Knight Family Tree - aqwg601

Descendants of Richard And Sarah Rogers Knight


Joel SEARLE [Parents]-16859 was born on 24 Nov 1773 in Southampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts. He died on 11 Jan 1860 in Huntington, Hampshire, Massachusetts. Joel married Sophia SHELDON-16861.

Sophia SHELDON-16861 was born on 29 Jan 1776 in Southhampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts. She died on 17 Aug 1861 in Huntington, Hampshire, Massachusetts. Sophia married Joel SEARLE-16859.

They had the following children.

  M i Ebenezer Sheldon SEARLE-9860 was born on 13 Jan 1813. He died on 4 Dec 1880.

Walter Murphy CRITCHLOW-31019 was born on 30 Sep 1902 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah. He died on 23 Nov 1947 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah. He was buried in Mount Olivet Cemetery, Salt Lace City, Salt Lake, Utah. Walter married Helen Louise KNIGHT-9862 on 27 Nov 1929 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah.

MEDIA: MK8147 - Walter Murphy Critchlow h/o Helen Louise Knight - U.S. Passport Applications 1795-1925 - Roll 2514-Certificates 414350-414414849 - 8 May 1924 - Ancestry.com

BURIAL: Walter Murphy Critchlow in the U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current
Name: Walter Murphy Critchlow
Birth Date: 30 Sep 1902
Birth Place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, United States of America
Death Date: 23 Nov 1947
Death Place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, United States of America
Cemetery: Mount Olivet Cemetery
Burial or Cremation Place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, United States of America
Has Bio?: Y
Father: Edward Benjamin Critchlow
Mother: Mary Willis Critchlow
Spouse: Helen Louise Critchlow
Source Information: Ancestry.com. U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.
Original data: Find A Grave. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi.

PASSPORT: Walters Murphy Critchlow in the U.S. Passport Applications, 1795-1925
Name: Walters Murphy Critchlow
Age: 21
Birth Date: 30 Sep 1902
Birth Place: Salt Lake City, Utah
Residence Place: Salt Lake City, Utah
Passport Issue Date: 14 May 1924
Father: Edward B Critchlow
Has Photo: Yes
Source Citation: National Archives and Records Administration (NARA); Washington D.C.; Roll #: 2514; Volume #: Roll 2514 - Certificates: 414350-414849, 14 May 1924-14 May 1924
Source Information: Ancestry.com. U.S. Passport Applications, 1795-1925 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2007.
Original data: Selected Passports. National Archives, Washington, D.C.

Helen Louise KNIGHT [Parents]-9862 was born on 3 Jun 1903 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah. She died on 28 Sep 1971 in San Rafael, Marin, California. She was buried in Mount Tamalpais Cemetery, San Rafael, Marin, California. Helen married Walter Murphy CRITCHLOW-31019 on 27 Nov 1929 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah.

BIRTH: Name: Helen Louise Knight
Event Type: Birth
Event Date: 03 Jun 1903
Event Place: Salt Lake, Utah
Gender: Female
Race: W
Father's Name: Harry Knight
Mother's Name: Louise Johnson
Source Reference: line 15941
Digital Folder Number: 004121046
Image Number: 00403
Citing this Record:
"Utah, Salt Lake County Birth Records, 1890-1915," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XXXM-3S9 : accessed 07 Feb 2014), Helen Louise Knight, 1903.

BURIAL: Helen Louise Critchlow in the U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current
Name: Helen Louise Critchlow
Maiden Name: Knight
Birth Date: 3 Jun 1903
Birth Place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, United States of America
Death Date: 28 Sep 1972
Death Place: San Rafael, Marin County, California, United States of America
Cemetery: Mount Tamalpais Cemetery
Burial or Cremation Place: San Rafael, Marin County, California, United States of America
Has Bio?: Y
Spouse: Walter Murphy Critchlow
Source Information: Ancestry.com. U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.
Original data: Find A Grave. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi.


Harry Spooner KNIGHT [Parents]-27361 was born on 9 May 1873 in Ilion, Herkimer, New York. He died on 27 May 1935 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah from Natural causes (Coronary Occlusion). He was buried in Mount Olivet Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah. Harry married Louise Rhodes JOHNSON-27362 on 6 Jun 1901 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah.

DEATH: Name: Harry Spooner Knight
Official Cause of Death: Natural causes (Coronary Occlusion)
No attending physician
Event Date: 27 May 1935
Event Type: Death
Event Place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah
Gender: Male
Age: 62
Marital Status: Married
Race: White
Birth Date: 09 May 1873
Birthplace: Ilion, New York
Father's Name: George Knight
Mother's Name: Evelyn Cameron
Spouse's Name: Louise Johnson Knight
Document Type: Certificate of Death
Source Reference:
Digital Folder Number: 004139751
Image Number: 00227
Citing this Record:
"Utah, Salt Lake County Death Records, 1908-1949," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NQ4L-TRC : accessed 03 Feb 2014), Harry Spooner Knight, 1935.

CENSUS: Name: Harry S Knight
Event Type: Census
Event Year: 1920
Event Place: Salt Lake City Ward 5, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
District: 158
Gender: Male
Age: 46
Marital Status: Married
Race: White
Race (Original): White
Can Read: Yes
Can Write: Yes
Relationship to Head of Household: Head
Relationship to Head of Household (Original): Head
Own or Rent: Rent
Birth Year (Estimated): 1874
Birthplace: New York
Immigration Year:
Father's Birthplace: United States
Mother's Birthplace: United States
Sheet Number and Letter: 6A
Household ID: 132
Line Number: 26
Affiliate Name: The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)
Affiliate Publication Number: T625
GS Film number: 1821867
Digital Folder Number: 004390821
Image Number: 00209
Household Gender Age Birthplace
Head Harry S Knight M 46 New York
Wife Louise Knight F 40 Pennsylvania
Daughter Helen Knight F 16 Utah
Daughter Marian Knight F 15 Utah
Daughter Betty Knight F 11 Utah
Son Maurice Knight M 8 Utah
Citing this Record:
"United States Census, 1920," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M8PV-XKW : accessed 07 Feb 2014), Harry S Knight, Salt Lake City Ward 5, Salt Lake, Utah, United States; citing sheet , family 132, NARA microfilm publication T625, FHL microfilm 1821867.

OBITUARY: Deceased
Name: Mr. Harry Spooner Knight
Event Type: Obituary
Event Date: 27 May 1935
Event Place: Utah, United States
Gender: Male
Age: 62
Relationship to Deceased: Deceased
Birth Date: 09 May 1873
Birthplace: Ilion, , New York
Newspaper: Salt Lake Telegram 18
Spouse and Children
Louise Johnson Knight Wife    Female
Maurice J Knight      Son     Male
Mrs Marion K Stannard Daughter Female
Helen K Critchlow     Daughter Female
Miss Betty Knight       Daughter Female
Others on Record
James Sullivan Non Relative Male
Affiliate Name: Utah Digital Newspaper Project, J. Willard Marriott Library, University of Utah , Digital Folder Number: 100600335 , Image Number: 00094

Salt Lake Telegram
27 May 1935
City Employee Dies Suddenly
Harry Spooner Knight, 62, of 1385 Gilmer drive, superintendent of shops in the city water department dropped dead Monday at 7:30 a.m. apparently from a heart attack. Mr. Knight was entering the shops at 657 Edison street at the time of his death. He apparently had been in good health upon leaving home earlier in the morning. Born in Illion, N. Y., May 9 1873, Mr. Knight came to Salt Lake City in 1896. He was a graduate of the Case School of Applied Sciences in Cincinnati, Ohio. Following his arrival in Salt Lake City, Mr. Knight became connected with the Hanauer Smelting company in Bingham as a chemist. He also had held positions with the Wibert Mines company of Utah and the Talache Mines company of Idaho. At one time he was senior partner of Knight & Warnock, ore buyers, with offices in Salt Lake City. Mr. Knight was appointed to the position he held at the time of his death in January 1932. He succeeded James Sullivan. He was an active Mason and a past master of Wasatch Lodge, F. & A.  He also was a member of the Utah consistory and of El Kalah  temple Ancient Arabic Order, Noble of Mystick.  Surviving are his widow, Mrs. Louise J. Johnson Knight; one son Maurice J. Knight, and three daughter, Mrs. Marion K. Stannard, Mrs. Helen K. Critchlow and Mrs. Betty Knight, all of Salt Lake City. Funeral services have been tentatively set for Wednesday afternoon in the Masonic temple

Louise Rhodes JOHNSON-27362 was born in Sep 1879 in Harrisburg, Dauphin, Pennsylvania. She died on 27 Oct 1962 in Phoenix, Maricopa, Arizona. She was buried in Mount Olivet Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah. Louise married Harry Spooner KNIGHT-27361 on 6 Jun 1901 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah.

They had the following children.

  F i Helen Louise KNIGHT-9862 was born on 3 Jun 1903. She died on 28 Sep 1971.
  F ii
Marion KNIGHT-28576 was born on 26 Jun 1904 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah.



BIRTH: Name: Marion Knight
Event Type: Birth
Event Date: 26 Jun 1904
Event Place: Salt Lake, Utah
Gender: Female
Race: White
Father's Name: Harry S Knight
Mother's Name: Louise Johnson
Source Reference: line 1010
Digital Folder Number: 004121066
Image Number: 00056
Citing this Record:
"Utah, Salt Lake County Birth Records, 1890-1915," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XXXM-24W : accessed 07 Feb 2014), Marion Knight, 1904.
  F iii
Betty KNIGHT-28577 was born in 1909 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah.
  M iv
Maurice KNIGHT-28578 was born in 1912 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah.



CENSUS: Name: Maurice Knight
Event Type: Census
Event Year: 1920
Event Place: Salt Lake City Ward 5, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
District: 158
Gender: Male
Age: 8
Marital Status: Single
Race: White
Race (Original): White
Can Read:
Can Write:
Relationship to Head of Household: Son
Relationship to Head of Household (Original): Son
Own or Rent:
Birth Year (Estimated): 1912
Birthplace: Utah
Immigration Year:
Father's Birthplace: New York
Mother's Birthplace: Pennsylvania
Sheet Number and Letter: 6A
Household ID: 132
Line Number: 31
Affiliate Name: The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)
Affiliate Publication Number: T625
GS Film number: 1821867
Digital Folder Number: 004390821
Image Number: 00209
Household                    Gender Age Birthplace
Head    Harry S Knight M 46 New York
Wife    Louise Knight F 40 Pennsylvania
Daughter Helen Knight   F 16 Utah
Daughter Marian Knight F 15 Utah
Daughter Betty Knight   F 11 Utah
Son Maurice Knight        M 8 Utah
Citing this Record:
"United States Census, 1920," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M8PV-XK8 : accessed 07 Feb 2014), Maurice Knight in household of Harry S Knight, Salt Lake City Ward 5, Salt Lake, Utah, United States; citing sheet , family 132, NARA microfilm publication T625, FHL microfilm 1821867.

