Rev. Thomas E. Sherwood 

Rev. Thomas E. Sherwood                1871-3

(31 May 1835 - 10 Apr 1897)

  T. E. Sherwood  [i]

                  1834          born [ii]

   31  May  1835          born: La Porte County, IN, [iii] son of Jeremiah and Sarah Sherwood [iv]

          circa 1842          moved with his parents to Texas when about seven years old and settled in Kaufman County [v]

                  ????-????   educated in the common schools of his day [vi]

                  1848          converted [vii] [viii]

          Oct   1848          baptized by sprinkling; converted under the ministry of Rev. Enoch Chisholm joining the Methodist Episcopal Church, South [ix]

                  1851          felt a call to preach as early as 1851 [x]

                                    received business education in the Dolbear College of New Orleans [xi]

   30  Oct   1856          married Miss Nannie Lavenia McCreary of Rockwall County, TX [xii] (Nannie Lavernia McCreary [xiii] )

                                   (four children: one son and three daughters)

          Oct   1857          licensed to exhort [xiv] [xv]

          Aug  1861-Aug 1862     mayor of Dallas, TX [xvi]

          circa 1862          enlisted in the first company organized in Dallas, Dallas County, TX, serving as regiment quartermaster; afterwards quartermaster

                                    of his brigade attaining the rank of lieutenant colonel [xvii]

     1  Oct   1866          licensed to preach by Dallas Circuit, Dallas District, East Texas Conference, Rev. W. H. Hughes, P.E. [xviii]

                  1867          licensed to preach [xix]

     1  Oct   1867          licensed to preach [xx] [xxi]

                  1869          commenced traveling [xxii]

                  1869          appointed: Dallas District, Scyene [xxiii]

                  1870          ordained deacon [xxiv]

   22  Oct   1870          ordained deacon by Bishop Enoch M. Marvin [xxv] [xxvi]

   22  Oct   1870          admitted on trial at Jefferson, TX, by Bishop Marvin [xxvii]

                  1871          entered itinerancy [xxviii]

                  1871          admitted into North Texas Conference [xxix]

          fall    1871          admitted on trial into the Trinity (now North Texas) Conference [xxx] [xxxi]

                  1871-72     appointed: Trinity Conference, Sherman District, Greenville Circuit [xxxii] [xxxiii]

                  1871-73     appointed: Greenville Circuit [xxxiv]

   25  Dec  1871          delivered an address[xxxv] at the first community Christmas tree in Greenville [xxxvi]

                  1872-73     appointed: Greenville [xxxvii]

                  1872-73     traveled with circuit rider, Rev. D. F. Fuller, to raise funds to erect church building [xxxviii]

                  1872-73     pastor: Methodist Church, Greenville [xxxix] Greenville Circuit [xl]

     2  Nov  1873          ordained elder by Bishop Hubbard H. Kavanaugh at Dallas, TX [xli] [xlii]

                  1873-75     appointed: Rockwall [xliii]

                  1874

                  1875-77     appointed: Sulphur Springs District [xliv] [xlv]

                  1875          appointed: Sulphur Springs District, Presiding Elder [xlvi]

                  1876          appointed: Sulphur Springs District, Presiding Elder [xlvii]

                  1877          appointed: Paris District, Honey Grove [xlviii]

                  1877-79     supernumerary [xlix] [l]

                  1878

                  1879-82     appointed: Pilot Point Station [li] [lii]

     4  Jun    1880          resident Precinct No. 2, Denton County, TX [liii]
                                    (T. E. Sherwood, white, male, 45 years old, minister, born IN, father born NC, mother born NC
                                    Nancy L., white, female, 44 years old, wife, keeping house, born MO, father born TN, mother born Scotland
                                    Effie E., white, female, 20 years old, daughter, at home, born TX, father born IN, mother born MO
                                    Marvin B., white, male, 11 years old, son, at home, born TX, father born IN, mother born MO)

                  1881

                  1882-83     appointed: Jefferson Station [liv] [lv]

                  1883-84     appointed: Henrietta Mission [lvi] [lvii]

                  1884-85     appointed: Henrietta and Wichita Falls [lviii] [lix]

                  1885-87     appointed: Denison Station [lx] [lxi]

                  1886

                  1887-89     appointed: Whitesboro Station [lxii] [lxiii]

