bath, New Hampshire. John's (Last name left out for privacy) family lived across the street from General Richardson in a beautiful brick federal (1810) house. John lives across the street today.

Greg, I acquired the footlocker from the estate of his son, Brig. Gen RC Richardson III. The footlocker had two sets of saddle bags, halter, riding helmet, ww2 buckle boots, curb chains (six), leather and canvas leggings, Early horse lead, some text books from his years at the USMA, (Ordinance and Gunnery, Solid Geometry, Advanced Algebra- geometry- calculus and chemistry. First edition of "The Officers' Guide"1930 (haven't seen many of these), and its predecessor- "Officers Manual" Inscribed to Richardson and signed by the author "Col. James Moss" (Richardson wrote the forward for that year). Several USMA cadet registers from the 30's. (Richardson was Commandant of Cadets for several years), "Building Honolulu", Richardson cited as military governor of Hawaii after the bombing and tasked with much of the rebuilding, "West Point Today", 1937 Col. Richardson cited several times. Also had a USMA Howitzer yearbook from 1909 that belonged to his brother in-law (that was the year Patton graduated) along with a 40th reunion annual complete with career bio's (fascinating the number of generals from that class) and some pictures of the 70th reunion. And few other items of General Richardson.

Before John's grandfather passed away a few days before I purchased General Richardson's footlocker, he had a chance to talk to him about his neighbor General Richardson:

"My grandfather and I talked about General Richardson and how "great" he was in all aspects. This was on Tuesday and unfortunately my grandfather passed away on Thursday. General Richardson was an incredibly smart man and I guess he came from a long line of prominent generals (civil war maybe) and I told you about his son, Brig General Robert C. Richardson III, USAF RCR III. My grandfather said his one mistake was to take on General Holland Smith USMC (in defense of his friend General Smith USA - (look in the seating chart that was included in your purchase of the footlocker) regarding joint operational proceedings with the Marines and the Army during WW2. I guess had he not overstepped his bounds he would have gone right to the very top. Look up Smith vs. Smith for the whole story, it is a pretty neat story".

"Greg another interesting story- When my grandfather was a young Marine 1st LT, he was stationed off of Hawaii preparing for the final invasion of Japan (ended up being the occupation). His CO called him to his office and informed him that a certain Lt. General requests your presence for lunch. He asked my grandfather "how the hell do know an Army 3 star?" He replied, "he's my neighbor sir" My grandfather said it was quite an experience and raised a lot of eyebrows with his men and superiors".

John continues with our communicating: With regard to the sale- His family left the footlocker and several wooden packing trunks behind when they sold the house in around 2014-15. I have no idea where his uniforms and medals went. I purchased the locker from the new owners and still have five large packing trunks with his name and rank stenciled.

The General's family had all moved and the house was vacant for some time. Once General Richardson's son Brig General Robert C. Richardson III, USAF died, his children sold everything off at a Pennsylvania auction and unfortunately, chucked the rest. I don't think it was an oversight that the footlocker and trunks were left behind. They had cherry picked the good stuff and into a dumpster went the rest. I'm assuming they were children of great privilege.

Oh, by the way, I had a very unexpected find under a false bottom in the footlocker. A picture portrait of the general signed by the photographer (not sure who). There's also a large seating chart from a dinner he hosted with some high-profile generals attending.

Take care,

John

January 22, 2016 - I emailed John seeking permission to use the above story and other information on my website:

Greg,
Yes, you can use the story if you'd like. I'll snap a picture of General Richardson's packing trunks.

John (Last name left out for privacy)

Note: it appears General Richardson were one of the original settlers of Bath, New Hampshire and the home may have been in the Richardson family for a very long time. I will be looking researching the Richardson family line in Bath, New Hampshire.



General Richardson's family home, rich in family history, Bath, New Hampshire.


LIST OF GENERAL RICHARDSON COLLECTION ITEMS PURCHASED BY THE U.S. ARMY VETERINARY CORPS HISTORICAL PRESERVATION GROUP

Note: This is a list of the items I was able to purchase from John when he was selling the things that were in General Richardson Field Locker:

General Richardson Field Locker (Labelled Lt. Gen. R.C. Richardson Jr.).

General R.C. Richardson WW1 M1904 horse halter.

Pommel pocket made by Leon Braun, 24r Chateau, Landen, Paris who sold saddles and tack to the U.S. during the time period of the Spanish American War and WW1 for the U.S. Cavalry. It is believed General Richardson purchased these pommel pockets for his saddle when he was in France during WW1 or when he spend time in France after the war.

General R.C. Richardson leather officer's leggings.

General RC Richardson Picture Portrait and guest dinning seating arrangement chart.

Officer's Manual 1929 signature of author Robert C. Richardson.

Officers Guide 1930 signed R.C. Richardson.

Register of Officers and Cadets West Point 1935-1937.

Academy List Cadets 1937.

General R.C. Richardson canvas leggings dated 1941.

John also added many of General Richardson books and his West Point text books from 1904 with his name in them.


NEGOTIATING A PRICE FOR GENERAL RICHARDSON'S FOOTLOCKER

January 4, 2016 - Message from John the seller about selling General Richardson's footlocker.

Hi Greg,
Sorry for not getting back sooner. I've talked to military experts on the price of General Richardson's footlocker and no one could not figure out the value of the footlocker. They asked when was the last time I saw a WW2 General officer's footlocker for sale? Never.

John



Description from John's November, 2015 Ebay Auction:
US Cavalry Model 1904 Horse Halter: This just came out of a WW2 foot locker owned by a Lt. General R.C. Richardson, a decorated WW1 officer and military Governor of Hawaii during WW2. I have attached a picture of his footlocker but it is not part of this bid. (more WW1 tack to be listed). Hard to find. Metal is tarnished and there is a field repair to the leather (see photo). Stamped on leather: Rock Island Arsenal 1904 H.E.



Description from John's December, 2015 Ebay Auction:
WW1 pommel pockets made by Leon Braun, London. Fresh out of a WW2 foot locker owned by Lt. General R.C. Richardson who no doubt used this item in WW1. Bayonet style fittings (see pictures). Approx. 8"x12" and leather is in good shape. Leon Braun, 24r Chateau, Landen, Paris, Stamped Leon Braun 24.r chateau-landon Paris. Lt. General (R.C. Richardson, decorated WW1 officer and military gov. of Hawaii during WW2.



Description from John's December, 2015 Ebay Auction:
WW1 era military lace up/hook and eye leather leggings made in England. Leather is in very good condition, Some very light wear present on the top. Beautiful color. Approx. 12.5 inches long. Just taken out of a footlocker owned by a WW2 Lt. General R.C. Richardson, decorated WW1 officer and military gov. of Hawaii during WW2, who no doubt used these leggings. I have attached a picture of his foot locker for authenticity but it is not part of this bid. (Owned by Lt. General R. C. Richardson)



Description from John's January, 2016 Ebay Auction:
For bid are two WW2 era items:
First item - is an original and matted picture (16x20) of General Robert C. Richardson Jr. signed by the photographer done sometime in the 1940s. Excellent shape with only of few spots at the top of the matting.