Wanton SHIPPEE [Parents]-9864 was born on 27 Jul 1827 in East Greenwich, Kent, Rhode Island. He died on 1 Aug 1909 in East Greenwich, Kent, Rhode Island. He was buried in East Greenwich Cemetery, East Greenwich, Kent, Rhode Island. Wanton married Zilpha Bucklin KNIGHT-9863 on 8 Mar 1857 in South Kingston, Washington, Rhode Island.

1860 United States Federal Census
Name: Wanton Shippee
Age in 1860: 32  
Birth Year: abt 1828  
Birthplace: Rhode Island  
Home in 1860: South Kingstown, Washington, Rhode Island
Gender: Male  
Post Office: Peace Dale
Household Members: Name Age
Zilpah B Shippee 27  
Zilpah K Shippee 2  
Wanton Shippee 32  
Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: South Kingstown, Washington, Rhode Island; Roll: M653_1211; Page: 404; Image: 371.

DEATH: Name: Wanton Shipper
Gender: Male
Burial Date:
Burial Place:
Death Date: 01 Aug 1909
Death Place: Rhode Island
Age: 82
Birth Date: 1827
Birthplace:
Occupation:
Race:
Marital Status:
Spouse's Name:
Father's Name: Lodowick W. Shipper
Father's Birthplace:
Mother's Name: Mary Spencer
Mother's Birthplace:
Indexing Project (Batch) Number: I09339-6
System Origin: Rhode Island-EASy
Source Film Number: 1906752
Reference Number: p58
Collection: Rhode Island Deaths and Burials, 1802-1950

BIOGRAPHY: History of Washington and Kent Counties, Rhode Island
By J. R. Cole
New York - W. W. Preston & Co. - 1889
Page 1315
Wanton Shippee, born in 1827, is a brother of Manser above mentioned. He has been engaged in farming for the last twenty-five years. He has been a member of the town council several years. He married Zilpha B. Knight, granddaughter of Dr. Nathan Knight, of South Kingston, R. I. Their only living child is Zilpha K., now Mrs. S. Edwin Lillibridge. She has three children : Jesse, Maud and Bessie.
.

Zilpha Bucklin KNIGHT [Parents]-9863 was born on 8 Mar 1833 in South Kingston, Washington, Rhode Island. She died on 5 Apr 1895 in Kent County, Rhode Island. She was buried in East Greenwich Cemetery, East Greenwich, Kent, Rhode Island. Zilpha married Wanton SHIPPEE-9864 on 8 Mar 1857 in South Kingston, Washington, Rhode Island.

BIOGRAPHY: American Genealogical-Biographical Index (AGBI)
Name: Zilpha K. Shippee
Birth Date: 185?  
Birthplace: Rhode Island  
Volume: 158  
Page Number: 373  
Reference: The lillibridge fam., & its branches in the U.S. By J.N. Eno. Rutland, Vt. 1915. (50p.):43  
Source Information:
Godfrey Memorial Library, comp.. American Genealogical-Biographical Index (AGBI) [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 1999. Original data: Godfrey Memorial Library. American Genealogical

MARRIAGE: Groom's Name: Manton Shippe
Groom's Birth Date:
Groom's Birthplace:
Groom's Age:
Bride's Name: Litpha B. Knight
Bride's Birth Date:
Bride's Birthplace:
Bride's Age:
Marriage Date: 08 Mar 1857
Marriage Place: South Kingston,Washington,Rhode Island
Groom's Father's Name:
Groom's Mother's Name:
Bride's Father's Name:
Bride's Mother's Name:
Groom's Race:
Groom's Marital Status:
Groom's Previous Wife's Name:
Bride's Race:
Bride's Marital Status:
Bride's Previous Husband's Name:
Indexing Project (Batch) Number: M50214-1
System Origin: Rhode_Island-ODM
Source Film Number: 931841
Reference Number:
Collection: Rhode Island Marriages, 1724-1916

BURIAL: Name: Zilpha Bucklin Knight Shippee
Maiden Name: Knight
Event Type: Burial
Event Date: 1895
Event Place: East Greenwich, Kent, Rhode Island, United States of America
Photograph Included: Yes
Birth Date: 18 Mar 1833
Death Date: 05 Apr 1895
Affiliate Record Identifier: 19337620
Cemetery: East Greenwich Cemetery
Citing this Record:
"Find A Grave Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QVVG-FZYS : accessed 12 June 2015), Zilpha Bucklin Knight Shippee, 1895; Burial, East Greenwich, Kent, Rhode Island, United States of America, East Greenwich Cemetery; citing record ID 19337620, Find a Grave, http://www.findagrave.com.


Lodowick Updike SHIPPEE-9865 was born on 23 Aug 1789 in East Greenwich, Kent, Rhode Island. He died on 12 Jul 1843 in East Greenwich, Kent, Rhode Island. He was buried in Shippee-Arnold Lot, East Greenwich, Kent, Rhode Island. Lodowick married Mary SPENCER-9866 on 16 Oct 1817 in East Greenwich, Kent, Rhode Island.

Mary SPENCER-9866 was born on 26 May 1796 in East Greenwich, Kent, Rhode Island. She died on 26 Apr 1873 in East Greenwich, Kent, Rhode Island. She was buried in Shippee-Arnold Lot, East Greenwich, Kent, Rhode Island. Mary married Lodowick Updike SHIPPEE-9865 on 16 Oct 1817 in East Greenwich, Kent, Rhode Island.

They had the following children.

  M i Wanton SHIPPEE-9864 was born on 27 Jul 1827. He died on 1 Aug 1909.

Alma Zemira PALMER [Parents]-9869 was born on 9 Aug 1831 in West Loughboroug, Frontenac, Ontario. He died on 22 Oct 1880 in Orderville, Kane, Utah. He was buried in Orderville Cemetery, Orderville, Kane, Utah. Alma married Caroline M JACQUES-11184 on 30 Mar 1856 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah.

Other marriages:
KNIGHT, Sally Adeline

BIOGRAPHY: BY DARYL JAMES
FROM 'JAMES/HATCH ONE MINUTE HISTORIES' (1994)
Zemira Palmer was born Aug. 9, 1831, at West Loughborough, Ontario, Canada, the sixth child of George Palmer Jr.  and Phoebe Draper Zemira's mother joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Canada when Zemira was 2, and Zemira inherited his religion from her. He remained faithful to its cause throughout his life. However, his father did not join the Church and died shortly after Phoebe's conversion. About 1834, after his father's death, Zemira came with his mother from Canada to join the Saints in Kirtland, Ohio. He remained in Kirtland until age 7, when he moved again with his mother to Illinois. In 1846, Mormon persecutors forced the Saints out of Illinois under bloody and miserable circumstances, and Zemira moved westward with his mother and new stepfather, Ebenezer Brown. On their way through Iowa, the Saints received a call from Captain James Allen to furnish 500 able-bodied men to march against Mexico with an army under the command of Colonel Stephen L. Kearny. When Ebenezer volunteered as a soldier for the battalion, Phoebe joined as a laundress in order to remain with her husband. Zemira, at the age of 14 or 15, was too young to join as a soldier, so instead joined as an orderly to Captain Allen. The Mormon battalion marched more than 2,000 miles to San Diego, Calif. Although the soldiers never saw battle, many died of thirst, hunger, and exhaustion along the way. After the ordeal was over, Phoebe confessed that she sometimes burned a little bread purposely to make it look inedible so she could give it to Zemira. After Zemira's service in the armed forces ended, he was among the battalion members who found work at Sutter's Mill in northern California. By this time he was 17 and stood about six feet high. He was present when gold was discovered and did some washing of gold on his own. He found a spot rich in gold dust and came out with enough to begin life for himself in Utah. He settled at Willow Creek in 1850, and forthwith became the second counselor in the first bishopric of the Draper ward. His uncle, William Draper, was the bishop and his other uncle, Zemira Draper, was the first counselor. Not long after this he met Sally Knight  and married her on her 15th birthday, Dec. 1, 1851, at Provo, Utah. Sally was the oldest daughter of Newel Knight and Lydia Goldthwaite. Zemira and Sally lived in Provo until about 1861, when they moved to Heber City, Utah. Two or three years before this, Zemira married as his second wife Caroline Jacques. By these two women Zemira had 20 children, 16 of which lived to adulthood. While at Heber City, Zemira served a term as Constable of Wasatch County. However, he never stayed in one place long. After six or seven years he took his family to Nevada, living first at Panaca and then at Eagle Valley. Although his motives for moving to Nevada are uncertain, he may have been lured there by the active mining industry, hoping to duplicate the success he had in California. However, after a few years the Church called him back to southern Utah to assist in promoting the cotton industry there. He operated from Springdale and Santa Clara in Washington County, but finally settled in Orderville, where he and Zemira Draper organized and supervised branches of the United Order. He loved poetry and often wrote lyrics to songs and performed them in public. He suffered ill health several years before his death and died prematurely at 49 in Orderville on Oct. 22, 1880. Sources: 1. "Phoebe Draper Palmer's Children." The Mormon Drapers, pps. 53-58 (On record at Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah). 2. Descendants of George Palmer and Phoebe Draper, pps. 445-461 (On record at Harold B. Lee Library).

OBITUARY: November  17, 1880, in the Deseret News
Died at Orderville, Kane County, Utah, October 22nd, 1880, Zemira Palmer. Brother Palmer was born in the province of upper Canada, County of Frontenac, midland district, East Laborough, August 9th, 1831. His mother was baptized by elder Brigham Young in 1833. His father, who opposed the truth, died in 1834, and in 1835 the family moved to Kirtland, Ohio, and shared the many persecutions the saints were called to endure. At Council Bluffs he sought to enlist in the Mormon battalion, but his age and feeble appearance barred his enlistment. He was, however, determined to take part in that mission, and found employment as a servant to Captain Allen, until the captain's death, when he was attached to Lieutenant Clark, and bore cheerfully all the trials of that unparalleled journey. he reached the valley in the fall of 1848. December 1st, 1851 he married Sally Knight, eldest daughter of Newell Knight. August 10th, 1857, he was ordained a member of the forty-fifth quorum of seventies. In 1863, with his own team he crossed the plains to help gather the poor. Was in the snow with the hand cart companies, and was one of the guards in Echo Canyon during the Buchanan war. In 1865 was called to southern Utah and located by direction of President E Snow at Meadow Valley. On the 11th of April, 1874, was called by President Young to take charge of the United Order at Springdale, on the Rio Virgin. Upon the breaking up of that organization he removed to Orderville, and labored with great zeal under the direction of the authorities to the day of his death. He was laboring as a carpenter, when he was taken with a pain in his stomach, and died at 4 pm the following day. Brother Palmer married two wives, and leaves a wife and 16 children, and six grand children, and a large circle of friends to mourn his loss. His death was peaceful and painless, and he departed in strong hope of the resurrection and eternal life.