                  1888          appointed: Sherman District, Whitesboro Station [lxiv]

                  1889          appointed: Paris District, Clarksville Station [lxv]

                  1889-91     appointed: Clarksville Station [lxvi] [lxvii]

                  1890          appointed: Paris District, Clarksville Station [lxviii]

                  1891-92     appointed: Brookston Circuit [lxix] [lxx]

                  1892          transferred out to another conference [lxxi]

          fall    1892          transferred from the Trinity (sic) Conference to the Denver Conference [lxxii] [lxxiii]

                  1892-93     appointed: Denver, CO, Morrison Memorial [lxxiv] [lxxv]

                  1893          received by transfer into the North Texas Conference [lxxvi] [lxxvii]

          fall    1893          transferred to the Trinity Conference (sic) from the Denver Conference [lxxviii]

                  1893-96     appointed: Pottsboro Station [lxxix] [lxxx]

                  1896          appointed: Bonham District, Dodd [lxxxi]

                  1896-10 Apr 1897 appointed: Dodd City [lxxxii] [lxxxiii]

                  1897          died in the past year [lxxxiv]

                  1897          died [lxxxv] (20 years in ministry, 26 years in conference)

   10  Apr   1897          died: Dodd City [lxxxvi]

   11  Apr   1897          buried: Sulphur Springs [lxxxvii] [lxxxviii] [lxxxix]

 

Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496: (transcription)

Thomas Emory Sherwood

Birth                             Born in La Porte, Indiana, May 31, 1835.

Parentage                     Son of Jeremiah and Sarah Sherwood.  Moved with his parents to Texas when about seven years of age and settled in Kaufman County.

Conversion                   Converted October, 1848, under the ministry of Rev. Enoch Chisholm; joined the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, immediately.

Baptism                        Baptized by sprinkling, October, 1848.

Ministry begins             He felt a call to preach as early as 1851.  Licensed to exhort, October, 1857.  Licensed to preach October 1, 1867.

Deacon                        Ordained deacon by Bishop Enoch M. Marvin, October 22, 1870.

Elder                            Ordained elder by Bishop Hubbard H. Kavanaugh, November 2, 1873.

On Trial                        Admitted on Trial into the Trinity (now North Texas) Conference in the fall of 1871.

Transfer                        From the Trinity to the Denver Conference in the fall of 1892, and stationed at “Morrison Memorial”, Denver, Colorado

                                   From the Denver to the Trinity Conference in the fall of 1893.

Marriage                      Married Miss Nannie Lavenia McCreary, of Rockwall County, Texas, October 30, 1856.

Family                          To them were born four children - one son and three daughters.  Two daughters are now in “the better land”.

Education                     His education was had in the common schools of his day.

War Record                 His war record is interesting.  He enlished in the first company organized in Dallas, Dallas County, Texas.  Served as Regiment Quartermaster; afterwards, Quartermaster of the Brigade, with rank of Lieutenant Colonel.

Mason                          He is a prominent mason, having risen to the high position of 33°.

Remark                        After the city of Dallas, Texas, was incorporated he was elected mayor.  He, therefore, holds the distinction of being the first mayor elected for the city of Dallas. (note: in the margin was this: ‘NO; 5th WNV’ which is interpreted here to mean that he was the 5th mayor instead as noted by Walter N. Vernon)

Charges                        Trinity (North Texas) Conference
1871 to 1873; Greenville Circuit.
1873 “ 1875; Rockwall Circuit.
1875 “ 1877; Sulphur Springs District
1877 “ 1879; Supernumerary
1879 “ 1882; Pilot Point Station
1882 “ 1883; Jefferson      
1883 “ 1884; Henrietta Mission
1884 “ 1885; Henrietta and Wichita Falls
1885 “ 1887; Denison Station
1887 “ 1889; Whiteboro 
1889 “ 1891; Clarksville 
1891 “ 1892; Brookston Circuit

Denver Conference

1892 to 1893; Morrison Memorial, Denver, Colorado.

North Texas Conference

1893 to 1896; Pottsboro Station.

1896 “ April 10, 1898; Dodd City

Death                           He was 61 years, 10 months, and 9 days old at death.