Second item - A dinner seating chart - General Richardson hosted at his home with some high-ranking important field generals. Take a close look at the names and check out their careers, very impressive. The chart measures 32 inches w by 22 inches h and has been folded in half.

General Richardson was a decorated WW1 Cavalry officer, USMA Commandant, Military Governor of Hawaii, Classmate and close friend of General MacArthur and was in the front row during the Japanese surrender on the USS Missouri.

These two items were carefully protected in the bottom of General Richardson's footlocker. He must have thought highly of them to such care in preserving them. An interesting collector's piece of a prominent general. Please note I have included a photo of General Richardson's footlocker for authenticity but it is not part of the auction.



Description from John's December, 2015 Ebay Auction:
1929 Army Officer's Manual signed by author inscribed to a future general. You are bidding on "Officers manual by Col. James Moss. 5 x 7 inches, good condition, corner are bumped, tops of spine are bumped. 489pp, normal wear for 86 years old.

What makes this book unique - signed and inscribed by the author to Robert C. Richardson, Jr. who wrote the forward for the book, was commandant of cadet and staff member at West Point. A decorated officer of WW1, Military Governor of Hawaii after the bombing and lastly, a four-star general. Just to name a few accomplishments of this man.

I've included a picture of General Richardson's footlocker from which this book came out of for authenticity, but not part of this auction.



Description from John's December, 2015 Ebay Auction:
You are bidding on the U.S. Army "The Officers Guide" 1930 first Edition. Hardcover, DJ was not issued. Put out by the National Service Publishers Co. Washington, D.C. "A Ready Reference on Customs of the Service and Correct Procedure in all Situations". This book in now in its 58th edition and still cites the original. This particular book was owned by General Richardson Jr. and has his signature on the inside. General Richardson is a decorated WW1 officer and military governor of Hawaii during WW2. I've included a picture of General Richardson's footlocker from which this book came out of for authenticity, but not part of this auction.



Description from John's December, 2015 Ebay Auction:
1. Official Register of the Officers and Cadets, US Military Academy, West Point New York for 1935, 1936, 1937. Soft bound with 70 pages (1935) 75 pages (1936) 76 pages (1937) Excellent shape some foxing. (Directory of Officers and cadets: Contains directory of staff and instructors, directory of cadets by class and class ranking, grades, appointment state, age, and date of birth.)

2. Roster of officers and troops 1935. Soft bound (26 pp)

3. Official Courtesy and Customs of the Service USMA 1933 (47 pp)

4. USMA catalogue 1955-1956. (131 pp)

5. Information relative to appointment to the USMA 1935. (70 pp)

Excellent grouping of West Point collectibles in very good condition for 80 years old. Many of these officers were the company commanders and field officers of WW2. A great reference for a military collector and a great read in general. Per piece this is a bargain. Came out of a footlocker owned by Gen Robert c. Richardson jr. Decorated ww1 officer and military governor of Hawaii in ww2 just to name a few of his posts He was also Commandant of Cadets at West Point for years.



Description from John's December, 2015 Ebay Auction:
Up for bid is a U.S. Military Academy list of cadets from its origin till 1937. 167 pages, some foxing present, few page corners bent. This book contains every graduate from the USMA and years graduated until 1937. From Lee and Grant to MacArthur, Patton, and so many more. Contains a listing of graduates from each state as well. Very interesting. This is an incredible reference to any WW1, WW2, collector or historian. I have never seen another.



Description from John's December, 2015 Ebay Auction:
U.S. Army canvas leggings Stamped- Hillsdale MFG. Co. Dated 1941 size 2R. Good condition except for a small stain, tarnished brass, and missing one lace. Appear to be used very lightly if at all. Just taken out of a footlocker owned by a WW2 Lt. General R.C. Richardson, decorated WW1 officer and military gov. of Hawaii during WW2, who no doubt used these leggings. I have attached a picture of his foot locker for authenticity.


OTHER THINGS IN THE FOOT LOCKER NOT PURCHASED: Note: At the time I discovered John's Ebay auction of General Richardson's footlocker and items that were in the footlocker. Also at the time I did not realize that General Richardson was connected to the Defense of the West Coast and also was connected to my Fort Ord research. I had already missed several of the first items John had auctioned off. Even know I didn't purchase these first items, I did document them. Once I realized who General Richardson was, I was able to purchase most of the remaining items, except some items that went for quite a bit, including his Phillips officers saddle pommel bags and the rear shelf of the Phillips officers saddle. Below is a list of items not purchased:

- 1909 Howitzer yearbook class of 1909, this was General Richardson brother in-laws (Sold for $500).

- 1938 Phillips Officer Saddle pommels (I was out bid at $333.00).

- 1938 Phillips Cantle Roll Support (shelf) (Priced out of my budget at $633. 88).

- Curb Bit Chains General R.C. Richardson (I missed this auction before I knew who General Richardson was).

- Double Buckled Boots WW2 Gen Richardson's (I missed this auction before I knew who General Richardson was).

- General R.C. Richardson leather officer's leggings (There was a total of 3 pairs of officers' leather leggings, they were all about the same and I felt one pair was enough.

- WW1 Era Military horse lead (I missed this auction before I knew who General Richardson was)



Description from John's December, 2015 Ebay Auction:
You are bidding on a number of items from the class of 1909. These items were originally owned by Elbert Farman jr., a 1909 graduate and personal friend of Gen. George Patten. This is all fresh and just recently purchased from the estate. I was told Farman is in the 70th reunion photo included in this collection.

For Bid:
1. The 1909 howitzer annual for the united states military academy west point.
2. The 40th reunion book with bios of each classmate (rare).
3. Pictures and letter from the 70th reunion in 1979. The annual is in very good condition. contents are in vg condition. Original leather cover. Some foxing and pages beginning to detach from binding. Pages are bright and not soiled.

The legendary General George S. Patton has a senior bio and photo and is pictured several other times in the annual. The 40th reunion book included is in good shape. Water staining to cover and some pages in the back. Foxing present. EXTREMELY interesting book, of which I have never seen another copy.

Complete with bios on each classmate chronicling their careers. Of Note- there were 26 general officers in the class of 1909, INCREDABLE. Papers and pictures including 70th reunion photos, a 1959 directory of classmates, letter to Col Farman and three 8.5X11 etchings of West Point (stock etchings).

