Richard John Templeton1,2

M, #18379, b. 10 April 1871, d. 8 August 1952
  • Reference: W999 ID745

Family: Bertie Blanche Wells b. 7 Aug 1880, d. 2 Dec 1978

Citations

  1. Carolyn L. Wells, as submitted in GEDCOM file C:TMGWGEDCOMSID745_~1.GED and imported on 07/28/2008 at 11:30:41.,_ID745 _Researcher.
  2. Wells Surname DNA Study,Orin Wells, Wells Surname DNA Study.

_ID384 B372 _W0131,2

M, #18382, b. 384
  • Reference: W013 ID384
  • Birth*: 3841

Citations

  1. Wells Surname DNA Study,Orin Wells, Wells Surname DNA Study.
  2. John D Wells, W013 ID384 as submitted in GEDCOM file C:TMGWGEDCOMSID384_~1.GED and imported on 07/25/2008 at 14:47:36.

_ID384 _Researcher1,2

M, #18383
  • Reference: W013 ID384

Citations

  1. Wells Surname DNA Study,Orin Wells, Wells Surname DNA Study.
  2. John D Wells, W013 ID384 as submitted in GEDCOM file C:TMGWGEDCOMSID384_~1.GED and imported on 07/25/2008 at 14:47:36.

Horace Melbourne Wells1,2

M, #18385, b. 2 September 1904, d. 30 January 1956
  • Reference: W013 ID384

Family: Edith Mc Millian b. 1905, d. 1966

Citations

  1. John D Wells, W013 ID384 as submitted in GEDCOM file C:TMGWGEDCOMSID384_~1.GED and imported on 07/25/2008 at 14:47:36.
  2. Wells Surname DNA Study,Orin Wells, Wells Surname DNA Study.

Horace Spencer Wells1,2

M, #18386, b. 5 November 1876, d. 22 February 1955
  • Reference: W013 ID384

Family: Jettie M Tuton b. 1880, d. 1908

Citations

  1. John D Wells, W013 ID384 as submitted in GEDCOM file C:TMGWGEDCOMSID384_~1.GED and imported on 07/25/2008 at 14:47:36.
  2. Wells Surname DNA Study,Orin Wells, Wells Surname DNA Study.

Andrew A Wells1,2

M, #18387, b. 1813, d. 12 June 1865
  • Reference: W013 ID384
  • (Researcher) ResAddr: Researcher=_ID384 _Researcher2
  • (Head of Household) Census*: 1850; Alachua Co., Florida, USAG; 1850 United States Federal Census
    View 1850 United States Federal Census

    View blank form

    Report issue

    Name:      Andrew Wells
    Age:      37
    Birth Year:      abt 1813
    Birthplace:      Georgia
    Home in 1850:      Division 14, Alachua, Florida, USA
    Gender:      Male
    Family Number:      101
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Andrew Wells      37
    Mary Wells      34
    Thomas A Wells      13
    George W Wells      11
    William Wells      8
    Andrew J Wells      7
    Henry Wells      4
    James Wells      1; Household Member=William G Wells, Household Member=Henry Wells, Household Member=James Wells, Household Member=Thomas N Wells, Household Member=George W Wells, Household Member=Andrew J Wells
  • (Head of Household) Census: 1860; Ocala, Marion Co., Florida, USAG; 1860 United States Federal Census
    View 1860 United States Federal Census

    View blank form

    Report issue

    Name:      A A Wells
    Age:      47
    Birth Year:      abt 1813
    Gender:      Male
    Birth Place:      Georgia
    Home in 1860:      Marion, Florida
    Post Office:      Ocala
    Family Number:      235
    Value of real estate:      View image
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    A A Wells      47
    Mary E Wells      45
    Geo W Wells      20
    W G Wells      16
    Henry Wells      14
    James Wells      12
    Isaac Wells      10
    Caroline Wells      5
    Passa Wells      3; Household Member=Issac N Wells, Household Member=William G Wells, Household Member=Henry Wells, Household Member=James Wells, Household Member=Caroline Wells, Household Member=Passa Wells, Household Member=George W Wells, Household Member=Mary E _____

Family 1: Mary E _____ b. 1815

Family 2:

Citations

  1. John D Wells, W013 ID384 as submitted in GEDCOM file C:TMGWGEDCOMSID384_~1.GED and imported on 07/25/2008 at 14:47:36.
  2. Wells Surname DNA Study,Orin Wells, Wells Surname DNA Study.

Edith Mc Millian1,2

F, #18388, b. 1905, d. 1966
  • Reference: W999 ID384
  • (Researcher) ResAddr: Researcher=_ID384 _Researcher2
  • Married Name: before 1927; Mrs. Wells (Mc Millian)

Family: Horace Melbourne Wells b. 2 Sep 1904, d. 30 Jan 1956

Citations

  1. John D Wells, W013 ID384 as submitted in GEDCOM file C:TMGWGEDCOMSID384_~1.GED and imported on 07/25/2008 at 14:47:36.
  2. Wells Surname DNA Study,Orin Wells, Wells Surname DNA Study.

Jettie M Tuton1,2

F, #18389, b. 1880, d. 1908
  • Reference: W999 ID384

Family: Horace Spencer Wells b. 5 Nov 1876, d. 22 Feb 1955

Citations

  1. John D Wells, W013 ID384 as submitted in GEDCOM file C:TMGWGEDCOMSID384_~1.GED and imported on 07/25/2008 at 14:47:36.
  2. Wells Surname DNA Study,Orin Wells, Wells Surname DNA Study.

Anna Virginia Blount1,2

F, #18390, b. 18 May 1843, d. 12 May 1929
  • Reference: W999 ID384
  • (Researcher) ResAddr: Researcher=_ID384 _Researcher2
  • Married Name: circa 1868; Mrs. Wells (Blount)
  • Married Name: circa 1884; Mrs. Waldron (Blount)

Family 1: Henry Wells b. 1846, d. c 1900

Family 2: Michael B Waldron b. 1834, d. 1912

Citations

  1. John D Wells, W013 ID384 as submitted in GEDCOM file C:TMGWGEDCOMSID384_~1.GED and imported on 07/25/2008 at 14:47:36.
  2. Wells Surname DNA Study,Orin Wells, Wells Surname DNA Study.

Mary E _____1,2

F, #18391, b. 1815
  • Reference: W999 ID384
  • (Researcher) ResAddr: Researcher=_ID384 _Researcher2
  • Married Name: circa 1835; Mrs. Wells (_____)
  • (Household Member) Census: 1860; Ocala, Marion Co., Florida, USAG; 1860 United States Federal Census
    View 1860 United States Federal Census

    View blank form

    Report issue

    Name:      A A Wells
    Age:      47
    Birth Year:      abt 1813
    Gender:      Male
    Birth Place:      Georgia
    Home in 1860:      Marion, Florida
    Post Office:      Ocala
    Family Number:      235
    Value of real estate:      View image
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    A A Wells      47
    Mary E Wells      45
    Geo W Wells      20
    W G Wells      16
    Henry Wells      14
    James Wells      12
    Isaac Wells      10
    Caroline Wells      5
    Passa Wells      3; Head of Household=Andrew A Wells

Family: Andrew A Wells b. 1813, d. 12 Jun 1865

Citations

  1. John D Wells, W013 ID384 as submitted in GEDCOM file C:TMGWGEDCOMSID384_~1.GED and imported on 07/25/2008 at 14:47:36.
  2. Wells Surname DNA Study,Orin Wells, Wells Surname DNA Study.

_ID735 B735 _W0131,2

M, #18392, b. 735
  • Reference: W013 ID735
  • Birth*: 7351,2

Citations

  1. Robert H. Wells.
  2. Wells Surname DNA Study,Orin Wells, Wells Surname DNA Study.

_ID735 _Researcher1,2

M, #18393
  • Reference: W013 ID735

Citations

  1. Robert H. Wells.
  2. Wells Surname DNA Study,Orin Wells, Wells Surname DNA Study.

Capt. Samuel Welles1,2

M, #18394, b. 13 April 1660, d. 21 August 1731
  • Reference: W015 ID001
  • Note: from Samuel Welles, descended Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy in the administrations of Presidents Lincoln and Johnson, 1861-1869, married June 1683 to Ruth Rice, daughter of Edmund Rice of Marlborough, MA.
  • Note: References:
    Andrew Henshaw Ward, The Rice Family, pp. 5, 10.
    Rice Gen'l Register, pp. 1, 4.
    Margaret Skinner Rice, Rice Family - S2/P1, p. 1.
    NEHG Register, p. 80:279.
    The Barbour Collection: p. 1:14; F/93/C71/micro film at NEHGS.
    W I Tyler Brigham, Brigham Family, vol 1, p. 52.
  • Nam-Std: Capt. Wells
  • (Researcher) ResAddr: Researcher=_ID001 _Researcher2
  • (Head of Household) Census*: 1685; Glastonbury, Hartford Co., Connecticut, USAG2

Family: Ruth Rice b. 29 Sep 1659, d. 30 Mar 1742

Citations

  1. GEDCOM, Gedcom.
  2. Wells Surname DNA Study,Orin Wells, Wells Surname DNA Study.
  3. GEDCOM.

Sarah Atkin Welles1,2

F, #18395, b. 20 December 1864
  • Reference: W015 ID049
  • Nam-Std: Wells
  • (Researcher) ResAddr: Researcher=_ID049 _Researcher2
  • (Household Member) Census: 1870; Wethersfield, Hartford Co., Connecticut, USAG; [
    1870 United States Federal Census
    about Roger Wells
    Name: Roger Wells
    [Roger Welles]
    Birth Year: abt 1829
    Age in 1870: 41
    Birthplace: Connecticut
    Home in 1870: Wethersfield, Hartford, Connecticut
    Race: White
    Gender: Male
    Value of real estate: View image
    Post Office: Newington
    Household Members: Name Age
    Roger Wells 41
    Mercy D Wells 36
    Martin Wells 11
    Roger Wells 7
    Mary C Wells 9
    Sarah Wells 5
    E Stanley Wells 3
    Electa Wells 73
    Welles Wheeler 10
    Nora Connelly 24
    Maggie Adison 13

    ; Head of Household=Roger Wells3,2

Citations

  1. Cemetery Records, Wethersfield, CT Vital Records 1634 - 1868 From the Barbour Collection as found at the CT State Library Transcribed by Coralynn Brown, Sarah A, dau Roger, lawyer, age 35 & Mercy D, age 32, b Dec 20, 1864.
  2. Wells Surname DNA Study,Orin Wells, Wells Surname DNA Study.
  3. United States Federal Census, 1880 CT Hartford Newington ED54, fam: 95, Roger Welles.

