Knight Family Tree - aqwg623

Descendents of Richard & Sarah Rogers Knight


Samuel STEERE [Parents] was born on 13 Jan 1745 in Glocester, Providence, Rhode Island. He died on 26 Jan 1826 in Johnston, Providence, Rhode Island. He was buried in Samuel Steere Lot, Johnston, Providence, Rhode Island. Samuel married (MRIN:6251) Mary SMITH on 1 Jan 1775.

Mary SMITH was born on 25 Dec 1755 in Scituate, Providence, Rhode Island. She died on 25 Jul 1830 in Johnston, Providence, Rhode Island. She was buried in Samuel Steere Lot, Johnston, Providence, Rhode Island. Mary married (MRIN:6251) Samuel STEERE on 1 Jan 1775.

They had the following children.

  M i Hardin STEERE was born on 15 Jan 1798. He died on 13 Jul 1847.

Abel JONES was born on 7 Sep 1782 in Winchendon, Worcester, Massachusetts. He died on 25 Nov 1840 in Worcester, Worcester, Massachusetts. He was buried in Old Centre Burial Ground, Winchendon, Worcester, Massachusetts. Abel married (MRIN:6252) Hannah KNIGHT.

BIRTH: Name: Abel Jones
Gender: Male
Christening Date:
Christening Place:
Birth Date: 07 Sep 1782
Birthplace: WINCHENDON,WORCESTER,MASSACHUSETTS
Death Date:
Name Note:
Race:
Father's Name: Abel Jones
Father's Birthplace:
Father's Age:
Mother's Name: Lucinda
Mother's Birthplace:
Mother's Age:
Indexing Project (Batch) Number: C50162-1
System Origin: Massachusetts-ODM
GS Film number: 0873759 IT 3
Reference ID:
Citing this Record:
"Massachusetts, Births and Christenings, 1639-1915," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VQ6F-Q4M : accessed 28 May 2015), Abel Jones, 07 Sep 1782; citing WINCHENDON,WORCESTER,MASSACHUSETTS, ; FHL microfilm 0873759 IT 3.

Hannah KNIGHT [Parents] was born on 3 Oct 1786 in Fitzwilliam, Chester, New Hampshire. She died on 27 Dec 1869 in Worcester County, Massachusetts. She was buried in Old Centre Burial Ground, Winchendon, Worcester, Massachusetts. Hannah married (MRIN:6252) Abel JONES.


Oren Arms CURTIS [Parents] was born on 23 Jun 1829 in Evertonville, Vermillion, Indiana. He died on 28 Mar 1898 in Newkirk, Kay, Oklahoma. He was buried in Curtis Family Cemetery, Shawnee County, Kansas. Oren married (MRIN:6253) Helen C. PAPPAN on 1 Feb 1859.

OBITUARY: TOPEKA DAILY CAPITAL Wednesday March 30, 1898
Captain "Jack" Curtis
Captain "Jack" Curtis, the father of Congressman Charles Curtis, died suddenly last Monday afternoon at 3 o'clock at his home six miles out of Newkirk, Oklahoma Territory. Captain Jack left Topeka for Newkirk about two years ago and has since lived there with his brother. His death was very sudden and last night no word had been received by the family. He had written a letter to his daughter, Mrs Elizabeth Colvin, in the early part of the week in which he said that he and his brother were both well. At the time of Captain Curtis' death telegrams were sent to both Congressman Curtis and to the family here. The relatives in Topeka failed to receive the telegram and the first word they received of the death of Captain Curtis was at 2 o'clock yesterday morning, when a reporter for the Capital went to the Curtis home to ascertain whether or not they knew the particulars of his death. His mother did not then tell her granddaughter and she knew nothing of it until she read yesterday morning's Capital. She could scarcely credit the report and while she still had the paper in her hand, a messenger boy arrived with the delayed telegram. Congressman Curtis, upon the receipt of the news of his father's death immediately telegraphed A.A. Hurd to make arrangements for having the remains sent to Topeka. He also sent a telegram Harry Safford, asking him to arrange to receive the body. As Mr. Safford was in Denver, his wife showed the telegram to Archie Williams, who has made arrangements to care for the body upon its arrival here.
Captain Curtis was born in Vermillion county, Indiana; and lived there until 1855. when he came to Topeka. He was a participant in the border war which so aroused Eastern Kansas in the early days. He was an ardent Free State man. He has been married five times, and one of his wives, is still living, Mrs Rachel (Funk) Hatch, is still living. His first wife was Miss Isabelle Jane Quick and their son John, is now a brakeman on the Rock Island railroad. Captain Curtis was divorced from his first wife and later married Helen Pappan. From this union two children were born, Congressman Charles Curtis and Mrs Elizabeth Colvin. After his wife's death, Captain Curtis married Miss Rachel Funk, and after being divorced from her, married Miss Lucy (Lou) Jay, who was the mother of Miss Permelia (Dollie) Curtis. Captain Curtis was the eldest of fourteen children, eleven of whom are still living. Of these, Mrs Cynthia Smith, Mrs Eunice Wise and Mrs Elizabeth Brown are residents of Topeka, Kansas. Charles Curtis lives in Lawrence, Kansas and William Curtis, in California. The mother of the family is still living at the old Curtis house in North Topeka and is 91 years old. The arrangements of the funeral have not yet been made but the body will probably be interred in the Curtis Cemetery north of North Topeka. Congressman Curtis and Miss Dollie Curtis left Washington yesterday at noon and expected in Topeka on Thursday. The remains will probably arrive in the city this evening. They will be taken to the home of Congressman Curtis to await his home coming. Capt. O.A. Curtis served with Co. F 15th Kans. Cav. during the Civil War.

MEDIA: J3217 - Orem Arms Curtis Civil War Uniform h/o Helen C. Pappan Grandfather of Leona Virginai Curtis Knight - Find A Grave Memorial# 17853810

BIOGRAPHY: Orren (Oren, Oran) Arms Curtis was the oldest son of William and Permelia Hubbard Curtis.  He was born in Eugene, Vermillion County, Indiana, June 2, 1829.  At the age of twenty years, he married Isabelle Quick. They only lived together a few years and were divorced.  They had two children, Harvey and John Curtis.

After he was divorced from his first wife, he joined a circus for a season, then arrived in Topeka, Kansas, about the year 1856, and was for a time employed by the Pappans to assist in running or operating a ferry boat across the Kansas River.  About 1859 he married Helene (Helen or Ellen) Pappan, the oldest daughter of Louis and Julia Gonvil Pappan.  There were two children born of this marriage:  Charles, born January 25, 1860, and Elizabeth, born September 2, 1861.

Charles Curtis in his autobiography later wrote:  To explain my Indian heritage I will tell this.

