Sept of Anghaile (Muintir Ghiollagain)

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A sept of Anghaile (Annaly), a branch of the Conmhaicne and of the same stock as O'Fearghail (O'Farrells), who were chiefs of Muintir Ghiollagain, an extensive district in Longford until they were displaced by the O'Fearghail.

Cuinn sept of Muintir Giollgain This Sept of the O'Cuinn's were of the Tribe of Ir, son of Milesius (according to the synthetic historians), descendants of Conmac who gave his name to Conmacne a powerful kingdom part of the overkingdom of North Leinster. He lived in the first or second Centuries B.C. They were of the same stock as Anghaile who lived in the ninth Century a powerful prince who gave his name to that part of Conmacne from Drumrany in Westmeath to Mohill in Leitrim including the whole of County ___________________________________________s of Ireland to Henry II in 1176 the title Kings of Conmacne was changed to Lords of Annaly. The — Cuinn were vassels of the O'Farrell who were Lords of Annaly and who had their Fortress at Longphort. The Pedigree of the — Cuinn Croman Eimhin GIOLLAGAN Segannon Gormgal CONN Searragh Aodh — Cuinn First assumed name Donagh c. 1170 Teige Sitric slain 1181 Amhailgadh slew Rory O'Farrell in 1200 Gormgal taken prisoner 1199, founded abbey 1205 Dermod died 1255555255 Giolla-na-Naomh died 1265 Gormgal Cuchonacht died 1341 Cathal died 1355 Cairbre Feidlim died 1414 Giollaghan was the eponymous ancestor and gave his name to the Sept and the Territory, which they occupied. Giolla means Minister, Servant, Page. In the earlier period they were a powerful Sept and occupied the area around Rathline and had a Fortress there, in the Fifthteenth Century they would seem to have moved north and their power declined. Muintir Giollgain if at first denominated the name of their territory, O'Cuinn's were Chiefs of the Country denominated Muintir Giollgain, But where was Muintir Giollgain? This is a matter of dispute, some authorities say Armagh, Moydow and Schrule and others Ratchline in the South. But it can be ascertained that in the earr____________ x_____________________________________________________________|_____Longford. After the submission of the Kings of Ireland to Henry II in 1176 the title Kings of Conmacne was changed to Lords of Annaly. The O’Cuinn were vassels of the O'Farrell who were Lords of Annaly and who had their Fortress at Longphort. The Pediggritory was certainly later more important as the Sept's tribe name. The Annals contain more references to the O'Cuinn's of Muintir Giollaghan than any other Sept of the O'Cuinn's. The first reference that can be taken as referring to the O'Cuinn's in Annaly is in 1050, they are not yet referred to as the Muintir Giollaghan, there is mention of a Fegartach who was probably Chief. In 1071 (M) it is recorded that Finnachta son of Eigneachan Ua Cuin and Donn son of Fogartach UaCuinn (above mentioned) were kiln and Donn son of Fogartach UaCuinn (above mentioned) were killed most treacherously by the Connaughtmen. Many members of this Sept or of the Muintir Iffernain or of smaller families of the name concentrated on pursuits other than warfare. In 1079 (M) is recorded the death of Maelchiarain who was reputed to be the glory of Cluan Mac Noise in his time. In 1095 (M) Augustin Chief Brehon (Judge) of Leinster died of the pestilence, In 1079 (M) Maelcor U) of Leinster died of the pestilence, In 1079 Maelcor UaCuinn died. In 1103 (M) Cormac described as prosperous and affulent died. In 1134 (M) Cormac Ua Cuinn lost two sons from natural causes, Ceilelent died. In 1134 Cormac Ua Cuinn lost two sons from natural causes, Ceileo sons from natural causes, Ceileachair in September and Maelclarain at Christmas. In 1140 Fogartach was Chief when Annaly was dragged into the wars of Tighearnan O'Rourke Lord of Brefny, by this time Annaly had become separated from Meath and more under Connaught and Brefiny influence. English and the sons of Aonadh O'Rourke and the English plundered the inhabitants of Annaly and Muintir Giollgain. The O'Cuinn's spent much of their time feuding with the O'Farrell's and amongst themselves. From this period onwards the Sept is referreed