Other notable cadets pictured in the annual include Jacob Devers- commander 6th army in WWII, Robert l. Eichelberger commander 8th army WWII and led invasion of Philippines in 1945, William h Simpson commander of 9th army WWII and Walton Walker commander of 3rd armored division WWII. pictured as commandant of cadet. Indian wars medal of honor recipient Robert l Howse. a very rare grouping and a fine addition to your collection.
Note: Came from the foot locker of Lt. Gen R.C. Richardson



Description from John's November, 2015 Ebay Auction:
1938 Phillips Officers saddle pommel pockets. Pre- WW2 saddle bags Stamped "J.Q.M.D. 1938 J.B" on the back. Leather is in very good condition. Just taken out of a footlocker owned by a WW2 Lt. General (R.C. Richardson, decorated WW1 officer and military gov. of Hawaii during WW2) who no doubt used these pommel pockets on his Phillips Officers saddle. I attached a picture of his foot locker and it is not part of this bid.



Description from John's November, 2015 Ebay Auction:
Phillips Officers saddle cantle shelf, attaches to the back of the saddle to support the bed roll. It was just taken out of a foot locker of a WW2 Lt. General (R.C. Richardson, decorated WW1 officer and military gov. of Hawaii during WW2) who no doubt used this. I attached a picture of his foot locker and it is not part of this bid. It's about 11.25" long About 4" wide. G.E.M. stamped on the back. Note: Now days is very hard to find and expensive. - Greg Krenzelok



Description from John's November, 2015 Ebay Auction:
6 - US Calvary Curb Chains straight out General R.C. Richardson Calvary officer's foot locker. All chains are about 9" long and have some surface rust. The sixth is shorter and rustier than the others. I don't know much about curb chains but four appear to be single link and two are double link. See pictures. All but one in the same condition taken out of a foot locker of a WW2 Lt. General (R.C. Richardson, decorated WW1 officer and military gov. of Hawaii during WW2) who no doubt used these curb chains during and after WW1.



Description from John's November, 2015 Ebay Auction:
Just taken out of a WW2 Lt. General's foot locker (Lt. Gen. R.C. Richardson, decorated WW1 officer and military governor of Hawaii during WW2). The US Army's "double buckle" boots eliminated the need for leggings, which were difficult to don and remove quickly in the field. Their uppers provided similar comfort and protection, and the "roughout" insteps were built tough to withstand the rigors of combat.

This pair of US Army WW2 DOUBLE BUCKLE LEATHER COMBAT BOOTS are in good condition, no tears, moderate drying but still pliable, some patina to the upper buckles, some darkening and lighter spots to the rough out insteps, and with some overall age wear to be be expected (most pictured). Otherwise, the boots are in fine shape with what I believe are the original WW2 brown cotton laces. Other features: "LIGHT TREAD" black composition soles and they are stamped a Size "7 1/2 E" and GX in a box on the inside leather. You can still make out the date they were made, Jan. 17, 1944. A fine example of rare, original US Army WW2 DOUBLE BUCKLE LEATHER COMBAT BOOTS and owned by a prominent general of WW2. I have included a picture of Lt. Gen. Richardson's foot locker for authenticity



Description from John's November, 2015 Ebay Auction:
Up for bid is what I believe to be a WW1 era horse lead. I just took it out of a WW2 Lt. Gen. footlocker that was full of his horse tack from WW1. (Lt. Gen. R.C. Richardson, Decorated WW1 officer and Military Governor of Hawaii during WW2) I cannot find any makers mark and it's quite likely this was privately purchased while he was stationed in Europe. (As most officers purchased their own tack) Features: 1/2 inch tightly woven cotton rope, two brass hooks on either end that unscrew, and a center brass ring that also unscrews, allowing the brass sleeve to slide along the rope and then be re-anchored. The brass is tarnished and the rope is soiled in places but overall, it's in great shape. Again, I'm not sure what this is and I don't want to mislead anyone. I'm just making a logical assumption to what the item is and to the age but I am by no means an authority on this subject. Please ask away if you'd like, prior to bidding. I've included a picture of Gen Richardson's footlocker for authenticity but it is not part of this bid.



GENERAL RICHARD'S BOOKS IN COLLECTION:

Note: The below books came with the footlocker:

All of these images of General Richardson's book were shot on top of his footlocker - Greg Krenzelok

AN ELEMENTARY TREATISE ON SOLID GEOMETRY
By Charles Smith, M.A., 7th Edition, 1899 (Richardson wrote his name in the book: Robt.C. Richardson, 1904, U.S.M.A., West Point, N.Y.


Left image: General Richardson's signuture. Image credit: copyrighted Greg Krenzelok, all rights reserved.


Richardson's notes. Image credit: copyrighted Greg Krenzelok, all rights reserved.


Richardson's notes.


Richardson's notes. Image credit: copyrighted Greg Krenzelok, all rights reserved.

AN ELEMENTARY CORSE IN THE INTEGRAL CALCULUS
By Daniel Alexander Murray Ph.D., Copyright 1898 (Richardson wrote his name in the book: Richardson R.C., 1904.


General Richardson's signuture right side of page, dated 1904. Image credit: copyrighted Greg Krenzelok, all rights reserved.

ELEMENTS OF GEOLOGY
By Joseph Le Conte, 1902 (Richardson wrote his name in the book: Robt. C Richardson, a few handwritten notes at the beginning of book).


General Richardson's signuture right side of page,and some of his notes. Image credit: copyrighted Greg Krenzelok, all rights reserved.

ELEMENTS OF DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS
By Edgar W. Bass, 1901 1902 (Richardson wrote his name in the book: R.C. Richardson, U.S.M.A, handwritten notes at the beginning of book).


Richardson's signuture and his notes. Image credit: copyrighted Greg Krenzelok, all rights reserved.

DESCRIPTIVE GENERAL CHEMISTRY
By S.E. Tillman, 1901, (Richardson wrote his name in the book: R.C. Richardson, ? Class, U.S.M.A., handwritten notes at the beginning of book).


Title page and page with General Richardson signuture when he was at West Point and a page with his notes. Image credit: copyrighted Greg Krenzelok, all rights reserved.

UNKNOWN TEXT BOOK
Title page seems to be missing. (Richardson wrote his name in the book: Robt. C. Richardson, Sept 1903, U.S.M.A., (Interesting hand written notes at the beginning of book including a note to a classmate Paul Henry borrowing this book to him signed RCR and then a reply to Richardson from Paul Henry dated 8/31/04.


Left image: Text book with no title or title page. Right image: his notes on the leftside and his signuture on the right page date September 1903, U.S.M.A.


Left image: Richard's note to a Paul Henry and his reply. Right image: Chapter 1 of the book. Image credit: copyrighted Greg Krenzelok, all rights reserved.