(newspaper clipping with unknown source and date)

REV. T. E. SHERWOOD

            Rev. T. E. Sherwood died in Dodd City, April 10, 1897.  He was buried in Sulphur Springs, April 11.  Thus passes away another faithful member of the North Texas Conference.  Brother Sherwood was for several years an efficient traveling preacher, building up the various interests of the Church and blessing the world.  He has found his rest and reward.  A suitable obituary will appear soon.’

Tribute:                         (newspaper clipping with unknown source and date)

                                                                                                    ‘REV. T. E. SHERWOOD

            We print below a tribute to Rev. T. E. Sherwood, from his friend and brother, Rev. J. M. Binkley.  The statistical data having been published before, we omit:

            Rev. T. E. Sherwood was born May 31, 1835, in La Porte County, Indiana; moved with his parents to Texas at seven years of age, and settled in Kaufman County; was married to Miss Nannie Lavenia McCreary, October 30, 1856; was the father of four children (one son and three daughters), two of the children having preceded him to the better land.  He died in Dodd City, Saturday, April 10, 1897; buried in Sulphur Springs, April 11, 1897.

            I have known Bro. Sherwood for thirty-nine years.  He was steward on my second circuit, Rockwall; have had him in my district about ten years.  He was one of the truest and best men I have ever known-a good preacher and faithful, earnest, conscientious pastor, kind and loving husband and father, a true friend.  He has done a great deal of hard work, and successful work also.  He leaves many old friends who remember him as their kind and true friend.  He leaves a wife and two children and several grand-children and many friends who morn (sic) his loss.  He was fully ready for the summons.

            I was to see him on Wednesday before he died.  He was not able to talk much.  I said to him, “You may get well, but if you do not all is well, is it not?”  He responded, “Yes, all’s well.”  He is now at rest, his work is done and well done.  May we all meet him where all our sorrow will be over.’

Þ On next page you will find some valuable, and later information concerning Bro. Sherwood.

Conversion                   He was converted at St. John’s Camp-Ground in Kaufman County, under the ministry of Rev. Enoch Chisholm.

Occupation                   He was at one time a merchant in Farmersville, which place he named.  At another, he merchandised in Dallas, whose Mayor he was one of the first early ones.

License                         Licensed to preach October 1, 1866, by Dallas Circuit, Dallas District, in the then East Texas Conference; Rev. W. H. Hughes, P.E.

On trial                         Admitted on Trial at Jefferson, Texas, by Bishop Marvin.

Deacon                        Ordained deacon at Jefferson, Texas, Oct. 22, 1870

Elder                            Ordained elder at Dallas, Texas, Nov. 2, 1873, by Bishop H. H. Kavanaugh.

Health                          His record for health was remarkable.  Having been brought up through pioneer Texas-days his last, fatal illness was the first he ever had to keep him in his bed 24 hours, except a carbuncle last year.

War Record                 He joined the first Cavalry organized in Dallas, General Gano’s Regiment, and was Quartermaster.  At Little Rock, Arkansas,he was made Quartermaster of his Brigade, which place he filled ‘till the close of the war.

Death Bed                    His son, Marvin Sherwood, of Sulphur Springs, writes as follows: ‘Owing to his intense suffering for two or three weeks prior to his death, he talked none.  During his period of pneumonia, it was forbidden by the physicians.  He seemed to realize all during his sickness that the end was near, and repeatedly told me so.  The last words, probably, ever spoken by him relative to dying, his preparation, etc., - were to Brother Binkley.  When ready to leave, Bro. B. told father that he hoped and prayed for his recovery, “but,” he said, “Tom, if you don’t get well all is right, isn’t it?”  His reply was: “It is all right anyway.”’

Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 15 Apr 1897, page 1:

“REV. T. E. SHERWOOD

     Rev. T. E. Sherwood died in Dodd City, April 10, 1897.  He was buried in Sulphur Springs, April 11.  Thus passes away another faithful member of the North Texas Conference.  Bro. Sherwood was for several years an efficient traveling preacher, building up the various interests of the Church and blessing the world.  He has found his rest and reward.  A suitable obituary will appear soon.”

