Canadian Forestry Corps
Canadian Forestry Corps in WWII
Information supplied by Robert Briggs with contributions by JFLH

I wish to thank everyone who has made contributions of photos, stories and other info of their
family members of the Canadian Forestry Corps to this website.

If anyone has additional photos or stories they would like us to add here – we would be pleased to do so

For Further information please contact Bob Briggs

No. 28 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps
District No. 3, Camp 17
Ardersier, Nairn

Canadian Mobilization Point – Camp Valcartier, Quebec
Mobilization Date – 16 May 1942
Arrived in Scotland – 26 May 1942
Ceased Operations in Scotland – 1 Apr 1944
Camps Occupied in Scotland - Ardersier, Nairn

No. 28 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps
History
23 January 1942 – Authorized – Serial 2135 (GO 84/42)
16 May 1942 – Mobilized at Camp Valcartier, PQ (CFC Website)
30 November 1945– Disbanded (GO 52/46)
War Diaries
16448 – 1942/05-1945/11
Notes
16/5/42 – No. 28 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps was formed as a company at Valcartier Camp, PQ. OC was Major F.J.I. Molyneux.
It left the camp the same day at 1015 hours and marched to the railway station with No. 29 Company. The companies boarded a train for Halifax. [No. 28 Coy WD]
17/5/42 – Both companies arrived at Halifax, NS and embarked on HMT Banfora. [No. 28 Coy WD]
18/5/42 – The ship sailed from Halifax. [No. 28 Coy WD]
25/5/42 – Ship anchored off Gourock, Scotland. [No. 28 Coy WD]
26/5/42 – Company disembarked at Greenock by lighter. Entrained for Fort George. [No. 28 Coy WD]
27/5/42 – Arrived at Ardersier and trucked to Ardersier Camp. [No. 28 Coy WD]
26/5/42 – Arrived in Scotland.
1/4/44 - Ceased operations in Scotland and continued operations in North-West Europe.
Courtesy of David Ryan

CFC Cap Badge
Courtesy of Robert J. Briggs

The war created a crisis in wood supply for the United Kingdom. Pre-war domestic production covered only a small fraction of the timber needed to support the war effort. In addition to civilian requirements, it was estimated that every soldier needed five trees: one for living quarters, messing, and recreation; one for crates to ship food, ammunition, tanks, and so on; and three for explosives, gun stocks, coffins, ships, factories, and direct or indirect support for the fighting line. It was not feasible to depend on imports as the ships were used for bringing in troops and left no room for lumber from the countries that Britain depended on prior to the war.

Canadians stepped up to fill this need. During 1941 and 1942, thirty companies drawn from all regions of Canada, totalling 220 officers and 6,771 regulars, were deployed to Scotland.

We did load a ship with lumber, yeah. And it went to Africa and I took a chalk and I wrote my name and address on the board. I get to, it was about a month after, first thing I get this letter from the soldier in Africa. He says, "I want to tell you, he said, that you people, your job is important," he said, "We used your lumber today, we landed in Africa.
Courtesy of Joseph Wilmer Gagnon - The Memory Project Historica Canada

Once again the British Government turned to Overseas Woodsman to assist in the war effort. Given their impressive record in World War One it was natural that they looked to Canada to provide forestry units once again. In May 1940 the Canadian Government decided to form a Canadian Forestry Corps. Twenty Companies were initially formed with ten more as the war progressed.
The financial agreement between the two Governments as similar to that in World War I. Canada would bear the cost of pay, allowances and pensions, all initial personal equipment, transport to and from the United Kingdom. The British Government paid for "all other services connected with equipment, work or maintenance" and certain others, including medical services. Canada covered the cost for Medical Officers and Britain paid for hospitalization.
The arrangement was unusual as it resulted in a Canadian Unit working for the British, who controlled the areas of work and disposal of the product, but Military operations of the C.F.C. was never surrendered by the Canadians and came under command of Canadian Military Headquarters in London. Even though the C.F.C. had to serve two masters, no serious problems ever resulted.
Mobilization centres for the Corp spanned all across Canada, and recruited both English and French speaking personnel. Many of the volunteers were veterans of World War One, including the Corp's Commander, Brigadier- General J.B. White. Many of the men carried out the same duties as they did in civilian life, such as loggers, black smiths, lawyers, store man, cooks and clerks. The big difference between the new Corp and their World War One counter parts were the new Corp were considered Combat Troops.

No. 28 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps War Diaries - Library And Archives Canada War Diary Index

War Diary No 28 Coy CFC Misc Part 1 & Part 2

May 1942 June 1942 July 1942 Aug 1942 Sept 1942
Oct 1942 Nov 1942 Dec 1942 Jan 1943 Feb 1943
Mar 1943 Apr 1943 May 1943 June 1943 July 1943
Aug 1943 Sept 1943 Oct 1943 Nov 1943 Dec 1943
Jan 1944 Feb 1944 Mar 1944 Apr 1944 May 1944 1 & 2
June 1944
Courtesy of Jean Francois Chicoine

No. 28 Company, No 8 Canadian Forestry District
No. 1 Canadian Forestry Group
Canadian Forestry Corps

July 1944 Aug 1944 Sept 1944 Oct 1944
Nov 1944 Dec 1944 Jan 1945 Feb 1945
Mar 1945 Apr 1944 May 1945 June 1945
July 1945 Aug 1945 Sept 1945 Oct 1945
Nov 1945

No. 28 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps - Enlisting and Training


Courtesy of 'The Sawdust Fusiliers' by William C. Wonders

Map shows that the men came from across our country of Canada and where each of the original 20
companies was mobilized and what percentage from each province the men came from.
Courtesy of 'The Sawdust Fusiliers' by William C. Wonders

Tucker, Perle ‘Bruce’ Pte H94781 signed up at No 10 District Depot in Winnipeg, MB
Photo courtesy of Robert J. Briggs - grandson

after the initial 20 companies were raised an additional 10 companies were formed. No. 28 Company was one of these ten. This soldier was attached to Canadian Forestry Corps Wing in Port Arthur then transferred to Canadian Forestry Corps Wing in Valcartier, Quebec - 2 Mar 1942. Capt Gordon Durward Baxter was in charge of the training of CFC Wing in Valcartier – who would become 2 I/C of No. 28 Coy CFC. These men were attached to A(I)TC A-13 for basic training. Then on completion of training was transferred to No. 28 Coy. 16 May 1942 No. 28 Coy was trained and left Valcartier for Scotland.

Tucker, Perle ‘Bruce’ Pte H94781
Photo courtesy of Robert J. Briggs - grandson

Source :Fort William Daily Times Journal Sat June 27, 1942

Forestry Corps at Valcartier
The 28th company of the "Canadian Forestry Corps" is now undergoing its military training at Valcartier camp, under the command of Major M. Larson. The purpose of this training center is to supply reinforcements to the companies which have now been in Scotland for over a year and a half. It is the only organization of its kind in Canada and as a result kept quite busy. It not only teaches Forestry engineering as well as everything pertinent to that branch, but the men are also put through an advanced military training, just like every other infantry battalion.
Several thousand men who are now overseas are divided in a number of companies, which are units in themselves having their own organization and each operating independently in the course of its activities. Since the bulk of their work lies in the lumber industry whether in Canada or elsewhere, the sawmill yields all the timber used in warfare, boards, beams, deals, railroad ties, etc. Every man works at his own craft, and when a forester joins the ranks of the Canadian Army he merely goes back to a set of tools similar to the ones which he used in civilian life. Each company starts with a brand new set of tools and equipment of the best quality; own their own vehicles, trucks, saw mill, blacksmith's shop and garage.
It would be well to say that the blacksmith and the chief mechanic are greatly responsible for the good functioning of operations and that each must be a master craftsman in his respective calling.
Since it has been realized that lumbermen are usually in a better state and health than the average city dweller, the age limit for enlistment in the Canadian Forestry Corps has been established as fifty, providing the applicant is accepted by the Army medical board.

