Janet's Genealogy

Berkeley Family

Berkeley

Henry Johnes was the son of Thomas Johnes and Mary Berkeley

According to the Annals and Antiquities of the Counties and County Families of Wales by Thomas Nicholas, F.G.S., page 291, the first Sir Thomas Johnes of Abermarlais was married to 1) Elizabeth, dau. and co-h. of Sir Edward Dwnn before he married 2) Mary Berkeley. Thomas' eldest son is shown as Sir Henry Johnes.

Thomas Johnes/JONES Sir Knt married Mary BERKELEY. Sir Thomas Johnes of Abermarlais, Kt., Sheriff of Carmarthenshire and Cardigan married 1st Elizabeth Dwnn (s.p.) and 2nd, as her second husband Mary Berkeley. Sir Thomas Jones was Mary Berkeley's second husband. Her first husband was Thomas Perrot, by whom she was mother of Sir John Perrot, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. Mary Berekley father: Sir James Berkeley and mother: Susan Fitz Alan .

“BURKE’S Genealogical and Heraldic History of the LANDED GENTRY founded 1836 by John Burke and Dir Bernard Burke, C. B. LL.D (Ulster King Arms 1853-1892)” Edited by Peter Towend. 18th Edition Published by Burke’s Peerage Limited in London in MCMLXV

Page 417

LLOYD-JOHNES OF DOLAUCOTHY

Sir Thomas Johnes, Kt of Abermarlais, Carmarthanshire and Haroldston, Pembrokeshire, 1st Knight of the Shire for Pembrokeshire and Sheriff of Carmartenshire (1541) and Cardiganshire (1544) m’d Mary, widow of Sir Thomas Perrott, Kt, Haroldston and dau and heir of Hon Sir James Berkeley, 2nd son of 3rd Lord Berkeley. ( Maurice De Berkeley)

Children

1*** Henry m’d Elizabeth, dau of Matthew Herbert of Swansea, Giam and Mary Gamage b: in Coity, Pen-y-Bont Ar Ogwr, Morgannwg, Cymru ancestor of the Johnes of Abermarlais , now extinct.

2 Richard of Cwmgwill, Carmarthanshire

3 Samuel

4 James Johns, of Llanbadarnfawr, Radnorshire, Sheriff of Cardiganshire, 1586 m’d Anne, Widow of James Lewis, of Llanbadarnfawr and dau and Her of John Thomas of Cryngae and Dolaucothy, Carmarthenshire

BERKELEY FAMILY

Mary BERKELEY married Thomas JONES Sir Knt Mary parents were: Sir James BERKELEY married Susan Fitz Alan b: Abt 1521. Susan father was Lord. William FITZALAN.

I am starting with Sir James Berkeley family and working backwards to first Berkely.

Maurice de Berkeley, 8th Lord Berkeley (by right 3rd Lord Berkeley), married in 1465, a person of humble birth, namely, Isabel Meade, daughter of Philip Meade, Esq., and alderman of Bristol (by some accounts the mayor of Bristol) and descended from the Meades of Wraxall in Somersetshire. Maurice obtained his share of an estate devolved upon him in right of his mother, Isabel Mowbray, but, as stated above, was denied any share of his brother's estate, because he had deemed to marry a "commoner, a person of mean blood.". He died in September, 1506. Maurice DE BERKELEY Lord died Sep 1506. He married Isabel MEADE on 1465. Father: Philip MEADE

Barony (1492): Maurice (Berkeley), de jure (apparently) Lord Berkeley [1421], brother of the whole blood & heir, styled "Maurice the Lawier." Though totally disinherited by his brother, and though 56 years of age at his brother's death, he recovered, within 7 years, upwards of 50 manors and other lands, the alienation of which had been effected illegally. He had been Knight of the body to Edward IV. He married in his 30th year (1465), Isabel (at that time a widow with 3 children who all died young), only daughter of Philip Mead, of Mead's Place, in Wraxall, Somerset, Alderman, and three times (1458-59, 1461-62, 1468-69) Mayor of Bristol, by his wife Isabel. She became heir to her brother, Thomas Mead, inheriting lands at Thornbury, co. Gloucester, and at Wraxall, Ashton, Bedminster, and Tickenham, Somerset. He died September 1506, aged 70, and was buried at Austin Friars, London. His widow died after 29 May 1514, at the same age of 70, at Coventry, and was buried with him. Source: CPII: 135

He and his wife had the following children:

1. Maurice de Berkeley (by right, Lord Berkeley); born 1467, was made a Knight of the Bath at the coronation of King Henry VIII. He married in 1484 Catherine Berkeley, daughter of William de Berkeley, Knight, of Stokes-Gifford. co. Gloucester; died September 12, 1523, but d.s.p., was succeeded by his brother, Thomas Berkeley.

2. Thomas de Berkeley (by right, Lord Berkeley); born 1472; held a command in the celebrated battle of Flodden, September 9, 1513, and for his signal services there, received the honor of knighthood from Thomas Howard, Earl of Surrey. He was summoned to parliament August 9, 1529. He married in 1504-05 (1) Eleanor, widow of William Ingleby, and daughter of Marmaduke Constable, of Flamborough, co. York, leaving a son, Thomas. Thomas (by right, Baron Berkeley), was born in 1505, summoned to parliament as a Baron, January 5, 1533, in the 25th year of the King Henry VIII.

3. James de Berkeley. married Susan FITZALAN. Susan father was Lord. William FITZALAN.

4. Anne Berkeley. See below.

James de Berkeley. married Susan FITZALAN. Susan father was Lord. William FITZALAN.

Children

Mary m’d Thomas JONES Sir Knt

Maurice de Berkeley,father was

James de Berkeley, 6th Lord Berkeley (1st Lord Berkeley), known as "The Just," male heir to his uncle Thomas de Berkeley; and inheriting , by virtue of a special entail and fine, the castle and lordship of Berkeley, with other lords in the said fine specified, was summoned as Baron Berkeley to parliament from October 9, 1421, to May 23, 1461. According to the Berkeley family pedigree obtained at Berkeley Castle (July 1993), he was the 11th Baron by tenure and the 1st Baron by Writ, 1394-1463. He was born in 1394 at Raglan and died in 1463 in Berkeley Castle. He married (1) a daughter of Humphrey Stafford, of Hooke, co. Dorset, by whom he had no issue; (2) Isabel Mowbray, widow of Henry Ferrers, son and heir of William Ferrers, Lord Ferrers, of Groby; and daughter and eventual co-heir of Thomas de Mowbray, 1st Duke of Norfolk, Lord Mowbray and Earl Marshal of England, by Elizabeth, his wife, eldest sister and co-heiress of Thomas Fitz Alan, Earl of Arundel. Isabel Mowbray, 2nd eldest daughter, married (1) Henry Ferrers, son and heir of William Ferrers, 5th Lord Ferrers of Groby, and had a child, Elizabeth Ferrers, heiress of Groby, born in 1419. Isabel married (2) James de Berkeley, 5th Lord Berkeley, and had a son, William de Berkeley, whom King Edward IV. made a Viscount in 1481, Richard II. advanced to the Earldom of Nottingham, and Henry VII. promoted to be Earl Marshal and Marquess of Berkeley. She was seized at Gloucester and held prisoner till her death. James the Just DE BERKELEY was born about 1394 in Raglan, Monmouth. He died Nov 1463 in Berkeley Castle, Gloucestershire. James married Isabel DE MOWBRAY on 1423. James was baptized in Berkeley. She married James the Just DE BERKELEY on 1423. Other for Maurice marriages: ST.JOHN, daughter ; STAFFORD, daughter ; TALBOT, Joan Isabel DE MOWBRAY died 27 Sep 1452 in Gloucester and was buried in Greyfriars Church, Gloucester. She died while imprisoned at Gloucester, England Other marriages: FERRERS, Henry of Groby

They had the following children:

1. William de Berkeley, his successor, 7th Lord Berkeley (by right 2nd Lord Berkeley), Knight, had been, when a boy, in the retinue of Henry Beaufort, Cardinal Bishop of Winchester. He having a dispute with Thomas Talbot, Viscount Lisle, regarding some landed property, the contest ran so high, that they encountered, with their respective followers, at Wooton-under-Edge, in 1469, when Lord Lisle was mortally wounded by an arrow shot through his mouth. In the next year when the Duke of Clarence and the Earl of Warwick took up arms against the king, we find Lord Berkeley commanded, with Maurice Berkeley, of Beverstone, to muster and array all fitting to bear arms in the county of Gloucester; and so great a regard had King Edward IV, for his lordship that he created him Viscount Berkeley, on April 21, 1481, with a grant of 100 marks per year, payable out of the customs of the port of Bristol, for life. The viscount was advanced to the Earldom of Nottingham (a dignity enjoyed by his ancestors, the Mowbrays), by King Richard III., on June 28, 1483; but his lordship afterwards espousing the cause of the Earl of Richmond, upon the accession of that nobleman to the throne, as King Henry VII., was constituted in 1485-giving for this purpose "all his part and purpart of 27 manors in Wales and the marches adjoining Shropshire" -Earl Marshal of England, with limitations of that great office to the heirs male of his body; and created on January 28, 1489-90, Marquess of Berkeley. He married (1) Elizabeth West, daughter of Reginald West, Lord de la Warre, from whom he was divorced without having issue; (2) Jane Strangwayes, widow of William Willoughby, Knight, and daughter of Thomas Strangways, Knight, by whom he had Thomas and Catherine, who both died young; and (3) Anne Fiennes, daughter of John Fiennes, Lord Dacre, but had no issue. The marquess d.s.p. on February 14, 1492, when all the honors acquired by himself became extinct, while the barony and castle of Berkeley, with his lordship's other estates, should have devolved upon his brother Maurice - from whom the title has descended to the present time - but for a settlement made by the deceased nobleman (who seems to have been offended with his brother for marrying lowly) of the castle of Berkeley upon King Henry VII. and the heirs male of that monarch's body, which castle and lands were thus alienated until the decease of King Edward VI., the last male descendant of Henry VII., when they were returned to the house of Berkeley, and have since been enjoyed by that family.