OFFICER'S MANUAL
By Colonel James A Moss, 7th Edition, 1929, Foreword written by Robert C. Richardson Jr., Lieutenant Colonel, Cavalry, Commandant of Cadets, United States Military Academy, West Point, New York, October 4, 1929.


Image of book and the right image: To: Lt. Colonel Richardson Cavalry, From: Colonel James A Moss. Image credit: copyrighted Greg Krenzelok, all rights reserved.

THE OFFICERS GUIDE
1st Edition, 1930, (Richardson wrote his name in the book: R.C. Richardson.


Left image: Richardson's signuture. Right image: Title page. Image credit: copyrighted Greg Krenzelok, all rights reserved.

OFFICIAL COURTESY AND CUSTOMS OF THE SERVICE
(Booklet), Prepared by The Department of Tactics, United States, Military Academy, West Point, N.Y. 1933.


Image credit: copyrighted Greg Krenzelok, all rights reserved.

INFORMATION RELATIVE TO THE APPOINTMENT AND ADMISSION OF CADETS
(Booklet), United States, Military Academy, West Point, N.Y, 1935 edition.


Image credit: copyrighted Greg Krenzelok, all rights reserved.

ROSTER OF OFFICERS AND TROOPS UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY WEST POINT
New York (Booklet), Major General William D. Connor, Superintendent and Commandant, September 15, 1935.


Image credit: copyrighted Greg Krenzelok, all rights reserved.

OFFICIAL REGISTER OFFICERS AND CADETS UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY
(Booklet), For the Academic Year ending June 30, 1935.


Image credit: copyrighted Greg Krenzelok, all rights reserved.

OFFICIAL REGISTER OFFICERS AND CADETS UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY
(Booklet), For the Academic Year ending June 30, 1936.


Image credit: copyrighted Greg Krenzelok, all rights reserved.

OFFICIAL REGISTER OFFICERS AND CADETS UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY
(Booklet), For the Academic Year ending June 30, 1937.


Image credit: copyrighted Greg Krenzelok, all rights reserved.

LIST OF CADETS UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY WEST POINT NEW YORK
(Booklet), From its Origin till June 30, 1937. With tables showing those admitted exclusive of foreigners, foreigners admitted, and promotion of graduates.


Image credit: copyrighted Greg Krenzelok, all rights reserved.

UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY WEST POINT NEW YORK CATALOGUE 1955-1956
(Booklet)


Image credit: copyrighted Greg Krenzelok, all rights reserved.

MAJOR R.C. RICHARDSON, 9 MILITARY PLAZA, MANILA, P.I.,
Undated personal notebook of expenditures and notes when he was stationed in the Philippines. All handwritten by then Major Richardson including title of this small bond notebook. Seems to be mainly household purchases, very detailed, many pages have been torn out. I did find a date of 1923 in the book. Written on the front cover: Major R.C. Richardson, 9 Military Plaza, Manila, P.I. (64 pages).

Note: In January 28, 1921 when he returned for his third Philippine tour of duty. In the Philippines, soon to be Major Richardson served as Assistant-to-Assistant Chief of Staff for Operations, Headquarters, Philippine Department, Manila until April 6, 1923


Note: Above are 6 examples from Richard's notebook labeled: R.C. Richardson, 9 Military Plaza, Manila, P.I. Image credit: copyrighted Greg Krenzelok, all rights reserved.

OLD MAP OF FLORENCE
From Newell's Guide to Florence


This map of Florence was tucked into Major R.C. Richardson's, 9 Military Plaza, Manila, P.I. notebook. Date of map unknown, maybe the 1920s. Image credit: copyrighted Greg Krenzelok, all rights reserved.

THE MAXIMS OF METHUSELAH
(Book) by Gelett Burgess, copyright October 1907. Note: Interesting illustration on the first blank page, appear to be a hand drawing of the Richardson in uniform sitting reading a book with his dog at his side and below in writing it says: "Trusting that it strikes you thusly - your wife, '09.

The Maxims of Methuselah: Being the Advice Given by the Patriarch in His Nine Hundred Sixty and Ninth Year to His Great Grandson at Shem's Coming of Age, in Regard to Women.


Drawn and written by General Richardson's wife, Lois Farman Richardson. She write to her husband:" Trusting that it Strikes You Thusly - Your Wife, 1909. Image credit: copyrighted Greg Krenzelok, all rights reserved.



GENERAL RICHARDSON'S FOOTLOCKER IMAGES 2020


Image credit: copyrighted Greg Krenzelok, all rights reserved.



Image credit: copyrighted Greg Krenzelok, all rights reserved.



Image credit: copyrighted Greg Krenzelok, all rights reserved.



VIDEO: PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT HAWAII TRIP JULY 1994
In this video President Roosevelt, General MacArthur, Admiral Nimitz, Fleet Admiral Leahy, and Lt. General Robert C. Richardson meet in Hawaii for a Presidential Conference on Pacific Strategy and to inspect the 7th Infantry Division and military facilities. Motorcade drives to Fort Shafter and Schofield Barracks. Most of the reel is silent except when the President speaks to the 7th Infantry Division. Archival footage from the FDR Presidential Library. Lots of great shots of General Richardson with President Roosevelt, General MacArthur, Admiral Nimitz,Fleet Admiral Leahy and very important military and civilian personnel. Very interesting footage. General Richardson was Commanding General of all Army personnel in the Central Pacific while simultaneously serving as Commanding General of the Hawaiian Department and as Military Governor of Hawaii.

Click on the below link:

President Roosevelt Presidential Conference Hawaii 1944



Left image: President Roosevelt and Lt. General Robert C. Richardson. Right image: General MacArthur and General Robert C. Richardson. Images taken aboard the heavy cruiser U.S.S. Baltimore in Honolulu, Hawaii on 26 July 1944.


Left image: President Roosevelt and Lt. General Robert C. Richardson. Right image: General Robert C. Richardson, behind him is General MacArthur and to General Richard is Admiral Nimitz. Images taken aboard the heavy cruiser U.S.S. Baltimore in Honolulu, Hawaii on 26 July 1944.


Presidential Review of the 7th Infantry Division at Schofield Barracks. In the car is President Roosevelt and General MacArthur. Saluting to the left is General Richard, unknown in back of him, and to Richardson's left is Fleet Admiral Leahy. July 27, 1944


Presidential Review of the 7th Infantry Division at Schofield Barracks. President Roosevelt speaks to the men. General Richardson is to the left. Fleet Admiral Leahy is to Richardson's left.

Note: Fleet Admiral William Daniel Leahy was an American naval officer who served as the senior-most United States military officer on active duty during World War II. He held multiple titles and was at the center of all major military decisions the United States made in World War II. - Wikipedia


Presidential Review of the 7th Infantry Division at Schofield Barracks. Review of the Division, on the left is President Roosevelt, to his right are General Richardson and Fleet Admiral William Daniel Leahy.