to as the — Cuinn of Muintir Giollgain, in this period it became important to distinguish them from the other Sept's who were now numerous. Amlainn chief of the Muintir Giollgain died in 1174 and was succeeded by Sitric who in 1181 was slain by Aodh OOO In 1156 (M) Tighearnan UaRuairc was defeated in battle by Diarmuid MacMurchadha King of Leinster at the Battle of Cuasan at Lis Luigdhi in Laeghaire many were slain including Fegartach Ua Cuinn who was on the side of O'Rourke. In 1168 (M) Dubhchabhlaigh daughter of the Chief of the — Cuinn and wife of MacCarrghamhra died at Druim creaigh (Drumeree, a townland in the Parish of Killcunny, Barony of Devlin) after the victory of Atha an chomair (Devlin, County Westmeath) over the people of Lune (Co. Meath). When Diarmuid MacMurchadha brought over Cambro-Normans to help him in his fight against O'Connor and O'Rourke, the O'Cuinn's helped O'Rourke in 1171 (M) when an army of Breifne and Airghialla was lead by Tighearnan UaRuairc a second time to Dublin Dublin to Atha Cliath they made battle with Myles DeCogan and his Knights in which the men of Brefiny and Annaly were defeated many were slain includiny and Annaly were defeated many were slain includin of Brefiny and Annaly were defeated many were slain including the grandson of Diarmuid Ua Cuinn. In 1172 Hugh De Lacy and dissident, O'Rourkes slew O'Rourke near Athboy, De Lacy was granted Meath by King Henry and divided it into 18 Baronies as far as Granard. Donnell O'Farrell Lord of Annaly was also slain by the 1172 Hugh De Lacy and dissident, O'Rourkes slew O'Rourke near Athboy, De Lacy was granted Meath by King Henry and divided it into 18 Baronies as far as Granard. Donnell O'Farrell Lord of Annaly was also slain by the Lord of Annaly was also slain by the'Farrell. In 1196 (M) the sons of Sitric had their revenge and slew Aodh most treacherously who had been expelled by his people. But the attention of the O'Cuinn's was diverted towards the Foreigners in the next few years In 1199 (LC) Gormghal — Cui was . But the attention of the O'Cuinn's was diverted towards the Foreigners in the next few years In 1199 (LC) Gormghal — Cuinn chief of Muinter Gillgain was tamken prisoner by the English and his people were reduced to great distress from want of food and clothing after being plundered. (But Gormgall was freed and must have restored his people's wealth, for in 1205 he founded a monastery at Abbeyderg which was about two miles from the village of Kenagh it was known as the Red Monastery). From the west also came trouble Aodh O'Cuinn and the sons of Aodh na-namus and more of Conmacne were slain by the mecenaries of Connaught. In 1200 (LC) a great depression was lead by Cathal Crobhderg and the Connaughtmen to the west of Meath, on their way back they came safely past the Brurghin where they separated but the English of Westmeath had followed them and Amhlaidh O'Cuinn of the Muinter Gslew Ruaidhri O'Thaithbhertaigh separated but the English of Westmeath had followed them and Amhlaidh O'Cuinn of the Muinter Gillgain slew Ruaidhri O'Thaithbhertaigh King of the West of Connaught, this would indicate that there was no qualms on the part of the O'Cuinn's as to who they sided in order to be revenged upon their enemies. When the external threat recided the Sept began to fight among itself, in 1234 Dermod t revenged upon their enemies. When the external threat recided the Sept began to fight among itself, in 1234 Dermod the Chief was slain in a domestic feud. The O’Farrell's at this time were also fighting amongst themselves. In 1231 (M) Duvtowragh daughter of — Cuinn and wife of — Flathartach died. The Lord of Annaly in 1232 being burned by some of his kinsmen on an island but the — Farrells were reunited under the strong leadership of Giolla-na-Naomh. In 1255 (M) he inflicted a severe defeat on the — Cuinn's thus destroying any aspirations they might have had to theeetroying any aspirations they might have had to the Lordship of Annaly, Dermod Chief of Muintir Gioblgain, Auliffe his son with many other important men were slain and afterwards ttmod Chief of Muintir Gioblgain, Auliffe his son with many other important men were slain and afterwards tain and