In the years when the North American Indians ruled supreme over that part of our country known as the Louisiana Purchase, there lived west of the Mississippi River two strong and powerful tribes of Indians:  The Osages and the Kanza (Kansas or Kaw).  These tribes had their enemies among the smaller tribes of the plains, but they were dominant over their respective domains until after the Louisiana Purchase by the United States, and until the government began to make treaties with them for the relinquishment of their lands, which they held by the right of occupancy.  History does not tell us where they came from, but they were in possession and each claimed by the right of occupancy a vast domain, which by means of many a hard-fought battle with the other wild tribes of the plains, they were able to retain.  When the United States became the owner of the lands covered by the Louisiana Purchase, it took the same subject to the rights of the Indians.  The Osages occupied lands covering a large part of Kansas.  The Kansas Indians occupied lands north and west, into what is now a part of Colorado and north into the state of Nebraska, and claimed a small strip in western Missouri, covering a part of the state in and around what is now known as Independence and Kansas City. At one time, these two tribes were supposed to make up one tribe, as their language and habits are quite similar and they were always friendly, and the members intermarried, so that many families are of the blood of both tribes, but later they separated, and were separate tribes thereafter. In the early days, Pawhuska was Head Chief of the Osage Tribe of Indians.  He was known as “White Hair,” and was a strong man and a great leader of his people.  After his death, after 1825, the tribe was placed on a reservation in the old Indian Territory, and named the principal town in Osage County, Oklahoma, Pawhuska, which covers the lands formerly within the Osage Reservation. White Plume was born about 1763, and died at the age of seventy or more.  He became chief of the Kansas Nation, and was highly regarded.  He was one of the ablest and most progressive Indians of his day.  He became a warm friend to Lewis and Clark, and was of great help to them in their work among the Indians of that section of the country.  He was the first Indian Chief for whom the government built a stone house in the Territory of Kansas.  He never lived in it, however, because he preferred his wigwam.  Before he became Head Chief of the Kansas Indians, he married a daughter of Pawhuska.  Then their oldest daughter married Louis Gonvil, a Frenchman who was an Indian trader who had lived among the Indians for many years.  There were two daughters born of this marriage, Josette and Pelagie Gonvil.  After the death of his first wife, Louis Gonvil married the second daughter of White Plume, and as a result of this marriage two more daughters were born, Julia and Victorie.  These four daughters are mentioned in the Treaty between the United States and the Kansas Indians, made at the City of St. Louis in 1825.  Each was given an allotment of one mile of land on the north bank of the Kansas River.  Kaw Mile Four, upon which North Topeka, Kansas, is now located was ceded to Julia Gonvil.  Julia (sometimes found as Julie Gonville) married Louis Pappan, who had been sent to trade with the Indians by the American Fur Company.  His people originally came from the north of France to Canada, and from there they moved to St. Louis and members of the old Pappan family still live in St. Louis. After the marriage of Julia Gonvil to Louis Pappan, they built a log house on the north side of her allotment and lived there until they moved to the Kansas Reservation near Council Grove, Kansas.  There were seven children born as a result of this marriage  The eldest daughter, Helene Pappan, when old enough , was sent to St. Louis to be educated.  In 1859, Helen Pappan (also known as Ellen or Helen), was married to Orren Curtis.  As stated before, there were two children born of this marriage, Charles and Elizabeth Curtis.  This delineates the Indian ancestry and heritage of Charles Curtis.
 
A biographer of Charles Curtis wrote the following:  “I remember quite well a visit Captain Jack Curtis and wife and baby son Charles made to the old home place through the winter of 1860.  Some of the older residents of that township may remember that every morning this little Indian mother would take her babe down to the Wabash and dip him into the water, in the approved Kaw Indian custom, much to the awe of the younger generation thereabouts.  No matter how cold, if the ice could be broken, this little Charlie Curtis got his refreshing morning plunge.” To continue with the record of Orren Arms (Captain Jack) Curtis, Charles Curtis stated in his autobiography:  At the time of my birth, January 25, 1860, my parents were living in a log house, which was located near the landing of the Pappan Ferry on the north bank of the Kansas River.  My sister, Elizabeth, was born September 2, 1861.  When the great Civil War came, my father, like thousands of others, volunteered in the Union Army, and soon after his enlistment he was sent to the front.  He was soon commissioned Captain of Company F of the 15th Kansas Cavalry.  Mother, sister and I were left behind.  Mother died in 1863 of what was then known as the “Black Fever.”  We two children were taken to the home of our grandparents, William and Permelia Curtis, who then lived on a farm near the old town of Mt. Florence.  (This was described in an earlier section.) Copies of the army records of Orren A. Curtis showed he enlisted October 2, 1863 and was mustered out on April 27, 1865, having been appointed a Captain on October 4, 1863.  Another enlistment showed enrolled October 16, 1868, discharged April 18, 1869 (6 months enlistment).  He served as Quartermaster Sergeant, Company H, 19th Kansas Cavalry.

In a History of Kansas:  Shawnee County, page 559, we read some of his life activities:

O.A. Curtis, born Vermillion County, Indiana, June 1, 1829 and lived at Eugene until age 23 years. He married in Indiana 1848; had two children, Harvey and John.  In 1851 moved to Platte County, Illinois; here 3 years, returned to Indiana; farming, hotel keeping and running flat boats. From Indiana he came directly to Kansas City, Kansas, arriving April 1, 1856.  The same month walked to the Quaker Mission, but night arrived before he reached his destination and due to his Free-State sentiments could not procure shelter for the night.  In the morning, he reached the Mission where he stayed for rest, then proceeded, still on foot, towards Lawrence, where he stopped at night in the home of a friendly Indian.  He went to Ft. Leavenworth with the intention of enlisting in the regular army, but being disgusted with the way the soldiers were treated, he returned to Leavenworth City. The following day he hired out to a man at Kickapoo to break prairie.

He later worked in St. Joseph, Missouri, and afterwards worked with business firms, traveling in Missouri and Iowa.  He then went to work running ferry boats for Louis Pappan; hauled logs for Covee until April 1857.  Took a claim in Rochester -- sold out to Hiller -- started a grocery on Soldier’s Creek -- ran that for two months, sold it and ran ferry again for Pappan, February 1858.  Started a saloon and did a good business until the pontoon bridge was washed away (the link between North Topeka and Topeka).  He sold the saloon, and then re-established a ferry in company with Louis Pappan.  In February 1859, he married Ellen Pappan, who died in April 1863.  Their children were Charles and Elizabeth. He retained his charter for the ferry boat until 1865.  In August 1863, he raised a company of militia, of which he was in command a short time.  He also raised Company “F” of the 15th Kansas Cavalry, and mustered in at Leavenworth as Captain in October 1863.   His activities with the militia were varied, and took him over many areas in Kansas and Missouri.  It would seem that he led a very colorful life. Taking a leave of absence, he married, on Christmas Day, 1864, at Olathe, Kansas, Miss Lou or Lucy Jay.  They had a daughter, Dolly, born March 24, 1866, at Topeka.  She married Edward Everett Gann on December 12, 1915, and they later lived in Washington, D.C. with her half-brother, Charles Curtis, where she served as hostess to him while he served as Vice President.
 