Image on the left: I believe this was the uniform General Richard was wearing on the heavy cruiser U.S.S. Baltimore. He is wearing his cavalry officer boots at the 7th Infantry Division review at Schofield Barracks. He was always a cavalryman at heart and loved the horses. Image on the right: from left to right: Fleet Admiral Leahy, General Richardson, unknown soldier, and President Roosevelt, reviewing of the 7th Infantry Division at Schofield Barracks, July 27, 1944. Note: General Richardson is not wearing his service coat in this image.


GENERAL RICHARDSON'S POST COMMANDER'S QUARTERS T- 5, FORT SHAFTER WW2


Left image: Fort Shafter Post Commander Qts building T-5 1916. Right image: Fort Shafter Post Commander Qts building T-5 2006.

The Post Commander's Quarters T-5 is the largest of the Palm Circle houses. It has continuously served as the quarters for the Commanding Officer of the post, the Hawaiian Department, or the senior commander at the base. This house has a patio area on the north side. A lava rock wall serves as a foundation wall for a small extension of the house and encloses the exterior patio. This feature was built in 1932 while the house was occupied by General B. H. Wells, Commanding General of the Hawaiian Department.

The front portion of the first floor contains the living room, library, a large dining room, and the main stair with a small bathroom underneath. The back portion of the residence has the back stair, pantry, kitchen, and former servant's quarters with a bathroom. The lanai (now enclosed) runs around almost the entire perimeter of the first floor. The second-floor features five bedrooms, four bathrooms, and a now-enclosed wrap-around lanai.


These are actual interior images of General Richardson's Fort Shafter Post Commander Quarters that I scanned at the Hoover Institution Archives. Source: Records and Images, Robert Charlwood Richardson papers, Hoover Institution.

GENERAL RICHARDSON'S HEADQUARTERS FORT SHAFTER HAWAII
Historically, the principal mission of the United States Army in Hawaii was the defense of the naval base at Pearl Harbor.

Lt. Gen. Robert C. Richardson's headquarters was at Fort Shafter, Hawaii. And under his command was the Central and South Pacific Base Commands were its major area commands. Tactical elements formerly subject to Army commands in the South Pacific Area, including the half dozen divisions and the Thirteenth Air Force which had comprised the bulk of its combat forces, had been moving into the boundaries of the Southwest Pacific Area command since the New Georgia campaign of mid-1943. The newly created South Pacific Base Command remained responsible for some months for the logistic support, including medical supply, evacuation, and rehabilitation, of some of its former troops, now in the northern Solomons. Army organization in the Southwest Pacific Area remained unchanged at this date except for the acquisition of the tactical elements from the South Pacific.

During World War II General Richardson's duties expanded, and his need for support staff increased, when he became commanding general of the U.S. Army Forces in the Central Pacific Area (USAFICPA) in August 1943, and then again in 1944 when he assumed command of the U.S. Army Forces Pacific Ocean Areas (USAFPOA), consisting of both central and south Pacific troops. "From 1943 to 1945, Richardson's command carried out logistical planning for the invasion of the Gilberts, Marshalls, Marianas, Guam, Palau, and Okinawa" (Thompson 1986). To provide space for the expanding administration of General Richardson, a complex of three structures was built in the northeast section of Palm Circle. These buildings, T-100, T-101, and T-102, were constructed at Palm Circle in 1944. Additional administration buildings were constructed behind the Officers' houses and adjacent to Building T-103 during WWII. General Richardson's headquarters was "Pineapple Pentagon". In 1944, the Army Corps of Engineers built the "Pineapple Pentagon" in just 49 days, with conversion of barracks housing into offices and other headquarters facilities. The complex of building was known formally as Richardson Hall and informally as the Pineapple Pentagon, stands at the eastern end of the parade. In connection with Richardson Hall there are three underground, bombproof tunnels in its vicinity. Tunnel 103 is presently a command center, while the current uses of tunnels 113 and 114 are unknown. The post remained the Army headquarters of the Asia-Pacific region until after WWII.


These are actual interior images of General Richardson's Fort Shafter Headquarters that I scanned at the Hoover Institution Archives. Source: Records and Images, Robert Charlwood Richardson papers, Hoover Institution.



Historic military housing neighborhoods and image of Fort Shafter Palm Circle.


FORT SHAFTER NEIGHBORHOOD SIGNIFICANCE
Fort Shafter is significant as Hawaii's first U.S. military post and as U.S. Army headquarters in Hawaii. The post was established just after Hawaii became a territory of the United States in 1900. In 1921, Fort Shafter became the headquarters of the Hawaiian Department, and since then it has served as the Senior Army Headquarters in Hawaii.

The Palm Circle neighborhood was constructed between 1907 and 1924 as officers' housing at Fort Shafter. Sited around the Palm Circle parade ground, this housing area is one of the oldest and most intact grouping of military buildings in Hawaii. The officers' housing is on one side of the somewhat-circular parade ground, and the original barracks, dining hall, and latrine structures are on the opposite side. The original buildings, nearly all of which remain, are of this same architectural style, even the latrine structures. The buildings have a refined style, reserved but moderately decorative, befitting a headquarters and signifying the importance of its residents. The buildings are complemented by stately rows of royal palms which were planted around the parade ground just after the first buildings were completed in 1909.

The officers' houses constructed in 1943 are located on the east side of the base, just south of the golf course. These houses were built as defense housing from standard plans used at other Army installations on Oahu. Set along tree-lined winding streets, the houses are relatively unaltered and appear much as they did when first completed. They serve as excellent examples of the WWII-era Army Officers' housing designs.

Most of the structures around Palm Circle were built between 1905 and 1909, all using the same architectural style. The original construction included 14 houses, an administrative building (formerly T-14, now demolished), four barracks buildings, four latrine buildings, two mess halls (now T-115 and T-123), a post exchange building (now T-118), and a guard house (now T-126). Except for the administration building and the post exchange building, all of the buildings directly on the parade ground circle were originally used for housing, with the officers' houses on the northwest side and the enlisted men's barracks on the southeast side. The supporting buildings for the barracks, including the two mess halls and four lavatories, were located behind the barracks buildings. The northeast and southwest sections of the circle were undeveloped.

Construction occurred in two phases, the first phase including all but four of the present quarters (5, 15, 17, 18) and buildings 119 (the pool, now demolished), 121, 122, 123, 127, and 128. Bids ranging from $2000,000 to $3000,000 opened on June 12, 1905; the contract was awarded to Burrell Construction Company of New York. Captain E. H. Humphrey, QMC, was the Construction Quartermaster. The houses were specially designed by the Quartermaster Corps for Hawaii and are marked by a special number in the index of standard drawings. The building forms are similar to other standardized plans used by the Quartermaster between 1901 and 1908, but modifications (particularly to increase ventilation) were made to adapt them to Hawaii's climate.