afterwards their territory was pillaged, the battle took place at Tanaddhan, Moighe Treagha (Moytra Barony in Co. Longford) at Fanney Hoogan about three miles from Newtownforbes and less than a mile from the town of Longford. But in 1262 the — Farrells themselves were thrown into disorder when the English sponsored a rival claimant to their Chieftainship by the end of it is recorded that many evils, depredations, aggressions, spoliations and slaughters had been committed. In 1265 Giolla-na-Naomh Chief of Muintir Giollgain died. In 1278 (M) Bishop of Clonmacnoise died. An incident occurred at this time although we cannot be certain about the exact date but it ougbroke out between the McCormacks of Baael-na-Cormack and the O'Cuinns who at this time lived in Ratht to be mentioned, a feud broke out between the McCormacks of Baael-na-Cormack and the — Cuinns who at this time lived in Ratchline and were a powerful Sept. The McCormack's expected the — Farrell Buidhe of Longford to help them but in this they were disappointed. The McCormacks accepted their fate and retired to the hill beside the present graveyard of Ballymaccormack where they took up their positions immediately behind the church. The — Cuinn's had encamped at Killashee, they now took the offensive attacked the McCormacks and defeated them. They sacked and burned the church at Ballymaccormack and having fired the haggards aaaaand homes of their enemies they retired to their own country in Ratchline, this episode casts much light on Irish society in those times. Annaly was never greatly influenced by the Normans English settlements only grew up in Western Meath. The later half of the 13th century saw a regrouping of the Irish against the English and Annaly was not unaffected by this, the early 1300's saw the Bruce Invasion, Meath was invaded in 1315. In 1316 a Battle was fought at Athenry where the English of West Connaught defeated the Irish whose forces included men of Annaly, two years later Edward Bruce was killed by the English whose death was welcomed amongst the Irish as he was the cause of much suffering English influences after this retreated to the Pale. In the 132220's there was much confusion in Annaly with a feud amongst the — Farrells. In 1330 Lochsendy was annexed to Trim. 1341 (M) Cuconnaught — Cuinn Chief of Muintir Gillagan (Ardagh, Moydow and Shrule) died In 135t least). Cathal chief of Muintir Giollgain a5 (M) the — Cuinn's were again interfered with by the — Farrells (sections) of them at least). Cathal — Cuinn chief of Muintir Giollgain andfive others of his Sept were slain by the Clann Shane and the Clann Hugh (Barony of Longford adjoining the district of Magh Treagh) this must have blew over without retaliation from the — Cuinn's all that is heard next is that Cairpre chief of Muintir GGiollgain died in 1362. Shortly after this the English of Meath were back againn in 1373 Annaly was invaded by them, these wars were not ones of conquest but more along the lines of the Irish cattle raiding and the descendants of the English settlers cancline. At first Longford was not interfered with indeed the — Farrells and their kinder Septs were regarded favourably by King James and Chichester the Lord Depudy. In 1611 through The Statute of Absentees it was noted that most of the land in County Loongford had passed to the King, but any immediate plans were royally opposed. Four years later Chichester had changed his mind for some reason and the Longford Septs were relegated to the status of mere Irish and through the authenticity of the royal titleenot be properly described as English as they were now more Irish than the Irish themselves. Nevertheless in 1376 a mini war ensued, a general muster of the English of Meath, Ulster and Leinster proceeded into Annaly and treacherous depredations were committed by them. Afterwards — Farrell with all his forces this would have included the — Cuinn's who would have united against the common enemy, invaded by turn the English of Ulster, Leinster and Meath this is a classic tail of the rish cattle raids. The Irish cattle raids. The defences of Annaly were strengthened in the following year when a castle was erected by John — Farrell at Lis and