Rebecca Welles1,2

F, #18396, b. 3 October 1703, d. 20 February 1725
  • Reference: W015 ID001

Citations

  1. GEDCOM, Gedcom.
  2. Wells Surname DNA Study,Orin Wells, Wells Surname DNA Study.

Capt. Samuel Welles1,2

M, #18397, b. 26 December 1694, d. 2 March 1760
  • Reference: W015 ID001

Family: Esther Ellsworth b. 9 Mar 1702, d. 3 Nov 1791

Citations

  1. GEDCOM, Gedcom.
  2. Wells Surname DNA Study,Orin Wells, Wells Surname DNA Study.
  3. Vital Records: Birth, Baptism, Christening, Marriage, Divorce, Death and Burial, Vital Records: Birth, Baptism, Christening, Marriage, Divorce, Death and Burial, Hartford CT Vital Records, Samuell WELLS was married to Esther ELLSWORTH Janry 31, 1722.
  4. Military Record, CT Soc of CT Colonial Sol, p 111, No. 41, Gen No. 582 - Thomas Welles, Pedigree 4.
  5. CT Soc of CT Colonial Sol, p 1253, Servies of Ancestors.
  6. Vital Records: Birth, Baptism, Christening, Marriage, Divorce, Death and Burial, Vital Records: Birth, Baptism, Christening, Marriage, Divorce, Death and Burial, Hartford CT Vital Records, Esther WELLS, dafter of Samll WELLS & Esther his wife was born Oct. 22, 1723
    Samll WELLS was born Octobr. 5, 1725
    Ruth WELLS was born Decembr 17, 1727
    Ann WELLS was born Decembr 17, 1727 -twins
    John was born Febry 20th 1732-3
    Hannah WELLS was born April 26th day 1736
    Rebecca born December 16 1743
    Elisha WELLS was married to Lydia DEMING of Wethersfield April 4th 1757
    Elisha WELLS son of said Elisha & Lydia was born Sept 27, 1758
    Lemuel WELLS their son was born July 30th, 1763.

Ruth Welles1,2

F, #18398, b. 29 January 1696/97, d. 2 April 1731
  • Reference: W015 ID001
  • Nam-Std: Wells
  • (Researcher) ResAddr: Researcher=_ID001 _Researcher2
  • Married Name: 5 January 1724; Mrs. Ruth Ely (Wells);
    Spouse

    Photo
    Daniel Ely

    1693–1776 (m. 1725)
    3

Citations

  1. GEDCOM, Gedcom.
  2. Wells Surname DNA Study,Orin Wells, Wells Surname DNA Study.
  3. Unknown author, FINDAGRAVE.COM, Record Type: CEMETERY.

Sarah Welles1,2

F, #18399, b. 18 December 1700
  • Reference: W015 ID001

Citations

  1. GEDCOM, Gedcom.
  2. Wells Surname DNA Study,Orin Wells, Wells Surname DNA Study.

James Welles (2)1,2

M, #18400, b. 1706, d. 10 February 1725
  • Reference: W015 ID001

Citations

  1. GEDCOM, Gedcom.
  2. Wells Surname DNA Study,Orin Wells, Wells Surname DNA Study.

Hannah Welles1,2

F, #18401, b. 22 November 1689, d. 1761
  • Reference: W015 ID001

Citations

  1. GEDCOM, Gedcom.
  2. Wells Surname DNA Study,Orin Wells, Wells Surname DNA Study.

James Welles (1)1,2

M, #18402, b. 26 February 1693, d. 2 March 1760
  • Reference: W015 ID001

Citations

  1. GEDCOM, Gedcom.
  2. Wells Surname DNA Study,Orin Wells, Wells Surname DNA Study.

Thomas Welles1,2

M, #18403, b. 1627, d. before 20 August 1668
  • Reference: W015 ID104

Family: Hannah Tuttle b. 20 Jan 1633, d. 8 Aug 1683

Citations

  1. Wells Surname DNA Study,Orin Wells, Wells Surname DNA Study.
  2. John S. Welles, as submitted in GEDCOM file C:TMGWGEDCOMSC104.GED and imported on 03/26/2008 at 14:43:29.
  3. Pat Thomas GEDCOM File.
  4. Vital Records: Birth, Baptism, Christening, Marriage, Divorce, Death and Burial, Vital Records: Birth, Baptism, Christening, Marriage, Divorce, Death and Burial, Hartford CT Vital Records, Mr. Thomas WELLS sonn of Mr. Thomas WELLS, magistrate of Wethersfield, was married to Mrs. Hannah Pantree of Hartford, widdowe the 23 day of June one thousand sixe hundred fifty four.
    Vol 13, p141.
  5. Vital Records: Birth, Baptism, Christening, Marriage, Divorce, Death and Burial, Vital Records: Birth, Baptism, Christening, Marriage, Divorce, Death and Burial, Wethersfield, CT Vital Records 1634 - 1868 From the Barbour Collection as found at the CT State Library Transcribed by Coralynn Brown, Thomas, supposed to have been son of the first settler, died about 1677.
  6. GEDCOM, Gedcom.
  7. Unknown compiler, unknown short title, Bio Rec Tolland Windham CT, Gov Thomas Welles, p132-5.

Elizabeth Hollister1,2

F, #18404, b. 1642, d. 1673
  • Reference: W015 ID001
  • Birth*: 1642; Wethersfield, Hartford Co., Connecticut, USAG; parents: lieut. John Hollister Sr. and Johanna Treat2
  • (Bride) Marriage*: 1659; Wethersfield, Hartford Co., Connecticut, USAG; The son of GOV. THOMAS & ALICE (TOMES) WELLES, he was brought to New England by his parents at a young age.
    He married first Elizabeth Hollister in 1659, daughter of John & Joanna (Treat) Hollister of Wethersfield. They were the parents of Capt. Samuel Welles, Capt. Thomas Welles, Sarah (Welles) Hawley, Mary (Welles) Hale, Ann (Welles) Judson, and Elizabeth (Welles) Shelton.

    He married second, Hannah Lamberton, daughter of George & Margaret (Lewen) Lamberton of New Haven, Conn. There was no issue. She married the Worshipful John Allyn of Hartford (his second wife) after Samuel's death.

    Samuel was deputy to the General Court for Wethersfield in 1657-1662 and 1675. He was a member of the Council of War in July 1675. Commissioned Ensign of the Wethersfield Trainband in March, 1657/8, Lieutenant in May, 1665, and Captain in May of 1670. He was present at the Great Swamp Fight at North Kingston, RI during the Narragansett War.

    In 1665 he was chosen Commissioner for the plantation of Wethersfield. He was appointed to be in a committee to settle the differences between the inhabitants of Middletown & the Indians and to settle the bounds.

    The inventory of Samuel's estate was taken July 15, 1675 by Samuel Talcott, John Deming and John Chester and was valued at œ1100. The children were aged Samuel, age 16 years, Thomas 14, Sarah 12, Mary 10, Ann 7, Elizabeth 5 years at the writing of his will. Administration went to Hannah Wells but she declined due to not being able to carry it out. The distribution was as follows: To the widow 1/3 of the Real Estate according to law, and œ50 personalEstate, forever; to Samuel Welles, œ380; to Thomas, œ230; to Mary, considering her lameness, œ140; to Sarah, Ann & Elizabeth, to each œ100.; Groom=Capt. Samuel Welles
  • (Deceased) Death*: 1673; Wethersfield, Hartford Co., Connecticut, USAG; Birth:      1642
    Wethersfield
    Hartford County
    Connecticut, USA
    Death:      1673
    Wethersfield
    Hartford County
    Connecticut, USA

    Daughter of John & Elizabeth (Treat) Hollister. Married Captain Samiel Wells in 1669 in Wethersfield CT.

    Family links:
    Parents:
    John Hollister (1612 - 1665)
    Johanna Treat Hollister (1618 - 1694)

    Spouse:
    Samuel Wells (1628 - 1675)

    Children:
    Thomas Wells (1662 - 1711)*
    Anna Wells Judson (1668 - 1739)*
    Elizabeth Welles Shelton (1670 - 1747)*

    Siblings:
    John Hollister (1642 - 1711)*
    Elizabeth Hollister Wells (1642 - 1673)
    Mary Hollister Welles (1650 - 1713)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Unknown

    Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]

    Created by: Linda Mac
    Record added: Feb 24, 2009
    Find A Grave Memorial# 341577822
  • Death: 1673; Wethersfield, Hartford Co., Connecticut, USAG; Daughter of John & Elizabeth (Treat) Hollister. Married Captain Samiel Wells in 1659 in Wethersfield CT. Their first child, Samuel, was born in 1660.

Family: Capt. Samuel Welles b. c 1630, d. 15 Jul 1675

Citations

  1. Stephanie Ruth Lee,.
  2. Wells Surname DNA Study,Orin Wells, Wells Surname DNA Study.
  3. GEDCOM, Gedcom.

Capt. Thomas Welles1,2

M, #18405, b. 22 July 1662, d. 7 December 1711
  • Reference: W015 ID001
  • Birth*: 22 July 1662; Wethersfield, Hartford Co., Connecticut, USAG4,2
  • Baptism: 29 July 1662; Wethersfield, Hartford Co., Connecticut, USAG
  • (Groom) Marriage*: 7 January 1697/98; Wethersfield, Hartford Co., Connecticut, USAG; Bride=Thankful Roote1,2
  • (Groom) Marriage*: 17 May 1705; Wethersfield, Hartford Co., Connecticut, USAG; Thomas, Capt., m Jerusha TREAT, dau Lieut. James, May 17, 1705, by John Chester; Bride=Jerusha Treat5,2
  • (Deceased) Death*: 7 December 1711; Wethersfield, Hartford Co., Connecticut, USAG2
  • (Witness) Burial*: 8 December 1711; Wethersfield, Hartford Co., Connecticut, USAG; Birth:      Jul. 29, 1662
    Wethersfield
    Hartford County
    Connecticut, USA
    Death:      Dec. 11, 1711
    Wethersfield
    Hartford County
    Connecticut, USA

    The son of Capt. Samuel & Elizabeth (Hollister) Welles, he married first Thankful Root on Jan. 7, 1697. His second marriage was to Jerusha Treat, daughter of Lieut. James Treat of Wethersfield on May 17, 1705.

    From Wethersfield Records: "Capt. Thomas Welles died December 7, 1711, about 5 o'clock in the morning, and was buried on the 8th of December, in the evening, about 5 o'clock, aged 49 years and 5 months wanting a few days."

    His residence was on north corner of High and Fort (Prison) St's. He bought this lot from his brother, Rev. Samuel Welles of Lebanon.

    Family links:
    Parents:
    Samuel Wells (1628 - 1675)
    Elizabeth Hollister Wells (1642 - 1673)

    Spouses:
    Jerusha Treat Goodrich (1678 - 1754)
    Thankful Root Wells (1662 - 1704)*

    Siblings:
    Samuel Welles (1660 - 1731)**
    Thomas Wells (1662 - 1711)
    Sarah Welles Tomlinson (1664 - 1694)**
    Anna Wells Judson (1668 - 1739)*
    Elizabeth Welles Shelton (1670 - 1747)*

    *Calculated relationship
    **Half-sibling

    Burial:
    Wethersfield Village Cemetery
    Wethersfield
    Hartford County
    Connecticut, USA

    Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]

    Created by: Nareen, et al
    Record added: Aug 18, 2008
    Find A Grave Memorial# 291192832
  • Death: 11 December 1711; Wethersfield, Hartford Co., Connecticut, USAG; The son of Capt. Samuel & Elizabeth (Hollister) Welles, he married first Thankful Root on Jan. 7, 1697. His second marriage was to Jerusha Treat, daughter of Lieut. James Treat of Wethersfield on May 17, 1705.