MEDIA: U579 - Alma Zemira Palmer
U582 - Alma Zemira Palmer
U1894 - Alma Zemira Palmer h/o Sally Knight - http://www.josephknightfamily.org/photos/gallery/zemirapalmer.html

Caroline M JACQUES-11184 was born on 13 Aug 1841 in Northampton, Carleton, New Brunswick, Canada. She died on 16 Dec 1877 in Orderville, Kane, Utah. She was buried in Orderville Cemetery, Orderville, Kane, Utah. Caroline married Alma Zemira PALMER-9869 on 30 Mar 1856 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah.

MEDIA: U1896 - Caroline Jacques Palmer 2nd w/o Alma Zemira Palmer - http://www.zemirapalmer.blogspot.com/search/label/Joseph%20Knight

MARRIAGE: Caroline Jacques in the U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900
Name: Caroline Jacques
Gender: Female
Birth Place: Yo
Birth Year: 1841
Spouse Name: Zemira Palmer
Spouse
Birth Place: Fr
Spouse Birth Year: 1831
Number Pages: 1
Source Citation: Source number: 1810.000; Source type: Electronic Database; Number of Pages: 1; Submitter Code: LSM
Source Information: Yates Publishing. U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.
Original data: This unique collection of records was extracted from a variety of sources including family group sheets and electronic databases. Originally, the information was derived from an array of materials including pedigree charts, family history articles, querie.

BURIAL: Caroline M. Palmer in the U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current
Name: Caroline M. Palmer
Gender: F (Female)
Birth Date: 13 Aug 1841
Birth Place: Carleton, Carleton County, New Brunswick, Canada
Death Date: 16 Dec 1877
Death Place: Orderville, Kane County, Utah, United States of America
Cemetery: Orderville Cemetery
Burial or Cremation Place: Orderville, Kane County, Utah, United States of America
Has Bio?: Y
Spouse: Zemira Palmer
Children:
Susan Louisa Black
Daniel Whitmore Palmer
Sarah Arletta Cox
George Edwin Palmer
Almeda E. Cox
Ann Palmer
Mary Dell Palmer
Laura Lovina Walker
Source Information: Ancestry.com. U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.
Original data: Find A Grave. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi.


George PALMER-11185 was born on 13 Jul 1795 in Cramahe, Newcastle, Ontario. He died on 4 Dec 1833 in Loughborough. Frontenac, Midland District, Canada. George married Phebe DRAPER-11186.

MEDIA: U0580 - George Palmer

BIOGRAPHY: Little is known of George Palmer Jr. He was born July 13, 1795, somewhere in the United States or Canada. He probably moved with his family to Cramahe township, Northumberland, Ontario, Canada, in September 1797 at age 2. Hoyt Palmer, a great-grandchild of George, tells a story about George he heard from his father and uncles, who heard it from their father, Zemira Palmer: "In the rather sparsely inhabited area of `Upper Canada' where George lived, there were frequent stories among the inhabitants of a large white wolf, which a number of settlers reported having seen, and which was making inroads among their livestock, killing several small animals. "While George was out on a winter night, walking through the snow-covered countryside, he saw, a short distance ahead of him, a white object which seemed a slightly different shade from the whiteness of the snow. As he slowed down, his eyes on the suspicious object, he thought he saw it move, and prickles of apprehension raced up his spine, as he thought he might be coming upon the `white wolf.' In spite of his alarm, he quelled his mounting fears, and, seeing a sizeable stick standing up in the snow, he seized it to use as a club. Then he advanced toward the object, which still stood beside the path he was following. "As he advanced closer, he again thought he saw it move, but the night being fairly dark, he could not be certain, and as it did not flee nor come to attack him, he walked close enough to give it a hard blow with the club he had picked up. To his surprise, the club came down on an object of more firmness than he had expected, and the stick broke in two. A closer examination showed the object was merely an oddly-shaped, snow-covered stump.'' On April 4, 1812, at age 17, George joined the Canadian Army as a private in the Glengarry Light Infantry Fencibles in Kingston, Ontario, and fought against the United States in the War of 1812. He was stationed throughout the war in Canada where little fighting took place. In 1814 he was in Montreal and in the beginning of 1815 in his hometown of Cramahe. At the end of his three-year term in the military, George received land in Cramahe from the Crown of England for his service. He married Phebe Draper in 1815 and settled with her on his newly acquired land. Phebe had come to Ontario from the United States at age 10 with her family to visit her dying grandmother; after her grandmother had passed away, her family had remained in the province. George was 20 and Phebe was 18 when they got married. According to legend, George began working in Cramahe as a shoemaker. George and Phebe had their first two children in Cramahe but then sold their land and moved to nearby Haldimand, where Phebe's father lived. In Haldimand they had three more children. By 1831 George and Phebe had moved to Loughborough, Frontenac, Ontario, where their sixth child was born. In 1832 at age 8, Eliza, their fourth child, was burned to death. Missionaries from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints arrived in the area near the time of this accident. Eleazer Miller came to Loughborough in 1832 and Brigham Young arrived in 1833. Most of the Drapers accepted this new religion, but apparently George did not. When Phoebe was baptized by Brigham Young on Feb. 17, 1833, George remarked, ``So you had to get your backside wet, did you?'' Whether George would have joined the Church later is not known. He died in Canada in 1834 at age 38, leaving Phebe pregnant with their seventh child. Phebe moved to Kirtland, Ohio, with most of her children and spent the rest of her life with the Church. In 1844 Phebe had George baptized by proxy, and later the Palmer children had George and Phebe sealed together in the temple by proxy.
-- Sources: 1. "Phebe Draper Palmer Brown." The Mormon Drapers, pps. 41-52 (On record at Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah); 2. Descendants of George Palmer and Phoebe Draper, pps. 445-461 (On record at Harold B. Lee Library).

Phebe DRAPER-11186 was born on 9 Oct 1797 in Rome, Oneida, New York. She died on 28 Feb 1879 in Draper, Salt Lake, Utah. She was buried in Mar 1879 in Draper City Cemetery, Draper, Salt Lake, Utah Territory, United States. Phebe married George PALMER-11185.

MEDIA: U0581 - Phebe Draper Palmer w/o George Palmer - Ancestry.com

BIOGRAPHY: PHEBE DRAPER PALMER BROWN
The following is taken from the book "PEOPLE OF DRAPER - 1849-1924"  The History of Draper, Utah - Volume One

Lydia Lathrop Draper gave birth to her first daughter, Phebe, on October 9 1797.  Lydia and her husband William Draper Sr. and their first son, Charles, were living in Rome, Oneida County, New York.  William's parents and most of his brothers and sister had moved to Canada. Phebe moved to Ontario, Canada, with her parents when she was ten years old to see her Grandmother Draper.  An Indian guide had brought them word in February of her desire to see William and his family before she died.  They followed the guide across the eastern end of Lake Ontario as the ice creaked beneath the sleigh that carried them to this beloved pilgrim grandmother.  Her Grandmother Draper gave each of them, including Phebe, a blessing before she died, shortly after their arrival. The family stayed in Ontario, Canada, where Phebe married George Palmer when she was eighteen years old.  They had seven children.  Her fourth child, Eliza, was burned to death at the age of eight.  It was in this year of 1832 that Eleaser Miller, a Mormon missionary, introduced the gospel and, when Brigham Young came to Canada the following year, he baptized Phebe.  Her husband did not join the church and, in face, chided her for her decision.  He died in 1833, a few months before her last child was born.

A widow at thirty-seven, Phoebe took her four youngest children with her to Kirkland, Ohio, where she joined her brother, William Draper, and many other Saints from Canada.  It was here that she witnessed the real joy of the Gospel as she watched the Kirkland Temple built and dedicated.  The day after the dedication on March 28, 1836, she was given a blessing by the Prophet's father, Joseph Smith Sr.  She was promised she would have a companion who would be a man of God, if she kept the commandments and the Word of Wisdom she would have a long life and would be a pattern for her ***.  She was admonished to "trust in God and He will deliver thee in all things which thou shalt need." For the next several years her life was one of hardship and struggle as she, with her little family was driven from Kirtland to Missouri, and from there to Illinois.  Her brother William Draper helped her cross the Mississippi River.  Ebenezer Brown had accompanied them and the three families settled in Pleasantville, Pike County, Illinois.  Ebenezer's wife, Ann Weaver, died June 24, 1842, and later that year he married Phebe.  He also had four small children.  They joined their two families and from that time on followed the direction of the Lord.

When persecution followed them to Illinois, Ebenezer and Phebe moved into Nauvoo at the direction of the church.  While living in Nauvoo, Phebe was baptized for her husband, George Palmer.  They found no peace in Nauvoo as their Prophet was martyred and they, with their friends, were threatened.  They left yet another temple they had helped build, a city that had promised them a safe haven, and faced the crossing of the Mississippi River once again in the cold of winter. The summer of 1846 found the Saints in Iowa on their way west to the Rocky Mountains.  Answering the call of Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball for the able-bodied men to join Captain James Allen of the United States Army in a march against Mexico, Ebenezer, Phebe and her young son, Zemina enlisted.  This body of enlistees was named the Mormon Battalion.  Ebenezer was made a sergeant, Phebe a cook and laundress, and Zemira became an orderly to Captain Allen.  Their older children were assigned to take care of the younger children and stay with the main body of the church as they moved west.  They were mustered into service and marched to Fort Leavenworth.  Their enlistment was for twelve months and their pay was the same as other infantry volunteers.

After joining their families in the Salt Lake Valley in the fall of 1848, they spent the winter with them and then went to the southeast corner of the valley where there was ample grazing land fed by the mountain streams.  There they could raise cattle to sell to the immigrants on their way to the goldfields.  Willow Creek, as it was known them, became Phebe’s home and provided her with happy family times.  As in the past, her family and that of Ebenezer soon followed them to this peaceful and fertile spot.  Phebe's brother, William, and his family were soon to arrive and he became the first presiding elder.  By 1852 the small community had grown to about fifty families and was named Draperville.  Later, the name was shortened to Draper.  Phebe was the first lady of the town and greeted each new family as they arrived, helping the women and children fit into their new homes. Ebenezer was appointed the first Postmaster but it was Phebe who kept the office in the fort they had built.  She "kept" school for the little ones.  She was a well-read woman and had a fairly good education for that time.  Her daughter Lovina had remarried and moved to Utah Valley leaving her two young daughters with their grandmother, Phebe.

In 1853 and 1854 Ebenezer was called to practice the principle of polygamy.  With Phebe's approval he took two young wives: Mary Elizabeth Wright and Elsie Samantha Pulsipher.  Mary Elizabeth died in 1870 at the birth of her eighth child, leaving Phebe at the age of seventy-three with a third family to raise.  Elsie, who had ten children, died in 1877, two years before Phebe, also leaving a young family.  Ebenezer had built two homes, one for the young wives, as well as one for Phebe.  Phebe moved into Mary Elizabeth's home to care for that family and Mary's parents moved into the old home to raise their little grandson, Jim.  It is reported that the children from the four families Phebe had helped raise and her grandchildren as well showed her great love and devotion. Phebe was five years older that Ebenezer but she outlived him one year.  He died January 25, 1878, and Phebe February 28, 1879, at the age of eighty-two.  They are buried side by side in the Draper Cemetery. Her story is one that pales the imagination.  She was a pioneer woman of great faith, fortitude, and perseverance.  In her eighty-two years she crossed the continent from Canada to Mexico, New York to California, and back to Utah.  She traveled by foot, wagon, sleigh, horseback, and mule.  She faced starvation, thirst, angry mobs, wild bulls, the desert's burning heat as well as the bone-chilling cold of winter.  It appears that every mile and task was the answer to the call beyond her own comfort or personal desire.  That same spirit that drove the efforts of her maternal great-grandfather, the noted Reverend John Lathrop (1584-1653) who fought for religious freedom in England, seemed to propel her through life.  It was a life of devotion to God, family, and her fellowman.