After World War II no regiment was stationed at Fort Shafter.


Note: References material for the above information comes from these sources:
- Fort Shafter HABS Report HABS No. HI-287-C.

- Historic Context Study of Historic Military Family Housing in Hawaii A Study funded by the Department of Defense Legacy Resource Management Program, Project No. 115.

- National Register Historic Places Inventory - Nomination Form.

- Stanford Hoover Institution Archives.

Special Note: Robert Charlwood Richardson Jr. papers (1917-1954) were donated by his son Brig. General Robert C. Richardson III to the Stanford Hoover Institution Archives. The ground and air forces in the Pacific are represented by the papers of General Robert C. Richardson, Jr. General Richardson's papers, consisting of 74 manuscript boxes, record his activities as Military Governor of Hawaii, with special reference to martial law, and Commanding General Army and Air Forces Central Pacific in 1945. Also included in this collection is General Richardson and his military command history, including commanding the VII Army Corps and Northern California Sector, Western Defense Command. The documentation on Saipan is particularly significant. The papers of General Delos C. Emmons, Chief of the Hawaiian Command, 1941-1945, are also concerned with martial law in Hawaii.

General Richardson's papers include:Correspondence, bulletins, directives, maps, and photographs relating to American military operations in the Pacific Theater during World War II and the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I. - Greg Krenzelok - Director - U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group.


VIDEO: FORT SHAFTER ONCE UPON A TIME
This a compilation of old photographs of Fort Shafter, Hawaii. The base was established in 1907 and continues to operate today as the location of U.S. Army Pacific's headquarters. These are photographs I have acquired and restored over the years. As I walk around Palm Circle and through the streets of Fort Shafter each day before lunch, I think of the many soldiers who have passed through this beautiful military facility. Many of the buildings depicted in the photographs are long gone, however, many still exist, and amazingly look much as they did in the old photographs. A new headquarters building T100 was built at the onset of World War II. It was affectionately referred to as the Pineapple Pentagon. The USARPAC headquarters is still located in this building. A new HQ building and command center is in the works.

Click on the below link:

Fort Shafter Once Upon a Time



During WWII. General Richardson's headquarters was "Pineapple Pentagon". The complex of buildings was known formally as Richardson Hall and informally as the Pineapple Pentagon, stands at the eastern end of the parade.


PACIFIC OPERATIONS DURING WORLD WAR II


Lt. General Robert C. Richardson Jr., commanding general United States Army Forces Middle Pacific, places a wreath on the grave of the late Lt. General Simon B. Buckner, Jr. Image credit: Associated Press.

LT. GENERAL SIMON B. BUCKNER,JR. KILLED IN ACTION BATTLE OF OKINAWA
In July 1944, Buckner was sent to Hawaii to organize the 10th Army, which was composed of both Army and Marine units. The original mission of the 10th Army was to prepare for the invasion of Taiwan. However, this operation was canceled and Buckner's command was instead ordered to prepare for the Battle of Okinawa. This turned out to be the largest, slowest, and bloodiest sea-land-air battle in American military history. According to an eyewitness account, on 18 June 1945, Lieutenant General Buckner had arrived in his command jeep, which was flying its standard 3-star flag, to inspect a forward observation post. Visits from the general were not always welcome as his presence frequently drew enemy fire, which fortunately, usually happened as General Buckner was departing. However, on the 18th Buckner had arrived with his standard bright three stars showing on his steel helmet and a nearby Marine outpost sent a signal to Buckner's position stating that they could clearly see the three stars on the general's helmet. Told of this, Buckner replaced his own helmet with an unmarked one. However, the Imperial Japanese Army artillery (Type 96 15 cm Howitzer) position had already observed General Buckner and commenced fire upon his position; exploding shrapnel tore into his chest. Buckner was carried by stretcher to a nearby aid station where he died on the operating table. Colonel Clarence R. Wallace and PFC Harry M. Sarkisian were at his side when he died.

Buckner was the highest-ranking U.S. military officer killed by enemy fire during World War II; he was also one of the highest-ranking military officers to die during the war.

He was succeeded in command by Marine General Roy Geiger. Total American deaths during the battle of Okinawa were 12,513.

Source: Military Hall of Honor
https://militaryhallofhonor.com/honoree-record.php?id=197


CINCINNATI VETERAN TAKE US BACK TO BATTLE OF OKINAWA

Click on the below link:

Cincinnati Veteran Take us back to Battle of Okinawa


THE WAR IN THE CENTRAL PACIFIC

By Lieutenant General Robert C. Richardson (In his own words)

After fighting a defensive war in the Central Pacific for more than 18 months, American forces were ready to take the offense in the fall of 1943.

The strategy of this offensive consisted of a continuous march westward with the aim of seizing bases and driving the Japanese back to their homeland.

The first of the desired bases were those in the Gilbert Islands - bases which would serve as a stepping stone to the acquisition of the Marshalls. The ultimate destination, of course, was Tokyo by way of Truk, Saipan, Iwo Jima, Okinawa, or whatever islands were deemed to be the best route.

In August 1943 I had been designated Commanding General of all Army and Air Forces in the Central Pacific Area. Admiral Nimitz was the Commander-in-Chief of the Pacific Ocean Areas and directed the operations of all Army and Air Forces. He retained also immediate command of the Pacific Fleet, assuming the respective titles of CINCPOA and CINCPAC. On 20 July 1943 he received a directive from the Joint Chiefs of Staff to assume the offensive.

The attack against the Gilberts was launched on 20 November 1943, and consisted of the seizure of Tarawa by the Second Marine Division and the capture of Makin by a reinforced regimental combat team of the 27th Infantry Division, under Major General Ralph C. Smith. This force had been placed under the operational control of the V Amphibious Corps for this operation.

Makin was captured in three days, and about 900 Japanese were killed or captured.

The enemy was given little time to rest. A vast armada assaulted the Marshall Islands 31 January 1944. The upper islands of the atoll, Roi and Namur, were assigned to the Marines, and Kwajalein, the main objective, was the target of the Seventh Infantry Division. Kwajalein was taken with a minimum of American losses, but more than 4,000 Japanese were killed on that island alone. Nearly 10,000 Japanese lost their lives in the seizure of the atoll. The Seventh Infantry Division made 42 one island after another following the capture of Kwajalein.

This operation was accomplished with such surprising ease that the Task Force Commander recommended the use if the reserves, which had not been committed, for an immediate assault on Eniwetok Atoll. This decision, approved by Admiral Nimitz, advanced the campaign of the Central Pacific by more than three months. A regiment of the Marines was assigned to the seizure of Engebi and the 106th Infantry of the 27th Infantry Division to Eniwetok. This regiment commanded by Colonel Russell G. Ayers, lost 61 men killed while destroying 1,094 Japanese.