2. Maurice de Berkeley, successor to his brother, William. See above

3. James de Berkeley, killed in France.

4. Thomas de Berkeley, seated at Dursley, co. Gloucester, died in 1484. he married Margaret, daughter of Richard Guy, Esq., of Minsterworth, in the same shire, and had Richard de Berkeley, of Dursley, husband of Margaret Dyer. This lineage continues for 13 generations of male descendants to the present -day Berkeleys who own the Berkeley Castle in 1993, Robert John Grantley Berkeley and his wife, Georgine. They had two sons, Robert Charles, born in 1968, and Henry John, born in 1969.

5. Elizabeth Berkeley, married Thomas Burdett, Esq., of Arrow, co. Warwick.

6. Isabel (Isabella) Berkeley, married Thomas Tyre, Esq., of Hardwick, co. Gloucester.

7. Alice Berkeley, married Richard Arthur, Esq., of Clapton, co. Somerset.

He married (3) in 1457, Joan Talbot, daughter of John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury (who married (2) in 1487, Edmund Hungerford). He died in November 1463, and was buried in Berkeley Church.

James "James The Just." De Berkeley parents were:

James de Berkeley, 2nd son, died before his elder brother, the 5th Lord Berkeley. He married Elizabeth Bluet, daughter of John Bluet, Knight, of Raglan, co. Monmouth, by whom he got Ragland and a fair estate in Gloucestershire. This James died June 8, 1368. He and his wife (who married (2) William Thomas, a Welsh gentleman) had a son, James.

1 James (de Berkeley), Lord Berkeley, nephew & heir male, being son and heir of Sir James de Berkeley, by Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Sir John Bluet, of Raglan, co. Monmouth, which Sir James, being next brother, to Thomas, the last Lord Berkeley, d.v.f, 13 June 1405. He was born about 1394, at Raglan, co. Monmouth, and was styled "James the Just." He succeeded to the Castle of Berkeley (to which the Barony of Berkeley was then very generally considered as appendant) and other estates under an entail of his great grandfather, but was much hindered in getting possession thereof by the Countess of Warwick (daughter and heir of the last Lord), the heir general. By writ directed "Jacobo de Berkeley", he was summoned to Parliament 20 October (1421) 9 Henry V to 23 May (1461) 1 Edward IV, and was knighted by Henry VI, 19 May 1426. In April 1410, being then aged 16, he married (1st), or perhaps was only contracted to (N.N), daughter of Sir John St. John (contract date 19 April 11 Hen IV). He married (2nd), (1415) 3 Henry V, (N.N), daughter of Sir Humphrey Stafford, of Hook, Dorset, but she died very young. He married (3rd), (1423-24) 2 Henry VI, Isabel, widow of Henry Ferrers, son and heir apparent of William, Lord Ferrers of Groby, and 1st daughter (whose issue became coheirs) of Thomas (de Mowbray), Duke of Norfolk, by Elizabeth, daughter of Richard (Fitz Alan), Earl of Arundel. She was, while about to appeal to the King in Council on behalf of her husband, arrested by order of Margaret, Countess of Shrewsbury (granddaughter and coheir of the last Lord Berkeley), and imprisoned at Gloucester, where she died 27 September 1452, and was buried in the church of the Greyfriars there. He married (4th) (settlement 25 July 1457) Joan, daughter of John (Talbot), 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, by his 1st wife, Maud, daughter of Thomas (Nevill), Lord Furnival, which Joan was consequently step-daughter of Margaret, Countess of Shrewsbury above named. He died at Berkeley Castle November 1463, within 36 days of having (22 October 1463) executed a deed of reconciliation with the said Countess, and was buried at Berkeley. His widow married before 26 May 1474, Edmund Hungerford. Source: CPII: 132-133

James de Berkeley parents were;

Maurice de Berkeley, 4th Lord Berkeley, known as "The Valiant," was born in 1330, knighted by his father at seven years of age, to prevent wardship, which was also avoided by early marriages, and accordingly he married, when eight years old, Elizabeth Despencer, daughter of Hugh Despencer the Younger, Lord Despencer, who was hanged for treason in 1326, and his wife, Eleanor Clare, daughter of Gilbert de Clare, 9th Earl of Clare and 3rd Earl of Gloucester, whose portion was 1,000 marks, payable by half-yearly installments of 200 marks. He was summoned to parliament from August 16, 1362 to 1368, and died in August, 1368. He accompanied the Black Prince into Gascony, and was severely wounded and taken prisoner at the battle of Poictiers, September 19, 1356. He was summoned to parliament from 1362 to 1368

He and his wife had the following children:

1. Thomas de Berkeley, 5th Lord Berkeley, died July 13, 1417, married Margaret Warren, daughter and heiress of Gerard Warren (Warine), Lord De L'Isle (contracted when but seven years of age, and required to remain for four years with her father), by whom he had an only child, Elizabeth Berkeley, married to Richard Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick (also contracted when under seven years of age), and they had three daughters and co-heirs: Margaret, Countess of Shrewsbury; Eleanor, Duchess of Somerset; and Elizabeth, Lady Latimer, who married Richard Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick. Between these ladies, according to modern doctrine, the Barony of Berkeley, created by summons in 1134, fell in abeyance. Thus dying without male issue, he was succeeded by his nephew and heir male, James de Berkeley, son of James de Berkeley, brother of Thomas. The Earl of Warwick and his daughters claimed the castle and lands of Berkeley, but possession was obtained by James, 6th Lord Berkeley.

2. James de Berkeley. See above

3. John de Berkeley, d.s.p.

4. Maurice de Berkeley, married Joan _______, by whom he got the manors of Dodescote, etc., co. Devon, and had a son, Maurice de Berkeley, living in the 45th year of King Edward III. (1371-72).

5. Catherine Berkeley, a nun at Wherwell

6. Agnes Berkeley, d.s.p., unmarried.

7. Elizabeth Berkeley, d.s.p., unmarried.

He died in 1405 at Berkeley Castle, and was succeeded by his eldest son, Thomas.

Maurice The Valiant De Berkeley parents were:

Thomas de Berkeley, 3rd Lord Berkeley, known as "The Rich," was born in 1293. Knighted before 1322, and aged 30 and upwards at his father's death. He fought at Boroughbridge, 16 Mar 1321/2, and was taken prisoner. He was released from imprisonment in Pevensey Castle on 16 October 1326, and on 4 April 1327, was made Joint Custodian of the deposed King, Edward II, whom he "curteously received" the next day at Berkeley Castle, but being commanded to deliver over the government thereof to his fellow custodians, departed there from to Bradley, "with heavy cheer perceiving what violence was intended." He was tried by a jury of 12 Knights (without protest) in (1330-1) 4 Edward III as an accessory to the murder of the deposed King, but was acquitted. In 1328 he was in the expedition against Scotland. From 14 June (1329) 3 Edward III to 20 November (1360) 34 Edward III, he was summoned to Parliament, the last two writs having the addition of "Senior" thereto. In 1336 he was Chief Warden of the counties of Gloucester, Worcester, and Hereford; in 1340, Marshal of the English army in France; in 1342, Captain of the Scottish Marches; Warden and Chief Justice in Eyre south of Trent 1345-48; he is stated (apparently in error) to have been, in 1346, Commander of the English forces at the battle of Crecy, and in 1361, was on an Embassy to Pope Innocent VI.

In 1327 he was made joint custodian of the deposed King Edward II, whom he received at Berkeley Castle, but being commanded to deliver over the government to his fellow custodians, Lord Maltravers and Sir Thomas Gournay, he left there to go to Bradley "with heavy cheere perceiving what violence was intended." As an accessory to the murder of the deposed king, he was tried by a jury of 12 knights in the 4th year of King Edward III., but was honorably acquitted.

He married about 1320 (1) Margaret Mortimer, daughter of Roger Mortimer, Earl of March, and in 1347, (2) Catherine Clivedon, widow of Peter le Veel, of Tortworth, co. Gloucester, and daughter of John Cliveton, of Charfield.. He married (1st) in or shortly before 25 July (1320) 14 Edward II (Papal dispensation to remain married with legitimization of past issue dated September 1329), Margaret, daughter of Roger (Mortimer), Earl of March, by Joan, daughter of Sir Piers de Joinville. She died 5 May 1337, being under 30, and was buried at St. Augustine's, Bristol. He married (2nd) 30 May 1347, at Charfield, co. Gloucester, Katharine, widow of Sir Piers le Veel, of Tortworth, in that co., and daughter and heir of Sir John Clivedon, of Charfield, by Emma, his wife. He died 27 October 1361, in his 69th year, and was buried in Berkeley Church. M.I. (Monumental Inscription). His widow died 13 March 1385, and is also buried there. Inquisition post mortem 1386-7 Sources: CPII: 129-130

This lord having adhered to the interests of the Queen, Mortimer, and Prince Edward, afterwards the third of that name, furnished "the only precedent," says Smith, "of a peer being tried by knights, as the peers would have been both judges and jurors." He first assumed a miter for his crest. He was summoned to parliament from June 14, 1329 to November 20, 1360.

He and his first wife, Margaret, had the following children:

1. Maurice de Berkeley, his successor. See above

2. Thomas de Berkeley, d.s.p.

3. Roger de Berkeley, d.s.p.

4. Alphonsus de Berkeley, d.s.p.

5. Joan Berkeley, wife of Reginald Cobham, Knight.

Thomas and his second wife, Katherine Clivedon had the following children:

1. Thomas de Berkeley, born June 7, 1348, d.s.p.

2. Maurice de Berkeley, born May 27, 1349, d.s.p.

3. Edmund de Berkeley, born July 10, 1350, d.s.p.

4. John de Berkeley, ancestor of the Berkeleys of Beverstone. Look below Under Jones= Herbert= Berkeley

Thomas de Berkeley died October 27, 1361, and was succeeded by his eldest son, Maurice, of the first marriage.