The soldiers of No. 28 Coy were in various areas of Canada and then transferred to CFC Wing, Valcartier, A(I)TC – Army Infantry Training Centre
for combat training prior to going overseas. Valcartier CFC Combat Training

valcartier Camp had been around for quite some time, including WW1 and it is a training base, with bare essentials .Unlike their role in World War One when the CFC played a non-combatant role, during World War Two they received military training and were considered combatant troops.
Left photo - Note date Apr 1942
Middle photo – in full battle gear
Right photo – gas mask at ready

Photos courtesy of Robert J Briggs grandson of Pte Perle Bruce Tucker

tucker, Perle ‘Bruce’ Pte H94781
Photo courtesy of Robert J. Briggs - grandson


No.28 Coy, CFC soldiers Roll
call at Valcartier Camp, Quebec

No.28 Coy CFC soldiers doing
early morning exercises


No. 28 Company, time for clowning around as well.

Note on the back from Bruce to his family in Carman, Manitoba, he had taken these photos

Photos courtesy of Robert J Briggs
grandson of Private Perle Bruce Tucker

More p of not in them I took them

Map of Camp Valcartier, Quebec Courtesy of Paul Keenleyside

It was very interesting to see Valcartier. I have letters that my Dad wrote home from there. He liked to shoot so he enjoyed the rifle training and said there were a lot of fellows who couldn't hit the side of a barn door. If they were from the Cities it stands to reason. The country men learned to shoot young and well especially during the Depression so that they could feed their families. I found the condition of the grounds at Valcartier very interesting. Lots of mud!! I wonder if they did that deliberately so the men would have experience in fighting in the mud, etc. or if the buildings and grounds were put together really fast and they were not really concerned with the state of grounds, etc.
Linda Bish - daughter of Pte Edward James Ted Bish

Left - Valcartier Camp Quebec

Photos courtesy of Melanie McLennan

Right -Valcartier Camp Canteen

No. 28 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps - Troop Movement

1942 No.28 Coy CFC Troop Movement
Courtesy of David Ryan

St-Gabriel de Valcartier Quebec Depot Train Station
- 1015 hrs marched to the train station which was 2 miles south of camp
-Train Schedule 561 Serial #2315
-Embarked 1130 hrs 16 May 1942 – arrived in Halifax Nova Scotia 1300 hrs 17 May 1942
- No. 29 Coy having received it’s marching orders was on the same train

HMT Banfora
- Boarded ship at Halifax, Nova Scotia - Sailed 1050 hrs 18 May 1942
- Ship number E486 - Convoy NA-9 HMT Banfora
- No. 29 Coy CFC was on the same ship
Photo Courtesy of George Cowie - The Shiny Seven in the Italian Campaign 1944 Part Two The Gothic Line

Canadian Ships in Halifax Harbour
CWM 20020135-084
George Metcalf Archival Collection
Canadian War Museum

Interactive Map of Port of Halifax & PDF Map
Courtesy of Paul Keenleyside

Firth of Clyde is where the ship with the men came in to disembark at Gourock, Scotland
Then they caught a train to Fort George and then by lorry to Ardersier, the site of Camp 17, District No. 3

Map of Gourock
Courtesy of Paul Keenleyside

No. 28 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps - Camp 17

Camp 17 Ardersier, Nairn Scotland
Courtesy of 'The Sawdust Fusiliers' by William C. Wonders

CFC Map Scotland
Courtesy of Paul Keenleyside

Map of Camp 17
Courtesy of Paul Keenleyside

the camps were located on estate property near a road to permit vehicle access. Buildings were mostly frame, lumber cut in Corp's sawmills. Some Nissan huts were erected and housed shoemakers, armourers carpenters as well as serving other purposes
Men were housed in huts accommodating 14 men each. A cookhouse, ablution hut with hot and cold showers, sergeants' quarters and mess, officers' quarters and mess, orderly room, medical hut, quartermaster stores, garage and workshop were present in the camp.

Nissan Hut at some of the camps
Due to its semicircular, corrugated iron shape the Nissen Hut deflected shrapnel and bomb blast making it a perfect bomb shelter
Photos courtesy of Melanie McLennan


unknown soldier in the
No. 28 Coy CFC Camp
17 at Ardersier

Unknown soldiers of the
No. 28 Coy working at the
camp gate, Delnies, Scotland

Unknown soldiers of the
No. 28 Coy CFC In camp
photos courtesy of Robert J Briggs grandson of Pte Perle Bruce Tucker


Photo of CFC cook Pe Perle 'Bruce Tucker with
No.28 Coy Camp 17 Ardersier, Nairn & A note home
to his youngest daughter Lila
This is for lila Taken at the citchen door

Photos courtesy of Robert J Briggs grandson of Pte Perle Bruce Tucker

No.28 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps - Logging Operations

Prior to the arrival of the Canadian lumberjacks there were various undertakings by the British Government to aid in the harvesting of limber for their own use. Such contributions were helpful, but on occasion the efforts of unskilled workers created problems for the professionals later.
The No. 28 Coy brought with them the most up-to-date logging equipment then available in Canada. They brought a standard medium type rotary mill with a capacity of 1500-2000 bd. ft. an hour or c. 8,000 cu. ft a week/3-5-4-7 cm an hour or 227 cm a week. (The British Forestry Commission also provided the company with a Scotch mill or bench, but these were not popular with the Canadians.) Power was supplied by 100-horsepowe Diesel generators. Logging equipment included TD9 caterpillar tractors, lorries, sulkies (pneumatic-tired arches), angle dozers for road making, and two and three drum winches for high-lead logging. They also were equipped with a variety of transportation vehicles, four tractors, two sulkies, one motorcycle, and originally six bicycles.
The majority of companies (18 of 30) remained at the same camp throughout their entire time in Scotland. The No. 28 Coy was one of the companies that stayed in one camp until it was time to prepare to get ready to go over to the mainland
The No. 28 Coy consisted of 190 - 230 all ranks, under the command of a major. British authorities already had identified and requisitioned the major forest resources to be harvested. It laid on privately owned land, the owner had a long tradition of scientific forestry and was generally willing to assist in the wartime emergency despite the cost to their long-range forestry programmes.
The camp were located on estate property near a road to permit vehicle access. Buildings were mostly frame, lumber cut in Corp's sawmills. Some Nissen huts were erected and housed shoemakers, armourers carpenters as well as serving other purposes
Men were housed in huts accommodating 14 men each. A cookhouse, ablution hut with hot and cold showers, sergeants' quarters and mess, officers' quarters and mess, orderly room, medical hut, quartermaster stores, garage and workshop were present in the camp.
The heavy-laden Canadian lumber lorries from mills to shipping points placed a great deal of strain on local roads and access roads even when they were gravelled, particularly during rainy periods.
Even before felling could begin most companies had to introduce an access road network in the forests to enable their mechanized equipment to be used, in contrast to the widespread use of horses in prewar local forests. Road building and maintenance continued to occupy part of the CFC personnel even after the initial period.
The military role of the CFC as distinct from its industrial role was important, particularly during the period of possible German Invasion after the fall of France. Personnel were allowed to wear civilian clothing while working, but uniforms were required for military activities and when on leave. As combatant troops they received additional military training on Saturdays after their week's work in the woods. This included practice on rifle ranges and tactical exercises with other military units. Periodically they participated in weekend military schemes in their areas.
In the earlier period a shortage of weapons and ammunition proved frustrating, e.g. one company waited a month after arrival before receiving its first arms and then these consisted of a total of 48 Lee-Enfield rifles and only 100 rounds of ammunition.