Operations at Eniwetok had been covered by a bold fleet strike of Truk and the Marianas 17-22 February. The strike at Truk was particularly effective. The Japanese fleet was forced to retire from this advanced base. Nearly all remaining enemy air power in the eastern Central Pacific Area was destroyed. Plans to land on Truk were already in process of formulations. Photographs made during the strike and analysis of intelligence reports convinced the Joint Chiefs of Staff that Truk could be safely by-passed and neutralized by American sea and air power. On 12 March 1944 Truk was dropped as a potential target and Nimitz was directed to proceed with the capture of the Marianas Islands on or about 15 June 1944. Earlier estimates of the landings to be made in the Marianas had placed the dates a 1 November 1944.

Two Marine Amphibious Corps were to conduct the invasion of the Marianas. The V Corps, including the 2nd and 4th Marines, was to land originally on Saipan. The III Amphibious Corps comprised of the 3rd Marines Division and the 1st Provisional Marine Brigade, were to land at Guam. The 27th Infantry Division was in floating reserve for both operations, while the 77th Infantry Division, then newly arrived in the Central Pacific, was to be held in strategic reserve in the Hawaiian Islands, for use after D-Day plus 20, if needed.

The landings at Saipan were strongly opposed and on 16 June, the second day of the operation, the 27th Division was committed. From that time until the island was officially declared secure on 9 July 1944, elements of the 27th Division were constantly in the line. At the close of the operations, this division had suffered 3,670 casualties, of whom 1,053 were killed in action. From 9 July until late August the Division was engaged in mopping up.

The bitter struggle on Saipan had resulted in the postponement of the attacks upon Guam and Tinian. Commitment of the 27th Division also necessitated bringing in the 77th Division from Oahu. The landings on Guam eventually took place on 21 July, with the 77th Division going ashore o D-Day, although not in the assault. The island was finally announced secure on 10 August. Approximately 10,000 Japanese had been killed. Casualties in the 77th Division amounted to 270 killed and 876 wounded.

While the fighting had been taking place in the Marianas, two more operations were in preparation. The first of these, directed by the III Amphibious Corps, was aiming at the Palau group. On 15 September members of the 1st Marines and the 81st Infantry Division landed on Pelelieu and Angaur respectively. Angaur was garrisoned by about 1,400 Japanese who were subdued by the 81st by 22 September. On the same day, elements of the 81st Division landed unopposed on Ulithi. Meanwhile, opposition encountered by the 1st Marine Division on Pelelieu had been great, and during the first week in October, two regimental combat teams of the 81st Infantry Division were landed to assist in the reduction of that island fortress, manned by about 9,000 Japanese. Fighting here ended 8 November.

The second of the two planned autumn operations for 1944 was seizure of Yap on 15 October. For this purpose, I organized the XXIV Corps in Hawaii and placed Major General John R. Hodge in command. His troops were loaded for this operation when the Joint Chiefs of Staff, on recommendation General MacArthur, and Admiral Nimitz, changed the target to Leyte in the Philippines. The XXIV Corps landed on Leyte as a part of the Sixth Army on 20 October 1944.

During the summer of 1944, Army Headquarters in the Pacific had undergone a major reorganization. USAFICPA now became United States Army Forces in the Pacific Ocean Areas. I still retained command of this headquarters. Three separate base commands were established under USAFPOA. At Fort Shafter on Oahu, the Central Pacific Base Command was established under the command Major General Henry L. Burgin. The old South Pacific Area was disbanded. In its place appeared the South Pacific Base Command under the command of Major General Frederick Gilbreath. In September, 1944 the island command of newly-conquered Saipan became the Western Pacific Base Command under Major General Sanderford B. Jarman. Operational command in the Central Pacific continued to be held by Admiral Nimitz as CINCPAC-CINCPOA.

Meanwhile, CINCPOA had given me directions to prepare an attack on Formosa. The Tenth Army was activated for this operation, and Lieutenant General Simon B. Buckner was assigned to lead it. Although all plans were made for this attack, they were abandoned in favor of a strike in the Ryukyus Islands.

This operation, the last of the war in the Central Pacific, began on 26 March 1945, when elements of the 77th Division seized the Kerama Retto, a small group of islands southwest of Okinawa. On 1 April the Tenth Army landed on Okinawa itself with two corps abreast. The III Amphibious Corps with the 1st and 6th Marines Divisions landed on the north and the XXIV Corps, comprising of the 7th and 96th Divisions, landed on the right, south.

The III Corps turned north and swept rapidly up the island against negligible opposition, reaching the north tip in mid-April. The XXIV Corps met only minor opposition in the south until 4 April when the two assault divisions ran head-on into the Shuri Defense line. Almost two full months later Americans were still pounding their way through the incredibly tangled terrain of a superior Japanese defense system. Shuri fell on 31 May and finally, on 21 June, Okinawa was declared secure. Both the 27th and 77th Army Divisions fought on Okinawa. The latter also captured le Shuri in a bitter 4-day battle in April, killing 5,000 Japanese. The victory cost the enemy more than 120,000 men, killed and captured. Including naval causalities, American losses in this last battle of the war were over 40,000. Of these 4,675 Army men were killed in the four divisions that participated. Some 18,100 were wounded. General Buckner was among those killed in the final stages of this battle.

During this last desperate battle at Japan's doorstep all Army commands in the Pacific were placed under General MacArthur. Under his direction former Central Pacific units were busily engaged in preparing for the invasion of the Japanese homeland. The Japanese, blasted by the Atom bomb, mindful that all the forces of the whole Allied world were massing for this assault, gave up the fight and surrendered unconditionally.

Signed

Robert Richardson

Source: The War in the Central Pacific By Lieutenant General Robert C. Richardson


YOUR VICTORY: THE WAR IN THE CENTRAL PACIFIC

The Whole Picture Fitted together. Written by enlisted Army correspondents who have been in all the places about which they have written and have not forgotten the men about whom they are writing.


Booklet cover, center image: Lt. General R.C. Richardson Commanding. Right image: units of the Middle Pacific Command and Pacific Ocean Areas. Image credit: U.S. Army Signal Corps.

FOREWARD
It would be pretentious of us to label this a "history" of the Middle Pacific War. It's too informal and not comprehensive enough for that. It is an unofficial account of MidPac at war, and we learned an interesting thing when we started work on it: No one had yet given the whole Army picture of what happened in the Middle Pacific, from Pearl Harbor to Okinawa.

All the G sections had their reports, and there were newspaper stories and unit histories and articles by GI correspondents, but the whole picture had never been fitted together before.

