RELEASE DATE: NOVEMBER 4 , 2018



KINSEARCHING

by

Marleta Childs
P. O. Box 6825
LUBBOCK, TX 79493-6825
kinsearching@gmail.com
 

     This week we conclude the list of the names of members of the Royal Arch Masons chapter in Sulphur Springs, Texas, for the years 1878-1879. The data can be found on pages 97-98 of TRANSACTIONS OF THE M. E. GRAND ROYAL ARCH CHAPTER OF TEXAS AT ITS THIRTIETH ANNUAL CONVOCATION HELD AT THE MASONIC TEMPLE, IN THE CITY OF HOUSTON, ON THURSDAY, THE ELEVENTH DAY OF DECEMBER, A. D. 1879, A. I. 2409, AT THREE O’CLOCK P. M., which was published in Houston by W. H. Coyle, Printer and Lithographer, in 1880. (In the title, the M and E are each followed by three dots, representing the Triple Tau emblem of the organization. However, for simplicity, a period is used in this column.)

     Royal Arch Masons:

RAYNAIDS, D.

ROGERS, F. M.

RUSSELL, H.

RUSSELL, L.

SHOOK, W. A.

SMITH, D. M.

SMITH, J. C.

SMITH, W. W.

STURDIVANT, A. J.

TALMAN, T. M.

THOMAS, Wm.

TOMLINSON, S. G.

URY, Amos

WEANER, J. A.

WITHERS, R.

     Nark Masters:

STEPHENSON, J. W.

BLYTHE, R. S.

Expelled:

ROEBUCK, L. B.

     Deaths:

LONG, P. H.

MATTHEWS, Z. G.


     This death notice, entitled “Another of the Old Guard Passes On,” can be found on page 12 the December 1927 (Volume 49, Number 1) issue of The Texas Druggist. (Surnames are capitalized for emphasis. Some punctuation may be added or changed for clarity.)

     “W. E. WILLIS, for 41 years a druggist of Temple, died September 29th. A gentleman of quiet and lovable disposition, he was privileged to number his friends by the hundreds. He had the love and respect of his fellow druggists, both at home and in other sections of the State. We will miss his cordial greetings at our gatherings and we feel a personal loss in his death. Through the courtesy of the Temple Telegram, we are presenting a cut [i.e., a picture] showing the first store of Mr. Willis.

     The drug store was just a step up on the board sidewalk from the muddy street and the market place for the little town. Inside this store was the first soda fountain, selling the old ‘soda pop,’ glassades (sic), and the few other soft drinks afforded in that early day.”

     A photograph of his early drug store accompanies the item.

(End)


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