She helped raise four families and some of her grandchildren.  Her dedication to The Church of Jesus Christ never wavered, but was a driving force to an eternal end.  Distinguished by the cape she wore and cushion she carried under her arm to protect her from the hard benches, heads would turn in reverence as she took her preferred seat in the chapel.  She was active in the Relief Society and known for her compassion for others.

Beverly B. Thompson, great-great-granddaughter

They had the following children.

  M i Alma Zemira PALMER-9869 was born on 9 Aug 1831. He died on 22 Oct 1880.

Joseph KNIGHT [Parents]-9870 was born on 21 Jun 1808 in Halifax, Windam, Vermont. He died on 3 Nov 1865 in Salt Lake, Salt Lake, Utah. He was buried in Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah. Joseph married Betsey COVERT-10461 on 22 Mar 1832 in Kirtland, Lake, Ohio.

Other marriages:
JOHNSON, Adeline
WELDON, Abba Jane
WOOLERTON, Mary

CENSUS: 1860 United States Federal Census
Name: Joseph Knight
Age in 1860: 52  
Birth Year: abt 1808  
Birthplace: Vermont  
Home in 1860: Great Salt Lake City Ward 19, Great Salt Lake, Utah Territory
Gender: Male  
Post Office: Great Salt Lake City
Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: Great Salt Lake City Ward 19, Great Salt Lake, Utah Territory; Roll: M653_1313; Page: 282; Image: 287.

BURIAL: Salt Lake City, Utah Cemetery Records, 1848-1992
Name: Joseph Knight
Birth Date: Jun 21, 1808  
Birth Place: Vermont  
Death Date: 4 Nov 1866
Death Place: Salt Lake City, Utah
Plot: 2824 A-7-2  
Burial Date: 4 Nov 1866
Source Information:
Ancestry.com. Salt Lake City, Utah Cemetery Records, 1848-1992 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004. Original data: This index was created from cemetery inscriptions and records from the Salt Lake City Cemetery located at 200 N. Street, Salt Lake City, Utah.

Utah Cemetery Inventory
Name: Joseph Knight
Birth Date: 21 Jun 1808
Birth Place: Vermont  
Death Date: 4 Nov 1866
Death Place: Salt Lake City, Utah
Burial Date: 4 November 1866
Cemetery: Salt Lake City Cemetery
Source: Sexton Records  
Grave Location: A-7-2--  
Source Information:
Utah State Historical Society, comp.. Utah Cemetery Inventory [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2000. Original data: Utah State Historical Society. Utah Cemetery Inventory. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: 2000.

BIOGRAPHY: Name: Joseph Knight , Jr.
Pioneer: before 1869
Birth Date: 21 Jun 1808
Death Date: 03 Nov 1866
Birth Place: Halifax, Windham, Vt.
Death Place: Salt Lake City, Utah
Donor: Darrell J. Knight
Chapter: Pioneer  
SUP-Pioneer Memorial Gallery Index Cards

Page: 001468
Name: Joseph Knight Jr.
Gender: male
Birth Date: 20 Nov 1808
Birth Place: Halifax, Windham, Vermant
Parent1: Joseph Knight Sr.
Parent2: Polly Peck
Spouse: Betsey Covert;Adeline Johnson;Abba Weldon;Mary Woolerton
Marriage Date: 22 Mar 1830;19 Nov 1847;05 Apr 1852;03 Nov 1866
Marriage Place: ;;;Salt Lake City
Departure Date: 09 Sep 1850
Departure Place: Kainsville, Io (New York, Ohio, Mo., Nauvoo
Party: Care Thomas Johnson 2nd Company
Trail: Mormon Trail
Arrival Date: 31 Dec 1850
Arrival Place: Great Salt Lake City
Religion: LDS
Place Settled: GSLC 6th So 7 2nd West
Occupation: Miller
Death Date: 03 Nov 1852
Death Place: G SLC
Burial Place: G SLC
Sources: Ancestrel File & Ordinances File His Personal Pedigree Genealogical File of Submitter
Comments: Member of Colesvile Branch; First Brancih of Church. Converted with Extended Family by Joseph Smith Bishop at Kainsville, Iowa
Sub Name: Darrell V. Knight
Sub Date: Jan 1999  
Pioneer Immigrants to Utah Territory.

Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847–1868
Knight, Joseph, Jr.
Birth Date:  21 June 1808
Death Date:  3 Nov. 1866
Gender:  Male
Age:  42
Company: Benjamin Hawkins Company (1850)
Pioneer Information: in Thomas Johnson's Fifty
Sources: Journal History, Supp. after 31 Dec. 1850, p. 2

The Miracle of the Quail
Leaving Nauvoo in the spring of 1846 was Joseph Knight Jr. and his family, including 13 year old Martha Ann. The Knights were part of the Colesville, New York Branch that had, up until this time, traveled together. Joseph Knight Sr. was unable to leave, so stayed behind in Nauvoo. Shortly after their arrival at the Missouri River, Joseph Jr. was appointed Bishop and was chosen to captain a group to return to Nauvoo to assist those, including his father and family, who had stayed behind. By this time, they had been driven from the city, being forced across the river into Iowa. They were barely surviving in what was called the “Poor Camp”. As they were about to start west, the party experienced the “Miracle of the Quails”. Several flocks of exhausted quail dropped into the camp. The hungry saints were easily able to capture and make a meal of the birds.
(Source “Pioneer Teamster, Peter Edmund Van Orden Sr.” By Bruce A Van Orden, July 2004.)

On 9 October 1846, Saints camped by Potter’s Slough participated in the “Miracle of the Quail,” when large flocks of exhausted quail flopped into the camp, landing on and under wagons and in tents. “Every man, woman and child had quails to eat for their dinner,” Thomas Bullock wrote.
(Source: Ensign, JUNE 1997 THE PIONEER TREK: NAUVOO TO WINTER QUARTERS)

More from another journal by Barbara Belinda Mills (KWNJ-MY8)
[We were] living in a dugout in the side of a hill.  The snow was very deep and the people were getting hungry and one day a great flock of quails flew into camp.  The people killed them with sticks and there was plenty to eat in camp for quite a while.

History by Joseph B. Knight, from collection of Daughters of Utah Pioneers; from Dean Jessee, BYU Studies, Vol. 17, No. 1; also from LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, by Andrew Jenson. 1951. Volume 2, page 772-773, paragraph separations added

Joseph Knight Jr. was born 21 June 1808 to Joseph Knight and Polly Peck. His father owned a farm, a gristmill and carding machine, and according to his son, Newel, "was not rich, yet possessed enough of this world's goods to secure to himself and family the necessaries and comforts of life.  His family, consisting of my mother, three sons, and four daughters, he reared in a genteel and respectable manner and gave his children a good common school education. My father was a sober, honest man, generally respected and beloved by his neighbors and acquaintances. He did not belong to any religious sect, but was a believer in the Universalian doctrine." While Joseph Smith was living in Harmony, Pennsylvania he was occasionally employed by Joseph Knight. Such was the friendship that developed between these two men that the younger Joseph confided in his employer the circumstances of the coming forth of the Book of Mormon, and the elder sent provisions from time to time for the sustenance of his friend during the translation work. When Joseph Smith obtained the Book of Mormon plates in September 1827, Knight was visiting in the Smith home in Manchester. According to Lucy Smith, her son used Knight's horse and carriage as his means of conveyance on that occasion. Late in the year of 1830, a commandment was given that the whole Church, in the state of New York, move to Ohio. At this time the Church in New York was centered around Colesville, and the Smith home in Palmyra. The little flock numbered about seventy souls.
 
The Colesville saints, led by Newel Knight, left soon after receiving this commandment. As they began to arrive in Ohio, some arrangement had to be made to settle them. At the request of Bishop Partridge, Joseph inquired of the Lord, and received the revelation recorded in Doctrine and Covenants section 55. The Colesville saints were to consecrate everything they possessed to the Bishop, and then receive from the Bishop a stewardship, according to his needs. Leman Copley had a large tract of land and offered to let the saints use it. Copley broke his agreement after a short time, and Newel Knight went to see the Prophet, who inquired of the Lord, and received the revelation recorded in Doctrine and Covenants 54. This revelation tells them to flee westward to the land of Missouri. In compliance, they made all haste to leave for the west under the leadership of Newel Knight.
 
Sometime later Joseph came to Independence and met with the Colesville group. The question uppermost in many minds was, “Where is the place of our inheritance? Where is the City of Zion to be built? Where shall the temple stand?” A few days after his arrival, Joseph received a revelation in which it was announced that Missouri was the land, and Independence its center. The saints were instructed to buy land. In August, the Colesville group laid the foundation for the first house to be built there. It was to be a log structure. The first log was carried to the site by twelve men representing the Twelve Tribes. One of the men was the Prophet. So the Knights were some of the first to settle in Independence, Missouri, and live the Law of Consecration. On August 6, 1831, Polly Peck, wife of Joseph Knight Sr., died. The following day the Prophet attended and spoke at her funeral. This was the first death to occur in Independence.
 
After they had built houses for the members and were comfortably settled, Joseph Knight Jr. went to work by the day to earn money to buy millstones and iron to build a mill. He had previously been in the milling business at Colesville. The saints had been eating their corn whole up to this time. He built the first mill that was built in Jackson County by the church. He also fixed up the first printing plant, built the shelves and counters for the first store and ground the corn and grain for the saints.
 
The battle of the Big Horn was fought about a mile from his mill, and he could hear the guns, which were the first that were fired at the saints in Jackson County. They finally had to leave Independence, and scatter in all directions. Mr. Knight said that he witnessed women and children walking all hours of the night, with bare feet on the frozen ground, crying from the effects of the cold. He kept grinding for and feeding the saints and was the last to leave. He took meal and flour with him and distributed it among the destitute saints. He and his brother Newel, bought a piece of land and built another grist mil. It was not quite finished when they were again attacked. In 1837 they left their mill, not even getting the price of the stones for it, and moved to Far West, an uninhabited spot fifty miles north of his home in Clay County. While still in Jackson County, Joseph Knight Jr. married Betsey Covert, and started raising a family. In all he had six children, born in different places, as they were driven from place to place.
 