Heavy CFC logging truck
Photo Courtesy of Al Neale - son of Pte Charles Frederick Neale

Companies usually worked in two sections, "one cutting 'in the bush' and bringing out the timber, the other sawing it into lumber in the company mill, and both using mostly Canadian mechanical equipment," The relative openness of the cultivated Scottish forests in contrast to the tangled undergrowth of most natural Canadian pleased the CFC. Nevertheless, pressure had to be applied to Canadian fallers to cut trees close to the ground in Scottish fashion, rather than higher up, which left unsightly stump-fields so common in home forestry operations. The felling crew consisted of three men, two sawing down and one trimming or limbing. Hand saws and axes were the tools employed. The trees involved reflected the variety of Scottish plantations, with Scot pine, spruce and larch particularly common, but also Douglas fir and hardwoods on occasion.
The frequent alternation of rain and snow proved unexpected for many of the Canadians, accustomed to a more continuous snow season. Men's hands were often cut up by handling wet lumber in raw cold weather. Most of the area where they were working in Scotland lay north of 57degrees N, a higher latitude location than most forest operations in Canada-approximately the latitude of Mile 150 on the Alaska Highway (some 100 miles or 160 kilometers north of Fort St. John, B.C.), Fort McMurray, Alberta, Lynn Lake, Manitoba, and the Belcher Islands in Hudson Bay. Consequently, the longer winter darkness period in Scotland was an inconvenience for the felling teams at the extreme ends of the working day and working hours had to be adjusted to seasonal light conditions. (Companies worked a full-hour day, with precise hours decided by individual company commanders.
There was no specific equipment provided for loading logs on trucks when they had to be transported to the mill. In most cases where the logging was conducted not too far from the mill, the trees could be taken tree length to the mill by the sulky and bucked (cut into log lengths) at the landing.

Total Production of Forest Products CFC Scotland
Courtesy of 'The Sawdust Fusiliers' by William C. Wonders

No. 28 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps - Life in Scotland

Several camps had garden patches to provide fresh vegetables for the men. Swill from the messes was sold to local farmers and the income spent on the messes, or some companies kept pigs and the swill was fed to them. On reaching maturity the pigs were sold to the RASC. Rather than have to purchase young pigs, one company at Cawdor North Camp decided to raise its own, but discovered pigs do not always obey army orders: "17 March 1942 - Delighted to notice that one of our sows is pregnant. We had come to the conclusion that her several trips to the boar had provided her with diversion only."
The CFC was apparently well liked in the Scottish Highlands. The men became active participants in local functions, from fundraising to staging Christmas parties for the local children. A notable tribute to the CFC was paid by Laura Lady Lovat when she stated, "you Canadians may be cutting the Scots firs of the Highlands, but in Highland hearts you are planting something far more lasting".
Members of the CFC were seen in uniform regularly at local parades in support of varied wartime causes. In addition to their distinctive cap badges and shoulder patches, from Mar 1943 the CFC were identified by a green triangle below the 'Canada' flash on the upper arm of the battle dress. Church parades also brought them to the public's attention as the No. 28 Company made use of the local church buildings as well as holding religious services in the camp.
CFC companies transported and sold scrap wood from the mills to the public for fuel, at prices and delivery charges fixed by the Ministry of Supply. At times some scrap wood "mysteriously`` fell from lorries to land beside individual homes in financial need.

PPte Perle Bruce Tucker & Nancy

Some of the older men left families behind and befriended folks in the
community and enjoyed the time with these families

Photo courtesy of Robert J Briggs grandson of Pte Perle Bruce Tucker

Courtesy of Maurice Horsburgh - Ardersier - Scotland

Hi Robert,
Sincere apologies for the delay in replying to your email, my telephone lines and server have been out of action for 5 days.
What a pleasant surprise to hear from you, yes! I remember very well the Canadian Forestry Corps unit which was camped at Delnies just outside Ardersier.
Quite a few of them married local girls, in fact thanks to them I became a musician. My family were invited to the wedding of a very good friend who married a Canadian, the reception was at the camp and the entertainer was an accordion player. I was only 14 years old and had spent most of the war years in hospital with an injured leg.
I was really enthralled with this chap's playing and when he found out, he said I should take the instrument home and try it out. Due to his generosity I became a musician, found work - which up until then my chances were nil - and as you will see by my web page music has taken me round the world many times. Thanks to a very generous "Cannuk" who came from Alberta, his name was Clayton or Layton, unfortunately I have never managed to trace him.
My friend who got married is now living in Ontario, her married name is Glassford and we write each year at Christmas, I shall pass on your information and I may glean something from her.
As for the Campbell family you mention, I do have a recollection of them, but a very good friend who lives not far from here left Ardersier much later than I, so I will pick his brains.
I will be updating my website soon so I may have some success there.

Once again thank you for contacting me and I will pass on any information that comes along.
Very kindest regards,
Maurice Horsburgh
Palm Beach - Queensland
Australia

The wedding Maurice was invited to was
RE SANDRA SHANKS – WAR BRIDES
In Ardersier on 9th Feb 1944 Rhoda Neish Duncan married Henry George Edwards, Company Sergeant Major No. 28 Coy.

no. 28 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps - War Brides

Edwards, Henry George CSM married Miss Rhoda Neish Duncan in Ardersier 9th Feb 1944
Glassford, Bernard Pte married Miss Audrey Cook in Ardersier
Gauthier, Tony A. Pte H83794 married Miss Maude Leith of Nairn
Martell, H. Louie LCpl C31246 married Miss Maude Marie Hughes
Moggey, H.W. Sgt H94394 married miss Helen Main in Ardersier, Inverness-Shire
Williamson, Albert Arthur Alexander LCpl H94472 married Miss Mary (Maisie)

No. 28 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps - Photos and stories of the soldiers

Left - Pte Edward James Bish "Ted"
CFC # 28 Valcartier, Que
He enlisted at Geraldon, Ont
Feb 12/42 & by May/42 was at Valcartier

Right - Pte Edward James Bish "Ted"
in Scotland No.28 Coy CFC

Photo's courtesy Linda Bish – daughter

Hi Bob
I have gone through my Dad's army letters (there are only about 5) and other letters/notes from my Dad's funeral that my Mum saved and here are a few facts that might be of interest:
My Dad died Dec 22/50 among others 2 of the pall bearers were: Bill Brough & Doug Thain
Late 1949 the Brough's wrote of my Dad going across a lake with Bill and in the letter Bill's wife, Belle makes mention of a son, Allan.
Army letter dated June 21/43 my Dad makes mention that "lots of fellows are getting married over here."
Army letter dated Nov 18/43 (all letters are C.F.C. 28 Coy C.A.O.S.) - my Dad writes ..."we have no snow here yet, but it never does snow here very much anyhow. Well it's the same old thing here, 2000 out of the 6000 Forest Corps went back to Canada about a month ago but they missed me. I think the Forestry Corps will bust up pretty soon. A bomb dropped close to my sister's house (Emsworth) not long ago. It knocked the end house down in the terrace and broke all the windows and shook the doors off the rest of the houses in the terrace. Portsmouth town is bombed pretty bad. It gets all the odd bombs from the odd Raiders. Gee, the trains and buses over here are so crowded all the time. I wish you could see London. There are a lot of people moving around all the time. You meet an awful lot of nice people over her though, travelling around. I met an old fellow going down to London last time I went on leave, he was awful interesting. He had been all over the world I guess. He was out in Canada for quite awhile. He was a Bank Manager down in the Okanagan Valley in Canada. He was telling me about a hold up that he had one time when he was in the Bank. He was shot by a gunman and the bullet went through his hand and lodged in his throat - he showed me the bullet hole in his hand. He told me the people that came to see him said it was funny it never killed him. So, he said to them - "it is pretty hard to kill a Scotsman," and he laughed about it when he was telling me, he was sure interesting to listen to, he is retired now, but a nice old fellow to travel with. He was going down to his winter mansion in England for the winter. He was spending his summer up in the Highlands. ....It is a fellow's own fault over here if he doesn't have a good time, I don't go out very much but I get all kinds of invitations out with the guitar. I go once in awhile but I don't seem to care to go out much. They really think I am good, you should see them - they make me laugh. You would think to see them I was Wilf Carter or Gene Autry or somebody. The kids around the towns all seem to know me, they say to me you're the fellow that plays the guitar and yodels aren't you, I guess they have never heard any of that over here. I go with two or three other guys sometimes and we take the guitar into the Pub every once in awhile and the room just packs full while we are there. It doesn't cost us any money for whiskey or beer. The gang always buys the drinks for us so we get a free drink out of it. I went to a wedding party about a week ago with it, and what a time I had, I met some nice people and I got invited out for weekends or anytime I wanted to stay there I was told I was welcome but I guess I'll never go. It is about 40 miles from our camp. It is a little too far. I've met a lot of people over here who have invited me to spend my leaves with them. Of course they didn't know I had a home over in this country. .... I hope this time next year I am back in Canada. I would sure be nice. It was too bad Bob Webber was killed - he was such a nice fellow. Doug got married Monday last, I was at the wedding. ... They looked pretty nice - she is a small girl. ... I don't think she is 26 yrs old. "
Army letter dated Feb 4/1944 ... "We don't get very cold weather over here, but it seems always damp. Well there isn't much new around here - the same old thing. We are still in the same place as when we landed.
That is about all of any interest as far as Army doings, etc.
"P.S. this is our home at
TThe present time - we have two hotels" Written on the back