According to the history, he had also been married to a Mrs. Hatch, from whom he was divorced, and also to Rachel Funk, and they were divorced also.  (Same person?)

He returned to Topeka, ran the ferry for one year, then in 1866 he started a dry goods store and grocery, which he ran for one year.  He commenced shipping cattle to St Louis, Missouri, in which business he remained one year.  In November, 1868, he re-enlisted with the 19th Kansas Cavalry as Quartermaster Sergeant, and mustered out in Aril 1969.  He spent the year of 1871 in Jackson County, Missouri, and then recommenced shipping cattle for 8 years, doing most of his business at St. Louis, Missouri.  He went to Nebraska to work on the Missouri Pacific Railroad. The history does not cover his activities during the later years of his life, but we find that Orren A. Curtis died suddenly in March 1898, six miles out of Newkirk, Oklahoma, where he had been living with a younger brother.  From information received, he died of heart failure.  He had been in the field cutting underbrush and came into the house at noon, where he was talking to his brother.  He was laughing heartily, when he suddenly stopped and walking to the lounge, laid down and he was dead in a moment. The body of Captain Curtis was returned to Topeka, and the funeral was held at the residence of his son, Congressman Charles Curtis, with services conducted by Rev. W. B. Hutchinson of the Baptist Church and Rev. T. E. Chandler of the Kansas Street Methodist Church.  Music was furnished by a choir.  The services were attended by a great many family members and their friends.  Interment was in the Curtis Burying Ground at the north end of Harrison Street.   (North Topeka News)
 
Congressman Charles Curtis and his sister, Miss Dollie Curtis, arrived from Washington to attend the funeral of their father.  Mr. Curtis was very deeply affected by the death of his father to whom he has always been greatly devoted.  His appearance indicates that this has been a great and unexpected blow.  (Topeka State Journal)

Captain Curtis was the oldest of fourteen children of William and Permelia Hubbard Curtis, eleven of whom are still living, as well as his mother, who still lives at the old Curtis house in North Topeka, and is 91 years old. Captain Curtis was a born rover.  He made frequent trips through the country and when last heard of he was making arrangements for a wagon trip during the coming summer through Arkansas.  (Topeka State Journal)

Taken from the history of William & Permelia Hubbard Curtis Family, compiled and prepared by Roberta Hubbard Palmer for the Charles Wesley Hubbard Organization, July 1992, from many sources researched over the years, and from two trips to Topeka, Kansas, in 1972 and 1974.   Additional resources include:

Autobiography of Charles Curtis
The Emporia Kansas Research Studies of Charles Curtis of Kansas
Kansas State Historical Society
Harold O’Donnell, “The First 100 Years of Eugene, Indiana.”
Professional researcher Irene Williams, who sent and provided all kinds of Curtis records, from Topeka, Kansas, census records, certificates, obituaries, newspaper articles, etc.
Harold J. Smith, from all kinds of family records, his letters, his taking care of the Curtis Burying Ground,
Newspaper articles.
Helen King, who made a special study of the Curtis Burying Ground, and who took me there for the pictures I took.
Jim French, newspaper columnist from Olate, Kansas.
Various correspondence from some of the descendants of Charles Curtis.

Helen C. PAPPAN was born in 1840 in Shawnee County, Kansas. She died on 1 Apr 1863 in Topeka, Shawnee, Kansas. She was buried in Curtis Family Cemetery, Shawnee County, Kansas. Helen married (MRIN:6253) Oren Arms CURTIS on 1 Feb 1859.

BURIAL: Name: Helen Pappan Curtis
Maiden Name: Pappan
Event Type: Burial
Event Date: 1863
Event Place: North Topeka, Shawnee, Kansas, United States of America
Photograph Included: Yes
Birth Date: 1840
Death Date: Apr 1863
Affiliate Record Identifier: 17853786
Cemetery: Curtis Family Cemetery
Citing this Record:
"Find A Grave Index," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/QVVK-3T55 : accessed 20 January 2015), Helen Pappan Curtis, 1863; Burial, North Topeka, Shawnee, Kansas, United States of America, Curtis Family Cemetery; citing record ID 17853786, Find a Grave, http://www.findagrave.com.

They had the following children.

  M i Charles CURTIS was born on 25 Jan 1860. He died on 8 Feb 1936.

John Albro PLACE [Parents] was born in 1726 in Glocester, Providence, Rhode Island. He died on 26 Mar 1812 in Middle Smithfield, Monroe, Pennsylvania. John married (MRIN:6254) Grace KITCHELL.

Grace KITCHELL was born in 1741 in Hanover, Morris, New Jersey. She died on 7 Nov 1818 in Cincinnati, Hamilton, Ohio. Grace married (MRIN:6254) John Albro PLACE.

They had the following children.

  M i Arca PLACE was born on 14 Feb 1766. He died on 6 Jan 1827.

Titus REYNOLDS was born on 10 Dec 1770 in Nine Partners, Dutchess, New York. He died on 30 Mar 1860 in Chatham, Columbia, New York. Titus married (MRIN:6255) Elizabeth BROWN in 1792.

DEATH: Titus Reynolds in the U.S. Federal Census Mortality Schedules, 1850-1885
Name:Titus Reynolds
Gender:Male
Marital status:Widowed
Estimated birth year:abt 1771
Birth Place:New York
Age:89
Death Date:Mar 1860
Cause of Death:dropsy
Census Year:1860
Census Place:Chatham, Columbia, New York, USA
Line:12
Source CitationL New York State Education Department, Office of Cultural Education; Albany, New York; U.S. Census Mortality Schedules, New York, 1850-1880; Archive Roll Number: M3; Census Year: 1860; Census Place: Chatham, Columbia, New York
Source Information: Ancestry.com. U.S. Federal Census Mortality Schedules, 1850-1885 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. A portion of this collection was indexed by Ancestry World Archives Project contributors.

Elizabeth BROWN was born on 11 Oct 1770 in Chatham, Columbia, New York. She died on 29 Jul 1826 in Chatham, Columbia, New York. Elizabeth married (MRIN:6255) Titus REYNOLDS in 1792.

They had the following children.

  M i Ira REYNOLDS was born on 8 Nov 1805. He died on 4 Jan 1875.

Thomas KNIGHT [Parents] was born on 2 May 1769 in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. He died on 22 Sep 1797 in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. Thomas married (MRIN:6256) Mary WORRELL on 13 Oct 1795 in Oxford, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Mary WORRELL was born on 3 Mar 1773 in Frankford, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Mary married (MRIN:6256) Thomas KNIGHT on 13 Oct 1795 in Oxford, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

They had the following children.

  M i Jonathan Paul KNIGHT was born on 8 Jan 1797. He died on 7 Jul 1841.
  F ii
Elizabeth KNIGHT was born on 26 Jul 1798 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She died on 15 Sep 1799.