Thomas de Berkeley parents were:

Maurice de Berkeley, 2nd Lord Berkeley, the eldest son, known as "The Magnanimous," said to be born in April 1281 (must have been 1271, otherwise his son was born when he was only 12 years of age!) and died on May 31, 1326, having married in 1289 (1), both being very young,1st) (17 Edward I (neither party being aged over 8),

1st Eva (Eve) Zouche, daughter of Eudo (Eudes) le Zouche, a descendant of Saire de Quincy, sister of Willard Lord Zouche of Harringworth; sister of William La Zouche [Lord Zouche of Haryngworth], and daughter of Eudes La Zouche, by Milicent, daughter of William de Cantelou of Bergavenny. She died 5 December 1314, and was buried in Portbury Church, Somerset.

2nd Isabel Clare, daughter of Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, and his first wife, Alice le Brun. daughter of Gilbert (de Clare), Earl of Gloucester and Hertford, by his 1st wife, Alice, daughter of Hugh XI, called le Brun, Sire de Lusignan, Count of La Marche and Angouleme (uterine brother of Henry III). She was born 10 March 1362/3, and died without issue 1333 (7 Edward III). He died at Wallingford Castle 31 May 1326, and was buried at Wallingford, but removed to St. Augustine's, Bristol. Inquisition post mortem February (1326/7) I Edward III. Footnote c: From his 2nd son, Maurice, descend, the Berkeley's of Stoke Gifford, co. Gloucester (Lords Botetourt), the Berkeley's of Stratton, Cornwall (Lords Berkeley of Stratton), and the Berkeley's of Pyll, of which families the last is now (1911) represented in the male line by Viscount Portman. Source: CPII: 128-129

He received, in his father's lifetime, summons to parliament from August 6, 1308 to May 15, 1321. In 1312, he was made Governor of Gloucester and, in 1314, Governor of the town and castle of Berwick-upon-Tweed. He distinguished himself in the Scottish wars from 1295 to 1318, and was present at the siege of Carlaverock in July 1300. In 1315, he was constituted Justice of South Wales and had custody of all the castles there. In 1319, by the title of the king's beloved kinsman, he was made steward of the duchy of Aquitaine; but in 1321, joining Thomas Plantaganet, Earl of Lancaster, he was committed prisoner to Wallingford Castle, where he died December 5, 1314. Isabel d.s.p. 1333.

Maurice (de Berkeley), Lord de Berkeley, son & heir, styled "Maurice the Magnanimous", said to have been born April 1281 [CP Query 1271?]. He distinguished himself in the Scottish wars, 1295-1318, and was at the siege of Carlaverock in July 1300. He was summoned to Parliament in the lifetime of his father from 16 August (1308) 2 Edward II to 15 May (1321) 14 Edward II, by writs directed "Mauricio de Berkeleye", whereby he maybe held to have become LORD BERKELEY, though there is no actual record of his having sat in Parliament. He held several important posts, in the lifetime of his father, being Warden of Gloucester, 1312; Captain of Berwick, 1315; one of the Commissioners to Scotland, 1316; Chief Justiciar of South Wales 1316, and Seneschal of Aquitaine, 1320. Shortly afterwards he joined the Earl of Lancaster in the rebellion against Edward II and the Despenser family, and within 6 months of his father's death was sent prisoner to Wallingford Castle, 20 January 1321/22, where he died about 4 years afterwards Maurice succeeded on the death of his father, whom he much resembled in his fondness for all martial exercises and pursuits. He was early accustomed to arms in the Scottish and Welsh wars, held many important military posts and commands, and was summoned to parliament as a peer in the lifetime of his father.

In 1322 he joined with the lords Audely and Mortimer in the rebellion directed against the King's favourites, the two Despencers. Being induced to go with some others to meet the King at Cirencester, on the faith of a safe conduct, he was there treacherously seized and committed to prison in the castle of Wallingford. Berkeley Castle and manors were declared forfeited and were seized by the King, who also laid his hands on all Maurice's plate, jewels, and valuables.

Maurice remained in prison at Wallingford, although several attempts were made to rescue him, until May 1326, when he died there. His remains were at first interred at Wallingford, but were afterwards removed to St. Augustine's at Bristol. He was succeeded by Thomas, his eldest son.

The children by the first marriage were as follows:

1. Thomas de Berkeley.

2. Maurice de Berkeley, who died at Calais, in the 21st year of Edward III., having married Margaret Berkeley, daughter and heiress of Maurice Berkeley, of Uley, by whom he was the ancestor of the family of Stoke-Gifford.

3. John de Berkeley, Constable of Bristol Castle, from whom the Berkeleys of Shropshire are descended.

4. Eudo de Berkeley, rector of Llanbeder, co. Caernarvon.

5. Peter de Berkeley, a dignitary in the church of Wells.

6. Isabel Berkeley, married (1) Robert Clifford, Lord Clifford; (2) Thomas Musegrove (Musegrave), Lord Musegrove.

"Maurice The Magnanimous", De Berkeley parents were

Thomas II. Sixth Lord. 1281 to 1321. This lord was one of the most remarkable men of his age. Smyth calls him- "A man of men; a man for all hours and all affairs; a man at home and abroad, in peace and in war, in the foreign embassies of his Prince, and, in his country governments, of an universal understanding. And for his private husbandries and house keepings he admitted of few compeers. A wise, devout, and honest lord, much to be preferred above the best of his six forefathers."

After his succession to the Barony he devoted himself very much to the management and improvement of his estates, keeping many of his manors in his own hands, of which most minute and accurate accounts were kept, showing how the demesne lands were stocked and farmed, and how the produce was disposed of. Like several of his predecessors he granted away much land in fee, reserving what was then the full annual value as a chief rent; the object of this was to maintain the revenue of the estate at its then value, thinking that from the disturbed state of the kingdom it was more likely to diminish than to increase. His standing household consisted of upwards of 300 persons, of the various ranks of knights, esquires, yeomen, grooms, and pages, besides of others of less degree.

Lord Berkeley's public, civil, and military employments were as numerous as his domestic engagements. From the battle of Evesham in 1265, to 1319, he was almost constantly in arms and served in nearly every engagement in the civil wars, as well as against the French, Scots, and Welsh, during that turbulent period. In 1295 he was sent as ambassador to the king of France. In 1307, he was appointed with the Bishop of Worcester to go on an embassy to Rome, but their mission was stopped by the death of the king (Edward I) at Carlisle. Lord Berkeley was present at the coronation of Edward II and soon afterwards went with his two sons Maurice and John to France to witness the king's marriage with the Princess Isabella, little thinking probably, to what a tragedy that marriage would lead, and how great a share his family were destined to take in it! At the disastrous battle of Bannockburn, lord Berkeley and his son Thomas were both among the prisoners, but Maurice escaped, and aided in effecting the ransom of his father and brother. In 1319, lord Berkeley was again in arms, though 74 years of age, and joined the royal army at Newcastle with his son Maurice and Maurice’s two sons, there being thus three generations of Berkeleys in the field at once; this was Thomas lord Berkeley's 28th campaign and it was his last. After his return home he was several times written to by the king, Edward II, requiring him to repress the local and partial insurrections which were caused by the discontents occasioned by the King's weakness and incapacity and his devotion to favourites.

Thomas de Berkeley, feudal Lord of Berkeley, 2nd, but 1st surviving son & heir, styled "Thomas the Wise." He was born at Berkeley 1245, was at the battle of Evesham when under age, and was for nearly every year for the last 50 years of his life "employed either against the Welsh, the Scots, or the French." He was summoned to attend the King at Shrewsbury 28 June (1282) 11 Edward I by writ directed "Thome de Berkel", which writ was actually treated in the Mowbray case (1877) as one which created an hereditary Peerage. On 24 June (1295) 23 Edward I, he was summoned to Parliament by writ directed "Thome de Berkelegh", whereby he may be held to have become LORD BERKELEY. He continued to be so summoned till 15 May (1321) 14 Edward II. He was made Vice-Constable of England in 1297, was at the bloody battle and defeat pf the Scots at Falkirk 22 July 1298, the siege of Carlaverock in July 1300, and was taken prisoner at the battle of Bannockburn, 24 July 1314, paying a large sum for his ransom. He was likewise on the Commission to examine the claims of the Crown of Scotland, June 1292; was on an Embassy to France, January 1296, and to Pope Clement V, in July 1307 Thomas, 6th lord Berkeley, died in 1321, and was buried with his forefathers in St. Augustine’s under an arch between the vestry and the south aisle.

Thomas, 6th lord Berkeley, died in 1321, and was buried with his forefathers in St. Augustine’s under an arch between the vestry and the south aisle.

He married circa 1267 Joane (Jane) Ferrers, daughter of William de Ferrers, Earl of Derby, and his wife, Margaret, daughter of Roger de Quincy, Earl of Winchester.

They had the following children:

1. Maurice de Berkeley. See above.

2. Thomas de Berkeley, ancestor of the Berkeleys of Wymondham, co. Leicester; married the daughter and heir of John Hamelin, Lord Wymondham.

3. John de Berkeley, d.s.p. 1316, married Hawise ________.

4. James de Berkeley, who was rector of Slimbridge, and in the year 1326, consecrated Bishop of Exeter.

5. Isabel Berkeley, died unmarried.

6. Margaret, died unmarried.

Thomas died July 23, 1321, and was buried at St. Augustine's abbey. His wife, Jane, died March 19, 1309.