 

Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 22 Apr 1897, page 8:

“REV. T. E. SHERWOOD

     Rev.Thomas Emory Sherwood was born in La Porte County, Indiana, May 31, 1835.  He moved with his parents when about seven years old to Texas and settled in Kaufman County.  He was converted in October, 1848, and joined the Methodist Church at the same time in the Rockwall Circuit.  He was licensed to exhort October, 1857, and to preach October 1, 1867.  He was ordained deacon October 22, 1870, by Bishop E. M. Marvin, and elder November 2, 1873, by H. H. Kavanaugh.  He was admitted on trial into the Trinity Conference in 1871.  He transferred to the Denver Conference in the fall of 1892, and stationed at the Morrison Memorial Chapel in Denver, Colorado.  He transferred back to the North Texas in 1898.

     His appointments were as follows:

     Greenville, 1872 to 1873; Rockwall, 1873 to 1875; Sulphur Springs District, 1875 to 1877; supernumerary, 1877 to 1879; Pilot Point, 1879 to 1882; Jefferson, 1882 to 1883; Henrietta, 1883 to 1884; Henrietta and Wichita Falls, 1884 to 1885; Denison, 1885 to 1887; Whiteboro, 1887 to 1889; Clarksville, 1889 to 1891; Brookston, 1891 to 1892; Morrison Memorial, Denver, 1892 to 1893; Pottsboro, 1893 to 1896; Dodd City, 1896 to April 10, 1897.

     Bro. Sherwood married Miss Nannie Lavernia McCreary, October 30, 1856.  He had four children, one son and three daughters.  He was educated in the common schools of the State.  He enlisted in the first company organized in Dallas County and served faithfully and efficiently throughout the Civil War.  He was a prominent Mason, having taken the highest degrees.  Bro. Sherwood did some fine service to the Church.  He was instrumental in the conversion of many; in the edification and comfort of the people of God and in the furtherance of the gospel of Christ.  His companions in arms will regret his unlooked-for death, but will rejoice in the triumphs which he achieved.  Bro. Sherwood was one of those humble and unassuming men who go along quietly and accomplish a great deal of good without saying much about it.  He belonged to the rank and file of the ministry – the men who have toiled so earnestly and sacrificed so much to build up the interests of Methodism.  We have every assurance that he died in peace and hope.  Another itinerant preacher has laid aside the battered shield and sword and entered upon his everlasting rest and reward.

 

     To my great sorrow I see in the Dallas Morning News of this date a notice that Rev. T. E. Sherwood, pastor of the M. E. Church, South, of Dodd, Texas, died at said place on the 10th inst., and his remains were taken to Sulphur Springs for burial last Sunday.

     Bro. Tom Sherwood was once quite well known in Dallas and Dallas County.  About thirty years ago he was in business in Dallas, and subsequently lived in the eastern part of the county, where he studied for and entered the ministry.  Hundreds of men and women in our county, who knew and loved him, will drop a tear when they hear that Tom Sherwood has passed away.  While his first preaching was done in this county among his old-time friends and neighbors, most of his ministerial life has been spent in other portions of the conference, but many of us have kept up with him and know what his life-work has been.  Judged by all the standards with which we are familiar, in his death a broad-gauged, whole-souled, useful and godly man has fallen.  He received a business education in the Dolbear College of New Orleans, and when young embarked in business life.  He soon discovered that he was not in his proper sphere and began to prepare himself for the ministry.  It was at that time the writer became intimately acquainted with him.  No lawyer ever prepared his briefs with more deliberation and care, no physician ever diagnosed his case with more intense anxiety than that with which Tom Sherwood read the Scriptures and studied them preparatory to his chosen work.

     Long before he obtained license to preach, as a leader of a class or prayer-meeting he towered far above his pastor or presiding elder.  Entering the ministry after careful preparation and in mature life, he at once took rank in his Church as a good preacher.

     His fort, however, was never that of a brilliant preacher, but he was an ideal pastor, and his influence among those with whom he associated in and out of the Church was something phenomenal.  Occasionally he has returned to the eastern portion of this county to preach a funeral or on some other occasion, and invariably his coming would bring together the people of every denomination and the sinners as well, for all loved him and were anxious to greet him.

     True to his Church and its doctrines, pious always in his walk and conversation, he was nevertheless exceedingly popular among sinners.  If there was an infidel in the community Bro. Sherwood would seek him, remonstrate with and pray for him, and if he did not win him to Christ he would make a life-long, personal friend of him by the interest manifested in the infidel’s salvation.

     He could denounce sin with all the vehemence of his nature and all the vigor of the English language, but make the sinner feel that the preacher tenderly loved him.  He was a companionable man, a fluent and entertaining conversationalist, a true friend, a wise counselor, a model pastor, an able preacher, a godly man.