    From Wethersfield Records: "Capt. Thomas Welles died December 7, 1711, about 5 o'clock in the morning, and was buried on the 8th of December, in the evening, about 5 o'clock, aged 49 years and 5 months wanting a few days."

    His residence was on north corner of High and Fort (Prison) St's. He bought this lot from his brother, Rev. Samuel Welles of Lebanon.
  • Probate: between 1713 and 1731; Wethersfield, Hartford Co., Connecticut, USAG; Page 97.

    Welles, Capt. Thomas, Wethersfield. Invt. i785-03-02. Taken 23 January, 1711-12, by William Goodrich, Ebenezer Deming and Samuel Treat.

    Court Record, Page 50—4 February, 1711-12: Adms. granted to Jerusha Welles, the widow.

    Page 70—8 April, 1712: This Court appoint Samuel Treat of Wethersfield to be guardian to Thomas Welles, a minor son of Capt. Thomas Welles, late of Wethersfield, decd. And sd. Samuel Treat gave bond.

    Page 176—8 February, 1713-14: Samuel Treat, guardian to Thomas Welles, a minor son of Capt. Thomas Welles, was discharged, and Thomas the minor chose his uncle Thomas Sheldon of Northampton to be his guardian. Recog., i10o.

    Page 189—13 April, 1714: Whereas, the persons who were appointed by this Court on the 5th of this recent April to set out to Thomas Welles, a minor son, the sd. minor's part of his sd. father's estate, now meet with difficulty so that they cannot well proceed: 1st. For that they find that there is a piece of land valued in the inventory at £go, formerly devised by Mr. James Treat to another of the sons of the sd. Thomas Welles in and by his last Will. 2ndly. Because there is not rendered to this Court any account of the debts due from or paid out to that estate.

    Page 189—14 April, 1714: Thomas Sheldon now appears with complaint that the distributors appointed to set out the estate to the sd. minor, vizt., George Stilman, George Kilbourn and Josiah Churchill, do refuse to go forward with setting out the estate to the sd. minor according to sd. order given them 13 April. This Court now appoint Mr. Thomas Wickham, John Howard, Josiah Churchill and Lt. Jonathan Belding, or any two of them, to dist. the estate.

    Page 191—19 April, 1714: This Court accepts of the dist. presented by Deacon Thomas Sheldon of Northampton, guardian to Thomas Welles, eldest son of Thomas Welles.

    Page 148 (Vol. X) 7 March, 1726-7: This Court do appoint Capt. Thomas Welles, James Treat and Ebenezer Deming, of Wethersfield, to dist. and divide the real estate of Capt. Thomas Welles, late of Wethersfield, decd., unto the relict of the sd. decd., giving her 1-3 part thereof, the residue to be dist. to William Welles, Wait Welles, John Welles and Ichabod Welles, the four sons of the decd.

    Page 54 (Vol. XI) s October, 1731: Report of the dist. Likewise, the sd. Adms., Jerusha Goodrich, formerly Jerusha Welles, the relict, exhibited an account of her Adms., which was allowed. And this Court grant to Ephraim Goodrich, her now husband, a Quietus Est.

Family 1: Thankful Roote b. 1662, d. 4 Nov 1704

Family 2: Jerusha Treat b. 1678, d. 15 Jan 1754

Citations

  1. Vital Records: Birth, Baptism, Christening, Marriage, Divorce, Death and Burial, Vital Records: Birth, Baptism, Christening, Marriage, Divorce, Death and Burial, Wethersfield, CT Vital Records 1634 - 1868 From the Barbour Collection as found at the CT State Library Transcribed by Coralynn Brown, Thomas, Ens., m Thankfull ROOT, dau John, dec'd., of Northampton, Jan 7, 1696/97
    Thomas, son Ens. Thomas & Thankfull, b Jan 10, 1697/98.
  2. Wells Surname DNA Study,Orin Wells, Wells Surname DNA Study.
  3. GEDCOM, Gedcom.
  4. Cemetery Records, Wethersfield, CT Vital Records 1634 - 1868 From the Barbour Collection as found at the CT State Library Transcribed by Coralynn Brown, Thomas, son Samuell & Elizabeth, b July 29, 1662.
  5. Vital Records: Birth, Baptism, Christening, Marriage, Divorce, Death and Burial, Vital Records: Birth, Baptism, Christening, Marriage, Divorce, Death and Burial, Wethersfield, CT Vital Records 1634 - 1868 From the Barbour Collection as found at the CT State Library Transcribed by Coralynn Brown, Thomas, Capt., m Jerusha TREAT, dau Lieut. James, May 17, 1705, by John Chester.
  6. Vital Records: Birth, Baptism, Christening, Marriage, Divorce, Death and Burial, Vital Records: Birth, Baptism, Christening, Marriage, Divorce, Death and Burial, Wethersfield, CT Vital Records 1634 - 1868 From the Barbour Collection as found at the CT State Library Transcribed by Coralynn Brown, Hezekiah, son Capt. Thomas & Thankful, b Aug 12, 1701
    Hezekiah, died Dec 10, 1711, age 10 y 4 m.
  7. Vital Records: Birth, Baptism, Christening, Marriage, Divorce, Death and Burial, Vital Records: Birth, Baptism, Christening, Marriage, Divorce, Death and Burial, Wethersfield, CT Vital Records 1634 - 1868 From the Barbour Collection as found at the CT State Library Transcribed by Coralynn Brown, Wait, son Capt. Thomas & Jerusha, b Jan 4, 1707/08
    Wait, m Jerusha TREAT, dau James, Jan 10, 1733/34, by Rev Stephen Mix.
  8. Cemetery Records, Wethersfield, CT Vital Records 1634 - 1868 From the Barbour Collection as found at the CT State Library Transcribed by Coralynn Brown, Wait, son Capt. Thomas & Jerusha, b Jan 4, 1707/08
    Wait, m Jerusha TREAT, dau James, Jan 10, 1733/34, by Rev Stephen Mix.
  9. Vital Records: Birth, Baptism, Christening, Marriage, Divorce, Death and Burial, Vital Records: Birth, Baptism, Christening, Marriage, Divorce, Death and Burial, Wethersfield, CT Vital Records 1634 - 1868 From the Barbour Collection as found at the CT State Library Transcribed by Coralynn Brown, John, son Capt. Thomas & Jerusha, b Feb 10, 1709/10.
  10. Vital Records: Birth, Baptism, Christening, Marriage, Divorce, Death and Burial, Vital Records: Birth, Baptism, Christening, Marriage, Divorce, Death and Burial, Wethersfield, CT Vital Records 1634 - 1868 From the Barbour Collection as found at the CT State Library Transcribed by Coralynn Brown, Ichabod, son Capt. Thomas & Jerusha, b Apr 26, 1712
    Ichabod, m Abigail BIGLOW, Jan 3, 1751. Witnesses: Joshua Skinner & Mary Skinner.

Mary Welles1,2

F, #18406, b. 23 November 1666, d. 18 February 1715
  • Reference: W015 ID001
  • Nam-Std: Wells
  • Married Name: 1695; Mrs. Hale (Welles)

Family: Samuel Hale b. 12 Feb 1644/45, d. 18 Nov 1711

Citations

  1. GEDCOM, Gedcom.
  2. Wells Surname DNA Study,Orin Wells, Wells Surname DNA Study.
  3. Cemetery Records, Wethersfield, CT Vital Records 1634 - 1868 From the Barbour Collection as found at the CT State Library Transcribed by Coralynn Brown, Mary, dau Samuell & Elizabeth, b Nov 23, 1666.

Ann Welles1,2

F, #18407, b. 1668, d. 1739
  • Reference: W015 ID001
  • Nam-Std: Wells
  • Married Name: 19 July 1687; Mrs. Steele (Welles)
  • Married Name: 20 November 1718; Mrs. Judson (Welles)

Family 1: Capt. James Steele b. 31 Aug 1664, d. 15 May 1813

Family 2: Capt. James Judson b. 24 Apr 1650, d. 25 Feb 1719/20

Citations

  1. GEDCOM.
  2. Wells Surname DNA Study,Orin Wells, Wells Surname DNA Study.
  3. GEDCOM, Gedcom.
  4. Cemetery Records, Wethersfield, CT Vital Records 1634 - 1868 From the Barbour Collection as found at the CT State Library Transcribed by Coralynn Brown, Ann, dau Capt. Samuell, dec'd., m James STEEL, July 19, 1687, by Capt Jno Chester.
  5. Correspondance,Janet Wells, Samuel Welles, Captain, born Essex, about 1630, died 15 July 1675 in Connecticut; first marriage, before 1660, to Elizabeth Hollister, daughter of John Hollister of Wethersfield, Connecticut, six children; second marriage to Hannah Lamberton, daughter of George Lamberton; she survived him and remarried Lieut. Col. John Allyn, secretary of the Colony.
    Children of Samuel Welles and Elizabeth Hollister:
    i. Samuel Welles, Captain, born 13 April 1660, died 28 August 1731; from him descended Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy in the administrations of Presidents Lincoln and Johnson, 1861-1869; married 20 June 1683 to Ruth Rice, daughter of Edmund Rice of Marlborough, Massachusetts.
    ii. Thomas Welles, Captain, born 29 July 1662, died 7 December 1711; first marriage, 7 January 1696 or 1697, at Wethersfield, to Thankful Root, daughter of John Root of Northampton, Massachusetts; second marriage, 17 May 1705, at Wethersfield, to Jerusha Treat, daughter of Lieut. James Treat.
    iii. Sarah Welles, born 29 September 1664, died 29 June 1694; first marriage, 4 December 1683, to Ephraim Hawley of Stratford; second marriage to Augur Tomlinson of Stratford.
    3
    iv. Mary Welles, born 23 November 1666, died 18 February 1715; married Samuel Hale, his second wife.
    v. Ann Welles, born 1668, died 1739 at Wethersfield; first marriage, 19 July 1687, to Captain James Steele of Wethersfield; second marriage, 20 November 1718, to James Judson of Stratford, his second wife.
    vi. Elizabeth Welles, born 1670, died before 6 May 1746; married 4 April 1692 to Daniel Shelton of Stratford.

    http://uwfishcollection.org/Staff/Ted/Wells.pdf

Elizabeth Welles1

F, #18408, b. 1670, d. 1 April 1746
  • Reference: W015 ID001
  • Nam-Std: Wells
  • Married Name: 4 April 1692; Mrs. Shelton (Welles)

Family: Daniel Shelton b. c 1665, d. c 1728

Citations

  1. Wells Surname DNA Study,Orin Wells, Wells Surname DNA Study.
  2. Vital Records: Birth, Baptism, Christening, Marriage, Divorce, Death and Burial, Vital Records: Birth, Baptism, Christening, Marriage, Divorce, Death and Burial, American Marriages before 1699, Database: American Marriages Before 1699
    John WHEELER Elizabeth Wells 25 June 1684 Marlboro, Mass.
    John HARRIS Elizabeth Wells 27 October 1677 Rowley, Mass.
    Daniel SHELTON Elizabeth Wells 4 April 1692 Stratford, Conn.
    Elizabeth WELLS John Harris 27 October 1677 Rowley,
    .