At Far West, he bought sixty-one acres of land, and built another house and said he got comfortable again. They had three children at Far West. In the spring of 1838, he was taken ill and thought he was going to die. About a year later another mob came against them, and they were forced to leave the State. In the fall of 1838, he sold a piece of land and bought a team and wagon, which he loaned to the committee to use in moving the saints out of the state. He never saw it again. He says that he gave up all of his loose property to help the poor. In April 1839, he left with his family and that of a widow, with a borrowed team and wagon. They traveled one hundred miles to Keytsville and then returned the wagon to get the last family.
 
The next stop was Lima, Illinois, where he built another house and went to work to support his family. In the spring of 1840, he moved to Nauvoo, and built another house and a steam mill, he tended and plant at night, the fire and the engine alone. In 1844, the Prophet asked him to go to LaHarp and tend a mill for Stephen Markham which. In January 1846, he was ordained a High Priest by Isaac Morley, in the Nauvoo Temple. Sunday January 19, 1840, the High Council voted to give father Knight (Joseph Knight Sr.) a house and lot. Later they voted to give Joseph Knight Jr. a lot.
 
June 27, 1844, Joseph Smith was murdered by a mob in Carthage Jail, Hancock County, Illinois. Persecution continued and in February 1846, a large company of pioneers left Nauvoo for the purpose of finding a place where they might gather and dwell in peace. The season was unfavorable, and provisions scarce, so their progress was slow, and it became necessary to leave a portion of the company in the wilderness, at a place called Garden Grove, and another group at Mount Pisgah, Iowa, where Joseph Knight Sr. died in 1847. Newel Knight was captain of one company, and Brigham Young advised them to find a place where they could camp for the winter. Their camp was located at Pomca, on the bank of the Niebara River. Newel was taken ill, and died the morning of January 11, 1847, leaving his wife with seven children. The following summer, Lydia gave birth to a baby boy August 26, 1847. In 1908, Jesse Knight, son of Newel, erected a monument in honor of his father and the other saints that had sacrificed their lives for the sake of the Gospel, and were buried there in that little cemetery with him.
 
In a letter written to Hyrum Knight by President George Albert Smith, at the time the monument was dedicated, he made the following statement. “The monument to Newel Knight erected by your family is one to a man that was healed by the power of God, when the adversary sought to destroy him. It was the first Miracle in the Church, and is so recorded in Church history, and it is fitting that a substantial monument should mark the place where he lies. No better blood flows in the veins of any person than you have in yours.”

The balance of the pioneers, after searching the route, making the road, and a multitude of bridges over streams for more than three hundred miles through Indian country in Iowa, arrived at Council Bluffs, on the Missouri River, during the latter part of June. This is where they met Capt. J. Allen, soliciting them to enlist 500 men in the service of the United States. To this call the pioneers promptly responded, and before the middle of July more than 500 of the Brethren left on the long march to California, leaving hundreds of wagons and families, and protectors, on the open prairie, in savage country. A small group pressed on as far west as Pawnee Mission, where, finding it was too late to pass the mountains, they turned aside to winter on the banks of the Missouri River. While the greater numbers of feeble members located at the place called Winter Quarters, where seven hundred houses were built in the short space of three months. In July, there were more than 2000 wagons between here and Nauvoo. Joseph Knight Jr. spent the winter of 1847-1848 here, and their three year old daughter, Orpha Florilla, died 20 October 1847. She is buried in the Mormon cemetery. He crossed the plains with the Thomas Johnson company, captained by Benjamin Hawkins, December 31, 1850.
 
Joseph Knight Jr. worried because he had no living sons to carry on his name. His only son died at age six years. He must have made this known to Brigham young, who suggested that he marry Mary Woolerton, who would give him some. He followed Brigham’s advice. The first child was a girl, who died the same year. The next two were boys, Miland and Joseph. Milland and his wife, Sarah Ann Jones, had twelve children, ten of which were sons. Joseph and his wife, Andrine Winberg, had seven, three of which were sons. So President Young’s prediction proved to be correct.
 
Joseph Knight Sr. died at the age of seventy-five, the last few years of his life his health was bad. The Prophet referred to him as one whose body was “trembling, broken and tortured.” He and the Prophet met on the street one day and the Prophet gave him the cane he was using, saying to him, “Take this cane, Brother Knight, and use it. You need it more than I do.” At the same time he gave him a blessing and suggested that the cane be handed down to the Josephs in the Knight family. There are at the present writing, four generations of them. - Familysearch.org

On 9 October 1846, Saints camped by Potter’s Slough participated in the “Miracle of the Quail,” when large flocks of exhausted quail flopped into the camp, landing on and under wagons and in tents. “Every man, woman and child had quails to eat for their dinner,” Thomas Bullock wrote.
 
(Source: Ensign, JUNE 1997 THE PIONEER TREK: NAUVOO TO WINTER QUARTERS)

More from another journal by Barbara Belinda Mills (KWNJ-MY8)
[We were] living in a dugout in the side of a hill.  The snow was very deep and the people were getting hungry and one day a great flock of quails flew into camp.  The people killed them with sticks and there was plenty to eat in camp for quite a while.

Betsey COVERT-10461 was born on 27 Jul 1813 in Mayfield, Cuyahoga, Ohio. She died on 5 May 1876 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah. She was buried in Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah. Betsey married Joseph KNIGHT-9870 on 22 Mar 1832 in Kirtland, Lake, Ohio.

BIOGRAPHY: Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847–1868
Knight, Betsey Covert
Birth Date:  27 July 1813
Death Date:  5 May 1876
Gender:  Female
Age:  35
Company: Benjamin Hawkins Company (1850)

Betsy Covert Knight  
https://familysearch.org/photos/stories/9533589
23 August 2014
Betsy Covert Knight
BIRTHDATE:         27 June 1813  Mayfield (Cleveland), Cuyahoga Co., Ohio
DEATH:                5 May 1876  Salt Lake City, Utah
PARENTS:            James Covert and Martha Judd Covert
PIONEER:             12 September 1850  Thomas Johnson Wagon Train
SPOUSE:              Joseph Knight Jr.  Married 22 March 1832  Kirtland, Ohio
DEATH SP:           3 Nov. 1866  Salt Lake City, Utah
CHILDREN:           Martha Ann, 11 Jun 1833             Mary Elizabeth, 16 Jun 1836
               Rhoda Caroline, 14 Mar 1839      Joseph James, 25 Dec 1841
               Orpha Floilla, 24 Dec. 1844         Ellen Rebecca, 8 May 1848

Betsy was born in Ohio, 1813, in the little town of Mayfield, outside of Cleveland, Ohio. Of sixteen children she was the only one to join the Church. Betsy married Joseph just before her 19th birthday in Kirtland, Ohio. The Knight family was ask to remain together and settle in Thompson, sixteen miles from Kirtland. They were the first Saints to try the United Order on land that was part of Leman Copely’s before the Ohio Saints were asked to consecrate their holdings to the Church. Mr. Copely refused to do so and was excommunicated. He retaliated by ordering the Saints off his property and to pay sixty dollars for damages. Three weeks after the birth of their child at Far West a mob drove them from their home, leaving the stock and every thing that could not be hastily thrown into their wagon. For the next few years they were driven until they crossed the Mississippi. When they got to Nauvoo in 1839, they were with out possessions and life was very hard. They lived in a house close to the Temple. Mary Elizabeth recorded that their mother took them to the Bowery by the Temple where they saw the Prophet Joseph Smith. Four years of peace existed before the mobs again attacked them, (Betsy and her children would hide in the basement) and once again they had to flee. Their flight was so sudden they had taken nothing with them and joined those in the “poor camp” stranded on the banks of the Mississippi until some one could rescue them. Hungry, sick and faint for want of food, a miracle happened! The sky began to darken, looking up they saw hundreds of quail alighting among them in the camp and all around, they were caught so easily by hand, like “manna from heaven” and their lives were saved. The Knights left for Winter Quarters where their lives were little better. Two children died, John Joseph in Nauvoo, Orpha in Winter Quarters. They lived in Kanesville long enough to earn provisions. The family left for Utah in 1850. The whole family caught measles, water was scarce and they were frightened by the thought of Indians and the buffalo herd. In Salt Lake they located in one of the adobe houses in the old fort. Their food was plain, their dresses dyed wagon covers. Faith and courage characterized Betsy’s life. She was a widow for ten years when she died at the age of sixty-three in Salt Lake City.

They had the following children.

  F i Martha Ann KNIGHT-10462 was born on 11 Jun 1833. She died on 10 Jan 1919 from Cancer of the stomach.
  F ii Mary Elizabeth KNIGHT-10463 was born on 16 Jun 1836. She died on 16 Nov 1926 from Cardiovascular - Renal disease - Senility.
  F iii Rhoda Caroline KNIGHT-10464 was born on 14 Mar 1839. She died on 20 Feb 1920 from Gangrene - progressive dry involving feet and left hand.
  M iv
Joseph James KNIGHT-10465 was born on 25 Dec 1841 in Gallatin, Clay, Missouri. He died on 2 Feb 1846.
  F v
Orpha Floilla KNIGHT-10466 was born on 24 Dec 1845 in Gallatin, Clay, Missouri. She died on 20 Oct 1847 in Winter Quarters, Douglas, Nebraska. She was buried in Winter Quarters Cemetery, Douglas, Nebraska.



BURIAL: A "Grave" Experience at the Mormon Pioneer Winter Quarters Cemetery. By Carlyle B. Jensen and Gail Geo. Holmes, Published by Authors October 1999. The record is a Commencement to bury in the burying ground at Winter Quarters, North West Corner. Spellings, dates and etc. are as written in the original record - mistakes and all."
Stated in record above for Orpha Knight daugher of Betsy Knight, "Orpha Knight; age 2 yrs., 9 mos., 26 days; daughter of Joseph and Betsy Knight; deceased Oct. 20, 1847; disease canker; birthplace Nauvoo, Ill.; brithdate Dec. 24, 1845; grave no. 251." (Note: No gravestone marker exists at the Mormon Pioneer Winter Quarters Cemetery, there is a large plague with all the names of those buried here. wck)
  F vi
Ellen Rebecca KNIGHT-10467 was born on 8 Mar 1848 in Gallatin, Clay, Missouri. She died on 5 Jan 1854 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah.



DEATH: UTGenWeb-Salt Lake County
Deseret News Weekly Death and Marriage Notices
16 March 1854
Died, Salt Lake City, 05 Jan 1854, Ellen Rebecca daughter of Joseph and Betsey KNIGHT, 4 years 9 months 28 days.

BIOGRAPHY: Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847–1868
Knight, Ellen Rebecca
Birth Date:  8 Mar. 1848
Death Date:  5 Jan. 1854
Gender:  Female
Age:  1
Company: Benjamin Hawkins Company (1850)
  M vii
John Joseph KNIGHT-34127 was born in Nauvoo, Stone, Missouri.

Joseph KNIGHT [Parents]-9870 was born on 21 Jun 1808 in Halifax, Windam, Vermont. He died on 3 Nov 1865 in Salt Lake, Salt Lake, Utah. He was buried in Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah. Joseph married Adeline JOHNSON-11071 on 19 Nov 1847.