     His life-work has not been like a flashing meteor with coruscations of evanescent light, but with the steady glow of a planet he has moved in an important sphere, cheering his friends, serving God, blessing the people, and we doubt not, when his immortal spirit was unshackled on last Saturday, the Master said, “Well done, good, and faithful servant.”

     On Sunday last my wife and I talked about him and agreed to ask Bro. Rankin to have Bro. Sherwood and his aimable (sic) wife assigned to our house during conference next fall, if it was agreeable to them.  Since his death we are very glad we named our youngest child for him last fall.

     With his good wife and children their many friends in this county will deeply sympathise (sic).  As the friend and counselor of my youth, I cherish his memory and feel that heaven, is more inviting, as I believe if fortunate enough to enter that goodly land I shall again see that broad-minded, unselfish, cheerful, Christian gentleman whom I have loved so long and well.

T. F. NASH

Dallas, Texas, April 13, 1897”

 

Greenville Messenger, Thursday, 30 Oct 1930, page 5:

Some Early Church History

     “The following was written by Rev. D. F. Fuller, one of the pioneer preachers in Hunt County Methodism that will be of interest.

     The time, place and church in which the conference is held (transcription from help) Wesley church brings memories to this scribe.  Greenville, erstwhile village near the Sabine River, in Hunt County, 1872-73,__  This scribe was serving Lone Oak Circuit.  Lone Oak-a wide place in the road, on a ridge, having a store, blacksmith shop, and residence.  And Greenville-without a house of worship, with Tom Sherwood, pastor, scouring the country for aid to erect a Methodist church, the first in the capital of Hunt County.  Yes, I rode with him on my circuit and the Rabbs, Holt - great and good Asa Holt - Hefners, Drs. Holderness, and others contributed liberally, and Greenville came to the front as a town with a church building.  Across on Lone Oak Ridge that great old hero of the cross, Alexander Hefner, inspired by love of God moved until a church, with Masonic lodge overhead, was erected.  What a great place was the Hefner Chapel neighborhood.  How could it be otherwise when dominated by such spirit, an old “Uncle Alec” Hefner and his tribe.  Honor to his memory - he sleeps the sleep of the just, and reigns with the immortals.

     Three men live today who were members of the Trinity, now North Texas Conference, James McDugald, J. F. Sherwood and the writer.  The circuit rider nowadays goes whizzing along in a limousine or Ford, but we went about astride a horse with a fortnight’s clothing, in the saddlebags along with Bible, hymn book, discipline, some works contained in the course of study, and these occupied our moments of leisure between appointeds.  My circuit called for 18 sermons per month, pastoral visiting, and attention to other official business.  We had no time for a game of ball, or to attend special occasions and gather the latest for our furnishing.  If there was a parsonage in the conference outside five I am mistaken.  Sparsely settled, some of our trips were miles without a house.  The prairies in spring and summer abounded in flowers, birds, animals and often the wriggling snake, Ugh, how ugly.  And on one occasion as I was crossing the Sabine River into Van Zandt county, I saw a mother bear with her two cubs making way through the cane.  Of course, I made no effort to interview her.

     But thinking sometimes of the scenes of those long lonely rides, I recall one evening trying to sing, “How Happy Are They, Who Their Savior Obey,” etc. when a voice from the rear called: “Mr. is any of your kin dead that you are ___’__ so?”  Think of it, a lonely circuit rider, trying to sing, and mistaken in such manner.  But we soon became friends.  At that point I recall going to the quarterly conference over one the __habitable districts, accompanied by Asa Holt, Sam Wesley Jo__, Charile Featherstone, Darious Rowley, Alec Hefner, Sr. and son Hon. Alex Hefner, later mayor of Greenville.  How we made the large unoccupied territory fill with voice of song and praise.  We are going to quarterly conference to attend to __ters concerning the Masters __casts, and His presence was __ but could but make h__ effort to voice in praise, tho__ the birds and animals beside __ __faster world hear.  It is usel__ add, the quarterly conference __ real occasion.  In the meeting __wing 75 were added to the church.  Some remain to serve until t__esent time.  But like members __ conference at that time, m__ them are on the other shore, and sometimes I feel as if they are beckoning me to come on.