Sarah Welles1

F, #18409, b. 29 September 1664, d. 29 June 1694
  • Reference: W015 ID001
  • Nam-Std: Wells
  • Married Name: 4 December 1683; Mrs. Hawley (Welles)
  • Married Name: after 18 April 1690; Mrs. Tomlinson (Welles)
  • (Witness) Will: 27 November 1695; Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut, USAG; A Digest of the Early Connecticut Probate Records : Hartford district,
    Page 124-5.
    Welles, Jonathan. Distribution of Estate, £440-18-09, 27 November, 1695. It is to be understood that the several Legatees, viz, John Olcott and Mary his Wife as Administrators on the Estate of Mr. Thomas Welles Decd, Ichabod Welles, Samuel & Joseph Welles for themselves, Mr. James Judson in right of Rebecca his Wife, and Sarah Bidwell as
    Administrator on the Estate of Mr. John Bidwell Deceased, do mutually agree to exchange the 12 acres of Land that was Jonathan Welles's, lying
    in the Oxpasture, for 12 acres of Mr. Joseph Welles his Land, lying in the
    same Oxpasture, and that the sd. Land be distributed.
    JOHN OLCOTT &
    MARY HIS WIFE,
    ICHABOD WELLES,
    SAMUEL WELLES,
    JOSEPH WELLES, MRS. SARAH BIDWELL, RELICT OF JOHN BIDWELL DECD, JAMES JUDSON & REBECKAH HIS WIFE.; Deceased=Thomas Welles
  • (Witness) Will: 5 August 1706; Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut, USAG; A Digest of the Early Connecticut Probate Records : Hartford district,

    Page 86— (Vol. VII) 5 August, 1706: Sarah Bidwell of Hartford, Widow, & Capt. James Judson of Stratford, complain to the Court that no Dist. of sd. Estate had been made. The case came before this Court, and Claim was made that Dist. had been made by an Agreement among the parties concerned.; Deceased=Thomas Welles

Family: Ephraim Hawley b. c 1660

Citations

  1. Wells Surname DNA Study,Orin Wells, Wells Surname DNA Study.
  2. GEDCOM, Gedcom.
  3. GEDCOM.

Gov Thomas Welles1,2

M, #18410, b. 10 January 1594, d. 14 January 1659/60
  • Reference: W015 ID001
  • Birth: 1584; Stourton, Whichford, Warwick, EnglandG
  • (Child) Christening*: 10 January 1594; Dudley, Bridgenorth, Worcester, EnglandG2
  • Birth: 1598; Hathwell North, Hampshire, EnglandG4
  • Marriage License: 5 July 1615; Long Marston, Gloucester, EnglandG; Principal=Alice Tomes5
  • (Groom) Marriage*: 7 July 1615; Long Marston, Sicca, Gloucester, EnglandG; Bride=Alice Tomes6,2
  • (Child) Baptism: March 1636/373,7,2
  • (Groom) Marriage*: 2 March 1646; Wethersfield, Hartford Co., Connecticut, USAG; When he married Elizabeth (widow of Nathaniel Foote and sister of John Deming, both founders of Wethersfield, CT) they moved to Wethersfield to help oversee the estate of her late husband.

    no children by her marriage to Thomas Welles; Bride=Elizabeth Deming
  • Death: 14 January 1659; Wethersfield, Hartford Co., Connecticut, USAG;

    ~MY ANCESTOR~

    GOVERNOR THOMAS WELLES, the son of ROBERT WELLES and his wife, ALICE (HUNT) WELLES of Stouton, Wichford, Warwickshire, England, married ALICE TOMES in July of 1615 in Long Marston, Gloucestershire, England. He is known for being the fourth Governor of the Colony of Connecticut elected in 1655 and 1658.

    Thomas, his wife and most of his children, arrived in Boston prior to 1636 when he had a land deed witnessed, but he is probably not the Thomas Welles who came in the Susan & Ellen in 1635. He had a relationship with Lords Saye and Sele, but the nature of this relationship is not known.

    He was probably one of the group of about 100 settlers who came to Hartford with Thomas Hooker in 1636. He served a total of nineteen years in various offices in the Colony of Connecticut. He is the only man in Connecticut to hold all four top offices: governor, deputy governor, treasurer, and secretary. As Magistrate, he sat on the panel over the witchcraft trials of Mary Johnson, John & Joan Carrington, and Lydia Gilbert. He transcribed the Fundamental Orders into the official colony records as Secretary of the Colony.

    The family lived on the same street in Hartford as Governors Edward Hopkins, George Wyllys, John Webster, and Thomas H. Seymour. This street was known as Governor Street but was changed to Popielusko Court and may be called by another name now. After the death of Alice in 1640, he married Elizabeth Deming, sister of John Deming and widow of Nathaniel Foote. At the time of his marriage, they removed to Wethersfield, where he lived until his death. It is said that his remains were transfered to the ancient burial ground in Hartford. Many of the very oldest tombstones in Hartford were used for foundations of homes. Although there is no tombstone remaining, his name appears on the Founders Monument in this cemetery. This is a Cenotaph since his grave is in Wethersfield.

    I am descended from two of his known six children:
    MARY (WELLES) BALDWIN and JOHN WELLES.
    Their other children: Capt. Samuel Welles, Thomas Welles, Sarah (Welles) Chester, and Ann (Welles) Thompson Hawkins.
  • (Deceased) Death*: 14 January 1659/60; Wethersfield, Hartford Co., Connecticut, USAG; history of the old town of Stratford and the city of Bridgeport, Connecticut, p968,9,10,2,11
  • (Witness) Burial*: 17 January 1660; Wethersfield, Hartford Co., Connecticut, USAG2
  • Note: from the History of the Welles Family p132
    "Late investigations and discoveries indicate that Gov. Thomas Welles, of Connecticut was from Northamptonshire, England and removed to this country in 1636. He was the elder branch of the family in England.

    In the English calendar of the colonial State papers is found '1635 Record Commission State papers ... Thomas Welles and Elizabeth his wife rensant (i.e., non conformists), in Rothewell Northamptonshire.' As he disappeared from Rothwell in 1635, and having lost all his property by confiscation he doubtless at the time entered the service of Lord Saye and Sele as private secretary (as that nobleman protected all the Puritans to the best of his ability), and came to America early in the spring of 1636.

    Recusant signifies refusal to subscribe to the oath of conformity to the established Church of England, which required acknowledgement of the King as head of the Church, instead of the Pope. The Puritans would not subscribe on oat either, hence, their separation and emigration. This would seem to confirm the tradition to the elder branch of the Welles family, referred to by Hon. Gideon Wells on page 99 'Thomas Welles of Rothwell Northamptonshire, 1635-6, wife Elizabeth'."
  • Note: NOTE: 'Biographical Directory of American Colonial and Revolutionary Governors 1607-1789', by John W. Raimo, Meckler Books: ******************** Immigrated to New England, probably in late 1635, and had settled in Boston, Massachusetts by June 1636. Moved to Hartford, Connecticut a short time later, where he lived until he moved to Wethersfield following his second marriage. Named an Assistant of the Connecticut Beneral Court in 1637, an office which he held until his death. Chosen Treasurer of Connecticut in 1639, and served for two years; also acted as treasurer from 1648 to 1652. Served as Secretary of the colony from April 1640 to 1648. Became a Commissioner of the United Colonies in 1649 and again in 1659, filling that office on each occasion for a term of one year. Elected Deputy Governor of Connecticut on a yearly basis in 1654 (when he also served as chief executive in the absence of Bovernor Hopkins), 1656, 1657 and 1659; elected Governor in 1655 and 1658. During the 1650's Welles was perhaps the most prominent political figure in Connecticut, especially after the death of John Haynes in January 1654 and the departure of Edward Hopkins for England a short time earlier. Welles' years as chief executive were most noeworthy for the divisions which disrupted several of the colony's Congregational churches. Indeed, in the 1650's a schism had split the church in the governor's own home town of Wethersfield. Although the General Court was unsuccessful in its attempt to restore peace, the matter had resolved itself by the end of Welles' second period in office, when dissenting members from the affected congregations united to establish their own church in Hadley, Massachusetts, further up the Connecticut River. Following his service as chief executive, Welles was reelected deputy governor in the spring of 1659, but he did not live to complete the term. He died in Wethersfield, Connecticut on January 14, 1660, andwas probably buried in that community.

    From "Appleton's Encyclopedia dated 2001:

    WELLES, Thomas, governor of Connecticut, born in England in 1598; died in Wethersfield, Connecticut, 14 January, 1660. He came to this country before 1636 and settled in Hartford, Connecticut, where he was magistrate from 1637 till his death. In 1639 he became first treasurer of the colony, and he held that office till 1651. He was secretary of Connecticut in 1640-'8, and was commissioner of the united colonies in 1649 and again in 1654. During the absence of Governor Edward Hopkins in England in 1654 he was elected moderator of the general court, and in the same year he was chosen deputy governor. In 1655 he was elected governor, but after two years he returned to the office of deputy governor. He was chosen governor for a second time in 1658, and in 1659 again held the office of deputy governor. Governor Welles possessed the full confidence of the people, and many of the most important of the early laws and papers pertaining to the founding of the colony were drafted by him. The successful issue of Connecticut from her difficulty concerning the fort erected at Saybrook on one side and the Dutch encroachments on the other was largely due to his skill and wisdom.--12
  • Note: The first activity in which Thomas Welles is documented is when he received property from his father Robert and his brother Robert just before his marriage to Alice Tomes. The deed is dated 5 July 1615. This property included fields, pasturage, woodlot, and a cottage. Located in Burmington, Warwickshire, this property had been in the family for some time.

    Thomas and Alice probably spent the first twenty years of their married life in Burmington, as they received the land there as a wedding gift and sold it in preparation for their removal to New England in 1635 and they are not found elsewhere. Parish records, which would have shown the baptisms of the children, do not survive. However their ages have been reconstructed from their ages at their departure as given by two Hunt relatives in the proceedings of 1650. The six surviving children ranged in age from seventeen to two, from Mary, born in 1618 to Sarah born in 1632.

    We can assume that Thomas and Alice spent the first twenty years of their married life as most young couples do, making a living and raising the family. Thomas may have had hired men to work his estate while he may have been employed as a clerk or secretary elsewhere; perhaps in the service of Lord Say and Sele, whose manor at Broughton was only a few miles away. Alice would have managed the household, looking after the raising of her children who arrived about every two years. The couple must have stayed in touch with relatives on both sides of the family, as both sets of relatives were still pertinent to the story years after their removal to New England. They would also have become more and more involved in the growing Puritan movement, living so close to Lord Say and Sele and Lord Brook, who were in the forefront of both the Warwick Patent to colonize American and of the Parliamentary forces associated with Oliver Cromwell in the eventual English Civil War. Both the couple’s closeness to their family and their growing convictions about the ideals of the Puritans are reflected in the naming patterns of their children. Because the life history of this couple was similar to that of virtually every couple of that age who removed to America, the naming patterns of their children are typical of those of the generation of young couples in their thirties who had young families and moved with them to the New World as a result of their Puritan convictions.