Letter and photo courtesy of Linda Bish daughter of Pte Edward (Ted) James Bish

Crozier, David Sgt. C34314
Photos courtesy of Steven Andreyechen

From: Steven Andreyechen
Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2020 9:01 AM
To: rj.gonefishing@shaw.ca
Subject: Crozier, David Sgt. C34314 No. 28 Company
Robert,
I was so delighted to find your website. I would like to send you some photos of my Great-Grandfather (mother’s side), Crozier, David Sgt. C34314 of No. 28 Company. I am certain they will make a fine addition.
To add a few more details he was born on October 10th 1908 in Ryerson, Parry Sound, Ontario, Canada to Mary Wiseman (1871-1926) and John Reddick Crozier (1869-1933). He married Verna Margaret Faris (1922-2014) on January 17th 1942. They had seven kids, one of which was my grandfather.
One small story my grandfather (his son) told me with regards to his time in Europe was that he visited Notre Dame Cathedral, and being the lumber worker he was, was thoroughly impressed by the large timbers used in its construction.
One of the photos is him as a young man, chopping wood. Seeing as he was in the Forestry Corps I thought that particular photo would be a neat one to include in the email. The rest are from World War Two. The photo of him seated on a rock was taken at his home before leaving. I am afraid I don’t know much of the context of the other photos.
I must thank you again for your efforts to preserve history. I hope this will be of use for you and your site. If you would like anymore photos or information about him, feel free to ask, though I am not too sure how much more of what I have is directly related to his time in World War Two.
Best Regards
Steven

As Allied invasion preparations increased in late winter and spring of 1944 the CFC also prepared for movement across the Channel
Companies No. 5, 15, 16, 28, and 30 made up No. 1 Canadian Forestry Group, mobilized 1 May 1944, with its headquarters briefly at Wilderness Camp and then at Beaufort Castle. (A further five companies joined them subsequently. They were sent to Carronbridge Camp just north of Thornhill, Dumfries-shire, for further military training. In some cases they returned briefly to CFC camps while awaiting rail transport south. The first five companies trained at Carronbridge and then moved down to the staging area to Lancing, Sussex, near Brighton in southern England.
The first companies crossed the Channel from Portsmouth to the Normandy beaches in the last days of July and the first in August 1944. From there they moved with the First Canadian Army in the advance across North-West Europe.
Don't know how many of the original men of the 28th were with the unit when they went to mainland as all the 27th but one man who went to the 1st Coy was transferred to the 28th to go over.

For further info on No. 28 Coy in North West Europe go to
No 8 Canadian Forestry District

No. 28 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps - Company Photos
Why are some soldiers missing from the company photo's


No. 28 Company CFC Aug 1943 Scotland
Photo courtesy of Donald Ferguson son of Lt Col Neil Cameron Ferguson CO of HQ No 8 CFD
Via Michel Boily - Larger size photo available here

Photo courtesy of Linda Bish daughter of Pte Edward James “Ted” Bish
Which I had professionally mounted and framed
I noticed that your Grandfather sent the Christmas card copy of the large picture of No.28 home on Nov 15/43. It is kind of hard to make out all the men - that's why I wanted you to have the original. I guess it was maybe something you could buy extra. My Dad gave it to his parents in England and when I was over one time his only brother gave it to me. He was getting on in age and I guess it was something he wanted to give me and get rid of so I am glad it will find a good home with you. Linda Bish

No. 28 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps - Soldiers List

List of Abbreviations - Library and Archives Canada
ABBREVIATIONS and ACRONYMS of WW2 and service records
Military Districts of Canada 1939
Calgary Military Historical Society

22 Mar 1943 List No 28 Coy Soldiers Rifle Results
27 Apr 1943 List No 28 Coy Soldiers Rifle Results
13 Oct 1943 List No 28 Coy Soldiers Barrack Damage
27 Jan 1944 List No 28 Coy Soldiers Barrack Damage
13 Mar 1944 List No 28 Coy Soldiers Barrack Damage
10 Apr 1944 List No 28 Coy Soldiers Nominal Roll
21 May 1944 List No 28 Coy Soldiers Nominal Roll
21 Jul 1944 List No 28 Coy Soldiers Barrack Damage

Access to Information (ATI) Online Request – to obtain the services records for a soldier