John WOODS was born in 1782 in Ireland. John married (MRIN:6257) Sarah WAIT.

Sarah WAIT was born on 6 Jan 1785 in Newfane, Windham, Vermont. Sarah married (MRIN:6257) John WOODS.

They had the following children.

  M i Gilbert Allen WOODS was born on 5 Jul 1812. He died on 26 Mar 1896.

Charles George KNIGHT [Parents] was born on 6 Jul 1947 in Arcade, Wyoming, New York. Charles married (MRIN:6258) Rita KNIGHT.

BIRTH: Wyoming County Times
Thursday, July 10, 1947
Knight-Charles George on the 6th to Mr. and Mrs. Donald Knight of Arcade.

Rita KNIGHT. Rita married (MRIN:6258) Charles George KNIGHT.


Peter Edmund VAN ORDEN was born on 27 Jan 1830 in Moravia, Cayuga, New York. He died on 25 Sep 1911 in Lewiston, Cache, Utah. Peter married (MRIN:6259) Martha Ann KNIGHT on 5 Mar 1851 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah. The marriage ended in divorce.

BIOGRAPHY: Edmund Van Orden Sr.
By Alan Van Orden
Great-Grandson
July 2004
I have often commented on how it is that the hand of the Lord is evident in our lives. Such is the case with my great-grandfather, Peter Edmund Van Orden. He was born January 27, 1830, just months before the church was organized in this dispensation. His parents, William Van Orden and Julia Ann Haight resided in what would later become Moravia Township, Cayuga County, New York at the time of Peter's birth. He was their first son and second child. It wasn't until 1838, however, that the family was introduced to the restored gospel. Julia Ann's brother, Isaac Haight, met Elder Pelatiah Brown and was baptized in 1839. Very likely, the Van Orden family and others followed soon thereafter. Peter, even though he had reached the age of accountability, was not baptized until July, 1844. This is the time, 1838, when the saints were being driven from their homes in Missouri. Among them was the Knight family, part of the Colesville, New York branch sent to Missouri from Kirtland in the early 1830s. Joseph Knight, Sr. and his family had befriended Joseph Smith years earlier. A daughter of Joseph Knight, Jr., Martha Ann would later become Peter's wife. Also in 1838, the Twelve met at Far West, Missouri, despite the mob violence, to fulfill a prophecy that they would so meet prior to their mission to England. Most of them departed Nauvoo in the summer of 1839, sick of the fever and destitute. Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball could scarcely rise from the wagon box to bid farewell to their families. George A. Smith left with two companions, also sick. Peter would have been nearly ten years old when Elders Young and Smith arrived in Moravia in late 1839. The account of this visit is recorded in the History of the Church. Peter's father was able to help the missionaries with their needs. The story goes that William had cloth that was made into an overcoat for Elder Smith. A few years later, in 1843, the Van Ordens were ready to gather with the saints in Nauvoo. They sold their farm in New York and traveled by wagon to Illinois. This was probably an exciting adventure for Peter, now 13 going on 14 years old. This was not a forced move, so William and Julia were able to sell out for a good price, reportedly $3,000, in New York. This provided the means to buy property in Nauvoo. Eventually William bought a home on Mulholland Street in Nauvoo and farm property within a few miles of town. William participated in the activities of the saints, working on the temple one day in ten. He also was a member of the Nauvoo Legion. Peter was the age when he was probably receiving whatever education was available. The story is told of Peter going with his father to Joseph Smith to settle the tithing. William apparently gave $360 in cash plus one tenth of his livestock. Among the animals given, according to the family, was a horse named Charlie which soon became a favorite of the prophet Joseph. The prophet reportedly told young Peter that the Lord would bless him and his posterity that they would never want for bread. The Van Ordens had been in Nauvoo less that a year when things turned ugly for the saints. Nauvoo, by1844, was the largest city in Illinois. Joseph Smith was a candidate for President of the United States. Just as the saints had been driven from Missouri a few years earlier, now their enemies wanted them out of Illinois. Joseph had prophesied that the saints would ultimately settle in the Rocky Mountains and had determined to flee, hoping his leaving would allay the violence. He was dissuaded, however, by those close to his. He came back to Nauvoo, saying, “If my life is of no value to my friends, it is of none to myself.” (Comprehensive History of the Church, Vol. II, p.247) Peter was probably among those who witnessed the prophet's departure from Nauvoo to go to Carthage, where he had been summoned by Illinois Governor Thomas Ford. On this occasion, the prophet said, “I am going like a lamb to the slaughter; but I am calm as a summer's morning; I have a conscience void of offense towards God, and towards all men. I shall die innocent, and it shall yet be said of me - he was murdered in cold blood.” (Comprehensive History of the Church, Roberts, Vol. II, page 249)
In the aftermath of the martyrdom, Peter's father, William, took his turn in guarding the bodies of Joseph and Hiram. William became ill and, two weeks after the martyrdom, on July 11, 1844, died of the bloody flux”. A few weeks later, Peter's youngest brother, William Arthur, a child just three years old, died from the same malady. Only those who have experienced such losses can understand the grief. Peter was fourteen years old. He had an older sister, a younger brother, and three younger sisters. About this time, Peter would have witnessed another great event in the history of the Latter-Day Saints, the succession of the head of the Church. With the death of the Prophet Joseph Smith, Sidney Rigdon offered himself to be the guardian for the church. Many of the Twelve were away from Nauvoo at the time of the martyrdom. Travel was slow so it took several weeks for their return. But when the saints met to listen to the alternatives, the “mantle of the prophet” fell upon Brigham Young. For three years, Brigham led the Church as president of the Quorum of the Twelve before the First Presidency was reorganized. I am thankful to Peter that he was in tune to recognize that Brigham and the rest of the Twelve were the Lord's choice to lead the Church. In the spring of 1845, less than a year after the death of his father, Peter's mother married Dr. John M. Bernhisel, one of the leading brethren in Nauvoo. Julia Van Orden was not Dr. Bernhisel's only wife. Apparently, Peter and his brothers and sisters were not aware of the others. Julia was not pleased that Dr. Bernhisel had embraced “the principle”. She was especially annoyed when her husband, under the guise of providing medical attention, was late for dinner after visiting Elizabeth Barker, a young woman in her sixteenth year. One of these occurrences took place on a Sunday in January, 1846, when Peter was just sixteen. Dr. Bernhisel had been out visiting his wives. After dinner he told Peter to drive him to the temple for a meeting and then bring back the rig and take care of the team. “While Bernhisel could have put the team up himself and walked the short distance to the temple, he believed firmly that children must learn the dignity and joy of honest toil.” (Nightfall at Nauvoo, Samuel W. Taylor, p. 351) Apparently Julia and her children left Nauvoo after the first group of saints, who left in February, 1846. The Legacy film documents the difficulties they faced in getting across Iowa. Dr. Bernhisel was probably very little help; he stayed in Nauvoo to help settle affairs there. It is even unclear just what role Peter, as the oldest son, played. One account indicates that Peter was one who volunteered to return to Nauvoo to assist the poor who had not been able to leave to join the body of the saints. It appears, however, that on the way he met his mother and accompanied her to what would become Winter Quarters. Once in Winter Quarters, the saints needed to erect homes for shelter. The building materials consisted of logs and sod. Peter was nearly seventeen so he was undoubtedly expected to do a man's work. Available accounts indicate this to be so; he apparently carved a frame so his mother could have a window. He was apparently called to assist other families in need. Under these difficult circumstances, Peter's mother gave birth to a child, John Milton Bernhisel, Jr. Years later, this half brother would join with Peter in settling Lewiston, Utah. In the musical Porgy and Bess there is a song that starts out with “summertime, and the livin' is easy.” Well, at Winter Quarters, it was wintertime, and the livin' was anything but easy. It was a challenge just to keep warm and provide food. According to one account, Peter and another boy had the assignment of driving the cows out to find feed during the day and bringing them back at night. In the process, it is told that Peter's dog ran into some brush barking and emerged with a pig chasing after. Peter is said to have shot the pig and taken the carcass into camp where Brigham Young directed that it be divided among the people. Later, it developed that there were more pigs where the first one had come from. These also were killed for use by the saints. Peter was not among the group of pioneers who arrived in Salt Lake in July, 1847. He must have been needed at Winter Quarters to help care for his mother and the other brothers and sisters. He was also busy seeing to the needs of others, what with 500 men going off with the Mormon Battalion and many of the church leaders gone with the advance party to the Great Basin. Brigham Young returned to the Missouri River in 1847, where the First Presidency of the church was organized with Brigham as president. The Twelve had run the church since the martyrdom of Joseph Smith. In 1848, Peter's mother and his younger sisters and brothers were preparing to go west. The youngest brother, actually a half brother, John Milton Bernhisel, was just one and a half years old when they left the staging area at Elk Horn River on June 7. Peter, according to the available information, helped to get them fitted with a wagon, oxen and horses for the journey. He had borrowed $50 from the government, however, and was obligated to work to pay off the debt. He hired out as a teamster to help build roads and forts. It was two years later, in 1850, that Peter reached the Salt Lake Valley. (Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, p. 262) Also leaving Nauvoo in the spring of 1846 was Joseph Knight Jr. and his family, including 13 year old Martha Ann. The Knights were part of the Colesville, New York Branch that had, up until this time, traveled together. Joseph Knight Sr. was unable to leave, so stayed behind in Nauvoo. Shortly after their arrival at the Missouri River, Joseph Jr. was appointed Bishop and was chosen to captain a group to return to Nauvoo to assist those, including his father and family, who had stayed behind. By this time, they had been driven from the city, being forced across the river into Iowa. They were barely surviving in what was called the “Poor Camp”. As they were about to start west, the party experienced the “Miracle of the Quails”. Several flocks of exhausted quail dropped into the camp. The hungry saints were easily able to capture and make a meal of the birds. Bishop Knight presided over the 23rd ward situated on the Iowa side of the Missouri. The members were engaged in farming, raising wheat, corn and potatoes. Joseph stepped down as Bishop in 1849 due to ill health. He was 41 years old. He immigrated with his family to Utah in 1850, traveling with the Benjamin Hawkins Company. They settled in Salt Lake City. (A History of the Joseph Knight Family 1825-1850, William G. Hartley, p. 185) Peter Van Orden and Martha Ann Knight were married November 25, 1851. Peter was 21; Martha was 18. One can only speculate how they met and courted. Peter and Martha had their first child, Mary Elizabeth, on October 30, 1852 in Kaysville, Utah. Three more children were born in Kaysville, including my grandfather, named Peter Edmund after his father. In 1858, the Van Ordens were caught up in the migration south  to escape the Expedition of Johnston's Army. Thus, the fifth child, Ellen, was born in Provo in 1859. One account of Peter's life says that he was called by Brigham Young to drive a four horse team on a light wagon, called the fast freight, between Salt Lake City and the Missouri River. It is said that he made two trips a year for three years. It is not specified in what years he made the trips, but it must have included the years of the handcart pioneers as there is reference to his having carried some of the children to the valley. One account puts him in Wyoming meeting up with Ephraim Hanks and actually assisting in the location of the ill fated handcart companies of 1856. The book “Fire of the Covenant” does not list him among the rescuers, however. Apparently, Peter was a skilled teamster. What else he did for a living is not known for sure. One account indicates that, while in Provo, he worked in a blacksmith shop owned by a brother-in-law, a Mr. Peck. I am also told that he is listed as a “lumberer” in the 1860 census of the Provo area. According to the family traditions, he went to Montana to search for gold. What I do not know is when he left and when he returned. One account written by a grand daughter (Martha Van Orden Parks) indicates that he was gone for eight years. Peter's second family descendants believe it was closer to three years. I had always understood that he came back and discovered that Martha Ann had married again (the record shows that she married Martin Mills on November 2, 1867). Assuming this to be so, the question, then, is when did he leave? I do not know. The other question is why did he leave? Our family has understood that he went to find gold because Martha was unhappy with her circumstances and wanted more that he was providing. Definite answers will just have to wait.