    The naming patterns of the children of Thomas Welles and Alice Tomes are typical of that generation of English Puritans with the exception that the name of Alice was not used. Like many other cultures, the English named children after the father, mother, grandfathers and grandmothers, and then usually used names of siblings, usually favorite siblings, either those closest in age or sometimes those who died young. The order in which parents and grandparents names were used was not rigid…often the father’s name was not the first used. Sometimes the choice was influenced by which grandparent had most recently died or which other cousins also carried the name. In the generation of the Puritans one can often pinpoint the year in which the family developed Puritan sympathies in the break in the naming patterns of their children. The first several children will bear English names such as those here, plus Richard, Edward, George and Henry, and Edith, Jane, Joan, and Alice. Once in New England the families seldom used these English names unless they were specifically carrying on a parent’s name. When the English people individually became Puritans, they gave their children Biblical names from both the Old and New Testaments, with the exception of Peter and Paul, which were considered “too popish.” English names, which were also Biblical names continued, such as John, Thomas, Mary and Anne (the traditional name of the mother of Mary, the mother of Jesus.) The Welles family follows this pattern and even follows the traditional placement of the name of Joseph as a younger child. Curiously, none of the daughters were named Alice although that was the name of their mother and Thomas’ mother, and the family was evidently still using the traditional names at that time. Could it be that Alice refused to call any child by her own name? Or could it be that a daughter was born in 1616, was named Alice, and died after the last daughter’s birth? It would appear that it was Alice who selected the children’s names as the first two girls are named for her two sisters in their birth order rather than Elizabeth or Ellen for the parent’s grandmothers. The second daughter, Anne, bears the name of the stepmother who raised Alice. The third child and first son in named John for Alice’s father and brother. Only with the fourth child is Thomas’ family honored with the name of his father, Robert. The next child is named for his father, Thomas, since the grandfathers already had namesakes. The dates for the births of the children are based on the recollections of Nicholas and Richard Hunt, who were related by marriage to Thomas Welles’ sister, who remembered their ages at the time of their departure in 1635, as noted in the court case in 1650. Assuming these dates are correct, we can date the Welles’ deepening religious feelings to approximately 1627. When the next son was born in 1628, he was not given a name in the family but the name of Samuel. In the Old Testament Samuel was dedicated to God before his birth, heard from God as a child, and throughout his long life served the nation of Israel as a prophet. The next child was named Sarah, for Abraham’s wife, who became the mother of the Jewish nation. The Puritans who came to New England saw themselves as a modern counterpart of the nation of Israel, a special people through whom God spoke to the rest of the world. All these children were born in England, the first five being named for family members using traditional English names and the next two being given Old Testament names new to either family. The family names of Alice, Elizabeth, and Ellen were not used. After a space of five years and after the family transplanted itself across the ocean, another child was born. The selection of the name of Joseph is significant, often used after a space in the children… either after crossing the water, for a “late” baby, or for the first child of a second wife. The name indicates a joyful new beginning. In the Old Testament, after having ten sons by three other wives, the patriarch Jacob finally had a son by his favorite wife, whom he named Joseph, meaning “he adds” (This wife Rachel, had one more son, Benjamin, just before she died in childbirth. Sons born under this circumstance often bear this name. Sons born after the death of their father are often named Ichabod after a child born in the days of the prophet Samuel, who was born just after the death of his father.) Thus the names which Thomas and Alice chose for their children reveal several things about them: that Alice had the most influence in the choosing as she named the girls after her stepmother and sisters rather than their grandmothers; that Alice did not pass along her own name unlike nearly every other woman whose family has been studied unless an Alice died young; that the names of the father and grandfathers were used for the first three sons as was the usual custom; and that the abrupt change to Biblical names when more family names were available for use follows the practice of other Puritan couples of that generation and can be used to date the time of their conversion.

    Thomas and Alice probably became strong Puritans in the late 1620’s as they abruptly changed the naming patterns of their children. Welles’ neighbors, George Wyllys, the Griswolds, Rev Ephraim Huit and Daniel Clark were all becoming associated with each other, with Say and Sele, and with the group around Hooker in and around Braintree. Brook and Say and Sele were making plans to develop the area now known as Connecticut. The religious motivation and the economic opportunities coalesced in the minds and hearts of Thomas and Alice Welles. Although economic considerations would have been important, scholars agree that the religious motivation was paramount, especially in the early years of the Great Migration. People of comfortable means and social standing such as the Welles family usually do not leave a secure living and bring their young children across perils and into perils merely for material gain, but because they are motivated by a very strong conviction that they are doing right and that their activities will be guided and blessed by God. Virtually all the five thousand families who came to New England in the Great Migration had an individual experience with God which they felt enable them to undertake this great uprooting and transplanting into an entirely new and untried wilderness to fulfill a divine purpose for themselves and their nation. They endured the insecurities and discomforts out of an individual inner conviction that they were pursuing God’s will and would be blessed in and through that undertaking. Though no writings survive to tell us of the feelings of Thomas Welles, such thoughts were expressed many times over in the journals of those who kept them, and were a given part of the mindset of the first settlers in southern New England. Welles’ close association with Hooker and the high regard in which he was held from the initial days of the colony underscore the degree to which he was held to be a man of faith in a community where faith was a cherished virtue. While he may have been considering his personal motivations for removal to New England, Fiennes may have been recognizing that Welles’ leadership and secretarial skills would be useful in administering the new venture. It has been suggested that although Welles may not have been actually employed as Say and Sele’s secretary, the nobleman may have used this notion as a ploy to disguise to other authorities Welles’ more religious reasons for removal.

    When Thomas and Alice prepared to immigrate to New England, they disposed of the Burmington property turning it over to James Fiennes and William Sprigg. This action took place 20 August 1635. Court testimony shows that Thomas, Alice, and their six children took ship to the New World soon after.

    Welles’ administrative and clerical skills must have been well known to the community as he was chosen as a magistrate and as clerk of the General Court at its first meeting in March 1637. That court was the first that met independently of the authority of Massachusetts. In the opening session of their independent General Court, the three river towns were given their current names of Windsor, Hartford, and Wethersfield. That court declared war on the Pequots to avenge the savage murders of several early settlers. In the following years, Rev. Thomas Hooker preached his famous sermon in which he declared that “the foundation of authority is laid in the free consent of the people.” He closed his sermon with the challenge, “As God has given us liberty, let us take it” In his years as pastor in England and in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, he had developed a political philosophy shared by Roger Ludow and Rev. John Warham, which led to the removal of those parties from the Massachusetts Bay to the Connecticut River. While agreeing on theology, Warham and Hooker differed with Gov. John Winthrop and Rev John Cotton on the nature of government. Winthrop and Cotton believed that God spoke only through the religious official. Warham and Hooker believed that God spoke to all believers and that the entire body could therefore make political decisions. Hooker based his theology on the Old Testament incident in which God told Moses to take ten leaders elected by each of the twelve tribes of Israel to help him to render judgments. The General Court, including Welles, spent the ensuing year working this theory into a political document under the guidance of attorney Roger Ludlow, an organizer of the Warham party under Rev. John White of Dorchester in Dorset. The result was the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut. This document was the world’s first written constitution, for the first time placing and basing the authority of the government on the people. It claimed that the basis of government authority lies in the people themselves, not a king or any other source, and that the people have the right to chose their own leaders. The little colony along the river, consisting of perhaps five hundred individuals had declared itself an independent political entity concerning internal affairs, while owning general allegiance to the British crown

    Thomas Welles served for many years on the General Court which was the ruling body of the Connecticut Colony. During the first three years of his attendance, 1637–1639, the Court had two representatives from each of the three towns that then comprised the colony. These men met without titles or moderators. A new structure was set for the General Court by the Fundamental Orders of 1639. The General Court consisted of a council of Magistrates and one of Deputies. The Court met twice a year for Spring and Fall sessions.

    In the 1639 session Welles was elected Treasurer of the Colony. Two years later, after his election as Secretary in 1641, he transcribed the Fundamental Orders into the official record book in his own hand. To guard against authority becoming concentrated in one individual, the General Court limited the terms of governors to one year at a time, though a man could serve as governor more than once. For nearly all of the remaining twenty years of his life Welles attended the sessions of the General Court which both made laws and, sitting as the Particular Court, tried cases under the law. He rotated among the major offices of treasurer, secretary, deputy governor and governor. He was elected governor in his own right in 1655 and 1658. He served on the committee to negotiate the merger with Saybrook Colony. He also served as Commissioner from Connecticut to the meeting of the United Colonies of Connecticut, New Haven, Plymouth, and Massachusetts Bay in 1649, 1654, and 1659. As Magistrate, he sat on the judge’s panel for Connecticut’s earliest witchcraft trials in 1648, 1651, and 1654. He heard the cases concerning Mary Johnson, John and Joan Carrington and Lydia Gilbert.

    He became involved in the establishment of the settlement at Stratford, named for the town near his home village in England. His son John was sent to oversee his interests there. According to tradition, the last child of Thomas and Alice, a son named Joseph was born shortly after their arrival in Connecticut. Primary documentary evidence for this son has not yet surfaced. He apparently did not survive, as he is not mentioned in his father’s will. However he lived long enough to have his memory perpetuated the name of some of his sibling’s descendants. A few years later Alice died not having reached the age of 50. In 1646 Thomas married Elizabeth Foote, widow of Nathaniel Foote who died in Wethersfield in 1643, and sister of Joseph Demming of Wethersfield. She was unwilling to leave the homestead of many acres she was managing after her husband Nathaniel’s death. As a result, one to the highest officers in the colony left his home in the center of Hartford and moved to Wethersfield with his younger children, Sarah and Samuel who were raised with Elizabeth’s younger children Frances, Sarah and Rebecca.

    Thomas wrote his will on 7 November 1659. He seemed to be in good health on the evening of 14 January 1659/60, being well after supper, but dead by midnight. His will left his wife the use of half his housing and orchard, with her own land returned to her. His own land and house went to his grandson Robert, the only child of his oldest son to live in Wethersfield. He left land to sons Samuel and Thomas and to Thomas’ son of the deceased son John, 20 pounds to Thomas, Samuel, children, Anne, Sarah, Mary’s and 10 pounds to Mary Robbins children. Elizabeth lived another 22 years, leaving her estate to her children and grandchildren by Nathaniel Foote.