Akin, John Cedric Leith Lt D105756 Adj - transf from HQ CFC & OCTU & No.15 Coy - See No 8 CFD transf to No 5 Det
Alcock, Cecil Albert Stanley Pte H56322 cook "C" & officers mess head chef - RCASC att to No.28 Coy transf from No.17 Coy & No.7 Coy & No.28 Coy & RCASC
Allan, W. Pte K41331 Transf from No.29 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Allard, Pte - See No 8 CFD
Allen, C.T. Pte B62030 Transf to No.7 Coy
Alyward, T. Pte H99503 Transf to No.7 Coy & No.10 Coy
Amero, L.J. Pte G52632 Transf from No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Anderson, Andy R.H. LCpl H62962 Transf to Reinf Sect & No 1 NETD
Anderson, C.H. Pte H94794 Transf to No.24 Coy
Anderson, M. LCpl C36317
Anderson, R.G. Pte H62962
Anderson, W.A. Pte K100212 - See No 8 CFD
Andrew, Thomas Norton ACapt bush offcer - See No 8 CFD transf to 21 Army Group (Rear)
Antilla, G. Pte H62928
Armstrong, Bernard Joseph Pte H56386 driver mech (MV) ‘C’ - transf from No.17 Coy & No.7 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Armstrong, David James Pte M61918 Transf from No.19 Coy & No.18 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Armstrong, T.T. Pte H101800 Transf from No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Arseneault, Herve Pte G19780 Transf from No.27 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Asham, Albert Edward Pte H94793 - See No 8 CFD
Averill, J.E. Cpl C34303 - See No 8 CFD
Babin, A.J. Pte F66545 Transf from Reinf Sect & No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Baird, Clarence Marvin Pte D110150 Transf from No.2 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Baker, R.W. Pte H94599 - See No 8 CFD
Balfour, William Cpl H64067 - See No 8 CFD
Barrett, E.A. Pte K98251 Transf from No 11 DD & No.7 Coy & Reinf Sect & No.7 Coy transf to Gen Workshop
Baxter, Gordon Durward Major Transf from CFC Training Wing Valcartier - See No 8 CFD
Bayford, Shorty Tommy G. Cpl C63329 Transf from No.8 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Beadman, H. Pte C34348 Transf to No.8 Coy
Beal, C.J. Pte C34355
Beattie, Bernard R. Pte H94578
Belcourt, M. Pte B58800 Transf from No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Bernatchez, D.J. Pte H94587 Transf to No.8 Coy
Berthelette, Gerard Pte H63790 Transf from Reinf Sect - See No 8 CFD
Berg, J. Cpl D109103
Berube, 'Phil' Phillippe Pte H46619 mill worker - See No 8 CFD
Betts, Roy Lawrence LCpl K72959 Transf from Canadian Forestry Wing No 11 A DD Van & No.14 Coy & No.10 Coy - See No 8 CFD & CFC Casualties
Bigelow, Clayton Cpl D110154 tech storeman - transf from No.2 Coy & No.4 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Bird, J.E. Pte K41463 Transf from Reinf Sect & No.10 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Bish, Edward (Ted) James Pte H94634 batman - See No 8 CFD
Bisaillon, A.A. Pte C34330 Transf to No.23 Coy
Blais, J.A. Pte C34257 Transf to No.8 Coy
Boon, W.E. LCpl H94427 Transf to No.8 Coy
Boothby, R.V.Cpl B40270 - See No 8 CFD
Boschalk, Albert Julian Pte K99093 Transf from No.7 Coy transf to RCE
Botterhill, R.E. Pte H94799
Boudreau, L. Pte E39475 Transf from HQ No 2 Dist & No.12 Coy & No.10 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Boulianne, A. Pte E39505 Transf from No.10 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Bourghaize, Garnet Pte E36138 Transf from No.3 Coy & No.7 Coy & Reinf Sect transf to No.27 Coy & No.10 Coy
Bourgeau, Lucien Pte C2873 Transf from No.27 Coy transf to No 5 CIRU
Bourke, J.E. Pte H94400 Transf to Reinf Sect
Bowen, John Pte H94646 carpenter “B” - See No 8 CFD transf to L&WRegt
Bowers, M.J. Pte C63338 Transf from No.8 Coy & Reinf Sect - See No 8 CFD
Boyer, T. Pte B40169 Transf from No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Bracey, W.C. Pte D113065 Transf from No.9 Coy & No.7 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Bramburger, W.C. LCpl C32493 - See No 8 CFD
Brass, Harvey Merle LCpl H95797 - See No 8 CFD
Braun, R. Pte H99541 Transf from No.27 Coy- See No 8 CFD
Breen, S.T. Pte C34316 Transf to No.8 Coy
Brigham, H.J. Pte H94502 - See No 8 CFD
Broome, W.W. Pte H94464 Transf from No.25 Coy
Brough, William A. Pte H19446 tractor driver - transf to No.27 Coy & back to No.28 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Brown, T.J. Pte H94375 Transf to No.8 Coy
Brystrom, A. Pte H62850 - See No 8 CFD
Buckingham, Ralph Edward Pte K99675 Transf from No.10 Coy & No.4 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Buckler, E.G. Pte F95389 Transf from No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Burns, L.J. Pte C121015 Transf from No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Burstrom, Gregor J. LCpl H94597 - See No 8 CFD
Cameron, M.A. LCpl H69277
Cameron, Samuel Pte H94792 driver IC tractor - transf to RCE
Campbell, D.R. Pte G52763 Transf from No.1 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Campbell, Gordon Pte E39547 Transf to No.8 Coy & No 1 Det
Campbell, Wallace Frederick William Pte C70051 Transf from HQ CFC - See No 8 CFD
Carriere, A. Pte H63553 - See No 8 CFD
Catto, W.J. Pte H94575 batman - See No 8 CFD
Cayer, Lionel Pte D110249 Transf from No.2 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Chaboyer, G. Pte H94573 - See No 8 CFD
Champ, William J. Sgt D95807 Transf from 14 Gen Hosp - RCAMC & No.2 Coy & HQ No 1 Dist & HQ CFC & No.23 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Chapeski, T.J. Pte C101194 - See No 8 CFD
Charron, E. Pte E76027 Transf from No.7 Coy
Chartrand, M. Pte H41924 Transf to No.23 Coy
Cheatters, C. Pte C34925 Transf to No.8 Coy
Chernoff, J.A. Pte K45206 Transf from No.11 Coy & No 1 CSFS & No.1 Coy & - See No 7 CFD
Chevrier, L. Pte B29824 Transf to No.8 Coy
Chuipak, N.LCpl C29548 Transf to No.24 Coy
Christopher, L.J. Pte C34282 - See No 8 CFD
Clapp, Harry Gordon "Charlie" Clapp Pte H45577 Transf from LSR & No.26 Coy & No.10 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Clapp, Robert George Pte H36910 Transf from LSR & 102nd NPAM transf to No.5 Coy & QOCH
Clapp, Willett Earl Pte H94481 Transf from 2nd Battn LSR & No 10 MD CFC Wing & No.26 Coy & No.10 Coy transf to No.5 Dist HQ
Clark, Earl Kitchener Pte K72761 Transf from No.18 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Cockayne, Charlie E. Pte C70566 cook officer’s mess - transf from No.22 Coy & No.23 Coy transf to No.23 Coy
Colquhoun, W.L. Pte H94623
Couture, C.E. Pte C50140 Transf from No.23 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Cowling, W.L. Pte H94798 Transf to No.8 Coy
Creighton, David S. LCpl H94583
Creppin, Harvey Cpl C34892 - See No 8 CFD
Cromwell, E.F. Pte K41098 Transf from No.24 Coy & No.25 Coy & No 1 CSFS & No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Cross, Richard Earl L/Cpl F30606 Transf from Reinf Sect - See No 8 CFD & CFC Casualties
Crowe, W.C. Pte H62910 Transf to No.17 Coy & No.9 Coy
Crozier, David Sgt C34314 - See No 8 CFD
Cushing, Paul Hartley Lt K98616 Transf from No.6 Coy & OCTU & No.13 Coy - See No 8 CFD transf to No 4 CBR
Daneio, J. Pte H46524 Transf from No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Darling, C.R. Pte C34320 - See No 8 CFD
Darling, R.R. Sgt D125661
Davison, Charles Thomas Pte K99086 general duties - transf from No.7 Coy & No.9 Coy & No.7Coy - See No 8 CFD