MEDIA: U0773 - Peter Edmund Van Orden Husband of Martha Ann Knight
U3068 - Peter Van Orden & Siblings May 1883  John Milton Bernhisel, Peter Orden, Everett Van Orden. (Front Henrietta Harris Bernhisel (Milt's wife), Sarah Louisa Van Orden Curtis, and Charlotte Amelia Van Orden Peck - Cabrera Family Tree - Public Trees Ancestry
U4261 - Peter Edmund & Martha Ann Knight Van Orden and Family d/o Joseph Darrell & Betsey Covert Knight - https://familysearch.org/photos/images/5702064

Martha Ann KNIGHT [Parents] was born on 11 Jun 1833 in Kaw, Jackson, Missouri. She died on 10 Jan 1919 in Coveville, Cache, Utah from Cancer of the stomach. She was buried in Richmond City Cemetery, Richmond, Cache, Utah. Martha married (MRIN:6259) Peter Edmund VAN ORDEN on 5 Mar 1851 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah. The marriage ended in divorce.

Other marriages:
MILLS, Martin Walderfin
WINSOR, Anson Perry

DEATH: Name: Martha Ann Winsor
Titles:
Death date: 10 Jan 1919
Death place: Cache, Utah
Birth date:
Estimated birth year: 1834
Birth place:
Age at death: 85 years 6 months 30 days
Gender: Female
Marital status: Married
Race or color:
Spouse name: Anson P. Winsor
Father name: Joseph Knight
Father titles:
Mother name: Betsy Covert
Mother titles:
GSU film number: 2229969
Digital GS number: 4121289
Image number: 1342
Reference number: 18
Collection: Utah Death Certificates 1904-1956

BIOGRAPHY: Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847–1868
Knight, Martha Ann
Birth Date:  11 June 1833
Death Date:  10 Jan. 1919
Gender:  Female
Age:  17
Company: Benjamin Hawkins Company (1850)
Sources: Journal History, Supp. after 31 Dec. 1850, p. 2