Thomas "The Wise" De Berkeley parents were

Maurice de Berkeley, Maurice II. Fifth Lord. 1243 to 1281. feudal Lord of Berkeley, son & heir, styled "Maurice the Resolute", born 1218. He attended the wars with France and afterwards with North Wales. He was knighted before 1242. He did homage and had livery of his father's lands, 14 December 1243. He joined the Barons against the King (1264) 48 Henry III, was present at the award of Kenilworth (1267) 51 Henry III, at the Council at Marlborough 52 Henry III, and at the various assembles (1275-79) 3,4,6, and 7 Edward I. Maurice paying 100 pounds had livery of his inheritance, accompanied his father in the wars of France, in the 41st year of Henry III., and was in the expedition with Prince Edward against the Welsh. In the 42nd, 43rd, 44th, and 47th year of Henry III., he was summoned to attend to the king against Llewellyn ap Griffith, Prince of Wales, then in arms. He appears to have joined the insurrectionary lords, for which his lands were seized by the crown.

He married before 12 July 1247, Isabel, daughter of Richard Fitzroy (illegitimate son of King John), by Rohese, daughter and heir of Robert of Dover. On 10 August 1264, the King, out of compassion for the poverty of his niece, Isabel, the wife of Maurice de Berkeley, granted her certain Manors. She died 7 July, probably in the year 1276 or 1277, and was buried at St. Augustine's, Bristol. He died 4 April 1281, aged 63, "being his great clymactericoll yeare," and was buried at St. Augustine's, Bristol. Writ for Inquisition post mortem 5 April 1281. Source: CPII: 127 In 1256, King Henry III, having been the guest of his son Prince Edward at Bristol was, on his return royally entertained by Maurice lord Berkeley for three days at the Castle. (He married Isabel, dau of Maurice de Credonia, by with Isabel, sister of William de Valence, Earl of Pembroke d 4 April 1281 and was s. by his 2nd son (the Maurice having been killed in a Tournament at Kenilworth) Burkes also.) Maurice lord Berkeley was in arms with his proportion of followers of the King's summons on no less than sixteen different occasions, against the French, Scots, Welsh, and rebels at home. He however found time to attend to his own concerns, and effected many great improvements on his estates by means of inclosures and exchanges. He converted Whitcliff Wood into a Park and inclosed it. He also made fishponds, and beautified the east, west, and south sides of the castle with walks and gardens. He died in 1281, and was buried with his predecessors in St. Augustine's

Maurice and his wife had four sons and one daughter as follows:

1. Maurice de Berkeley was killed in a tournament in Kenilworth Jousts while his father was living. Footnote c: Maurice, Thomas elder brother, was killed in a tournament at Kenilworth, within the lifetime of his father, in 1279. Source: CPII: 127-128 Therefore Maurice was succeeded by Thomas his second son.

2. Thomas de Berkeley, the successor. See above.

3. Simon de Berkeley, died unmarried.

4. Robert de Berkeley, of Alkington, died 1315; married (1) Joan ____.

5. Maud Berkeley. No details known.

He died seized of his barony of Berkeley, April 4, 1281, and was buried in the north aisle of St. Augustine's abbey in Bristol.

Maurice De Berkeley parents were

Thomas de Berkeley feudal Lord of Berkeley ,brother & heir, styled "Thomas the Observer or Temporiser," was born in 1170. In the 8th year of Henry III. (1223-24), upon giving his two nephews as pledges for his fidelity, he had restitution of Berkeley Castle in 1223. He obtained livery of his brother's lands, but not, till 1223, of the Castle of Berkeley. He sustained many suits at law, and by his prudent conduct greatly improved his estate. He married, circa 1217, Joan Somery, daughter of Ralph de Somery, Lord of Campden, co., Gloucester, of Dudley, co. Worcester, by Margaret, sister of William (Marshal), Earl of Pembroke, and daughter of John Marshal.

Thomas died on November 29, 1243, aged seventy-three, and was buried in the south aisle of St. Augustine's abbey. His widow was living (1273-74) 2 Edward I. Source: CPII: 126-127.

He and his wife left six sons and one daughter as follows:

1. Maurice de Berkeley. See above.

2. Thomas de Berkeley, d.s.p.

3. Robert de Berkeley.

4. Henry de Berkeley, d.s.p.

5. William de Berkeley.

6. Richard de Berkeley.

7. Margaret Berkeley, married Anseleme Basset, of Basset's Court in Uley, Gloucestershire.

Thomas was succeeded by his eldest son, Maurice.

Thomas De Berkeley Father: Maurice Fitzharding De Berkeley b: Abt 1120 in Bristol, Gloucestershire, England Mother: Alice De Berkeley b: Abt 1133 in Dursley, Gloucestershire, England

Note:

Maurice de Berkeley strengthened his tenure of Berkeley Castle by marrying, at the instigation of Henry II, Alice, dau. and heiress of the ousted lord, Roger de Berkeley, of Dursley. By this lady he had six sons, and was s. by the eldest, Maurice de Berkeley. [John Burke, History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland, Vol. I., R. Bentley, London, 1834-1838, p. 469, Berkeley, of Spetchley] -------------------------- HOLDERS of the CASTLE of BERKELEY (V) MAURICE FlTZ ROBERT FITZ HARDING, otherwise DE BERKELEY, feudal LORD OF BERKELEY, son and heir, who "may bee called Maurice the Make Peace, born about 1120, in Bristol, received (at the same date as his father) a confirmation of the grant of Berkeley from Henry II, in 1155, and again 30 October 1189 from Queen Eleanor, Regent to her son Richard I. In 1190 he was Justice Itinerant in co. Gloucester. He enlarged the Castle of Berkeley, which thenceforth became the chief seat of, and gave the name to, the family. He married, in 1153 or 1154, at Bristol, Alice, 1st daughter (but not heir or coheir) of his dispossessed predecessor, Roger DE BERKELEY, feudal Lord of Dursley (formerly "fermer" of Berkeley), with whom he had the manor of Slimbridge, as by agreement between their respective fathers. He died 16 June 1190, and was buried in the church of Brentford, Middlesex. His widow died at an " extreame old age." [Complete Peerage II:126, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)] -------------------------- Maurice de Berkeley (son of Robert FitzHardinge, upon whom, for his attachment to the Empress Maud, had been conferred the lordship of Berkeley and Berkeley Hernesse, the confiscated possessions of Roger de Berkeley, the adherent of King Stephen; but, to reconcile the parties, King Henry, who had restored to Roger his manor and castle of Dursley, caused an agreement to be concluded between them that the heiress of the ousted lord should be given to marriage to the heir of the new baron; and thus passed the feudal castle of Berkeley to another chief; which Maurice de Berkeley became feudal lord of Berkeley upon the decease of his brother, Henry, and dying in 1189, left six sons, and was s. by the eldest, Robert de Berkeley. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 44, Berkeley, Viscount Berkeley, Earl of Nottingham, and Marquess of Berkeley]

Sources:

Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968 Page: 120 Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999 Page: 254 Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000 Page: II:125-6 Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000 Page: V:639 (b) Text: father of Maud Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999 Page: 254 Text: 1153/4

Maurice Fitzharding De Berkeley parents were

Father: Roger Fitsharding De Berkeley b: Abt 1096 in Bristol, Gloucestershire, England Mother: Eva Fitzestmond b: Abt 1099 in Gloucestershire, England

Note:

Robert Fitz Harding, feudal Lord of Berkeley; granted by Henry II 1153/4 the castle of Berkeley, Glos, founder 1141 of Abbey of St Augustine, Bristol. [Burke's Peerage] ------------------------------------------------ Robert FitzHardinge obtained for his fidelity to King Henry II the Castle of Berkeley, wrested from Roger de Berkeley, or Dursley, a partisan of Stephen, and thereby became one of the feudal barons of the realm. He married Eva, niece of William the Conqueror, and founded the monastery of St. Augustine, at Bristol, in the year 1140, and was buried there in 1170. He was s. by his eldest son, Maurice de Berkeley. [John Burke, History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland, Vol. I., R. Bentley, London, 1834-1838, p. 469, Berkeley, of Spetchley] ------------------------------------- HOLDERS of the CASTLE of BERKELEY (IV) Robert Fitz Harding, who "may bee called Rober the Devout," son of Harding (d), said to have been a merchant of Bristol, and of great wealth and influence, received from Henry of Anjou, in 1153 or 1154, shortly before his accession as Henry II, a grant (among others) of the Castle and "herness " of Berkeley (as above mentioned) which was confirmed by the said Henry when King, probably in 1155 the first year of his reign, whereby he the said Robert (doubtless) became feudal L.ORD OF BERKELEY. In 1168 he entetained Dermot Mae Murrough, King of Leinster, on his arrival, at Bristol, to solicit succour from Henry II. He founded, in 1141, the Abbey of St. Augustine, at Bristol, of which he afterwards became a canon. He married Eve (c). He died 5 February 1170/1, aged about 75. His wife, who founded a priory of nuns on St. Michael's hill, Bristol, whereof she died Prioress, 12 March 1170, was buried with her husband. [Complete Peerage II:124-25, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)] (d) The parentage of this Harding (living c 1125) has been long and hotly disputed. He has been termed "son of the King of Denmark" (as in the petition of 1661), "Mayor of Bristol", and so forth. The view now generally accepted is that he was the son of Eadnoth (killed 1068), "Staller" to King Harold and to Edward the Confessor. E.A. Freeman pronounces this descent "in the highest degree probable." Eyton (in his "Shropshire") devoted much attention to the subject. (c) She is alleged to have been sister of Durand, daughter of Sir Estmond, by Godiva, his wife, a pedigree which J. H. Round denounces as "obviously absurd".