We had hopes of putting out a sort of annual, like the ones which high school and colleges put out, for alumni of the Middle Pacific. We found out that wasn't feasible. We couldn't give the names and numbers of all the players, because there were just too many of them.

What we have tried to do is give an overall picture as not seen not from the top, but from the bottom. This is not a bird's-eye view, it is from a worm's-eye view, a G-eye view of what happened.

We wanted to tell not only who won the battle (it was usually us), but how we won it and how we felt about fighting it. We wanted to incorporate a bit of the folklore of the MIDPAC GI. Maybe we wanted to boast a little, too.

If Joe and his wife come over for a bit of bridge and ask what we did in the war, this book may help answer. And if there should be a little 12-pointer to ask "Daddy, what did you do?", you'll have this book to refresh your memory.

This piece was written by enlisted Army correspondents who have been in all the places about which they have written and have not forgotten the men about whom they are writing.

These pages will bring back many memories to the armed forces of the Middle Pacific Command and Pacific Ocean Areas.


Left image: General Richardson in the field, holding a cap and wearing it. Center and right images: Chronology, Middle Pacific Command. Image credit: U.S. Army Signal Corps.


Middle Pacific Command and Pacific Ocean Areas. Image credit: U.S. Army Signal Corps.


Images from "Your Victory". Image credit: U.S. Army Signal Corps.


Not many remember the saying: "Kilroy Was Here", history gets lost. Note: When I was researching the Fort Ord Stables and Blacksmith shop, I ran across this saying in the buildings. - Greg Krenzelok Image credit: U.S. Army Signal Corps.

Note: It is wonderful to have a small part of this history, having General Richardson personal footlocker and contents. He was a very big part of the above history. He was commanding the Middle Pacific Command and Pacific Ocean Areas. General MacArthur wired General Richardson and said this to him: "The splendid efficiency of your XXIV Corps reflects the careful training it has received under your able command, The Corps has performed most gallantly."

- Greg Krenzelok, Director U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historial Preservation Group.


7TH DIVISION ASSAULT ON ATTU ISLAND, WW2, BEFORE THEY WERE IN THE PACIFIC

(Story of Pvt. Joe Martinez, Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient)

In 1942 a Japanese assault force had been dispatched to seize Dutch Harbor, the U. S. outpost in the Aleutians. They got cold feet, however, and decided to settle for Kiska and Attu at the western end of the chain of islands we bad obtained from Russia in 1867. It was clear that the Japanese hoped to use the islands as a springboard for an attack against Alaska.

The job of getting these islands back was given to the 7th Division. The Hourglass soldiers found it hard to believe that they were headed for arctic terrain after their desert training.

The first elements to land moved up on to Attu's "Red Beach" on May 11, 1943. They probed about for several hours and were able to consolidate beach positions before the Japanese learned they were there and started to bring defensive fire to bear. Then they had to fight a brutal campaign, which was not concluded until the defeat of the Japanese at Chiehagof Harbor

The 7th Recon Troop went ashore first, moving in resolutely despite a pea-soup fog which reduced visibility to zero. The principal landings were carried out by elements of the 17th Infantry Regiment under the command of Colonel Edward P. Earle, who was killed in the battle. The 17th was neither properly equipped nor clothed for a northern campaign, for in those days we knew practically nothing about waging extensive winter warfare. Nevertheless, the 17th Infantry soldiers carried on, and for this action won a Distinguished Unit Citation.

Company B scaled a sheer cliff in the face of Japanese gunfire to attack positions which were holding up an important advance against a ridge between the valleys of Holtz Bay. Company F's attack in the pass between the valleys was magnificent. The GI's used rifles, bayonets, and hand grenades to drive the enemy out of a series of trenches near the vital Cold Mountain. Company E charged the enemy entrenched in the Saran Valley-Massacre Valley Pass, and buried the Japanese out by the sheer fury of their assault. Companies I and K, though depleted by battle losses, conducted the attack on the upper plateau of Attu which led to the capture of Chichagof Harbor, where the fighting was at its fiercest.

All efforts to dislodge the enemy from his defense positions in the snow-covered mountain passes leading to Chichagof failed. On May 26 a new attempt was made by a reinforced battalion of the 32d, which was successful at first, then stalled as the intensity of the enemy's defensive fires drove the Gl's to cover.

Then Private Jose P. Martinez, a Company K Barman from Taos, New Mexico, started to charge the enemy trench lines. A few hardy soldiers ventured to follow him. Martinez completed the climb, and firing his BAR and throwing hand grenades he knocked out part of the enemy strong point. The main pass was still 150 feet above him, and the way was barred by enemy fire from both flanks and from tiers of snow trenches to his front. But Martinez was confident; he rallied the men who had come with him, and once more started the climb, blazing a path with fire from his BAR. As he reached the final trench and started to clean it out, he was hit and mortally wounded. But a few minutes later the infantrymen swarmed over the Pass. Its capture was the end of organized Japanese resistance on Attu, although the enemy had enough strength in reserve to mount a night Banzai attack in the Clevesy Pass on the last day of the month of May.

With Attu under control the Division turned its attention to the next target: Kiska, westernmost of the Rat Islands.

The above information is taken from the "7th Division Bayonets Website".




Click on the below Homepage links:

11TH CAVALRY PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, 1919 TO 1940
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11th Cavalry Presidio of Monterey, 1919 to 1940


76TH FIELD ARTILLERY REGIMENT PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, 1922 TO 1940
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76th Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Battalion


7TH DIVISION HEADQUARTERS BUILDINGS, GENERAL STILWELL, FORT ORD, CALIFORNIA, WW2, 1940
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7th Division Headquarters Buildings, Fort Ord, WW2 General Stilwell


EAST GARRISON/CAMP ORD 1940's ARMY BUILDING DOCUMENTATION
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East Garrison/Camp Ord 1940's Army Building Documentation 2013


THE ARMY VETERINARY SERVICE DURING THE GREAT WAR, WW1
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Veterinary Corps in WW1


LEONARD PATRICK MURPHY U.S. ARMY VETERINARY CORPS, A.E.F., WW1
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Leonard Murphy in WW1





U.S. ARMY VETERINARY CORPS HISTORICAL PRESERVATION GROUP

Motto: "Illic est Vires in Numerus" There is Strength in Numbers

"Working Hard to Preserve Our Country's History wherever it is being lost".

U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group is a group of individuals that are concerned about the preservation of the History of the Veterinary Corps, Remount Service and Cavalry or wherever our country's history is being lost in conjunction with our beloved "Horse and Mule". There is no cost to join and membership is for life. We believe by uniting together in numbers we will be a more powerful force to be heard. Our membership list is private and only used to contact our members. Email us and become a member.

Greg Krenzelok
gregkrenzelok@msn.com

FACEBOOK: U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group

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U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group


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