Other marriages:
COVERT, Betsey
WELDON, Abba Jane
WOOLERTON, Mary

CENSUS: 1860 United States Federal Census
Name: Joseph Knight
Age in 1860: 52  
Birth Year: abt 1808  
Birthplace: Vermont  
Home in 1860: Great Salt Lake City Ward 19, Great Salt Lake, Utah Territory
Gender: Male  
Post Office: Great Salt Lake City
Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: Great Salt Lake City Ward 19, Great Salt Lake, Utah Territory; Roll: M653_1313; Page: 282; Image: 287.

BURIAL: Salt Lake City, Utah Cemetery Records, 1848-1992
Name: Joseph Knight
Birth Date: Jun 21, 1808  
Birth Place: Vermont  
Death Date: 4 Nov 1866
Death Place: Salt Lake City, Utah
Plot: 2824 A-7-2  
Burial Date: 4 Nov 1866
Source Information:
Ancestry.com. Salt Lake City, Utah Cemetery Records, 1848-1992 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004. Original data: This index was created from cemetery inscriptions and records from the Salt Lake City Cemetery located at 200 N. Street, Salt Lake City, Utah.

Utah Cemetery Inventory
Name: Joseph Knight
Birth Date: 21 Jun 1808
Birth Place: Vermont  
Death Date: 4 Nov 1866
Death Place: Salt Lake City, Utah
Burial Date: 4 November 1866
Cemetery: Salt Lake City Cemetery
Source: Sexton Records  
Grave Location: A-7-2--  
Source Information:
Utah State Historical Society, comp.. Utah Cemetery Inventory [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2000. Original data: Utah State Historical Society. Utah Cemetery Inventory. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: 2000.

BIOGRAPHY: Name: Joseph Knight , Jr.
Pioneer: before 1869
Birth Date: 21 Jun 1808
Death Date: 03 Nov 1866
Birth Place: Halifax, Windham, Vt.
Death Place: Salt Lake City, Utah
Donor: Darrell J. Knight
Chapter: Pioneer  
SUP-Pioneer Memorial Gallery Index Cards

Page: 001468
Name: Joseph Knight Jr.
Gender: male
Birth Date: 20 Nov 1808
Birth Place: Halifax, Windham, Vermant
Parent1: Joseph Knight Sr.
Parent2: Polly Peck
Spouse: Betsey Covert;Adeline Johnson;Abba Weldon;Mary Woolerton
Marriage Date: 22 Mar 1830;19 Nov 1847;05 Apr 1852;03 Nov 1866
Marriage Place: ;;;Salt Lake City
Departure Date: 09 Sep 1850
Departure Place: Kainsville, Io (New York, Ohio, Mo., Nauvoo
Party: Care Thomas Johnson 2nd Company
Trail: Mormon Trail
Arrival Date: 31 Dec 1850
Arrival Place: Great Salt Lake City
Religion: LDS
Place Settled: GSLC 6th So 7 2nd West
Occupation: Miller
Death Date: 03 Nov 1852
Death Place: G SLC
Burial Place: G SLC
Sources: Ancestrel File & Ordinances File His Personal Pedigree Genealogical File of Submitter
Comments: Member of Colesvile Branch; First Brancih of Church. Converted with Extended Family by Joseph Smith Bishop at Kainsville, Iowa
Sub Name: Darrell V. Knight
Sub Date: Jan 1999  
Pioneer Immigrants to Utah Territory.

Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847–1868
Knight, Joseph, Jr.
Birth Date:  21 June 1808
Death Date:  3 Nov. 1866
Gender:  Male
Age:  42
Company: Benjamin Hawkins Company (1850)
Pioneer Information: in Thomas Johnson's Fifty
Sources: Journal History, Supp. after 31 Dec. 1850, p. 2

The Miracle of the Quail
Leaving Nauvoo in the spring of 1846 was Joseph Knight Jr. and his family, including 13 year old Martha Ann. The Knights were part of the Colesville, New York Branch that had, up until this time, traveled together. Joseph Knight Sr. was unable to leave, so stayed behind in Nauvoo. Shortly after their arrival at the Missouri River, Joseph Jr. was appointed Bishop and was chosen to captain a group to return to Nauvoo to assist those, including his father and family, who had stayed behind. By this time, they had been driven from the city, being forced across the river into Iowa. They were barely surviving in what was called the “Poor Camp”. As they were about to start west, the party experienced the “Miracle of the Quails”. Several flocks of exhausted quail dropped into the camp. The hungry saints were easily able to capture and make a meal of the birds.
(Source “Pioneer Teamster, Peter Edmund Van Orden Sr.” By Bruce A Van Orden, July 2004.)

On 9 October 1846, Saints camped by Potter’s Slough participated in the “Miracle of the Quail,” when large flocks of exhausted quail flopped into the camp, landing on and under wagons and in tents. “Every man, woman and child had quails to eat for their dinner,” Thomas Bullock wrote.
(Source: Ensign, JUNE 1997 THE PIONEER TREK: NAUVOO TO WINTER QUARTERS)

More from another journal by Barbara Belinda Mills (KWNJ-MY8)
[We were] living in a dugout in the side of a hill.  The snow was very deep and the people were getting hungry and one day a great flock of quails flew into camp.  The people killed them with sticks and there was plenty to eat in camp for quite a while.

History by Joseph B. Knight, from collection of Daughters of Utah Pioneers; from Dean Jessee, BYU Studies, Vol. 17, No. 1; also from LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, by Andrew Jenson. 1951. Volume 2, page 772-773, paragraph separations added

Joseph Knight Jr. was born 21 June 1808 to Joseph Knight and Polly Peck. His father owned a farm, a gristmill and carding machine, and according to his son, Newel, "was not rich, yet possessed enough of this world's goods to secure to himself and family the necessaries and comforts of life.  His family, consisting of my mother, three sons, and four daughters, he reared in a genteel and respectable manner and gave his children a good common school education. My father was a sober, honest man, generally respected and beloved by his neighbors and acquaintances. He did not belong to any religious sect, but was a believer in the Universalian doctrine." While Joseph Smith was living in Harmony, Pennsylvania he was occasionally employed by Joseph Knight. Such was the friendship that developed between these two men that the younger Joseph confided in his employer the circumstances of the coming forth of the Book of Mormon, and the elder sent provisions from time to time for the sustenance of his friend during the translation work. When Joseph Smith obtained the Book of Mormon plates in September 1827, Knight was visiting in the Smith home in Manchester. According to Lucy Smith, her son used Knight's horse and carriage as his means of conveyance on that occasion. Late in the year of 1830, a commandment was given that the whole Church, in the state of New York, move to Ohio. At this time the Church in New York was centered around Colesville, and the Smith home in Palmyra. The little flock numbered about seventy souls.
 
The Colesville saints, led by Newel Knight, left soon after receiving this commandment. As they began to arrive in Ohio, some arrangement had to be made to settle them. At the request of Bishop Partridge, Joseph inquired of the Lord, and received the revelation recorded in Doctrine and Covenants section 55. The Colesville saints were to consecrate everything they possessed to the Bishop, and then receive from the Bishop a stewardship, according to his needs. Leman Copley had a large tract of land and offered to let the saints use it. Copley broke his agreement after a short time, and Newel Knight went to see the Prophet, who inquired of the Lord, and received the revelation recorded in Doctrine and Covenants 54. This revelation tells them to flee westward to the land of Missouri. In compliance, they made all haste to leave for the west under the leadership of Newel Knight.
 
Sometime later Joseph came to Independence and met with the Colesville group. The question uppermost in many minds was, “Where is the place of our inheritance? Where is the City of Zion to be built? Where shall the temple stand?” A few days after his arrival, Joseph received a revelation in which it was announced that Missouri was the land, and Independence its center. The saints were instructed to buy land. In August, the Colesville group laid the foundation for the first house to be built there. It was to be a log structure. The first log was carried to the site by twelve men representing the Twelve Tribes. One of the men was the Prophet. So the Knights were some of the first to settle in Independence, Missouri, and live the Law of Consecration. On August 6, 1831, Polly Peck, wife of Joseph Knight Sr., died. The following day the Prophet attended and spoke at her funeral. This was the first death to occur in Independence.
 
After they had built houses for the members and were comfortably settled, Joseph Knight Jr. went to work by the day to earn money to buy millstones and iron to build a mill. He had previously been in the milling business at Colesville. The saints had been eating their corn whole up to this time. He built the first mill that was built in Jackson County by the church. He also fixed up the first printing plant, built the shelves and counters for the first store and ground the corn and grain for the saints.
 
The battle of the Big Horn was fought about a mile from his mill, and he could hear the guns, which were the first that were fired at the saints in Jackson County. They finally had to leave Independence, and scatter in all directions. Mr. Knight said that he witnessed women and children walking all hours of the night, with bare feet on the frozen ground, crying from the effects of the cold. He kept grinding for and feeding the saints and was the last to leave. He took meal and flour with him and distributed it among the destitute saints. He and his brother Newel, bought a piece of land and built another grist mil. It was not quite finished when they were again attacked. In 1837 they left their mill, not even getting the price of the stones for it, and moved to Far West, an uninhabited spot fifty miles north of his home in Clay County. While still in Jackson County, Joseph Knight Jr. married Betsey Covert, and started raising a family. In all he had six children, born in different places, as they were driven from place to place.
 
At Far West, he bought sixty-one acres of land, and built another house and said he got comfortable again. They had three children at Far West. In the spring of 1838, he was taken ill and thought he was going to die. About a year later another mob came against them, and they were forced to leave the State. In the fall of 1838, he sold a piece of land and bought a team and wagon, which he loaned to the committee to use in moving the saints out of the state. He never saw it again. He says that he gave up all of his loose property to help the poor. In April 1839, he left with his family and that of a widow, with a borrowed team and wagon. They traveled one hundred miles to Keytsville and then returned the wagon to get the last family.
 
The next stop was Lima, Illinois, where he built another house and went to work to support his family. In the spring of 1840, he moved to Nauvoo, and built another house and a steam mill, he tended and plant at night, the fire and the engine alone. In 1844, the Prophet asked him to go to LaHarp and tend a mill for Stephen Markham which. In January 1846, he was ordained a High Priest by Isaac Morley, in the Nauvoo Temple. Sunday January 19, 1840, the High Council voted to give father Knight (Joseph Knight Sr.) a house and lot. Later they voted to give Joseph Knight Jr. a lot.
 
June 27, 1844, Joseph Smith was murdered by a mob in Carthage Jail, Hancock County, Illinois. Persecution continued and in February 1846, a large company of pioneers left Nauvoo for the purpose of finding a place where they might gather and dwell in peace. The season was unfavorable, and provisions scarce, so their progress was slow, and it became necessary to leave a portion of the company in the wilderness, at a place called Garden Grove, and another group at Mount Pisgah, Iowa, where Joseph Knight Sr. died in 1847. Newel Knight was captain of one company, and Brigham Young advised them to find a place where they could camp for the winter. Their camp was located at Pomca, on the bank of the Niebara River. Newel was taken ill, and died the morning of January 11, 1847, leaving his wife with seven children. The following summer, Lydia gave birth to a baby boy August 26, 1847. In 1908, Jesse Knight, son of Newel, erected a monument in honor of his father and the other saints that had sacrificed their lives for the sake of the Gospel, and were buried there in that little cemetery with him.
 