Sources:

Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968 Page: 120 Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999 Page: 254 Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000 Page: II:124-5 Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968 Page: 120 Text: 1096 Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999 Page: 254 Text: c1095 Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000 Page: II:124-5 Text: age about 75 at death

1. Robert de Berkeley, married Helena, daughter of Robert FitzHarding. Robert Fitz Harding, who styled "Robert the Devout," son of Harding, said to have been a merchant of Bristol, and of Great wealth and influence, received from Henry of Anjou, in 1153 or 1154, shortly before his accession as Henry II, a grant (among others) of the Castle and "heiress" of Berkeley as above mentioned) which was confirmed by the said Henry when King, probably in (1155) the first year of his reign, whereby he the said Robert (doubtless) became feudal LORD OF BERKELEY. In 1168 he entertained, at Bristol, Dermot Mac Murrough, King of Leinster, on his arrival to solicit succour from Henry II. He founded, in 1141, the Abbey of St. Augustine, at Bristol, of which he afterwards became a canon. He married Eve (parentage unknown). He died 5 February 1170/1, aged about 75. His wife, who founded a priory of nuns on St. Michael's hill, Bristol, whereof she died Prioress 12 March 1170, was buried with her husband. Source: CPII: 124-125

This Robert FitzHarding was conferred, for his attachment to the Empress Maud, the lordship of Berkeley and Berkeley-Hernesse, the confiscated possessions of the above Roger de Berkeley, the adherent to King Stephen; but, to reconcile the parties, King Henry, who had restored to Roger his manor and castle of Dursley, caused an agreement to be concluded between them that the heiress of the ousted lord should be given in marriage to the heir of the new baron; and thus passed the feudal castle of Berkeley to another chief, Maurice, who assumed the surname of Berkeley and became the feudal lord of Berkeley upon the death of his brother, Henry. He was the first of his family to dwell in the Berkeley Castle. He fortified the castle and founded two hospitals, one at Lowring between Berkeley and Dursley, and that at Longbridge to the north of Berkeley, dedicated to the Holy Trinity. He was born in 1120

(HARDING is said to have been a younger son of the King of Denmark, who, according to a custom in his family, went forth into the world to seek his fortune, and attached himself to William Duke of Normandy, who was at that time preparing for the invasion and conquest of England. William rewarded his services with a large grant of lands and property in and around Bristol, where he settled about A.D., 1069, and became Praepositus; an office somewhat resembling the more modern one of Mayor, except that it was a permanent appointment. He resided in Baldwin street, married a lady whose name was Livida, had five sons and three daughters, and died 6th Nov. 1115. Robert was the eldest son of Harding and succeeded him in his estates and in the office of Praepositus at Bristol. He rendered important services both with arms and money to the Empress Maud, daughter of Henry I, and her son Henry Plantagenet, afterwards Henry II, in their contest for the Crown with the usurper Stephen, to recompense which, Henry, on the ultimate success of his party, bestowed upon Robert the great Manor and Barony of Berkeley, which had been previously held from the crown by Roger (called Roger de Berkeley) the lord of Dursley. Roger however for some time held his inheritance by force of arms, and to settle the dispute the king gave Roger the Manor of Dursley in fee, on condition of his surrendering Berkeley to Robert; a double marriage was also arranged between the two families, Robert's eldest son Maurice marrying Alice the daughter of the Lord of Dursley, while Roger's son espoused one of the daughters of Robert Fitzharding. After this they all seemed to have lived in peace, and the new lord of Berkeley took quiet possession of his castle and manors.

In 1140, Robert commenced the long series of benefactions to the church for which his family were so remarkable, by building and endowing the monastery of St. Augustine at Bristol, the church of which is now the Cathedral. It was consecrated and dedicated on Easter Day 1148, when Robert laid upon the high altar his deed of gift by which he endowed it with many fair manors and lands, which still form the endowment of the Bishopric. He died in 1170, and was buried in St. Augustine's, in a monk's habit and cowl, having some time previously become a regular Canon therein)

2. Alice Berkeley, heiress to Roger de Berkeley, married, at the instigation of King Henry II., Maurice I. Second Lord. 1170 to 1189. son of Robert FitzHarding, son of Harding, called Robert Lord Berkeley, and his wife, Eva, daughter of Estmond, Earl of Mercia, and his wife, Godiva, sister of William the Conqueror. One source shows the grandfather of Maurice as Eadnoth, a wealthy merchant of Bristol. Alice founded the religious house called Magdalen's, near Bristol, and was its patroness; dying in March 12, 1170-71, she was buried beside her husband, between the stalls of the Abbot and the Prior. He founded the Abbey of St. Augustine's in Bristol, and dying, February 5, 1170-71 (one source has the death as June 11, 1190), was buried in the quire thereof. He is supposed to have been a canon in the Abbey.

Maurice the eldest son of Robert Fitz-Harding succeeded his Father, and was the first to take up his residence in the castle of Berkeley. He added to the fortifications of the castle by digging a ditch or moat on the northern side, it being already sufficiently defended on other sides by watercourses and low marshy ground; in doing this he encroached a little on the soil of the churchyard, which with the church had been given by his father to St. Augustine's. So tenacious however were the monks of their property and privileges, and so forgetful of former benefits, that they pursued the lord Maurice with ecclesiastical censures and threats of excommunication until he was forced to compound for his sacrilegious act by a large grant of rents, tithes and rights of pasturage. Maurice never forgot this ungrateful conduct, and though he had shown his good will to the abbey by a gift of lands in Hinton and Alkington, when he first succeeded to the Barony, he never afterwards looked with any favour upon them. He however founded two monastic establishments in Berkeley, viz. the Hospital of the master and brethren of Lorrenge, now called Lorridge farm, and the Hospital of the Holy Trinity at Longbridge, at the north end of Berkeley adjoining the road to Wanswell. Maurice died in 1189, and was buried in the parish church of Brentford, to which he had been a great benefactor.

Alice and Maurice had six sons and one daughter as follows:

1. Robert de Berkeley, Robert II. Third Lord. 1189 to 1220. Maurice was succeeded by Robert his eldest son, who discontinued entirely the name of Fitz-Harding by which his father and grandfather were distinguished, and was always styled Robert de Berkeley. In 1194, when Richard the First, surnamed Coeur de Lion, was captured and imprisoned on his return from the Crusades by the Emperor of Germany, the Barony of Berkeley was taxed at and paid twenty shillings for each of the five knights' fees by which it was held, towards the king's ransom.

Robert de Berkeley was one of the most conspicuous among the Barons in the great struggle with king John which led to the granting of Magna Charta, and Berkeley Castle was one of the places of rendezvous of the Confederates. In 1211, and again in 1216, the King, whose arms were for the time in the ascendant, seized the Castle and imprisoned in its dungeons those who fell into his hands. Robert who, in the turbulent times of King John, forfeited his castle and lands by his participation in the rebellious proceedings of the barons, but upon submission, and paying the king a fine of 1,000 pounds had livery of his lands, and had all restored except the castle and town of Berkeley, in the 1st year of King Henry III. Robert married (1) Julianna, daughter of William de Pontlarch and niece to the great Earl of Pembroke, Earl Marshal of England and afterwards Protector of King Henry III.; (2) Luci, who afterwards married Hugh de Gournay. On 20th July 1216, King John came to Berkeley, but the contest was terminated by his death in October following. Robert de Berkeley died May 13, 1219, and was buried in St. Augustine's. As he left no issue, he was succeeded by his brother Thomas.

2. Thomas de Berkeley.

3. Maurice de Berkeley, married and had Thomas; d.s.p.

4. William de Berkeley. No details known.

5. Henry de Berkeley, with his brother, Richard, accompanied William, King of Scotland, into that country when he returned from being a prisoner in England, became the ancestors of many eminent families in Scotland, France, and Ireland.

6. Richard de Berkeley. See above.

7. ________ Berkeley, a only daughter, married Osbert Gifford; and dying, according to the Abbot Newland, in the year 1190, was interred in the church of Brentford, co. Middlesex in the building of which he (Gifford) had been a great benefactor.

Maurice died on June 16, 1189, and was succeeded by his eldest son, Robert. (Ref: The Ligon Family)

Roger de Berkeley, Lord of Dursley, adhering to the Empress Maud (an adherence, however, denied by Smith and Fosbroke, in the Lives of the Berkeleys, page 11), "underwent", says Dugdale, "a very hard fate, through the perfidiousness and cruelty of Walter, brother of Milo, Earl of Hereford, his seeming friend (and kinsman by consanguinity), being treacherously seized on, stripped naked, exposed to scorn, put into fetters, and thrice drawn by rope around his neck, on a gallows, at his own castle gates, with threats that if he did not deliver up his castle to the Earl, he would suffer a miserable death; and when he was, by this barbarous usage, almost dead, carried to prison, there to endure further tortures." “Roger de Berkeley, son and heir, who completed the building of the Castle of Berkeley. He suffered much in the war between Stephen and the Empress Maud, at the hands of Walter, son of Miles, Earl of Hereford. He was deprived of the Manor of Berkeley, &c., about 1152, apparently for refusing to recognize the authority of either party, through he was soon afterwards restored to the Honour of Dursley. He died about 1170, leaving issue. The Castle and "heiress" of Berkeley were granted by the King as under. Footnote c: This Lordship (Dursley) continued in his descendants in the male line (the issue of his son and heir, Roger de Berkeley, by Helen, 1st daughter of Robert Fitz-Harding, his successor in the lands of Berkeley) for eight generations, when Nicholas Berkeley, the heir male died without issue in 1382. Source: CPII: 124” He was succeeded by his son, Roger.

William de Berkeley, 2nd feudal lord of Berkeley Castle, founder of the Abbey of Kingswood in 1139, was succeeded by his son and heir, Roger.

Roger, "styled Senior" or who is styled, in the 20th of William’s Reign. Who having between 1068 and 1071, been made provost of the manor of Berkeley by Earl William Fitz-Osbern (to whom it had been granted at the Conquest), took the name of de Berkeley from his residence there, and was confirmed in his office by the King about 1080. At the time of the Survey, 1086, Berkeley was farmed by him from the Crown. Rogerus senior de Berkeley” from the possession of Berkeley Castle. “The Castle” says Rudder ‘was began in the 17th Henry I by Roger de Berkeley the 2nd and finished by Roger the 3rd in the reign of King Stephen. At first it comprehended only the inmost of the three gates and what was within the same; the two outmost, and all the buildings within them, were added by Thomas, eldest son of Robert and by Thomas 2nd in the 6th Edward III (1332-3) and of Thomas the 3rd (8th Edward III) Smith and Fosbroke’s History of the Berkely. A plan of the buildings is given in Parker’s Domestic Archiecture, vol. III Part II. The Roger bestowed several churches upon the priory of Stanely, with the tithes and lands thereunto belonging, and being sborn a monke there, in 1091, restored the lordship of Shotesbore, which he had long detained from that convent. He was tenant "in capite" of Dursley, Cubberley, Dodington, &c., and (not improbably) was identical with "Roger," farmer of Barton Regis, Bristol. On 17 January 1091 he became a monk of St. Peter's, Gloucester, and died 1093. Source: CPII: 123-124. He was s. at decease by his nephew

The family of Berkeley established in England at the Norman conquest, was founded by a leading chief in the Conqueror’s army, named.