    (The information above is excerpted from the book: The Descendents of Gov. Thomas Welles of Connecticut, 1590-1660, and his Wife Alice Tomes by Donna Siemiatkoski)
  • Note: From "Randall and Allied Families", p333::
    "The English origin of Gov. Thomas Welles had bvaffled genealogists until 1919, when a descendant, Lemuel Aiken Wells, M.A., LL.B., of Bronxville, NY., commissioned an English genealogist to make a search through the Sheldon Charters in British Museum. This was follwed up by Col. Charles E. Banks who found some pleadings and depositions in a Chancery suit brought in England, 1648, relating to property covered by a five-party deed. The original of this, executed May 10, 1638, by "Thomas Welles of Hartford by the river of Connecticutt" was found in the Birmingham Public Library and from it and parish registers of Whichford, Co. Warwick, it was possible to get the authenticated record given below, much abridged (NE, Vol 80, pp279-305)."
  • Note: Thomas Welles was born in England in 1598; son of Robert, grandson ofThomas. Married Alice Tomes after July 5, 1615. All six children wereborn in England and traveled with their parents on the 'Susan and Ellen'to America in 1635. He owned a share of the Hilton Lands in NewHampshire. He went from Boston, to Saybrook, Connecticut and finallysettled in Hartford in 1637. He was magistrate and treasurer of theColony; Secretary and Commissioner of the United Colonies; electedGoverner in 1655 and 1658; and was deputy Governer for several years. Heremoved to Wethersfield, Connecticut in 1646 and owned land on which partof the Connecticut State Prison now stands. Governer Welles diedsuddenly January 14, 1659, 'being very well at supper and dead beforemidnight'. It is assumed that Thomas Welles was buried in Wethersfieldbut was later removed to the Ancient Burying Ground in Hartford where theactual spot of interment has been lost. His name is recorded there onthe Founders' Monument at First Church, Hartford.5
  • Occupation: 5
  • Note: Served as Assistant on Panel of Magistrates in Hartford.5
  • Nam-Std: Gov Wells
  • Note: They came under the influence of a Puritan minister in England anddecided to give up their landed gentry status and make the dangerouscrossing to the New World. Their children ranged in age from 2 to 17.The first came to Cambridge and made the trek to Hartford with the partyof the Reverand Thomas Hooker. They lived the next 11 years there untilAlice's death.; Principal=Alice Tomes5
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  • (Researcher) ResAddr: Researcher=_ID732 _Researcher2
  • (Researcher) ResAddr: Researcher=_ID928 _Researcher2
  • (Immigrant) Immigration: circa 1620; They came under the influence of a Puritan minister in England and decided to give up their landed gentry status and make the dangerous crossing to the New World. Their children ranged in age from 2 to 17.The first came to Cambridge and made the trek to Hartford with the party of the Reverand Thomas Hooker. They lived the next 11 years there until Alice's death.
    13,2
  • Note: 1620; As noted in "The Descendents of Gov. Thomas Welles of Connecticut 1590-1658" by Donna Holt Siemiatkoski, Gateway Press, Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, 1990, pp 11-13

    "1635: Off to America: As has been noted, Thomas and Alice Welles probably became strong Puritans in the late 1620s as they abruptly changed the naming patterns of their children. Welles' neighbors, George Wyllys, the Griswolds, Rev. Ephraim Huit and Daniel Clark were all becoming associated with each other, with Say and Sele, and with the group around Hooker in and around Braintree. Brook and Say and Sele were making plans to develop the area now known as Connecticut. The religious motivation and the economic opportunities coalesced in the minds and hearts of Thomas and Alice Welles. Although economic considerations would have been important, scholars agree that the religious motivation was paramount, especially in the early years of the Great Migration. People of comfortable means and social standing such as the Welles family usually do not leave a secure living and bring their young children across perils and into perils merely for material gain, but because they are motivated by a very strong conviction that they are doing right and that their activities will be guided and blessed by God. Virtually all the five thousand families who came to New England in the Great Migration had an individual experience with God which they felt enabled them to undertake this great uprooting and transplanting into an entirely new and untried wilderness to fulfill a divine purpose for themselves and their nation. They endured the insecurities and discomforts out on an individual inner conviction that they were pursuing God's will and would be blessed in and through that undertaking. Though no writings survive to tell us of the feelings of Thomas Welles, such thoughts were expressed many times over in the journals of those who kept them, and were a given part of the mindset of the first settlers in southern New England. Welles' close association with Hooker and the high regard in which he was held from the initial days of the colony underscore the degree to which he was held to be a man of faith in a community where faith was a cherished virtue. While he may have been considering his personal motivations for removal to New England, Fiennes may have been recognizing that Welles' leadership and secretarial skills would be useful in administering the new venture. It has been suggested that although Welles may not have been actually employed as Say and Sele's secretary, the nobleman may have used this notion as a ploy to disguise to other authorities Welles' more religious reasons for removal."
  • (Witness) Note: 1627; Robert Welles, of Tidmington, Worcestershire, the testator of 1627, died between 10 Jun 1627, when his will was dated, and 7 February 1627-1628, when it was proved by his brother, Thomas, on of the executors; married Joan (Tymms?), who was living in 1615, but evidently died before her husband; five children named in their father's will: John, Samuel, Hannah, Mary (Mrs. John Robbins of Wethersfield), and Hester; Principal=Robert Welles
  • Note: 1636; Saybrook, Middlesex Co., Connecticut, USAG12
  • (Head of Household) Census*: between 1636 and 1646; Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut, USAG; "Thomas Welles lived in Hartford from 1636 until the time of his second marriage. His house was on the same street as Governors Edward Hopkins, George Wyllys, John Webster, and Thomas H. Seymour, a street that was known as Governor Street until more recent times, when the name was changed to Popieluszko Court"2
  • Residence: between 1636 and 1646; Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut, USAG; "Thomas Welles lived in Hartford from 1636 until the time of his second marriage. His house was on the same street as Governors Edward Hopkins, George Wyllys, John Webster, and Thomas H. Seymour, a street that was known as Governor Street until more recent times, when the name was changed to Popieluszko Court"14
  • Note: June 1636; As noted in "The Descendents of Gov. Thomas Welles of Connecticut 1590-1658" by Donna Holt Siemiatkoski, Gateway Press, Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, 1990, pp 11-13

    "When Thomas and Alice prepared to emigrate to New England, they disposed of the Burmington property over to James Fiennes, and William Sprigg. This action took place 20 Aug 1635. Court testimony shows that Thomas, Alice, and their six children took ship to the new world soon after.
    At least one other Thomas Welles came to Boston in 1635. This second man we now know as Thomas Welles of Ipswich. He is probably the Thomas who came on the "Susan and Ellen." If Thomas of Ipswich went immediately to Ipswich upon his arrival, then the Thomas Welles listed as a householder in Cambridge on 8 Feb 1635/6 is the one who later moved with other residents of Cambridge to Hartford, CT. By 9 Jun 1636, Thomas and Alice were in the Boston area. On that day, they testified in front of John Winthrop and Thomas Dudley pertaining to the deed of the Burmington properly.
    No evidence exists that Welles was ever at Saybrook Colony. To have been part of the community at Saybrook Colony, given his presence in Hartford in the winter of 1637 and his presence in Cambridge in Feb 1636, he would have to have been there in the winter months of 1636. At that time Saybrook was only a fort manned by soldiers. The first family there was that of Gov. George Fenwick and his wife a few years later. The most logical conclusion is that Welles joined Hooker, whom he knew either personally or by reputation in England, at Cambridge in 1635, stayed about a year, entering the list of householders, and that he and his family were part of the company of one hundred who trekked to Connecticut in June 1636, journeying over existing Indian trails from the Bay to the River for a period of about ten days to two weeks. The trail had been developed by the Indians to provide passage between the Bay and the Falls about a hundred miles west where the shad spawned their young every spring, and fish could easily be caught and dried. The trail followed the most level terrain and crossed the least number of streams. Parts of the Old Connecticut Path still exists, unpaved, in Ashford and along Lake Shenipsit in Ellington."
  • Note: 1637; Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut, USAG; 312
  • Occupation: between 1637 and 1654; Connecticut, USAG; Member of the Court of Magistrates. Thomas Welles served a total of nineteen years in various Colony of Connecticut positions. He was a member of the first Court of Magistrates, elected March 28, 1637, and was reelected as a member of the Court of Magistrates from 1638 until 1654. During his terms as magistrate in 1648, 1651, and 1654 he sat on the panel hearing the witchcraft trials of Mary Johnson, John and Joan Carrington, and Lydia Gilbert2
  • Occupation: between 1637 and 1659; Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut, USAG; Magistrate -- held office every 2 years for 22 years.15,2,11
  • Occupation: 1639; Connecticut, USAG; Treasurer of the Colony of Connecticut. In 1639 he was elected as the first treasurer of the Colony of Connecticut, and from 1640-1649 served as the colony's secretary. In this capacity he transcribed the Fundamental Orders into the official colony records. In the words of Donna Holt S "In the 1639 session Welles was elected Treasurer of the Colony. Two years later, after his election as Secretary in 1641, he transcribed the Fundamental Orders into the official record book in his own hand. To guard against authority becoming concentrated in one individual, the General Court limited the terms of governors to one year at at time, though a man could serve as governor more than once. For nearly all of the remaining twenty years of his life Welles attended the sessions of the General Court, which both made laws and, sitting as the Particular Court, tried cases under the law. He rotated among the major offices of treasurer, secretary, deputy governor, and governor. "14
  • Occupation: 1640; 612
  • Occupation: Served as Assistant on Panel of Magistrates in Hartford.1,2
  • Occupation: between 1640 and 1649; Connecticut, USAG; Secretary of the Colony of Connecticut. Per Donna Holt "Governing Philosophy: Welles' administrative and clerical skills must have been well-known to the community as he was chosen as a magistrate and as clerk of the General Court at its first meeting in Mar 1637. That court was the first that met independent of the authority of Massachusetts. In the opening session of their independent General Court, the three river towns were given their current names of Windsor, Hartford, and Wethersfield. That court declared war on the Pequots to avenge the savage murders of several early settlers. In the following year, Rev. Thomas Hooker preached his famous sermon in which he declared that "the foundation of authority is laid in the free consent of the people." He closed his sermon with the challenge, "As God has given us liberty, let us take it" (Register and Manual, State of Connecticut, Hartford, 1984, p. 55). In his years as a pastor in England and in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, he had developed a political philosopy shared by Roger Ludlow and Rev. John Warham, which led to the removal of those parties from the Massachusetts Bay to the Connecticut River. While agreeing on theology, Warham and Hooker differed with Gay. John Winthrop and Rev. John Cotton on the nature of government. Winthrop and Cotton believed that God spoke only through the religious officials. Warham and Hooker believed that God spoke to all believers and that the entire body could therefore make political decisions. Hooker based his theology on the Old Testament incident in which God told Moses to take ten leaders elected by each of the twelve tribes of Israel to help him to render judgments. The General Court, including Welles, spent the ensuing year working this theory into a political document under the guidance of attorney Roger Ludlow, an organizer of the Warham party under Rev. John White of Dorchester in Dorset. The result was the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut. This document was the world's first written Constitution, for the first time placing basing of the authority of the government on the people. It claimed that the basis of government authority lies in the people themselves, not a king or any other source, and that the people have the right to chose their own leaders. The little colony along the river, consisting of perhaps five hundred individuals, had declared itself an independent political entity concerning internal affairs, while owing general allegiance to the British crown."14
  • Communion1*: 1641; Nunavut Territory, CanadaG3,7,2
  • Occupation: 1649; Connecticut, USAG; Commissioner of the United Colonies14
  • Occupation: 1653; Connecticut, USAG; Donna Holt's research revealed. "Thomas also served on the War Commission for Wethersfield in1653.

