Hague-on-Lake George



 

Hague-on-Lake George             

 

 

 

 

    Hague was first a part of Bolton in Washington County, New York. On the 28th of February, 1807, we got our own boundaries and became known as Rochester. A little over a year later, on April 6, 1808, we were re-named “Hague”. Why? No clue was found in our earliest minute books.  

    In her research of Hague’s history, Deborah Manning, our current Town Clerk, found that the Town Fathers didn’t have a say in the name change from Rochester to Hague. In fact, many names of towns were changed on April 6, 1808.  It happened in Albany, by an Act of our State Legislature:  “Whereas considerable inconvenience results from several of the towns in this state having the same name…for remedy whereof…from and after the first day of August next…the town of Rochester, in the county of Washington, shall be named Hague….”  Albany gave us until August 1st, 1808, to make the change, but it wasn’t until March 12, 1813, that Hague dropped out of Washington County to become part of Warren County. 

   Why did we have to change our name, and not the other “Rochester”?  True, in 1803, Colonel Nathaniel Rochester and two other gents from Maryland bought a tract of land on the Genesee River, which in 1817, became the “Village of Rochesterville” and in 1823 was named Rochester.  So it seems that in 1807 we were the first to be named Rochester. 

    For 200 years we have been known as Hague—and it has suited us just fine.  There’s no place like Hague-on-Lake George, NY!  Come visit!               –by Chris Ianson, Oct.12, 2006