Dea, N. Pte E62657 Transf from No.27 Coy & No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Dearden, L. LCpl G34295 Transf to HQ CFC
Delgaty, C.H. Pte H94774 Transf from Reinf Sect & No.7 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Demean, Frederick John Pte K99087 tailor - transf from No.7 Coy transf to No.16 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Demuynck, N. Sgt C34281 Transf to No.7 Coy
Depencier, Stewart J.A. Pte B18455
Desjardins, J.E. LCpl D125447 Transf from No.27 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Dezeng, G.A. Pte H94395 - See No 8 CFD
Dickson, S.H. Pte K50787 - See No 8 CFD
Dobbie, William Paul Cpl K99005 postal clerk - transf from No.7 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Dolan, Len T. Armr Sgt C94395 RCOC att to No.28 Coy & No.24 Coy
Doucette, A.E. Pte F5535 Transf from No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Doyle, T.E. Pte G50073 Transf from No.15 Coy - See No 8 CFD & No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Dueck, John Pte H94788 driver - transf to RCASC
Duff, James A. CQMS D125312 - See No 8 CFD
Eady, Barney W. Pte H94630 - See No 8 CFD
Easton, A.O. Pte C63463 Transf from No.8 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Edwards, Henry George (Bob) WOII CSM D110274 Transf from No 4 DD & No.2 Coy & HQ No 2 Dist - See No 8 CFD
Elaschuk, Nicklas Pte K99161 Transf from No.7 Coy transf to Reinf Sect & No.10 Coy & No.27 Coy & No.9 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Ellacott, L.B. Pte A103615 - See No 8 CFD transf to No. 20 SEC
Elliott, H.T. Pte H94397 Transf to No.27 Coy & No.1 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Ellis, Frederick Sgt H94787 orderly room staff - See No 8 CFD
English, David Pte Transf to No.11 Coy
Ethier, Maurice Pte C33432 sawyer
Farn, Harry Pte L50012 Transf from No.20 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Fillingham, Charles Edward CSM E38232 Transf from No.16 Coy & No.8 Coy & No.1 Coy & No.30 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Fitzgerald, A.M. Pte C34270 Transf to No.8 Coy
Flynn, Romeo Pte E39478 Transf from No 2 DD & No.12 Coy & No 1 CSFS transf to No.25 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Forrest, L.R. Pte C12054 Transf from No.17 Coy
Freeburn, Gordon E. Pte C34252 - See No 8 CFD
Frost, J.F. Pte H94351 driver mech - transf to No.10 Coy
Fuller, A.R. Pte K74964 - See No 8 CFD
Gabriel, H.V. Pte C34493 - See No 8 CFD
Galipeau, Rodolphe Duff Pte B20076 Transf from No.11 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Gallagher, D.J. Pte G17153 Transf from Reinf Sect transf to No.4 Coy
Garratt, Pte Transf to No.11 Coy
Gaspard, Wilfred Bertram Pte K99148 Transf from No.7 Coy transf to RCE
Gauthier, A.H. Pte H94666 - See No 8 CFD
Gauthier, F. Pte E48568 - See No 8 CFD
Gauthier, Tony A. Pte H83794
Gawley, Arthur Kenneth Pte H41674 - See No 8 CFD
Gawley, F.A. Pte B111357 Transf from Reinf Sect & No.27 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Gillan, Cecil Pte C34891 Transf to No.8 Coy
Glassford, Bernard Pte
Glover, H.N. Pte C33206 Transf from No.27 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Goldamer, Charles Adolph Pte H56225 officers mess cook - RCASC att to No.28 Coy transf from No.17 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Goudreau, E.A. Pte G28063 driver mech - transf from No.27 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Gracie, James Edwin Capt Transf from No.1 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Grant, J.D. Pte C34312 Transf to No.8 Coy
Greenwood, John Gladwell Sgt K99014 Transf from No.7 Coy & No.11 Coy - See No 8 CFD & CFC Casualties
Greiff, George R. Cpl K73328 Transf from No.10 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Guitard, E. Pte E39494 general duty - transf from HQ No 2 Dist & No.12 Coy & No.13 Coy & No.20 Coy & No.12 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Gutzman, H.M. Pte C34324 - See No 8 CFD
Hachey, V.A. Pte G48226 Transf from No.10 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Hamilton, D.H.G. Pte K65622 Transf to No.10 Coy
Hansen, E. Pte H62964 Transf from No.23 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Harris, H.D. Pte H95425 medical orderly
Heady, C.E. Pte H94641
Hellyer, G.O.W. Pte A58945 - See No 8 CFD
Henderson, Allan Parker Pte D125665 Transf from No.27 Coy - See No 8 CFD transf to Black Watch
Henry, Charles Edward Pte H94641 Transf to No.8 Coy
Herala, Thomas Tuomas W. Pte H94637 Transf to No.8 Coy
Hill, George Pte H68601
Hiltz, S.G. Pte B111630 - See No 8 CFD
Hindmarsh, J.R. LCpl H64068 Transf to No.8 Coy
Hobbs, James A. Pte A59595 - See No 8 CFD
Holland, Stewart S. Sgt D72070 - See No 8 CFD
Holt, William C. Pte H46620 - See No 8 CFD
Honkima, L. Pte H45972 Transf to Reinf Sect & No.10 Coy
Horton, Ephraim Michael LCpl M11022 Transf from No.7 Coy transf to No.24 Coy
Houston, Albert Cpl C75854 motor mech 'A' - transf from No 3 DD & Reinf Sect & No.27 Coy & No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Howard, W. Pte K41449 Transf from Reinf Sect & No.7 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Howkins, L. Pte H45972
Hubbard, J.F. Pte C34336 Transf to No.8 Coy
Hudder, P. Pte C33878 Transf from No.27 Coy- See No 8 CFD
Hurley, J.B. Pte B53832 Transf from No.27 Coy- See No 8 CFD
Ignace, P. Pte C34297
Illson, Clarence E. Pte H94591 Transf to No.27 Coy & No.5 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Jackson, W.R. Pte H68937 Transf from No.26 Coy
Jeffery, Ronald Leslie Pte H62935 Transf from No.23 Coy transf to No.8 Coy
Jobe, J.G. Pte H94613 - See No 8 CFD
Johnson, C. Pte H94328 Transf to No.8 Coy
Johnson, George Capt K99191 Transf from No.7 Coy & OCTU & No.18 Coy & Reinf Sect - See No 8 CFD
Johnston, Tom Pte C9919
Jones, Carlton Frank Pte K57828 Transf from No 11 DD & No.18 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Jones, E.V. Pte K41453 Transf from No.7 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Jones, E.W. Pte K41508 Transf from No.7 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Jones, Joseph Bernard Pte D95798 Transf from No 14 Gen Hosp - RCAMC & No.2 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Joyal, C.A. Pte H94796 Transf to No.8 Coy
Kay, Thomas Peter Milnes Capt Transf from HQ CFC & HQ No 3 Dist & HQ CFC - See No 8 CFD transf to HQ No 7 CFD
Keiller, James John Sgt E36005 transport - transf from No.3 Coy & No.27 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Kerr, Hugh Pte C34340 Transf to No.8 Coy
Ketonen, S. Pte B17403 Transf to No.8 Coy
King, E. Pte C33148 Transf to No.8 Coy
Kirton, J.G. Pte K94356 Transf to No.8 Coy
Kiser, Carl John Pte M61840 Transf from No.19 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Kisyel, Michael Pte K99168 Transf from No.7 Coy
Knott, A. Pte C34354 Transf to No.30 Coy
Kozody, J. Pte H62980 Transf to No.27 Coy & No.5 Coy
Kuehl, K.H. Pte C34325
Lafont, D. Pte C34307 Transf to No.23 Coy
Laird, Angus H. Sgt H62618 Transf to No.18 Coy & No 1 CSFS
Laliberte, L. Pte L74116 Transf from No.27 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Langcaster, J.C. Pte H94650 Transf to RCASC att to No.28 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Lankofski, Georges Pte E36166 Transf from No.3 Coy & No 6 DD & No.3 Coy & No.22 Coy & No.9 Coy - See No 7 CFD transf to CAOF