    He became involved in the establishment of the settlement at Stratford, named for the town near his home village in England. His son John was sent to oversee his interests there."
  • Occupation: 1654; Connecticut, USAG; Deputy Governor of the Colony of Connecticut. On May 18, 1654 he was elected as Deputy Governor and became the acting moderator of the General Court, as the elected governor, Edward Hopkins, was in England. He was elected governor in 1655 and 1658 and served again as deputy governor for 1656, 1657, and 1659.14
  • Occupation*: 1655; Connecticut, USAG; Governor of the Colony of Connecticut. Donna Holt S. research stated "He was elected governor in his own right in 1655 and 1658. As noted, he served on the committee to negotiate the merger with Saybrook Colony. He also served as Commissioner from Connecticut to the meeting of the United Colonies of Connecticut, New Haven, Plymouth, and Massachusetts Bay in 1649, 1654, and 1659. As magistrate, he sat on the judge's panel for Connecticut's earliest witchcraft trials in 1648, 1651 and 1654. He heard the cases concerning Mary Johnson, John and Joan Carrington, and Lydia Gilbert. He is not noted to have had any special role in these proceedings. The trials are well-documented in The Public Records of the Connecticut Colony, Records of the Particular Court of Connecticut 1639-1663, and Richard G. Tomlinson's Witchcraft Trials of Connecticut. "2
  • Occupation: between 1655 and 1658; Connecticut, USA; 1655 was the 4th Governor of Connecticut, in 1656, 1657, 1659 was Deputy Governor and Governor again in 1658.13,2
  • Occupation: 1656; Connecticut, USAG; Deputy Governor of the Colony of Connecticut14
  • Occupation: 1657; Connecticut, USAG; Deputy Governor of the Colony of Connecticut14
  • Occupation: 1658; Connecticut, USAG; Governor of the Colony of Connecticut2
  • Occupation: 1659; Connecticut, USAG; Deputy Governor of the Colony of Connecticut. Thomas Welles is the only man in Connecticut's history to hold all four top offices: governor, deputy governor, treasurer, and secretary. He was a commissioner to the New England Confederation in 1649 and in 1654. For a more extensive summary of Thomas Welles' service to the Connecticut Colony, see Appendix B of Siemiatoski's genealogy14
  • (Deceased) Will*: 7 November 1659; Thomas wrote his will on 7 Nov 1659. He seemed to be in good health on the evening of 14 Jan 1659/60, being well after supper, but dead by midnight. His will left his wife the use of half his housing and orchard, with her own land to his return to her. His own land and house went to his grandson Robert, the only child of his oldest son to live in Wethersfield. He left land to sons Samuel and Thomas, and to Thomas son of the deceased son John, 20 pounds to Thomas, Samuel, Mary's children, Anne, Sarah, and 10 pounds to Mary Robbins' children. Elizabeth lived another 22 years, leaving her estate to her children and grandchildren by Nathaniel Foote.2
  • Note: "The Descendants of Governor Thomas Welles and Alice Tomes

    Chapter 2
    Errors in Earlier Literature
    One of the objectives of the Welles Family Association in compiling this genealogy of the Descendants of Governor Thomas Welles has been to investigate conflicting claims about the family, determine the truth insofar as possible, and make these findings widely and easily available to the public. Although Lemuel Aiken Welles went to considerable effort and expense over sixty years ago to determine the English origins of the family, errors about the ancestry of Thomas Welles still persist in later publications and on the application forms of new members. This study has followed the work of reputable genealogists such as Col. Charles Edward Banks, Ernest Flagg, Donald Lines Jacobus, Frederick Lewis Weis, Walter Lee Sheppard, and Brainerd T. Peck in reaching these conclusions.
    The largest collection of errors on a single page that the compiler has seen occurs in a handsomely-bound and gilt-edged volume entitled Wells and Allied Families, privately printed for Catherine J. Welles and Frances S. Welles by the American Historical Society in New York in 1927, which is available at the Connecticut State Library. Page 6 states the following, all of which are incorrect:
    Thomas Welles was born
    1. in London 2. about 1598 3. son of Thomas Welles 4. of an Essex family 5. which resided on the manor of Welles Hall or Rayne Hall.
    Thomas Welles came to America
    6. as the private secretary of Lord Say & Sele and was in Saybrook 7. and later went up the Connecticut River to Hartford 8. with his company.
    Thomas Welles' first wife was
    9. called Elizabeth Hunt 10. married to him in 1618 11. is descended from Sir Thomas de Hunt 12. died of being unable to endure the New England climate.
    Elizabeth Hunt is entirely fictitious, and these statements do not apply to Alice Tomes.

    ...

    The "facts" in that genealogy by no means exhaust the misinformation around the Welles and Tomes families. Errors are made in six areas about Thomas Welles and Alice Tomes and in the identity of the spouses of their children Ann and John. A discussion of each error and the most current information on the state of knowledge of each topic is given here.
    1. Thomas Welles has no known connection to an Essex family of Norman descent or to the family of Sir Lionel de Welles, Baron Welles, Governor of Ireland. He has no known connection to any of the Magna Charta sureties. Thomas Welles' ancestry in Warwickshire for four generations is documented by the court proceedings concerning the Burmington land which he inherited, and from the presence of a Robert Wellys, possibly his grandfather's father, on the tax rolls of Whichford in 1527. Though the family owned property and was able to educate Thomas in Latin, they are not known to be of noble or even gentle birth. In Through the Lich Gate, a history of the neighboring parish of Long Compton by Rev. Edward Rainsberry, the presence of people named Wells/Welles in the villages of that area as far back at the twelfth century is documented. Nor is there any basis in fact for Robert Wellys of Whichford, who was taxed in 1523, being descended in six generations from Simon de Welles, a Crusader in 1191, and Eustace de Vesce, a Magna Charta surety, as has been circulated on papers in the family. Further study of the ancestry of Thomas Welles must begin where Lemuel Welles left off in 1926 in "The English Ancestry of Gov. Thomas Welles of Connecticut, " New England Historical and Genealogical Register, vol. 80 (1926), pp. 279-447.
    2. Thomas Welles was not born in 1598 which would make him seventeen at the time of his marriage. The marriage of Thomas Welles and Alice Tomes has been established by the court proceedings to have taken place shortly after he received his land in 5 Jul 1615. Moreover, his wife is shown to have been born before 1593, making his birth in 1598 unlikely. Therefore he could not have been born in 1598, but was more likely born around 1590, the date the family is using for this event pending further investigation.
    3. The name of the wife of Thomas Welles is given in the court proceedings as Alice Tomes of Long Marston, then across the county line in Gloucestershire. The origin of the notion that she was named Elizabeth Hunt may come from a misreading of the court records. Welles's sister's father-in-law, Nicholas Hunt, gave testimony.
    _____18

    Errors in Earlier Literature

    Perhaps some have interpreted this to mean that he was the brother of Welles' wife, whereas, he is the husband of Thomas Welles's sister, whose name is now lost. A death date of 1640 is given for Thomas' first wife, but no documentation for this has yet been seen. The vital records of early Hartford are now lost. Tradition states that Thomas and Alice had a son Joseph in 1637. If Alice did die around 1640, the death may have been related to a late pregnancy, although this idea is purely speculation. Alice's birth date is now known with greater certainty, as a result of the production of the Pedigree of Tomes in 1987. The Tomes family papers note that Ellen Gunne died circa 1593. This date, though undocumented, places the birth of Alice, her youngest child, about five years earlier than previously assumed, and definitely moves the birthdate of Thomas back from 1598 closer to 1590.
    4. Alice Tomes does not have a royal line according to the most recent scholarship on the question. A royal line has been proposed and published in earlier editions of Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists. However, further investigation by Daniel Lines Jacobus published in The American Genealogist, vol. 28, pp. 164-167, shows that this line fails in two places. Walter Lee Sheppard re-studied the problem and dropped this connection from the sixth edition of Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists (1988) where Line 98, Alice Tomes, is published, but with breaks at both points. Margaret Mytton may not be the daughter of John Mytton of Weston who has not been found to have had a daughter by that name (see Hale House, p. 780). Moreover, examination of early records by Jacqueline Beers in The American Genealogist, vol. 56, p. 228, reveals the strong possibility that Ellen Gunne is not the daughter of Anne Fulwood, but of an earlier, and unknown, wife of Richard Gunne. Although the editor's note to the Beers article is careful not to remove Anne Fulwood absolutely, and Sheppard stops short of this also, the link between Anne Fulwood and Ellen Gunne remains to be strengthened. The newly discovered Tomes pedigree is inconclusive on this issue. Any attempt to establish a royal line for Alice Tomes must address the issues raised by Jacobus, Beers, and Sheppard.
    5. Thomas Welles did not come to America as the personal representative of Lord Say and Sele and help establish Saybrook Colony in 1635, then come upriver to Hartford by 1637. Some have claimed that Welles was a secretary to Lord Say and Sele. However, primary evidence for this fact has not been found, although circumstantial evidence would allow for a such a conclusion. Welles did have a good education, as evidenced by books in English and Latin in his estate. He did have dealings with the Fiennes family... James Fiennes and a partner bought his land in Burmington. Welles would have been acquainted with the family as they were the most prominent lords in the area, seated nearby at Broughton Castle. As a neighboring fellow-Puritan, Welles must have been aware of the Warwick Patent and the plans to develop Saybrook Colony and Saltonstall Park in Windsor as places of refuge for Puritan lords in case flight from England was necessary. Some have suggested that Say and Sele developed the story of Welles being his secretary in order to mask Welles' removal for religious reasons as a business venture. In any case, Welles did have close associations with Say and Sele and did have the talents of a secretary. However, he had little, if anything, to do with Saybrook Colony. A review of the known facts and literature with Elaine Staplins and Joyce Heckman of the Saybrook Colony Association affirms the belief that no primary evide nce links this Thomas Welles with Saybrook at any time. He was most unlikely to have been at a fort in 1635-1636 with a family of six children. The one family who resided there, that of Governor George Fenwick, is noted for being the only such family. The scenario that Welles and his family came to Boston, sailed to Saybrook Colony and lived there for awhile, then sailed upriver to Hartford must be rejected. No primary evidence for his ever having been at Saybrook Colony exists, and his whereabouts can be accounted for between Boston, Cambridge, and Hartford for the time period involved.
    _____19