From "The Peerage, Baronetage, and Knightage of the British Empire", "The Earl of Berkeley", pp 70-71 (1882). Also Burke's "Peerage and Baronetage", pp 232-233.

"The history of the peerage of the Earl of Berkeley, unquestionably feudal in its origins, which has been more or less recognized in its territorial character at various epochs, is of exceptional importance in bearing upon the history of English dignities, and the gradual obsolescence and final extinction of barony by tenure." "Harding of Bristol, said by genealogists to have been the son of a king of Denmark and companion to the Conqueror, has been conjectured by a modern historian to be identical with Harding (a contemporary of Harold and William, son of Eadnoth the Staller, an officer of Edward the Confessor, who survived the Conquest; but this identification can only be regarded as `not improbable.' His son, Robert FitzHarding, of Bristol, obtained from Henry, Duke of Normandy, afterwards Henry II, a grant of the hundred of Berkeley, called Berkeley Herness. He granted all the churches in Berkeley Herness to St. Augustine's Abbey, Bristol (now the cathedral), of which he is the reputed founder, and where he was buried, 1171. His only surviving son, Maurice de Berkeley, obtained in 1189 confirmations from King Richard I., and from Queen Eleanor of Berkeley Herness. `to be held in barony by the service of five knights.' He married Alice, daughter of Roger de Berkeley, of Dursley, the former Lord of Berkeley. Their eldest son, Robert de Berkeley, obtained a charter of confirmation from King Richard I., in 1199. He was one of the Barons at war with King John, and died May 13, 1219. He was succeeded by Thomas, his brother, whose grandson, Thomas de Berkeley, 6th Baron by tenure, had writs of summons to parliament from June 24, 1295 (the 23rd year of King Edward I.), to May 15, 1321 (the 14th year of King Edward II.). In 1301, 1302, and 1305 he was serving in the Scottish wars with Maurice and John his son; prisoner at the battle of Bannockburn, in June 1314; Justice of West Wales, 1317. He died July 23, ????. His younger son, James, was Bishop of Exeter, 1326."

and

“GENEALOGICAL HISTORY of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct PEERAGES of the BRITISH EMPIRE” by Sir Bernard Burke. C.B. LL. D.

Page 43-47

“BERKLEY-- VISCOUNT BERKELEY, EARL OF NOTTINGHAM, AND MARQUESS OF BERKELEY.”

Ref: "The Ligon Family".

The Berkeley family is unique in having an unbroken male line of descent from a Saxon ancestor before the Norman Conquest of England in 1066 to the 20th Century. The family descends from Harding, the son of Eadnoth (Alnod), who was "Marshal" or "Staller", a high official under King Edward the Confessor. A study of dates makes it probable that this Harding had a son of the same name, perhaps the man who played a distinguished part in the Crusading Wars, helping King Baldwin I of Jerusalem, to win the battle of Jaffa in 1102. The son of the crusader would then be Robert FitzHarding of Berkeley, afterwards styled Robert de Berkeley. The town of Berkeley is located in the county of Gloucestershire and is situated about five miles west of Dursley and eighteen southwest of Gloucester, and northeast of Bristol. It was chartered by King Edward I. to be governed by a mayor and alderman, but the corporation was annulled in 1885. The place confers the title of Earl and Baron on the Berkeley family. The manor embraces nearly thirty parishes and is one of the largest in England; it was given by William the Conqueror to Roger de Berkeley, Lord of Dursley. Having espoused the cause of King Stephen in opposition to Empress Maud, the third Roger de Berkeley was deposed by King Henry II., and the title and estates were conferred upon Robert FitzHarding, a wealthy citizen of Bristol. In the Domesday Book, the name of Berkeley is written Berchelai, whereas the Saxons wrote it Beoncenlan. It is supposed to have been so called from Beonce, the beech-tree, because it once grew very plentifully there. The town is one of the ancient boroughs, of which there are five in Gloucestershire, in the time of King Edward I. At the time that William obtained the crown of England, he rewarded Roger de Berkeley with the manor of Berkeley. Roger was an ancient Saxon nearly allied in blood to King Edward the Confessor, and who supported William at the battle of Hastings. Roger, thus, assumed the name of Roger de Berkeley. Roger de Berkeley founded the family of Berkeley in England at the Norman Conquest. He was a leading chief in the army of William the Conqueror. He is styled, in the 20th year of King William, as "Roger Senior of Berkeley" from the possession of Berkeley Castle, co. Gloucester. "The castle." says Rudder, "was began in the 17th year of Henry I., by Roger de Berkeley the 2nd, and finished by Roger the 3rd, in the reign of King Stephen. Further additions were made during the reign of King Edward III."

This Roger bestowed several churches upon the priory of Stanley, with the tithes and lands, and being shorn a monk there, in 1091, restored the lordship of Stoteshore, which he had long detained from that convent. Since he had no issue, he was succeeded at his death by his nephew, William.

Holders of the Castle of Berkeley: 1-17 of the Berkeley families

-------- Source: Primarily from The Complete Peerage, 13 volumes in 6, by George E. Cokayne, ISBN: 0-904387-82-8, Reprinted in 2000 by Sutton Publishing Limited.

For more on the de Berkeley go here

The Berkeley Family

and

Vol II File 6: The Paternal Ancestry of Homer Beers James

and

A Sketch of the History of Berkeley

Jones= Herbert= Berkeley

Harry JONES Sir Knt married Elizabeth HERBERT. Sir Henry Johnes of Abermarlais, Kt., Sheriff of Carmarthenshire married Elizabeth Herbert of Castell Trefaldwyn, Trefaldwyn, Cymru Elizabeth Father: Matthew Herbert b: Abt 1525 in Swansea, Glamorganshire, Wales and Mother: Mary Gamage b: in Coity, Pen-y-Bont Ar Ogwr, Morgannwg, Cymru

Matthew HERBERT Father: George Herbert b: 1500 in Ewyas Harold, Hereford, Herefordshire, England and Mother: Elizabeth De Berkeley b: Abt 1508 in Beverstone Castle, Tetbury, Gloucestershire, England

George Herbert wife Elizabeth de BERKELEY Father: Thomas De Berkeley b: Abt 1462 in Beverstone Castle, Tetbury, Gloucestershire, England 1510 in Avon Manor, Sopley, Hampshire, England and Mother: Elizabeth De Neville b: Abt 1462 in Abergavenny, Monmouthshire, WalesLook later of Neville family lines

Thomas De Berkeley Father: Edward De Berkeley b: Abt 1436 in Beverstone Castle, Tetbury, Gloucestershire, England dead 1505 in Avon Manor, Sopley, Hampshire, England and Mother: Alice Cookes b: in , England

Note: Sources: Title: Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999 Page: 17-10 Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999 Page: 120-37 Title: Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com Page: Douglas Richardson (Dcrdcr4), 25 Jan 1999 Title: Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com Page: Douglas Richardson (Dcrdcr4), 25 Jan 1999 Text: no date, 2nd wife 2nd husb

Edward De Berkeley Father: Maurice De Berkeley b: Abt 1401 in Beverstone Castle, Tetbury, Gloucestershire, England and Mother: Lora Fitzhugh b: Abt 1400 in Ravensworth, Richmond, North Riding Yorkshire, England

Maurice De Berkeley Father: John De Berkeley b: 21 Jan 1351-1352 in Wotton, Gloucestershire, England and Mother: Elizabeth Bettehorne b: Abt 1353

Note: John, 2nd son (1st was by 1st marriage), ancestor of the Berkeley's of Beverstone. [Burke's Peerage] ---------------- Sir John Berkeley of Beverstone, Gloucester, b. 1352, d. 1428, MP, Sheriff of Gloucester; m. (1) Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Sir John Betteshorne. [Magna Charta Sureties]

John De Berkeley Father: Thomas, De Berkeley b: 1293 in Gloucestershire, England Mother: Katherine Clivedon b: Abt 1310 in Charfield, Thornbury, Gloucestershire, England

Note: Thomas, De Berkeley

He married about 1320 (1) Margaret Mortimer, daughter of Roger Mortimer, Earl of March, and in 1347, (2) Catherine Clivedon, widow of Peter le Veel, of Tortworth, co. Gloucester, and daughter of John Cliveton, of Charfield.. He married (1st) in or shortly before 25 July (1320) 14 Edward II (Papal dispensation to remain married with legitimization of past issue dated September 1329), Margaret, daughter of Roger (Mortimer), Earl of March, by Joan, daughter of Sir Piers de Joinville. She died 5 May 1337, being under 30, and was buried at St. Augustine's, Bristol. He married (2nd) 30 May 1347, at Charfield, co. Gloucester, Katharine, widow of Sir Piers le Veel, of Tortworth, in that co., and daughter and heir of Sir John Clivedon, of Charfield, by Emma, his wife. He died 27 October 1361, in his 69th year, and was buried in Berkeley Church. M.I. (Monumental Inscription). His widow died 13 March 1385, and is also buried there. Inquisition post mortem 1386-7 Sources: CPII: 129-130.