In a letter written to Hyrum Knight by President George Albert Smith, at the time the monument was dedicated, he made the following statement. “The monument to Newel Knight erected by your family is one to a man that was healed by the power of God, when the adversary sought to destroy him. It was the first Miracle in the Church, and is so recorded in Church history, and it is fitting that a substantial monument should mark the place where he lies. No better blood flows in the veins of any person than you have in yours.”

The balance of the pioneers, after searching the route, making the road, and a multitude of bridges over streams for more than three hundred miles through Indian country in Iowa, arrived at Council Bluffs, on the Missouri River, during the latter part of June. This is where they met Capt. J. Allen, soliciting them to enlist 500 men in the service of the United States. To this call the pioneers promptly responded, and before the middle of July more than 500 of the Brethren left on the long march to California, leaving hundreds of wagons and families, and protectors, on the open prairie, in savage country. A small group pressed on as far west as Pawnee Mission, where, finding it was too late to pass the mountains, they turned aside to winter on the banks of the Missouri River. While the greater numbers of feeble members located at the place called Winter Quarters, where seven hundred houses were built in the short space of three months. In July, there were more than 2000 wagons between here and Nauvoo. Joseph Knight Jr. spent the winter of 1847-1848 here, and their three year old daughter, Orpha Florilla, died 20 October 1847. She is buried in the Mormon cemetery. He crossed the plains with the Thomas Johnson company, captained by Benjamin Hawkins, December 31, 1850.
 
Joseph Knight Jr. worried because he had no living sons to carry on his name. His only son died at age six years. He must have made this known to Brigham young, who suggested that he marry Mary Woolerton, who would give him some. He followed Brigham’s advice. The first child was a girl, who died the same year. The next two were boys, Miland and Joseph. Milland and his wife, Sarah Ann Jones, had twelve children, ten of which were sons. Joseph and his wife, Andrine Winberg, had seven, three of which were sons. So President Young’s prediction proved to be correct.
 
Joseph Knight Sr. died at the age of seventy-five, the last few years of his life his health was bad. The Prophet referred to him as one whose body was “trembling, broken and tortured.” He and the Prophet met on the street one day and the Prophet gave him the cane he was using, saying to him, “Take this cane, Brother Knight, and use it. You need it more than I do.” At the same time he gave him a blessing and suggested that the cane be handed down to the Josephs in the Knight family. There are at the present writing, four generations of them. - Familysearch.org

On 9 October 1846, Saints camped by Potter’s Slough participated in the “Miracle of the Quail,” when large flocks of exhausted quail flopped into the camp, landing on and under wagons and in tents. “Every man, woman and child had quails to eat for their dinner,” Thomas Bullock wrote.
 
(Source: Ensign, JUNE 1997 THE PIONEER TREK: NAUVOO TO WINTER QUARTERS)

More from another journal by Barbara Belinda Mills (KWNJ-MY8)
[We were] living in a dugout in the side of a hill.  The snow was very deep and the people were getting hungry and one day a great flock of quails flew into camp.  The people killed them with sticks and there was plenty to eat in camp for quite a while.

Adeline JOHNSON-11071 was born on 21 May 1830 in Johnson, Ripley, Indiana. She died on 27 Dec 1874 in Provo, Utah, Utah. Adeline married Joseph KNIGHT-9870 on 19 Nov 1847.

BIRTH: Adaline Johnson in the Membership of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1830-1848
Name: Adaline Johnson
Gender: Female
Relationship to Primary Person: Self (Head)
Birth Date: 21 May 1830
Birth Place: Johnson, Ripley, Indiana
LDS Temple Ordinance Data: Endowment Date: January 31, 1846 Temple: Nauvoo, Hancock, IL, USA
Comments: Adaline and Richard were married by W. S. Hathaway. Comments: #21. April 2, 1845 Nauvoo Neighbor.
Household Members:
Name Relation
Adaline Johnson Self (Head)
Richard Bush Spouse
Source Information: Ancestry.com. Membership of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1830-1848 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2013.
Original data: Black, Susan Easton, compiler. Membership of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1830–1848. 50 vols. Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University Religious Studies Center, 1989. Private Donor.

MARRAIGE: Adeline Johnson in the Marriages in the Nauvoo Region, 1839-1845
Name: Adeline Johnson
Gender: Female
Birth Date: 21 May 1830
Birth Place: Johnson Township, Ripley, Indiana, USA
Marriage Date: 23 Mar 1845
Marriage Place: USA
Spouse's name: Richard Bush
Source Information: Ancestry.com. Marriages in the Nauvoo Region, 1839-1845 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2013.
Original data: Black, Susan Easton. Marriages in the Nauvoo Region, 1839–1845. Provo, Utah, 1981. Private Donor.

BIOGRAPHY: Adaline Johnson in the Membership of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1830-1848
Name: Adaline Johnson
Gender: Female
Relationship to Primary Person: Self (Head)
Birth Date: 21 May 1830
Birth Place: Johnson, Ripley, Indiana
LDS Temple Ordinance Data: Endowment Date: January 31, 1846 Temple: Nauvoo, Hancock, IL, USA
Comments: Adaline and Richard were married by W. S. Hathaway. Comments: #21. April 2, 1845 Nauvoo Neighbor.
Household Members:
Name Relation
Adaline Johnson Self (Head)
Richard Bush Spouse
Source Information: Ancestry.com. Membership of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1830-1848 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2013.
Original data: Black, Susan Easton, compiler. Membership of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1830–1848. 50 vols. Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University Religious Studies Center, 1989. Private Donor.


Joseph KNIGHT [Parents]-9870 was born on 21 Jun 1808 in Halifax, Windam, Vermont. He died on 3 Nov 1865 in Salt Lake, Salt Lake, Utah. He was buried in Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah. Joseph married Abba Jane WELDON-11072 on 5 Apr 1852 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah.

Other marriages:
COVERT, Betsey
JOHNSON, Adeline
WOOLERTON, Mary

CENSUS: 1860 United States Federal Census
Name: Joseph Knight
Age in 1860: 52  
Birth Year: abt 1808  
Birthplace: Vermont  
Home in 1860: Great Salt Lake City Ward 19, Great Salt Lake, Utah Territory
Gender: Male  
Post Office: Great Salt Lake City
Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: Great Salt Lake City Ward 19, Great Salt Lake, Utah Territory; Roll: M653_1313; Page: 282; Image: 287.

BURIAL: Salt Lake City, Utah Cemetery Records, 1848-1992
Name: Joseph Knight
Birth Date: Jun 21, 1808  
Birth Place: Vermont  
Death Date: 4 Nov 1866
Death Place: Salt Lake City, Utah
Plot: 2824 A-7-2  
Burial Date: 4 Nov 1866
Source Information:
Ancestry.com. Salt Lake City, Utah Cemetery Records, 1848-1992 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004. Original data: This index was created from cemetery inscriptions and records from the Salt Lake City Cemetery located at 200 N. Street, Salt Lake City, Utah.

Utah Cemetery Inventory
Name: Joseph Knight
Birth Date: 21 Jun 1808
Birth Place: Vermont  
Death Date: 4 Nov 1866
Death Place: Salt Lake City, Utah
Burial Date: 4 November 1866
Cemetery: Salt Lake City Cemetery
Source: Sexton Records  
Grave Location: A-7-2--  
Source Information:
Utah State Historical Society, comp.. Utah Cemetery Inventory [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2000. Original data: Utah State Historical Society. Utah Cemetery Inventory. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: 2000.

BIOGRAPHY: Name: Joseph Knight , Jr.
Pioneer: before 1869
Birth Date: 21 Jun 1808
Death Date: 03 Nov 1866
Birth Place: Halifax, Windham, Vt.
Death Place: Salt Lake City, Utah
Donor: Darrell J. Knight
Chapter: Pioneer  
SUP-Pioneer Memorial Gallery Index Cards

Page: 001468
Name: Joseph Knight Jr.
Gender: male
Birth Date: 20 Nov 1808
Birth Place: Halifax, Windham, Vermant
Parent1: Joseph Knight Sr.
Parent2: Polly Peck
Spouse: Betsey Covert;Adeline Johnson;Abba Weldon;Mary Woolerton
Marriage Date: 22 Mar 1830;19 Nov 1847;05 Apr 1852;03 Nov 1866
Marriage Place: ;;;Salt Lake City
Departure Date: 09 Sep 1850
Departure Place: Kainsville, Io (New York, Ohio, Mo., Nauvoo
Party: Care Thomas Johnson 2nd Company
Trail: Mormon Trail
Arrival Date: 31 Dec 1850
Arrival Place: Great Salt Lake City
Religion: LDS
Place Settled: GSLC 6th So 7 2nd West
Occupation: Miller
Death Date: 03 Nov 1852
Death Place: G SLC
Burial Place: G SLC
Sources: Ancestrel File & Ordinances File His Personal Pedigree Genealogical File of Submitter
Comments: Member of Colesvile Branch; First Brancih of Church. Converted with Extended Family by Joseph Smith Bishop at Kainsville, Iowa
Sub Name: Darrell V. Knight
Sub Date: Jan 1999  
Pioneer Immigrants to Utah Territory.

Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847–1868
Knight, Joseph, Jr.
Birth Date:  21 June 1808
Death Date:  3 Nov. 1866
Gender:  Male
Age:  42
Company: Benjamin Hawkins Company (1850)
Pioneer Information: in Thomas Johnson's Fifty
Sources: Journal History, Supp. after 31 Dec. 1850, p. 2

The Miracle of the Quail
Leaving Nauvoo in the spring of 1846 was Joseph Knight Jr. and his family, including 13 year old Martha Ann. The Knights were part of the Colesville, New York Branch that had, up until this time, traveled together. Joseph Knight Sr. was unable to leave, so stayed behind in Nauvoo. Shortly after their arrival at the Missouri River, Joseph Jr. was appointed Bishop and was chosen to captain a group to return to Nauvoo to assist those, including his father and family, who had stayed behind. By this time, they had been driven from the city, being forced across the river into Iowa. They were barely surviving in what was called the “Poor Camp”. As they were about to start west, the party experienced the “Miracle of the Quails”. Several flocks of exhausted quail dropped into the camp. The hungry saints were easily able to capture and make a meal of the birds.
(Source “Pioneer Teamster, Peter Edmund Van Orden Sr.” By Bruce A Van Orden, July 2004.)

On 9 October 1846, Saints camped by Potter’s Slough participated in the “Miracle of the Quail,” when large flocks of exhausted quail flopped into the camp, landing on and under wagons and in tents. “Every man, woman and child had quails to eat for their dinner,” Thomas Bullock wrote.
(Source: Ensign, JUNE 1997 THE PIONEER TREK: NAUVOO TO WINTER QUARTERS)

More from another journal by Barbara Belinda Mills (KWNJ-MY8)
[We were] living in a dugout in the side of a hill.  The snow was very deep and the people were getting hungry and one day a great flock of quails flew into camp.  The people killed them with sticks and there was plenty to eat in camp for quite a while.