Larson, M. Major
Larson, Swan Bertil Pte H76314 - See No 8 CFD
Lawrence, Edgar William Pte D110191 Transf from No.2 Coy & No.16 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Lawson, T.E. Pte H94418 Transf from No.25 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Laye, George Arthur Pte H94625 Transf to RCASC
Laye, Herbert Benjamin Sgt H94605 Transf to No.27 Coy & HQ No 1 CFG
Leclerc, Alphonse Pte E28448 Transf from No.3 Coy & No.22 Coy & No.27 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Lecompte, M. Pte D113054 Transf from No.9 Coy & No.7 Coy & Reinf Sect & No.7 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Lee, T.P. Pte M41387 - See No 8 CFD transf to No.27 Coy - See No 87 CFD
Leikvold, A. Pte H94615 Transf from & back to No.26 Coy
Letherby, Clarence Edwin Lt Adj - transf from G&SF RCA transf to No.10 Coy
Lindsley, C.A. Pte K100235 Transf from Reinf Sect & No.7 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Lindwall, George Pte H94653 millwright- transf to HQ CFC
Link, Garfield William Pte B144726 - See No 8 CFD & CFC Casuatlies
Linklater, T. Pte C2690 Transf from No.7 Coy
Luckese, A. Pte A57938 - See No 8 CFD
Lyman, W.D. Pte C34309 Transf to Elgin Regt
MacDonald, R.H. Pte D118069 Transf to No 20 SEC
MacDougall, L. LCpl L10746 Transf to No.7 Coy
MacDougall, Mark Rene LCpl K54044 Transf from SHofC & No.22 Coy & No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD & No 8 CFD
MacLeod, Hec C. Pte F78798 - See No 8 CFD
MacNeill, Hughie Alvin Pte K99607 Transf from No.10 Coy- See No 8 CFD
Madigan, Lawrence Michael Pte B17146 Transf from No.14 Coy & No.16 Coy & No.8 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Main, M.W. Pte K94384 - See No 8 CFD
Mallet, A. Pte E39485 Transf from HQ CFC & No.19 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Mallet, J.B. Pte G51036 - See No 8 CFD
Mannella, R.J. Pte B22841 Transf to No.30 Coy
Marks, Moe Sgt D113189 att from RCASC - transf from No.9 Coy & No.3 Coy & HQ CFC & No.22 Coy & No.27 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Marshall, G. Pte H99514 - See No 8 CFD
Martell, H. Louie LCpl C31246 Transf to No.8 Coy
Martel, Romuald Romeo Sgt E36177 Transf from Le Regiment du Saguenay & No.3 Coy & No.27 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Martin, A.V.B. Pte K72701 Transf from No.18 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Martin, Harold Francis Stanislaus Pte D113238 Transf from No.9 Coy & No.2 Coy & No.9 Coy transf to Reinf Sect
Martin, Tiger W.J. Pte H94429 Transf from No.24 Coy transf to No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Mastin, R.M. LCpl K72975 - See No 8 CFD
Mather, W.D. Pte H62975 - See No 8 CFD
Mathias, H. Pte C34353 Transf to No.27 Coy & No.7 Coy
Matson, Orval Pte H94458 Transf from No.25 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Mayson, Harry George Lt K99153 Transf from No.7 Coy & No.9 Coy & OCTU - See No 8 CFD
McCarthy, John Victor Pte K99174 drivers IC tractor - transf from No.7 Coy transf to RCE
McCharles, C.H. Pte C34306 Transf to No.8 Coy
McCormick, R.J. Pte F96501 Transf from No.27 Coy - See No 8 CFD transf to HQ No 7 CFD
McGinnis, Michael (Mike) H.J. Pte C31487 Transf from No.21 Coy - See No 8 CFD
McKenna, Wally R. Pte K41511 - See No 8 CFD
McKenzie, L.T. Pte H62984 - See No 8 CFD
McKinnon, Alex J. Pte F97311 - See No 8 CFD transf from No.26 Coy & No.27 Coy - See No 7 CFD
McKinnon, Hugh James ACQMS Transf from No.23 Coy - See No 8 CFD
McLaurin, D. Pte H46609 Transf from No.23 Coy
McLeod, W.D. Sgt H94332 Transf from No.25 Coy - See No 8 CFD
McMahon, G.R. Pte H94800 Transf from No.30 Coy & No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
McMath, Joseph LCpl D21512 Transf from No 4 DD & No.2 Coy & HQ CFC & No.10 Coy - See No 8 CFD
McMillan, H.G. Pte K62037 driver IC - See No 8 CFD
McMillan, M. Pte - See No 8 CFD
McNeill, Harry M. Sgt D121827 - See No 8 CFD
McRae, George Pte E36119 Transf from No.3 Coy & No.7 Coy transf to No.24 Coy & No 1 CSFS & No.18 Coy
McRae, Joseph Pte E36124 Transf from No.3 Coy & No.7 Coy transf to No.13 Coy & No.4 Coy
Melin, Frank V. LCpl M101043 - See No 8 CFD
Menzies, Ralph Edward Pte H94658 Transf to No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Mikita, J. Pte H62679 - See No 8 CFD
Miknius, A. Pte D88178 general duty - See No 8 CFD
Miller, Donald W. LCpl G51277 Transf from Reinf Sect - See No 8 CFD
Mitchell, E.S. Pte H94444 Transf from No.24 Coy transf to No.28 Coy & No.24 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Mitchell, J.M. Pte H56863 general duty - See No 8 CFD
Moffat, S.G. Pte K73981 Transf to HQ CFC
Moggey, H.W. Sgt H94394 - See No 8 CFD
Molyneux, Frederick John Langtry Major Transf from No.2 Coy & HQ CFC transf to HQ 21 Army Group – Laison Officer
Montgomery, R.I. Pte H94785 RCASC att to No.28 Coy
Moore, E.B. Pte F30724 Transf from No.30 Coy & No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Moore, G.V. Private G1856 Transf from No.27 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Moreau, W. Pte K99756 Transf from No.10 Coy & No.27 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Morphew, J.E. Pte A102580 Transf from No.27 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Morriseau, E.D. Pte H94572 - See No 8 CFD
Morton, R.A. Pte H94577 - See No 8 CFD
Mosseau, Mike Pte C34168 Transf from No.21 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Muotio, George Yrjo Pte H62972
Murdoch, Pte
Murphy, R. Pte H94609 - See No 8 CFD
Murray, A.J. LCpl H94345 Transf to No.8 Coy
Murray, Jack E. Sgt M35984 Transf from VGC & No.21 Coy & Reinf Sect - See No 8 CFD
Myles, W.H. Pte G49298 Transf from No.27 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Nadelko, Mickael Pte K99037 Transf from No.27 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Nelson, H.M. Pte K72750 general duties- transf from No.18 Coy & No.10 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Nelson, H.N. Cpl K100187 Transf from Reinf Sect - See No 8 CFD
Nicholson, N.D. Armr Sgt F59886 Transf from No.24 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Nicol, John LCpl H94431 postal clerk - transf to No.7 Coy
Norand, Pte - See No 8 CFD
Norrie, O.A. Pte B58275 Transf to No 2 DD & No 1 Det
Noyles, F.S. Pte G52282 - See No 8 CFD transf from No.29 Coy & No.10 Coy & No.27 Coy - See No 7 CFD
O'Donnell, D.J. Cpl H36859 Transf to Reinf Sect & No.10 Coy
O'Hara, Paul Franklin Cpl G56725 - See No 8 CFD
Orr, Pte Transf from Reinf Sect
Paget, S. Pte G48263 Transf from No.10 Coy & No.27 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Patterson, Richard David Pte B113800
Pelletier, Ernest Alexander Pte H94737 Transf to No.3 Coy & RCASC
Perhenic, E. Pte H94547 Transf to No 3 CIRU
Perrin, G.D. Pte F79050 Transf from No.21 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Petch, Charles Alfred Pte H94761 Transf from No.5 Coy transf to RCE
Pettapiece, Wally R. Sgt C70251 cook "C" - transf to RCASC att to No.28 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Pick, H. Pte K41152 Transf to No.30 Coy & No.17 Coy
Pinchbeck, Raymond Martin ALCpl K99113 Transf from No.7 Coy transf to No.10 Coy