Martha Ann Knight Van Orden Mills 1833-1919
https://familysearch.org/photos/stories/4691832
Contributed By Karen Payne1 · 22 January 2014
In 1829, while the work of translating was going on, the Lord sent a friend in time of need to give material assistance to the Prophet Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery. This was Joseph Knight, Sr. of Colesville, Broome County, New York. Having heard of the manner in which Joseph and Oliver were occupying their time, Mr. Knight brought them provisions from time to time a distance of some 30 miles and thus enabled them to continue their labor without interruption, which would have otherwise delayed the work. Persecution was very bitter at this time. In the spring of 1830, Joseph Smith, Oliver Cowdery, John and David Whitmer went to Colesville where they found a number of persons anxiously awaiting them and desiring baptism. Among those waiting were Joseph Knight, Sr., wife Polly Knight and son Joseph Knight, Jr. (E.C.H.) The fifth conference of the Church was held 4 August 1831 in Jackson County, Missouri. On the seventh, the Prophet attended the funeral of Polly Knight, wife of Joseph Knight, Sr. Her health had been failing for some time and she was very ill on the journey from Kirtland to Independence, but she had a strong desire to see the land of Zion. She lived to have that wish gratified and then she slept in peace. She was the first of the saints to pass away in that county. One of the granddaughters of this faithful family was Martha Ann, who was born 11 June 1833 at Kaw Township, Jackson County, Missouri to Joseph Knight, Jr. and Betsy Covert. Her parents came to Utah in the second company of 1850, which was organized four miles west of Council Bluffs on June 7th under Benjamin Hawkins. There were 150 wagons which arrived in Salt Lake on 9 September 1950. (Heart Throbs of the West, vol. 11.) According to Lydia and Milton Bair, Martha Ann did not talk much about herself but it is known that her mother died when she was very young. At 13 years of age, she ripped up an old suit of clothes for a pattern and made her father a new suit of clothes. They were so good, another man came and asked her to make him a suit. At about age 17 she worked in the home of President Brigham Young and became acquainted with his wives and children, whom she loved and respected very much. She was baptized 15 June 1841 and endowed 21 September 1855 at the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. She married Peter Edmund Van Orden in 1851. They were given land by the Church at Kaysville, Utah. Here in a covered wagon which was removed from its running gears and placed on the ground, then banked up with sod, they lived; and it was here that their first child, Mary Elizabeth, was born on 30 October 1852. Here they lived during that winter and perhaps longer, as many of the Saints had to live this way or in dugouts. She lived with Peter until she had one son and four daughters: Mary Elizabeth, Maria (died in 1863), Peter Edmund, Julia Ann, and Ellen. Times were very hard. Money was something that was very difficult to get hold of, so Peter left his wife and family and left the valley to get work. Peter considered Martha an “aristocrat” who had nice things all her life and he wanted her to have the same after their marriage. In order to make a living, he freighted by mule team and on one trip went clear up into Montana. He was gone for over a year and, having had no formal education, he was not one to write letters. He promised to contact her and send some money as soon as he could. Time passed and she never heard from him. It seemed that he had deserted her and their little family. She worked “out” to support her children and needed help but didn’t know where to turn. Martin Walderfin Mills (the owner of a sawmill) was infatuated with Martha Ann and kept besieging her with offers of marriage and telling her that she had been deserted by Peter. So Martha divorced Peter and married Mills on 2 November 1867. (They were to eventually have a son and three daughters.) Several months later a man came to see her and gave her a letter and some money that he had been carrying around for some time. He was supposed to have delivered it for Peter. Peter returned to find himself divorced and his wife remarried. He tried to persuade Martha to leave Mills and return to him. It is believed the two would have reconciled but they weren’t given a chance to talk alone to come to any decision. Mills was supposedly of a very “stingy” nature and Martha Ann would have to wait until he left the house before she dared fill her apron with biscuits she’d made and take them outside and feed the children before his return home. When daughter Mary Elizabeth moved away from this home, she was able to obtain her education. Martha Ann and Martin were called on a mission to the area of Lake Mead, Nevada (The Muddy Mission). Mills eventually deserted Martha and no one seems to know the reason for this. The following letters were written by Martha home to her sister from the Muddy Mission. (Submitted by Ida Ashton Ercanbrack and published in Treasures of Pioneer History, vol. 5, pp. 197-201.) St. Thomas December 15, 1869 Dear Sister, We have arrived at our destination at last and I thought I would write and let you know how we got along. We are all well but me and I feel terribly used up, but my washing is done thank fortune. We had very good luck to get here with all our teams. It is more than everybody does. I thought we had a very hard road to travel when we got to Beaver, so much uphill, so many mountains to climb. Brother Sheppard’s folks laughed at me and said I would know what bad roads were before I got to my journey’s end, and I have surely found out. I could not think there was such places on the earth. When we had come over a rocky ridge, we came up with a man that had had a wheel broke and had no tools so we camped and let him have some. He made his wheel and set his own tire and started in the morning before we did. We went about three miles and the tire on the wagon I drove broke and we had to camp. Martin walked about two miles and found a blacksmith at the settlement where Snow lives. Then he cut a pole and dragged the wagon with the wheel on a pole. He thought the horses wouldn’t have to pull harder than that, but they have. He got the wheel fixed and got about a mile and a half and the tire broke again. He took it back and got it patched, then came back and took the wheel and I took matches and hatchet and went back to water about half a mile and he set the tire himself. We started again and got about six miles from everybody and the tire broke again. While he was thinking what to do, a man came up with an old wheel. He helped put it on and we started again but being delayed so much we could not get to the settlement that night. After dark we had the first heavy sand to go over. The wind blowed very cold and the baby cried all the time. When we came to the sand the horses could not pull the wagon, so Martin went on and left me and the baby to sleep. By the time he got back with the oxen the sand was a mile long. We camped that night without water. The next day we got to Benington (now Leeds, Wash. Co.), got the tire mended again and Martin wet it again. Martin got sick of his mules and traded them for a yoke of oxen and thirty dollars. That is how I got to drive the horses. He traded Grey to Robert Smith for a cow and a calf and a yearling steer and fifteen dollars in corn and molasses. The next settlement was Washington. There he lost an ox, stayed a week and hunted for his ox every day. Took out seven hundred pounds of goods out of the wagon and left at Robert Smiths and went over to St. George. There he got in company with Henry Barney and Joseph Kesler and traveled with them over to this place. When we left St. George, we went six miles to the Clara, and took dinner with cousin Sam. That was the last settlement that afternoon. Brother Barney offered to drive the oxen and it seemed like my trouble was all over. I don’t think I will ever be catched driving team again with a baby to care for. (This baby was born May 13, 1869.) We crossed the Clara so many times we could not count but the men thought it was over a hundred. It is about such a stream as Provo when it is high. It has been a great deal wider and deeper. We traveled 30 miles and came to the Beaver Dam. There has been a small settlement there but the water has washed them out entirely there. The hills are as strait up and down as they can be. The big wagon ran back in the water 3 times before we could get the oxen to think they could get up. We sat up half the night, unloaded the wagon, dug a hole and buried a lot of things and left a lot laying out in the brush and then our loads were too heavy. When we left there I had to do some walking. Martin would say I must not walk but the horses could not go only a few rods at a time without resting and then I would get out. The Rio Virgin, when we came to that, it was very heavy pulling. It is a larger river than Provo and with a quicksand bottom. If a wagon stands five minutes they have to dig it out. We had to dig ours out once and have a yolk of cattle to help pull. We had to cross the river seventeen times and we are on the same side now that we commenced on. Some places he had to go down the stream from a quarter to a half mile. If the horses got ever so tired they could not rest till we got out of the stream. The last day it was deep sand or the river nearly all the way. I walked a mile and a half. When we came to the trail it was four miles over and eight around and we had to cross the river six times, so I took the basket, with a candle, milk, matches and squares and me and the children started off alone through the sand. We had to climb a mountain between four and five hundred feet high. Several places we would have to crawl up one at a time and then lift the baby up, but we got to the settlement before the teams that night. I could hardly get up alone that day. Sister Barney and Sister Kesler and me put our good things together and made dinner. The next day Martin got a little mud house about twelve feet square, a ground floor. I nailed a white cloth for a window and hung up a bed tick for a door, and I feel as proud as anybody that has a big house in Provo. We got here Thursday and Monday I hired a squaw and commenced washing. She and I washed all day Monday and I washed all day Tuesday. Yesterday I borrowed a table and ironed all the time that I could set up and last night I was sick all night. I got tired of the squaw. She brought three here for breakfast and five for dinner. She helped them to bread, in spite of all I could do. Some of the neighbors told her that I did not like it and would not hire her again, so she came here today and said she would not fetch any more Indians to eat my bread. Martin hauled two little jags of wood. He did not like that so he started for the cedars. It will take him four days if he has good luck. When he gets back, he wants to go to Washington. The men have nearly all left now, they want to go and get something to make them a New Year’s dinner. If Martin goes, I shall have to spend my Christmas and New Year’s alone for he will not get back in time. I expect you want to know what I think of this thorny country. I am glad to find a resting place and I don’t know as I shall ever go back. Martin