History by Joseph B. Knight, from collection of Daughters of Utah Pioneers; from Dean Jessee, BYU Studies, Vol. 17, No. 1; also from LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, by Andrew Jenson. 1951. Volume 2, page 772-773, paragraph separations added

Joseph Knight Jr. was born 21 June 1808 to Joseph Knight and Polly Peck. His father owned a farm, a gristmill and carding machine, and according to his son, Newel, "was not rich, yet possessed enough of this world's goods to secure to himself and family the necessaries and comforts of life.  His family, consisting of my mother, three sons, and four daughters, he reared in a genteel and respectable manner and gave his children a good common school education. My father was a sober, honest man, generally respected and beloved by his neighbors and acquaintances. He did not belong to any religious sect, but was a believer in the Universalian doctrine." While Joseph Smith was living in Harmony, Pennsylvania he was occasionally employed by Joseph Knight. Such was the friendship that developed between these two men that the younger Joseph confided in his employer the circumstances of the coming forth of the Book of Mormon, and the elder sent provisions from time to time for the sustenance of his friend during the translation work. When Joseph Smith obtained the Book of Mormon plates in September 1827, Knight was visiting in the Smith home in Manchester. According to Lucy Smith, her son used Knight's horse and carriage as his means of conveyance on that occasion. Late in the year of 1830, a commandment was given that the whole Church, in the state of New York, move to Ohio. At this time the Church in New York was centered around Colesville, and the Smith home in Palmyra. The little flock numbered about seventy souls.
 
The Colesville saints, led by Newel Knight, left soon after receiving this commandment. As they began to arrive in Ohio, some arrangement had to be made to settle them. At the request of Bishop Partridge, Joseph inquired of the Lord, and received the revelation recorded in Doctrine and Covenants section 55. The Colesville saints were to consecrate everything they possessed to the Bishop, and then receive from the Bishop a stewardship, according to his needs. Leman Copley had a large tract of land and offered to let the saints use it. Copley broke his agreement after a short time, and Newel Knight went to see the Prophet, who inquired of the Lord, and received the revelation recorded in Doctrine and Covenants 54. This revelation tells them to flee westward to the land of Missouri. In compliance, they made all haste to leave for the west under the leadership of Newel Knight.
 
Sometime later Joseph came to Independence and met with the Colesville group. The question uppermost in many minds was, “Where is the place of our inheritance? Where is the City of Zion to be built? Where shall the temple stand?” A few days after his arrival, Joseph received a revelation in which it was announced that Missouri was the land, and Independence its center. The saints were instructed to buy land. In August, the Colesville group laid the foundation for the first house to be built there. It was to be a log structure. The first log was carried to the site by twelve men representing the Twelve Tribes. One of the men was the Prophet. So the Knights were some of the first to settle in Independence, Missouri, and live the Law of Consecration. On August 6, 1831, Polly Peck, wife of Joseph Knight Sr., died. The following day the Prophet attended and spoke at her funeral. This was the first death to occur in Independence.
 
After they had built houses for the members and were comfortably settled, Joseph Knight Jr. went to work by the day to earn money to buy millstones and iron to build a mill. He had previously been in the milling business at Colesville. The saints had been eating their corn whole up to this time. He built the first mill that was built in Jackson County by the church. He also fixed up the first printing plant, built the shelves and counters for the first store and ground the corn and grain for the saints.
 
The battle of the Big Horn was fought about a mile from his mill, and he could hear the guns, which were the first that were fired at the saints in Jackson County. They finally had to leave Independence, and scatter in all directions. Mr. Knight said that he witnessed women and children walking all hours of the night, with bare feet on the frozen ground, crying from the effects of the cold. He kept grinding for and feeding the saints and was the last to leave. He took meal and flour with him and distributed it among the destitute saints. He and his brother Newel, bought a piece of land and built another grist mil. It was not quite finished when they were again attacked. In 1837 they left their mill, not even getting the price of the stones for it, and moved to Far West, an uninhabited spot fifty miles north of his home in Clay County. While still in Jackson County, Joseph Knight Jr. married Betsey Covert, and started raising a family. In all he had six children, born in different places, as they were driven from place to place.
 
At Far West, he bought sixty-one acres of land, and built another house and said he got comfortable again. They had three children at Far West. In the spring of 1838, he was taken ill and thought he was going to die. About a year later another mob came against them, and they were forced to leave the State. In the fall of 1838, he sold a piece of land and bought a team and wagon, which he loaned to the committee to use in moving the saints out of the state. He never saw it again. He says that he gave up all of his loose property to help the poor. In April 1839, he left with his family and that of a widow, with a borrowed team and wagon. They traveled one hundred miles to Keytsville and then returned the wagon to get the last family.
 
The next stop was Lima, Illinois, where he built another house and went to work to support his family. In the spring of 1840, he moved to Nauvoo, and built another house and a steam mill, he tended and plant at night, the fire and the engine alone. In 1844, the Prophet asked him to go to LaHarp and tend a mill for Stephen Markham which. In January 1846, he was ordained a High Priest by Isaac Morley, in the Nauvoo Temple. Sunday January 19, 1840, the High Council voted to give father Knight (Joseph Knight Sr.) a house and lot. Later they voted to give Joseph Knight Jr. a lot.
 
June 27, 1844, Joseph Smith was murdered by a mob in Carthage Jail, Hancock County, Illinois. Persecution continued and in February 1846, a large company of pioneers left Nauvoo for the purpose of finding a place where they might gather and dwell in peace. The season was unfavorable, and provisions scarce, so their progress was slow, and it became necessary to leave a portion of the company in the wilderness, at a place called Garden Grove, and another group at Mount Pisgah, Iowa, where Joseph Knight Sr. died in 1847. Newel Knight was captain of one company, and Brigham Young advised them to find a place where they could camp for the winter. Their camp was located at Pomca, on the bank of the Niebara River. Newel was taken ill, and died the morning of January 11, 1847, leaving his wife with seven children. The following summer, Lydia gave birth to a baby boy August 26, 1847. In 1908, Jesse Knight, son of Newel, erected a monument in honor of his father and the other saints that had sacrificed their lives for the sake of the Gospel, and were buried there in that little cemetery with him.
 
In a letter written to Hyrum Knight by President George Albert Smith, at the time the monument was dedicated, he made the following statement. “The monument to Newel Knight erected by your family is one to a man that was healed by the power of God, when the adversary sought to destroy him. It was the first Miracle in the Church, and is so recorded in Church history, and it is fitting that a substantial monument should mark the place where he lies. No better blood flows in the veins of any person than you have in yours.”

The balance of the pioneers, after searching the route, making the road, and a multitude of bridges over streams for more than three hundred miles through Indian country in Iowa, arrived at Council Bluffs, on the Missouri River, during the latter part of June. This is where they met Capt. J. Allen, soliciting them to enlist 500 men in the service of the United States. To this call the pioneers promptly responded, and before the middle of July more than 500 of the Brethren left on the long march to California, leaving hundreds of wagons and families, and protectors, on the open prairie, in savage country. A small group pressed on as far west as Pawnee Mission, where, finding it was too late to pass the mountains, they turned aside to winter on the banks of the Missouri River. While the greater numbers of feeble members located at the place called Winter Quarters, where seven hundred houses were built in the short space of three months. In July, there were more than 2000 wagons between here and Nauvoo. Joseph Knight Jr. spent the winter of 1847-1848 here, and their three year old daughter, Orpha Florilla, died 20 October 1847. She is buried in the Mormon cemetery. He crossed the plains with the Thomas Johnson company, captained by Benjamin Hawkins, December 31, 1850.
 
Joseph Knight Jr. worried because he had no living sons to carry on his name. His only son died at age six years. He must have made this known to Brigham young, who suggested that he marry Mary Woolerton, who would give him some. He followed Brigham’s advice. The first child was a girl, who died the same year. The next two were boys, Miland and Joseph. Milland and his wife, Sarah Ann Jones, had twelve children, ten of which were sons. Joseph and his wife, Andrine Winberg, had seven, three of which were sons. So President Young’s prediction proved to be correct.
 
Joseph Knight Sr. died at the age of seventy-five, the last few years of his life his health was bad. The Prophet referred to him as one whose body was “trembling, broken and tortured.” He and the Prophet met on the street one day and the Prophet gave him the cane he was using, saying to him, “Take this cane, Brother Knight, and use it. You need it more than I do.” At the same time he gave him a blessing and suggested that the cane be handed down to the Josephs in the Knight family. There are at the present writing, four generations of them. - Familysearch.org

On 9 October 1846, Saints camped by Potter’s Slough participated in the “Miracle of the Quail,” when large flocks of exhausted quail flopped into the camp, landing on and under wagons and in tents. “Every man, woman and child had quails to eat for their dinner,” Thomas Bullock wrote.
 
(Source: Ensign, JUNE 1997 THE PIONEER TREK: NAUVOO TO WINTER QUARTERS)

More from another journal by Barbara Belinda Mills (KWNJ-MY8)
[We were] living in a dugout in the side of a hill.  The snow was very deep and the people were getting hungry and one day a great flock of quails flew into camp.  The people killed them with sticks and there was plenty to eat in camp for quite a while.

Abba Jane WELDON-11072 was born on 7 Nov 1811 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She died on 18 Sep 1888 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah. She was buried in Sep 1888 in Provo City Cemetery, Provo, Utah, Utah. Abba married Joseph KNIGHT-9870 on 5 Apr 1852 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah.

BIOGRAPHY: An encounter with Indian chief Squash Head
While living with Andrew Hunter and Sarah Ann Scott, Abby Ann Roe, Sarah's mother, continued to work in Salt Lake City, many times going back and forth from Provo on foot. Warned not to make the journey during the Indian unrest, Abby was both stubborn and unafraid so did as she pleased. Returning from Salt Lake City on one occasion, she was directly confronted with trouble when the old Indian Chief Squash Head and two of his braves rode their ponies across the narrow Provo Bench road to prevent Abby from passing. She stopped and shook her fist in their faces. Probably amused at her fearlessness, the Indians moved aside to let her pass. Hearing of the incident, Andrew could have empathized with the Indians who chose not to tangle with this feisty woman. - Familysearch.org

MEDIA: U7959 - Abba Jane Weldon Knight 3rd wife of Joseph Knight married 5 April 1852 - Ancestry.com

BURIAL: Abby Jane Roe in the U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current
Name: Abby Jane Roe
Maiden Name: Weldon
Birth Date: 7 Nov 1809
Birth Place: Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, United States of America
Death Date: 18 Sep 1888
Death Place: Provo, Utah County, Utah, United States of America
Cemetery: Provo City Cemetery
Burial or Cremation Place: Provo, Utah County, Utah, United States of America
Has Bio?: Y
Source Information: Ancestry.com. U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.
Original data: Find A Grave. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi.

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