     D. F. Ful__

     Grand Prair__ Texas”

(note: newspaper copy was unreadable as noted by the underscores above)

 


[i] Texas Methodist Centennial Yearbook, page 121 (photo: 1870)

[ii] Texas Methodist Centennial Yearbook, page 255.

[iii] Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 15 Apr 1897, page 1

[iv] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[v] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[vi] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[vii] Texas Methodist Centennial Yearbook, page 255.

[viii] Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 15 Apr 1897, page 1

[ix] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[x] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[xi] Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 15 Apr 1897, page 1

[xii] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[xiii] Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 15 Apr 1897, page 1

[xiv] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[xv] Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 15 Apr 1897, page 1

[xvi] Memorial and Biographical History of Dallas County, Texas, page 278

[xvii] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[xviii] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[xix] Texas Methodist Centennial Yearbook, page 255.

[xx] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[xxi] Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 15 Apr 1897, page 1

[xxii] History of Methodism in Texas, page 187

[xxiii] 1916 JNTAC, page 10

[xxiv] 1916 JNTAC, page 12

[xxv] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[xxvi] Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 15 Apr 1897, page 1

[xxvii] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[xxviii] Texas Methodist Centennial Yearbook, page 255.

[xxix] Texas Methodist Centennial Yearbook, page 255.

[xxx] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[xxxi] Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 15 Apr 1897, page 1

[xxxii] History of Methodism in Texas, page 205

[xxxiii] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[xxxiv] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[xxxv] History of Hunt County-Cassles, page 63

[xxxvi] Greenville Evening Banner, Friday, 20 Mar 1925, section 4, page 7, “First Xmas Tree Was Big Success”

[xxxvii] Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 15 Apr 1897, page 1

[xxxviii] Greenville Messenger, Thursday, 30 Oct 1930, page 5, “Some Early Church History”

[xxxix] WUMC History 1850-1983, page 22

[xl] Greenville Morning Herald, Thursday, 2 Nov 1916, page 3, “SKETCH OF EARLY TEXAS METHODISM”

[xli] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[xlii] Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 15 Apr 1897, page 1

[xliii] Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 15 Apr 1897, page 1

[xliv] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[xlv] Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 15 Apr 1897, page 1

[xlvi] 1916 JNTAC, page 15

[xlvii] Texas Christian Advocate, Saturday, 9 Dec 1876, page 1, “NORTH TEXAS CONFERENCE APPOINTMENTS”

[xlviii] Texas Christian Advocate, Saturday, 17 Nov 1877, page 5, “APPOINTMENTS OF THE NORTH TEXAS CONFERENCE.”

[xlix] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[l] Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 15 Apr 1897, page 1

[li] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[lii] Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 15 Apr 1897, page 1

[liii] 1880 U. S. Census, Denton County, Texas, Precinct No. 2, page 52C

[liv] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[lv] Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 15 Apr 1897, page 1

[lvi] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[lvii] Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 15 Apr 1897, page 1

[lviii] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[lix] Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 15 Apr 1897, page 1

[lx] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[lxi] Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 15 Apr 1897, page 1

[lxii] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[lxiii] Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 15 Apr 1897, page 1

[lxiv] Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 22 Nov 1888, page 5

[lxv] Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 28 Nov 1889, page 1

[lxvi] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[lxvii] Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 15 Apr 1897, page 1

[lxviii] Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 27 Nov 1890, page 4

[lxix] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[lxx] Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 15 Apr 1897, page 1

[lxxi] 1916 JNTAC, page 25

[lxxii] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[lxxiii] Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 15 Apr 1897, page 1

[lxxiv] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[lxxv] Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 15 Apr 1897, page 1

[lxxvi] 1916 JNTAC, page 26

[lxxvii] Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 15 Apr 1897, page 1

[lxxviii] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[lxxix] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[lxxx] Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 15 Apr 1897, page 1

[lxxxi] Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 19 Nov 1896, page 1

[lxxxii] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[lxxxiii] Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 15 Apr 1897, page 1

[lxxxiv] 1916 JNTAC, page 28

[lxxxv] Texas Methodist Centennial Yearbook, page 255.

[lxxxvi] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[lxxxvii] Biographies of the North Texas Conference Clergy, pages 494-496, “Thomas Emory Sherwood”

[lxxxviii] Texas Methodist Centennial Yearbook, page 255.

[lxxxix] Texas Christian Advocate, Thursday, 15 Apr 1897, page 1