says he don’t feel like he should ever want to try that road again unless he is obliged to, but if ever we do come back I expect we shall be thorny for that is the fashion down here. There is the mesquite we burn, the briars stick out in every direction; the muscrew the same, the flowers or seeds look like a bench screw; and then the muscratch, if you get any of that on you it will stay there until it has a scratch; and then there’s the devil’s pin cushion, the largest are about like the beehives painted on the President’s house, from three to seven in a bunch, all sizes. The soap root is as sharp and stiff as a pitchfork. Then there is the Joshua, a tree from three to six feet high, the thorns on that are longer, but sharp and stiff as thorns. The green grows up and the dry ones turn down. The dry ones are as sharp as the green. The Sand burrs — a body can’t hardly stir without something sticking in them. The houses has little red ants so thick they could not well be thicker. Lice, bedbugs, and fleas in nowhere, for the ants eat them up. A good many have had to leave their houses, they was so thick. There is no fruit trees grows here, no potatoes. They can raise squash, beets, onions and grapes. When they got close enough to eat the Indians steal them. They can hardly raise bread enough to eat. There is a salt mine close by. They get that and peddle it through the northern settlements to get what they want. They get their lumber at St. George and Washington, which is 80 miles. There is no good houses here, there is no feed until we raise lucern. It makes it hard for a newcomer. The folks here I like. They stay here and make the best of it, because they were sent. Brother Woodruff has a son here. His wife has called with Sister Fuller. Several have called but I have not returned many for I have not had time. I told Martin I was going to write to you and he said he wished you would send it to his mother, for he has not had time to write and he said he had not found out the particulars yet. He is waiting to see something good to write. I expect the Lord will bless the land for our sakes. The folks in Provo don’t know what work is to what they do down here. When anybody works hard and can see anything they have accomplished it is encouraging. Well, I think you will be satisfied with the length of this letter and I hope you will answer it soon for I would like to hear from you. I think when you are tired you can sit down and read the ledger and here I could not get such a thing if I tried. I have drank tea ever since I left Provo, but I am going to quit now. The water here ain’t bad to take so that is no excuse. Well I must close. Give my love to all and write soon as you get this. Respectfully, Martha Mills This is a copy of the original letter written by Sister Mills to her sister telling of their release from the mission. St. Thomas October 23, 1870 Dear Sister, I thought I would write a few lines to you. I received yours about two weeks ago and was very glad to hear from you. We are very busy fixing to move to Washington. We want to get off this week. I am glad enough to get out of this place but I dread traveling over such awful roads. I did think I would stay till spring and fat the hog, but Martin thinks another trip down here would be worth more than the hog, so I am busy getting ready. I expect we shall have some cold weather before we get there, but I guess it will be as pleasant as it would be in the spring and when we get there we won’t have to dread any longer. I expect Martin will make the trip out to Kanab as soon as he gets settled a little. We shall leave Joseph Young’s mother in the house so it won’t be alone and if we can’t do better than we have here, we might as well dig a hole and get in. Brother Snow sent a letter here after the President was at St. George, releasing all that wanted to leave and they are all leaving the upper Muddy and that leaves no range for stock for this place. They all feel very happy about leaving. It will make plenty of bread for what’s left, for they don’t take their wheat with them and scarcely any furniture with them. October 25 It has rained two days and the house leaks very bad, so I can’t quilt. All you send me after this send to Washington City, Washington County, Utah. I must close for Martin is waiting to take this to the office. Write as often as you can and give my love to all inquiring friends. Julia will write next time. Martha Mills Quoting Lydia: “I cannot pass without telling what I observed of the dear little pioneer woman, Martha Ann. I was born and raised just three miles from the Bair Ranch and knew her quite well. She was lovely, gracious, kind and understanding. Whatever she did was well done and right. She was near 83 years old when I first met her. She was a small-boned woman and weighed less than 100 pounds when I knew her; about 5’ 4’ tall with dark hair and eyes. She was very industrious and had many talents, being an excellent cook, seamstress, and soap maker. She made hominy, mincemeat, and rendered out lard. She had a big iron kettle on a tripod. She gathered her own wood to feed the fire as she made soap or rendered lard. She wore a waist apron made of gingham and she would fill this full of broken pieces of wood and carry it into the house. She pieced many wool quilt tops and did real nice stitches when she quilted quilts. She spun and carded her own wool to fill them which was called wool bats. She took spool thread and made many yards of knit lace for pillow cases and sheets. In the winter she was busy knitting stockings for all the family. It was a thrill to see her mending. “She was well educated for those times and read whenever time permitted. She always read good books and never trash. Some I remember which she read were Innocents Abroad and Go West by Mark Twain, newspapers and other books. She loved reading history and about other countries. I remember I borrowed several books for her to read and she would read until she could hardly see. “Martha Ann loved to eat and enjoyed watermelons and grapes as they reminded her of the years spent in St. George, or ‘Dixie’ as she called it. She was a loyal American citizen and was glad when women were permitted to vote. Her moral standards were very high and her faith was very forceful. She was very neat in her personal appearance. She wore high-necked dresses and combed her hair in a ‘bob’ on top of her head. The dresses came to her ankles and the sleeves to her wrist. She wore a white apron on Sundays and checked ones on weekdays. “Although she was 83 years old before I met her, I have never had a friend whose company I enjoyed more. In her last years she would come to my home and tell me her experiences of pioneer life. How I wish I had written them down. She had a keen sense of humor. She would be silent rather than tell a falsehood. To me she was a very wonderful person. She had endured hardship, sorrow, disappointment but was always kind, modest, considerate, and helpful to those in need, never complaining, even on her sick bed which lasted several months. She died of dropsy at her daughter Mary’s home on 10 January 1918 at Cove, Utah. I bow my head in memory of a lovely lady.” Martha Ann lived with both her son Edmund and daughter Mary Elizabeth during her declining years. She more than paid her way. She could do what all pioneer women could do and when in later life she didn’t need to keep doing all these things, she still kept busy. Grandson Milton remarks, “Our house wasn’t heated upstairs except a small stove in her room, but as her fire went out her room would get cold and she would get a large rock, put it on the stove to heat and take it to bed with her. Mother (Mary Elizabeth) said that as much as Martha had lived with Mary and Hyrum, she had never taken sides against either one in an argument. I remember when she came to live in our home. In the spring, she would build a fire outside and get the grease or fat that had accumulated in the winter from the pork and beef and many cans of lye and, with a big kettle, commence to make soap. She would make enough to do all our laundry for a year. She would put it out on boards to dry and then put it in sacks or boxes and store it away. She knit the woolen stockings for each of us children. She sewed carpet rags out of the worn-out clothing to be woven into carpets [rugs] and did many other things that took extra work in addition to helping with regular housework. She said, ‘This is the way I pay for my keep!’ “When land for homesteading under the Cary Act was opened up in Utah, [at age 60] she homesteaded 160 acres joining Hyrum Bair’s ranch for him. Hyrum built a cabin on this land and she lived in it until it was proved up and then a deed was made out to her and she became the owner.” There is some question as to whom Martha Ann is sealed to. It is believed she was sealed to a man named Windsor (president of the St. George temple). In those days, a lot of women were sealed to older men in order to entitle them to enter the celestial kingdom. However, Martha Ann never lived with him. Peter E. Van Orden was to marry again — one Sarah Ellen McPherson. After his second marriage, he once made the statement that Martha Ann was his one true love. A daughter by his second marriage never forgave her father for making that remark. In Faith of Our Fathers, Anthony W. Ivins tells of the Muddy Mission: The toil, fatigue, hunger, and tragedy which some of the early settlers of Southern Utah, Southern and Southwestern Nevada and Northern Arizona suffered will never be told. Those who endured them are gone. The fortitude of the brave men and women who were called to settle “The Muddy Valley” is not surpassed in the annals of this people. Those who lost their lives in obedience to this call are entitled to place among the martyrs for the truth. Attack by hostile Indians was not the only danger which confronted the early pioneers of Southern Utah and Southeastern Nevada. The country they were sent to reclaim was a desert, roads were well nigh impassible and feed for livestock, and teams was exceedingly scarce. Medicine and proper medical care were not obtainable and consequently many lives were lost from accident and disease which, under present conditions, might have been saved. In no part of the south did this condition prevail to a greater extent than in the Muddy Valley. It was a country of rocks and sand, ninety miles from St. George (the nearest settlement), and that only an outpost of civilization, and could be reached only over one of the most difficult roads on the continent. The southern route to California bore southwest to Cedar City to the Mountain Meadows and from there six miles southeast to Cane Springs, from which point it passed onto Magotsa and Santa Clara, which it followed to the present site of the copper smelter at Shem, where it turned south to Camp Springs, the only water between Santa Clara and the Beaver Dams on the Rio Virgin River, twenty-five miles away. From the Beaver Dams the road followed the Rio Virgin sixty miles to the present site of St. Thomas on the Muddy, crossing the river as many as forty times. Compiled by Lydia Bair and Karen Payne, typed October 1996
(TalbotAD 26 September 2015 This version states that Martha's mother died while she was very young, this is not accurate and the death date of her mother is proof of that. Martha was 33 when her mother passed away.)