Thomas de Berkeley, age 30+ at father's death, d. 27 Oct 1361, Lord Berkeley, Marshal in France 1340, Captain of the Scottish Marches 1342; m. (1) 1320, Margaret de Mortimer, d. 5 May 1337, daughter of Sir Roger de Mortimer, Earl of March and Joan de Geneville; m. (2) 30 May 1347, Katherine, d. 13 Mar 1385, widow of Sir Piers le Veel, daughter and heir of Sir John Clivedon, of Charfield, co. Gloucester, by Emma his wife. [Magna Charta Sureties] -------------------------------------------------- Thomas de Berkeley, 3rd Baron Berkeley; knighted before 1322, joined with his father in Lancaster's insurrection, imprisoned until 16 Oct 1326, later Jt Custodian of Edward II 4 April 1327 but guessing what was in store for the deposed king left Berkeley Castle before the actual regicide, tried by jury of 12 knights 1330/1 as accessory to Edward's murder but acquitted, Chief Warden Glos, Worcs, and Herefs, Marshal English Army in France 1342, Capt Scottish Marches, Warden and Chief Justice in Eyre South of Trent 1345-48. [Burke's Peerage] -------------------------------------------------- BARONY of BERKELEY (III) Thomas de Berkeley, Lord Berkeley, son and heir by 1st wife, who "may bee called Thomas the Rich." Knighted before 1322, and aged 30 and upwards at his father's death. He fought at Boroughbridge, 16 Mar 1321/2, and was taken prisoner. He was released from imprisonment in Pevensey Castle on 16 Oct 1326, and on 4 Apr 1327, was made Joint Custodian of the deposed King Edward II, whom he "curteously received" the next day at Berkeley Castle, but being commanded to deliver over the government thereof to his fellow custodian, departed therefrom to Bradley, "with heavy cheere perceiving what violence was intended." He was tried by a jury of 12 Knights (without protest) in 1330-1 as an accessory to the murder (g) of the deposed King, but was acquitted. In 1328 he was in the expedition against Scotland. From 14 June 1329 to 20 Nov 1360, he was summoned to Parliament, the last two writs have the addition of "Senior" thereto. In 1336 he was Chief Warden of cos. Gloucester, Worcester, and Hereford; in 1340, Marshal of the English army in France; in 1342, Capt. of the Scottish Marches; Warden and Chief Justice in Eyre south of Trent 1345-48; he is stated (apparently in error) to have been, in 1346, Commander of the English forces at the battle of Crecy, and in 1361, was on an Embassy to Pope Innocent VI. He m. 1stly, in or shortly bef. 25 July 1320 (Papal disp. to remain married with legitimisation of past issue dated Sep 1329), Margaret, daughter of Roger Mortimer, Earl of March, by Joan, de jure suo jure (according to modern doctrine) Baroness Geneville, daughter and heir of Sir Piers de Geneville (2nd but 1st surviving son and heir apparent of Geoffrey, 1st Lord Geneville). She d. 5 May 1337, being under 30, and was buried at St. Augustine's, Bristol. He m. 2ndly, 30 May 1347, at Charfield, co. Gloucester, Katharine, widow of Sir Piers le Veel, of Tortworth, in that co., and daughter and heir of Sir John Clivedon, of Charfield aforesaid, by Emma, his wife. He d. 27 Oct 1361, in his 69th year, and was buried in Berkeley Church. M.I. His widow d. 13 Mar 1385, and is also buried there. [Complete Peerage II:129-30, XIV:87] (g) This was perpetrated with horrible barbarity by Sir John Mautravers and Sir Thomas Gurnay, the then custodians of the castle. See a detailed account in Smyth's "Berkeleys", vol i, p. 291, confirming the allusion in Gray's "Bard" to ...."The shrieks of death thro' Berkeley's roof that ring-- ....Shrieks of an agonising King." -------------------------------------------------- Thomas, 3rd baron, m. 1st, Margaret, dau. of Roger Mortimer, Earl of March, and 2ndly, in 1347, Catherine, dau. of Sir John Clyvedon, widow of Sir Peter le Veel. This lord having adhered to the interest of the Queen, Mortimer, and Prince Edward, afterwards the third of that name, furnished "the only precedent," says Smith, "of a peer being tried by knights, as the peers would have been both judges and jurors." He first assumed a mitre for his crest. He was summoned to parliament from 1329 to 1360. He had issue by his 1st wife, besides his heir, three sons, who d. s. p., and one dau., Joan, wife of Sir Reginald Cobham; by his 2nd wife, had had, with three sons, who d. s. p., a 4th, John, ancestor of the Berkeleys of Beverstone. He d. 1361 and was s. by his son, Maurice, 4th baron. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 44, Berkeley, Viscount Berkeley, Earl of Nottingham, and Marquess of Berkeley]

Sources:

Title: Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999 Page: 28B-8, 80-6, 80a-6 Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999 Page: 255 Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000 Page: III:353 Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000 Page: II:129-30 Title: Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999 Page: 80-6 Text: age 30+ at father's death Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000 Page: II:129-30 Text: 30+ at father's death Title: Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999 Page: 80-6 Title: Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999 Page: 80-6 Text: 1320 Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000 Page: II:130 LA ZOUCHE FAMILY

Maurice The Magnanimous", De Berkeley married Eva (Eve) La Zouche, b: Abt 1281 in Harringworth, Northumberland, England. dau of Father: Eudo La Zouche b: Abt 1244 in Ashby, Leicestershire, England Death: Aft 1273 in Ashton Cantelou, Warwickshire, England wife: Milicent De Cantelou Of Bergavenny b: Abt 1250 in Calne, Wiltshire

Note: Ref: Burke, pp. 598-599.

Eudo la Zouche, living in 1273, married Millicent Cantilupe, daughter of William de Cantilupe and his wife, Eva Braos. This was her second marriage, having been previously married to John de Montalt. Eudo and Milicent had the following children:

1. William (Willard) la Zouche, Lord Zouche, of Harynworth (Harringworth).

2. Eleanor Zouche.

3. Lucy Zouche

4. Eve Zouche.

Eudo la Zouche [son of Roger, brother of Alan], of Haryngworth, d. bet. 28 Apr and 25 June 1279; m. Milicent de Cantelou. [Magna Charta Sureties] ----------------------------- Eon la Zouche (not necessarily a "younger" brother of William, though probably so of Alan); m. by 13 Dec 1273 Millicent (d. by 7 Jan 1298/9), daughter of William de Cauntelo and widow of John de Mohaut, and d. 28 April-25 June 1279. [Burke's Peerage, p. 3102] ----------------------------- Eudo, from whom the Zouches, Barons Zouche, of Haryngworth derive. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 598, Zouche, Baron Zouche, of Ashby, co. Leicester]

Sources:

Title: Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999 Page: 74-4, 146-4, 60-5, 80-4 Text: Eudo is Brother of Alan not a son. Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999 Page: 12, 3102 Text: Eon la Zouche Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999 Page: 234a-32 Text: Eudo La Zouche of Cauntelo Title: Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999 Page: 74-4 Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999 Page: 3102 Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999 Page: 253-29

Eudo La ZoucheFather: Alan La Zouche b: Abt 1203 in Ashby, Leicestershire, England Mother: Helen Ela De Quincy b: Abt 1220

Note: Ref: Burke, pp. 598-599.

Alan la Zouche, in the 26th year of King Henry III., had a military summons to attend the king into France, and in ten years afterwards had the whole county of Chester, and all North Wales placed under his government. In the 45th year of the same reign he obtained a charter for a weekly market at Ashby-la -Zouche, in Leicestershire, and for two fairs in the year at Swavesey. About the same time he was constituted warden of all the king's forests south of Trent, as also Sheriff of Northamptonshire. In the 46th year of King Henry III., he was made Justice Itinerant for the cos. of Southampton, Buckingham, and Northampton; and upon the arbitration made by Louis, King of France, between Henry III. and the barons, he was one of the sureties on the behalf of the king. In three years afterwards he was constituted Constable of the Tower of London, and Governor of the castle at Northampton. He was violently assaulted in Westminster Hall, in 1268, by John, Earl of Warren and Surrey, upon occasion of a dispute between them regarding some landed property, and with his son, Roger, who happened to be with him, severely wounded.

He married Ela (Elena) Quincy, daughter and heir of Roger de Quincy, Earl of Winchester, and they had the following children:

1. Roger la Zouche, his successor, married Ela, daughter and co-heir of Stephen de Longespee, 2nd son of William, Earl of Salisbury, succeeded by his son, Alan la Zouche.

2. Eudo la Zouche, from whom the Zouches, Baron Zouche, of Harynworth (extant) derive.

Notes: in the 26th year of Henry III, had a military summons to attend the King into France, and in ten years afterwards had the whole county of Chester, and all North Wales placed under his government. In the 45th year of the same reign he obtained a charter for a weekly market at Ashby-La -Zouche, in Leicestershire, and for two fairs in the year at Swavesey. ABT the same time he was constituted warden of all the King's forests south of Trent, as also Sheriff of Northamptonshire. In the 46th year of Henry III, he was made Justice Itinerant for the cos. of Southampton, Buckingham, and Northampton; and upon the arbitration made by Louis, King of France, between Henry III and the barons, he was one of the sureties on the behalf of the King. In three years afterwards he was constituted Constable of the Tower of London, and Governor of the castle at Northampton. He was violently assaulted in Westminster Hall, in 1268, by John, Earl of Warren and Surrey, upon occasion of a dispute between them regarding some landed property, and with his son, Roger, who happened to be with him, severely wounded.

Alan La Zouche Father: Roger La Zouche b: Abt 1182 in North Molton, Devonshire, England Mother: Margaret Biset b: Abt 1183 in North Tidworth, Wiltshire

Note: Ref: Burke, pp. 598-599. Roger la Zusche had two sons as follows:

1.. William la Zusche, the eldest son, his successor. In confirming to the monks of Swavesey, in Cambridgeshire, the grants made by his ancestors to the abbey of St. Segius and Bacchus, in Anjou (to which the priory of Swavesey was a cell), identified his father and grandfather. He died in the first year of the reign of King John, and was succeeded by his brother, Roger.