Pizzacalla, N.J. Pte B58435 - See No 8 CFD transf to No 20 SEC
Plume, J. Pte K49460 - See No 8 CFD
Poirier, Charles B. ALCpl H36933 Transf to No.10 Coy & No.27 Coy & back to No.28 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Poirier, Emile Cpl E39531 bush foreman 'B' - transf from No.23 Coy & No.27 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Poulain, C.J. Pte C34497
Poulin, Fernand Pte E36149 saw filer 'C' - transf from No.3 Coy & No.27 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Poulin, R. Pte E62607 Transf from No.27 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Poynting, Arthur Ralph Pte H94338 Transf from No.25 Coy transf to No.8 Coy
Pratt, D.B. Pte C34350 - See No 8 CFD
Price, John James (Jack) Sgt H94401 Transf from No.24 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Puglsey, V.L. Pte F95494 Transf from Reinf Sect - See No 8 CFD
Rajotte, P.A. Pte H94671 Transf from No.29 Coy transf to No.10 Coy
Rankine, A. CQMS D73317 Transf to No.7 Coy
Rantala, S. Pte B17405 Transf to No.8 Coy
Rathwell, E.J.N. Pte B40304 Transf from No.27 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Reid, Arthur C. Pte H94657 - See No 8 CFD
Renor, A.R. Pte H91444
Roach, Danny B. Pte C34335
Robbins, Raymond LCpl H94606 - See No 8 CFD
Roberts, H.L. Pte C57520 - See No 8 CFD
Roberts, Ned E.L. Lt Transf from RRC transf to No 3 CIRU R Can R
Robichaud, F. Pte G23778 Transf from No.27 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Ross, J. Neil LCpl H94627 - See No 8 CFD
Ross, S. Pte B137869 - See No 8 CFD
Rugenius, Benedict Julien Pte D110238 general duty - transf from No.2 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Ruppel, C. Pte A59569 - See No 8 CFD
Russell, E.V. Pte B138363 general duty - See No 8 CFD
Rutledge, F.C. Pte C33820 Transf to No.7 Coy
Rykyta, W. Pte H95511 Transf to No.26 Coy
Salmon, W.F. Pte K47342 - See No 8 CFD
Sannie, R. Pte H94406
Savard, Allan Pte H94483 Transf from No.25 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Savoie, Amedee Pte G50680 Transf from No.27 Coy & No 1 CSFS & No.27 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Scott, Michael John Pte C34057 Transf from No 3 DD & No.12 Coy & No.11 Coy & No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Sedor, Alick (Alex) Pte H94403 - See No 8 CFD
Serafinchon, J. Pte M45404 - See No 8 CFD
Serafinchon, S. Pte H94534 Transf from No.24 Coy transf to RCASC att No.28 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Sewell, Herb H. Pte G56706
Shand, Frank J. Pte B16633 - See No 8 CFD
Shaver, D.M. Pte K74858 Transf from No.10 Coy - See No8 CFD
Shaw, Dave Pte B77158 Transf to RCASC
Shaw, John A. Pte H94342 Transf from No.25 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Sherry, G. Pte L64661 Transf from HQ No 1 CFG - See No 8 CFD
Shuman, H.S. Pte H76295 Transf from No.23 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Siak, S. Pte H94364
Sidney, P. Pte K73610 Transf from No 11 DD & No.18 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Simond, B. Pte C34322 Transf to No.8 Coy
Slojkowski, Walter Leon Cpl K99182 postal orderly - transf from No.7 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Smiley, G.D. Pte K57878 Transf from No.7 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Smith, D.V. Pte H94405 Transf to HQ CFC - Gen Workshop
Smith, J.C. Pte F95556 general duty - See No 8 CFD
Smith, J.R. LCpl C4365
Smith, L. ASgt H94600 Transf to RCAMC
Smith, W.H. Pte K97921 - See No 8 CFD
Somer, D. Pte H94574 Transf to No.7 Coy
Squier, John Ellard Pte H94480 - See No 8 CFD
Staddon, Robert Pte A57790 - See No 8 CFD
Stephens, H. Alvin Pte B27291
Stevens, E.E. Cpl H94620 motor mech "A" - transf to HQ No 5 Dist
Stewart, B.P. LCpl G56677 Transf from Reinf Sect - See No 8 CFD
Stidworthy, 'Eddie' Herbert Edwin Cpl C63374 Transf from No.8 Coy
Stinson, Thomas Allen Lt - See No 8 CFD
Strecker, Johnny W. Pte H94354 truck driver - See No 8 CFD
Stunden, A.F. Pte B137860 general duty - See No 8 CFD
Styles, A.B. Pte H94476
Sullivan, L. Pte H94469 Transf from No.25 Coy transf to No.8 Coy
Swallow, R.W. Pte K41253 - See No 8 CFD
Swanson, Claude Leslie Pte M61744 Transf from No.19 Coy
Swazey, Lorne P. Pte H94512 - See No 8 CFD
Syrja, R.M. LCpl H94349
Syvret, Chester Pte E36132 Transf from No.3 Coy & No.7 Coy & Reinf Sect & No.7 Coy transf to No.19 Coy & No 1 NETD
Tarnowski, Andrew Cpl H62912 Transf from No.23Coy - See No 8 CFD
Tawigishig, P. Pte H69968
Taylor, Harry Sgt K/53927 Transf to SHofC
Tencummah, P. Pte B29725
Thain, Doug P. Pte H94636 - See No 8 CFD
Thom, V.J. Pte C34485
Thomas, E.L. Pte A59544 Transf to No.10 Coy
Tillson, W.J. Pte H94432 Transf from No.24 Coy
Toneff, Jack Raymond Pte K99183 Transf from No.7 Coy transf to No.9 Coy
Tourand, H.A. Pte H41906
Towigishig, Peter Pte H69968 Transf to No.30 Coy
Trachsel, Alfred Cpl H99530 Transf to No.27 Coy & No.9 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Trahan, J.T. Pte B58342
Tremblay, E. Pte H94403 Transf from No.24 Coy
Trewin, K.W. Pte H76313 Transf from No.23 Coy & No.24 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Tucker, George Everett Pte H94363 Transf from No.24 Coy transf to No.10 Coy
Tucker, Perle Bruce Pte H94781 Transf to No.8 Coy
Tuckwanow, J. Pte H99507
Turcotte, A. Pte H94595
Vaarala, George William Pte H94261
Vaillancourt, W. Pte H94612
Valcourt, C. Sgt H94376 mill foreman -transf from No.25 Coy transf to No.27 Coy & No.7 Coy
Valley, Gilbert George Pte G48234 Transf from No 55 DD & No.4 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Van Dorn, William Pte K37777 Transf from No.10 Coy - See No 8 CFD transf to BCR
Vardy, C.J. Pte C34208 Transf to No.27 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Verrette, Albenie G. Cpl E0203 Transf from No.3 Coy & No.22 Coy & No.27 Coy & HQ No 7 CFD
Villpula, Otto E. Pte H94364 Transf to No.8 Coy
Vincent, H. Pte H94496 Transf from No.25 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Vincent, S. Pte H94495
Virgin, A.N. Pte C58133 Transf to No.30 Coy & No.9 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Walsh, J.W. Cpl D72211
Wheeler, J.K. Pte H94445 Transf from No.25 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Watkinson, Thomas Pte K41338 Transf from No.30 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Williams, Jewel Y. Pte
Williams, John Albert Cpl H94571 - See No 8 CFD & CFC Casualties
Williamson, Albert Arthur Alexander LCpl H94472 Transf from No.25 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Williamson, Joseph Minard Pte G56761 Transf from No.24 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Willie, George Paul Pte K99136 Transf from No.7 Coy transf to No.6 Coy
Wilson, H. Pte K41542 Transf from No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Wilson, J.V.D. Pte F97069 Transf from No.25 Coy & No.1 Coy - See No 7 CFD
Woods, Garnet Sgt D110125 Transf from No.2 Coy & HQ CFC transf to No 1 NETD
Woolward, W.J. Pte C34667
Young, K.G. Pte B76774 cook - transf from No.21 Coy & No.10 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Yuille, A. Pte H62736 Transf from No 10 DD CFC Wing & No.19 Coy & HQ No 5 Dist - See No 8 CFD
Zalinsky, J.S. Pte H93466

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