    Descendants of Gov. Thomas Welles and Alice Tomes

    His arrival in Boston in before 9 Jun 1636 when his deed was witnessed by Winthrop and Dudley, his listing as a head of household in the Feb 1635/6 Newtown (now Cambridge), MA, town records and his appointment to the General Court in March 1637 indicate that he was part of the group of about 100 people who came to Hartford from Cambridge with Rev. Thomas Hooker in June 1636. This sequence allows only the winter of 1636/7 for residence in Saybrook Fort, not a likely prospect for a young family. Welles association with his former neighbor, Lord Say and Sele, and resulting associations with the Warwick Patentees who operated Saybrook Colony place him in the critical juncture between that group and the governing group of the Connecticut Colony headed by Hooker and Haynes. When Saybrook Colony merged with Connecticut Colony in 1644, Welles was appointed as one of the negotiators, presumably because he was known to and respected by both colonies.
    6. Thomas Welles and his family did not come to America on the "Susan and Ellen" in 1635, as stated in Virkus' Compendium of American Genealogy and elsewhere. 'The passenger listings of the "Susan and Ellen" include the passengers ages at embarkation. The Thomas Welles listed on the "Susan and Ellen" is too young and lacks Gov. Thomas Welles' large family which we know sailed together because the court witnesses so testified. This Thomas Welles is probably Thomas of Ipswich, born circa 1598, who is apparently travelling on the "Susan and Ellen" as a servant in the household of Sir Richard Saltonstall. The young age and dependent status rule out Thomas of Ipswich as the Thomas Welles who was a head of household in Cambridge in Feb 1636, leaving that identification to the future governor of Connecticut, who was later associated with other residents of Cambridge, the most prominent of whom was the Rev. Thomas Hooker.
    7. The husband of Anne Welles, Thomas Thompson is not the Thomas Thompson, son of John Thompson and Alice Freeman, of royal lineage, born on 23 Dec 1616 in the Little Preston Parish, Preston Capes, Northamptonshire. His place in the Thompson family of Shropshire is proven by the will of his brother, Samuel Thompson citizen and stationer of London, written 25 Aug 1668, proven 9 Nov 1668. In it he mentions his nephew Thomas Thompson, now apprenticed to him whose mother went to New England, and his niece, Beatrice, who was named for her grandmother Beatrice Detton who married and returned to England. (New England Historic and Genealogical Register 49:395/6--Jul 1895). Full references for his ancestry are found in Flagg's Genealogical Notes on the Founding of New England, which is completely accepted by Jacobus in Hale House. The Thomas Thompson of Northampton (son of John Thompson and Alice Freeman) had an entirely different family in New England. The Thompson and Detton families in Burford, Doddington and Neen Savage and can be followed for generations in the parish registers and the Visitations of Shropshire, details of which will be given in Volume II. 8. The wife of John Welles was Elizabeth Bourne, not Elizabeth Curtis; her origins are presently unknown. The designation of Curtis in earlier works comes from a misreading of the term sister-in-law in estate papers. Stiles corrected Goodwin's error in 1904. She is not the daughter of Elisha Bourne and Patience Skiff and therefore the granddaughter of Rev. Richard Bourne of Cape Cod. This Elizabeth Bourne was born circa 1675, not a possibility for the wife of a man who died in 1659. She is said to be related to the Tomlinson family. Further research on the Tomlinson family background in England may yield more clues on her origin. The name Bourne is prevalent in the Warwickshire area.
    In this genealogy, other errors have been discovered and corrected as noted in the text. However, these errors cited above on the ancestry, life, and children of Thomas
    _____20

    Errors in Earlier Literature

    Welles and Alice Tomes should be noted by all serious students of the family and laid to rest. The correct information has been discovered and made widely available in all cases for decades and is accepted in every case by serious scholars. The definitive articles on the family, summarized by Jacobus in Hale House, are the Welles/Banks study on the Warwickshire origins published in the New England Historical and Genealogical Register in 1926, and the articles on the alleged Tomes royal ancestry in New England Historic and Genealogical Register in 1930, and in Weis and Sheppards' Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists (sixth Edition). Jacobus also discussed the related families of Thompson, Tuttle, Hollister, Treat, and Chester in Hale House and gives the citations for all those lines in England. The line of the Baldwins does not have a contemporary study done, although the Baldwin genealogy by C.C. Baldwin contains generations of material from Buckinghamshire taken from parish records. The ancestry of Anthony Hawkins is currently unknown. More full discussions of the origins of these families will be undertaken in Volume Il.
    _____21

    Source: The Descendents of GOVERNOR THOMAS WELLES of Connecticut 1590-1658 and his wife ALICE TOMES by Donna Holt Siemiatkoski / sponsored by The Welles Family Association The Gateway Press, Inc. - Baltimore, 1990
    Used by permission ofThe Welles Family Association P. O. Box 290526Wethersfield, CT 06169"16

Family 1: Alice Tomes b. 1595, d. 1640

Family 2: Elizabeth Deming b. 28 Jul 1595, d. 28 Jul 1683

  • (Groom) Marriage*: 2 March 1646; Wethersfield, Hartford Co., Connecticut, USAG; When he married Elizabeth (widow of Nathaniel Foote and sister of John Deming, both founders of Wethersfield, CT) they moved to Wethersfield to help oversee the estate of her late husband.

    no children by her marriage to Thomas Welles; Bride=Elizabeth Deming

Citations

  1. Stephanie Ruth Lee,.
  2. Wells Surname DNA Study,Orin Wells, Wells Surname DNA Study.
  3. John S. Welles, as submitted in GEDCOM file C:TMGWGEDCOMSC104.GED and imported on 03/26/2008 at 14:43:29.
  4. Unknown compiler, unknown short title, Wilbur Francis Wells, 1230 Wooded Trail, Hurst, TX 76053-3703, 817-595-3471.
  5. Unknown author, Stephanie Ruth Lee, 2303 Roosevelt Drive, Anchorage, AK 99517.
  6. GEDCOM, Gedcom.
  7. Welles Family Assn. Book 1590-1658 p.3.
  8. Cemetery Records, Wethersfield, CT Vital Records 1634 - 1868 From the Barbour Collection as found at the CT State Library Transcribed by Coralynn Brown, Thomas, dept. Gov., died Jan 14, 1659/60.
  9. The Public Records of the Colony of Connecticut prior to the union with New Haven Colony May 1665 transcribed and published under the supervision of the Secretary of State with occasional notes and an appendix:, Public Records of the Colony of Connecticut, Public Records of the Colony of Connecticut, Vol 1 page 343.
  10. The History of Ancient Wethersfield Connecticut - Vol II - Genealogies and Biographies, History of Ancient Wethersfield Connecticut - Vol II - Genealogies and Biographies, The History of Ancient Wethersfield Connecticut - Vol II - Genealogies and Biographies - page 2-761
    .
  11. , Refugees Long Island to Connecticut, Refugees Long Island to Connecticut.
  12. Unknown author, GEDCOM.
  13. Stephanie Ruth Lee, as submitted in GEDCOM file C:TMGWDNADON~1ID918NU.GED and imported on 06/14/2008 at 03:37:00.
  14. Unknown compiler, unknown short title, Biography of Gov Thomas Welles BibliographyNational Cyclopedia of American Biography. New York: J. T. White, 1898- , s.v. "Thomas Welles" [CSL call number HistRef E 176 .N27]. Norton, Frederick Calvin. The Governors of Connecticut. Hartford: Connecticut Magazine Co., 1905 [CSL call number HistRef F93 .N 88 1905]. Raimo, John W. Biographical Dictionary of American Colonial and Revolutionary Governors 1607-1789. Westport, CT: Meckler Books, 1980 [CSL call number E 187.5 .R34]. Siematowski, Donna Holt. The Descendants of Governor Thomas Welles of Connecticut, 1590-1658. 1990. Baltimore: Gateway Press, 1990 [CSL call number CS 71 .W55 1990]. Talcott, Mary Kingsley. The Original Proprietors. Reprint. [Hartford?]: Society of the Descendants of the Founders of Hartford, Inc., 1986 [CSL call number HistRef F 104 .H353 A26 1986]. Welles, Edmund. The Life and Public Services of Thomas Welles, Fourth Governor of Connecticut 1940. Welles, Lemuel. "The English Ancestry of Gov. Thomas Welles of Connecticut," New England Historical and Genealogical Register 80 (1926), pp. 279-447 [CSL call number F 1 .N56]. PortraitNo known portrait of Thomas Welles exists. Prepared by the History and Genealogy Unit, Connecticut State Library, April 1999.     Page: http://www.cslib.org/gov/wellest.htm, Biography of Gov Thomas Welles.
  15. GEDCOM.
  16. Unknown subject unknown repository, https://sites.rootsweb.com/~wellsfam/genealgy/govwels2.html
  17. Pat Thomas GEDCOM File.
  18. Ronald Harry Wells as submitted in GEDCOM file C:TMGWBACKUPSID788C~1.GED and imported on 08/19/2008 at 12:37:41.,_ID788 _Researcher.

Alice Tomes1,2

F, #18411, b. 1595, d. 1640
  • Reference: W015 ID085
  • Note: They came under the influence of a Puritan minister in England anddecided to give up their landed gentry status and make the dangerouscrossing to the New World. Their children ranged in age from 2 to 17.The first came to Cambridge and made the trek to Hartford with the partyof the Reverand Thomas Hooker. They lived the next 11 years there untilAlice's death.; Principal=Gov Thomas Welles4
  • Nam-Std: Mrs. Wells (Tomes)
  • (Researcher) ResAddr: Researcher=_ID049 _Researcher2
  • (Researcher) ResAddr: Researcher=_ID085 _Researcher2
  • (Researcher) ResAddr: Researcher=_ID104 _Researcher2
  • (Researcher) ResAddr: Researcher=_ID271 _Researcher2
  • (Researcher) ResAddr: Researcher=_ID367 _Researcher2
  • (Researcher) ResAddr: Researcher=_ID782 _Researcher2
  • (Researcher) ResAddr: Pat Thomas 1335 Lakeview Avenue Winona, MN 55987 1-507-458-8227; Researcher=_ID792 _Researcher2
  • Married Name: 7 July 1615; Mrs. Welles (Tomes)
  • (Immigrant) Immigration: circa 1620; They came under the influence of a Puritan minister in England and decided to give up their landed gentry status and make the dangerous crossing to the New World. Their children ranged in age from 2 to 17.The first came to Cambridge and made the trek to Hartford with the party of the Reverand Thomas Hooker. They lived the next 11 years there until Alice's death.
    6,2

Family 1: Gov Thomas Welles b. 10 Jan 1594, d. 14 Jan 1659/60

Family 2: John Wells b. 1635

Citations

  1. Stephanie Ruth Lee,.
  2. Wells Surname DNA Study,Orin Wells, Wells Surname DNA Study.
  3. GEDCOM.
  4. Unknown author, Stephanie Ruth Lee, 2303 Roosevelt Drive, Anchorage, AK 99517.
  5. GEDCOM, Gedcom.
  6. Stephanie Ruth Lee, as submitted in GEDCOM file C:TMGWDNADON~1ID918NU.GED and imported on 06/14/2008 at 03:37:00.
  7. Pat Thomas GEDCOM File.
  8. Ronald Harry Wells as submitted in GEDCOM file C:TMGWBACKUPSID788C~1.GED and imported on 08/19/2008 at 12:37:41.,_ID788 _Researcher.