2. Roger la Zusche, successor to his brother, William.

Roger la Zusche, for his fidelity to King John, had a grant from that monarch of the manors of Petersfield and Maple Durham, co. Southampton, part of the lands of Geoffrey de Mandeville, one of the rebellious barons then in arms. In the next reign he was Sheriff of Devonshire, and had further grants from the crown. He married Margaret ________, and they had the following children:

1. Alan la Zusche, his successor.

2. William la Zusche, who left an only daughter Joyce, who married Roger Mortimer, of Richard's Castle, and had issue: Hugh Mortimer, summoned to parliament as Lord Mortimer, of Richard's Castle; and William Mortimer, who assumed the surname of Zouche, and was summoned to parliament as Lord Zouche, of Mortimer. He was succeeded by his eldest son, Alan.

Roger la Zusche , for his fidelity to King John, had a grant from that monarch of the manors of Petersfield and Maple Durham, co. Southampton, part of the lands of Geoffrey de Mandeville, one of the rebellious barons then in arms. In the next reign he was Sheriff of Devonshire, and had further grants from the crown.

Roger la Zouche [elder brother William dsp 1199], of Ashby-de-la-Zouche, Leics; served in Poitou, possibly under Geoffrey (died 1205), an illegitimate son of King John who held the homour of Perche and led an expedition of mercenaries to France in 1205, and again in 1214, though under some other leader; served in Ireland 1210; took an oath to uphold the baronial enforcement of Magna Carta 1215 but witnessed a charter issued by John 1216, hence had presumably switched support to the King by then; benefited from substantial land grants in Cambs, Devon, Hants and Norfolk at John's and Henry III's hands; Sheriff of Devon 1228-31; a witness to Henry III's confirmation of Magna Carta Jan 1236/7; married Margaret (died in or after 1220 or even as late as 1232 or after) and died by 14 May 1238. [Burke's Peerage] ----------------- Roger la Zusche who, for his fidelity to King John, had a grant from that monarch of the manors of Petersfield and Maple Durham, co. Southampton, part of the lands of Geffrey de Mandeville, one of the rebellious barons then in arms. In the next reign he was sheriff of Devonshire and had further grants from the crown. By Margaret, his wife, he had issue, Alan, his successor, and William, who left an only dau., Joice, who m. Robert Mortimer, of Richard's Castle, and had issue, Hugh Mortimer, summoned to parliament as Lord Mortimer, of Richard's Castle; and William Mortimer, who assumed the surname of Zouche, and was summoned to parliament as Lord Zouche, of Mortimer. He was s. by his elder son, Sir Alan la Zouche. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 598, Zouche, Baron Zouche, of Ashby, co. Leicester] ----------------- Ancestral Roots, p. 43, younger son (of Alan Ceoche of La Coche), heir to brother William 1199, sheriff of Devonshire 1228-31, a witness to Henry III's confirmation of the Magna Carta, d. shortly before 14 May 1238. Browning, p. 308, lists him as son of Roger, son of Alain IV, Viscount de Rohan, Count of Brittany and Mabilla, dau. of Raoul II, Lord of Fourgeres. -------------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------- ROGER LA ZOUCHE, brother and heir, paid £100 to have William's lands in 1199. Those in England were seized, before 1204, while he was in Brittany, because of the war in Normandy, and he proffered 100m. to regain possession of them in that year. He served in Poitou, 1204-05 and 1214; was in Ireland, 1210; and swore to support the Barons who were enforcing Magna Carta in 1215. However, he soon joined the King, for he witnessed a royal charter, 11 June 1216, and was rewarded, both at the end of John's reign and during the opening years of Henry III, with numerous grants of land. He had licence to go on pilgrimage to Santiago, 6 August 1220; was given money as a royal messenger, October 1224; was going to Brittany, with the King's leave, May 1228; Sheriff of Devon, 10 November 1228-April 1231. In May 1229 he, with Philip Daubeney and Godfrey de Crawcombe, was allowed 100m. to cover the costs of a mission across the seas for the King. He served in Brittany, 1230; was ordered to find one knight at the King's cost to aid the Duke of Brittany, 1234; and was among those who witnessed Henry III's confirmation of Magna Carta at Westminster, 28 January 1236/7. He married Margaret, who was living in 1220 and presumably 1232. He died shortly before 14 May 1238. [Complete Peerage XII/2:931-2, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)] Sources:

Title: Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999 Page: 120-3, 74-3 Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999 Page: 98-31 Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999 Page: 3099 Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000 Page: XII/2:931-932 Title: Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999 Page: 120-3 Text: 1238 Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999 Page: 39-28

Roger la Zusche , for his fidelity to King John, had a grant from that monarch of the manors of Petersfield and Maple Durham, co. Southampton, part of the lands of Geoffrey de Mandeville, one of the rebellious barons then in arms. In the next reign he was Sheriff of Devonshire, and had further grants from the crown.

Roger la Zouche [elder brother William dsp 1199], of Ashby-de-la-Zouche, Leics; served in Poitou, possibly under Geoffrey (died 1205), an illegitimate son of King John who held the homour of Perche and led an expedition of mercenaries to France in 1205, and again in 1214, though under some other leader; served in Ireland 1210; took an oath to uphold the baronial enforcement of Magna Carta 1215 but witnessed a charter issued by John 1216, hence had presumably switched support to the King by then; benefited from substantial land grants in Cambs, Devon, Hants and Norfolk at John's and Henry III's hands; Sheriff of Devon 1228-31; a witness to Henry III's confirmation of Magna Carta Jan 1236/7; married Margaret (died in or after 1220 or even as late as 1232 or after) and died by 14 May 1238. [Burke's Peerage] ----------------- Roger la Zusche who, for his fidelity to King John, had a grant from that monarch of the manors of Petersfield and Maple Durham, co. Southampton, part of the lands of Geffrey de Mandeville, one of the rebellious barons then in arms. In the next reign he was sheriff of Devonshire and had further grants from the crown. By Margaret, his wife, he had issue, Alan, his successor, and William, who left an only dau., Joice, who m. Robert Mortimer, of Richard's Castle, and had issue, Hugh Mortimer, summoned to parliament as Lord Mortimer, of Richard's Castle; and William Mortimer, who assumed the surname of Zouche, and was summoned to parliament as Lord Zouche, of Mortimer. He was s. by his elder son, Sir Alan la Zouche. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 598, Zouche, Baron Zouche, of Ashby, co. Leicester] ----------------- Ancestral Roots, p. 43, younger son (of Alan Ceoche of La Coche), heir to brother William 1199, sheriff of Devonshire 1228-31, a witness to Henry III's confirmation of the Magna Carta, d. shortly before 14 May 1238. Browning, p. 308, lists him as son of Roger, son of Alain IV, Viscount de Rohan, Count of Brittany and Mabilla, dau. of Raoul II, Lord of Fourgeres. -------------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------- ROGER LA ZOUCHE, brother and heir, paid £100 to have William's lands in 1199. Those in England were seized, before 1204, while he was in Brittany, because of the war in Normandy, and he proffered 100m. to regain possession of them in that year. He served in Poitou, 1204-05 and 1214; was in Ireland, 1210; and swore to support the Barons who were enforcing Magna Carta in 1215. However, he soon joined the King, for he witnessed a royal charter, 11 June 1216, and was rewarded, both at the end of John's reign and during the opening years of Henry III, with numerous grants of land. He had licence to go on pilgrimage to Santiago, 6 August 1220; was given money as a royal messenger, October 1224; was going to Brittany, with the King's leave, May 1228; Sheriff of Devon, 10 November 1228-April 1231. In May 1229 he, with Philip Daubeney and Godfrey de Crawcombe, was allowed 100m. to cover the costs of a mission across the seas for the King. He served in Brittany, 1230; was ordered to find one knight at the King's cost to aid the Duke of Brittany, 1234; and was among those who witnessed Henry III's confirmation of Magna Carta at Westminster, 28 January 1236/7. He married Margaret, who was living in 1220 and presumably 1232. He died shortly before 14 May 1238. [Complete Peerage XII/2:931-2, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

Sources: Title: Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999 Page: 120-3, 74-3 Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999 Page: 98-31 Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999 Page: 3099 Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000 Page: XII/2:931-932 Title: Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999 Page: 120-3 Text: 1238 Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999 Page: 39-28

Roger La Zouche Father: Alan La Zouche b: Abt 1157 in Rohan, Morbihan, Bretagne, France Mother: Alice b: Abt 1150 in Ashby, Leicestershire & Tong, Shropshire, England.Alan married Alice Abt 1181 in Losselin, Morbihan, France

Note:

Alan Ceoche/la Coche/la Zouche; mentioned in connection with his elder brother's grant; also witnessed the latter's grant of a charter founding Lantenac Abbey; had established himself in England by 1172, where he seems to have held land in Devon and Northants, if not elsewhere, being referred to in the Devon instance as Alan la Zouche; married Alice, daughter and eventual heir of Philip de Belmeis, of Tong, Salop, and Ashby, Leics, among other places, and died 1190. [Burke's Peerage]

Ref: Burke, pp. 598-599. That the Zouches branched from the Earls of Brittany is admitted by all genealogists, but they do not coincide in the exact line of descent. William la Zusche to the monks of Swavesey, in Cambridgeshire, the grants made by his ancestors to the abbey St. Segius and Bacchus, in Anjou (to which the priory of Swavesey was a cell), calls Roger la Zusche, his father, and Alan la Zusche, his grandfather. This William died in the first year of the reign of King John, and was succeeded by his brother, Roger. 1. Alan la Zusche, Earl of Brittany, in Normandy, had a son, Roger.

Alan La Zouche Father: Geoffrey La Zouche b: 1126 in Rohan, Morbihan, Bretagne, France 1141 in Josselin, Morbihan, Bretagne, France and Mother: Hawise De Fergant b: Abt 1100 in Nantes, Loire-Atlantique, Anjou/Pays-DE-La-Loire, France

Geoffrey La Zouche Father: Alan La Zouche b: Abt 1093 in Rohan Mother: Constance De Bretagne

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