Abhlu. In 1381 (M) Owen — Cuinn chief of Muintir Giollgain died. In 1393 the English of newly inaugurated chief o plans were drawn up for a Plantation in 1620 one quarter of the Irish land was taken and planted. The rest of the land was distributed amongst the Gaelic Septs. There was a very small assignment to the Quinn's - Brian 115 acres, John 60 acres, Robert annd Phelen 100 acres, the vast majority of the — Cuinn's Sept would have remained on the land of their ancestors as labourers working for the new owners, or for their kinsman who now accepted their land under English Law. With the Rising of 1641 the Septs Cuinns was gone forever. Under the Cromwellian Settlement Longford was taken for the 1649 arrears in 1654. In 1656 amongst the forfeited properties are a Quin from Lisdrinagh in the Barony of Ardagh and Edmund and John Quin in the Barony of Schrule. I Meath and Barony of Devlin slew the newly inaugurated chief of the — Farrells and at the same time the — Neill extended his influences into Annaly. In 1405 CuChonnacht chief of Muintir Giollgain died and was succeeded by Feidlim who was on his death In 1414 (C) Feidhlim — Cuinn champion of all Ireland for joviality and good fellowship and chieftain for nine years of the Muinter Giln died at the end of the first min his own house at Brenad and was buried at Abbeyderg. In 1403 the O'Cuinn's along with lgain died at the end of the first month of spring in his own house at Brenad, after a victory of repentence, and was buried at Abbeyderg. In 1403 the — Cuinn's along with the — Farrels submitted to Owen — Neill. From this time onwards the — Cuinn's must have faded into insignificance as there is no further mention of them specifically in the Annals. In 1445 the feuding amongst the — Farrells came to a head when they divided in two and Annaly was destroyed until peace was declared between them. In 1452 the — Farrells had to submit to the Earl of Ormonbetween them. In 1452 the O'Farrells had to submit to the Earl of Ormon2 the O'Farrells had to submit to the Earl of Ormond and in the 1490's it is again recorded that they were feuding. This threatned the independence of Annaly and the — Farrell Boy in the South and West became anglacised and the — Farrel Bane remained gaelic occupying the North and East and were later to support — Neill. — Cuinn by this time had moved to these parts. Annaly was invaded by Brian — Rourke of Brefiny in the same year under the Composition of Connaught Annaly was shired by Elizabeth and formed into the County Longford. In 1589 we learn from the English State Papers that Fergus — Farrell had sent a harp with Richard O'Quinn a priest as a token to the Spainish ambassador who had been received by O'Rourke . This was considered a treasonable act and reported to London in this period the — Cuinn's would have been no more than a minor Sept the fact that an — Cuinn was a messenger of the — Farrells was an example of this. After the Nine Years War (1594 - 1603), the defeat of — Neill, — Donnell and the Gaelic Lords of Ireland went into its final denths__6‚6€Valuation c. 1850's the Quinn's are spread throughout Longford__i0____i,_______ÿ€______Ø__ the Census of Ireland 1659 there are 13 Quinns recorded in Shrowell and 4 in the Barony of Longford. Under the Acts of Settlement and Explanation in the first years of the reign of Charles I a few Quinns were rewarded for their fidelity to the crown durinof Longford rose in support of the North and in the Confederate wars which followed the Castle at Ratchline which had been destroyed by a Parlimentary army, this destruction of the Castle was symbolic in that the one time powerfully organized Sept of the —g the fight against the parliament by the restoration of their lands to them. With the Jacobite Wars 1685 - 88 and the defeat of the Irish there was again deposition of the land owning Quinn's. The eighteenth century was dominated by the penal legislat which had been occupied by their ancestors as far back as the twelfth century. The confusion of Irish History, the spoliation that was wrecked in the Country is adequately reflected in the story of the — Cuinn of Muintir Giollgain.

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