MEDIA: U3066 - Martha Ann Knight Van Orden Mills Winsor d/o Joseph Darrell & Betsey Covert Knight - McDonald Family Tree - Public Trees Ancestry
U4260 - Mary Elizabeth, Martha Ann and Rhoda Caroline Knight ds/o Joseph & Polly Peck Knight - https://familysearch.org/photos/images/16974261
U4261 - Peter Edmund & Martha Ann Knight Van Orden and Family d/o Joseph Darrell & Betsey Covert Knight - https://familysearch.org/photos/images/5702064


Martin Walderfin MILLS [Parents] was born on 30 Aug 1830 in Pickering, Kitley Leeds, Ontario. He died on 30 Apr 1925 in Washington, Washington, Utah. He was buried in Washington City Cemetery, Washington, Utah. Martin married (MRIN:6260) Martha Ann KNIGHT on 2 Nov 1867 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah.

MEDIA: U1090 - Martin Walderfin Martin h/o Martha Ann Knight - from his findagrave memorial

Martha Ann KNIGHT [Parents] was born on 11 Jun 1833 in Kaw, Jackson, Missouri. She died on 10 Jan 1919 in Coveville, Cache, Utah from Cancer of the stomach. She was buried in Richmond City Cemetery, Richmond, Cache, Utah. Martha married (MRIN:6260) Martin Walderfin MILLS on 2 Nov 1867 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah.

Other marriages:
VAN ORDEN, Peter Edmund
WINSOR, Anson Perry

DEATH: Name: Martha Ann Winsor
Titles:
Death date: 10 Jan 1919
Death place: Cache, Utah
Birth date:
Estimated birth year: 1834
Birth place:
Age at death: 85 years 6 months 30 days
Gender: Female
Marital status: Married
Race or color:
Spouse name: Anson P. Winsor
Father name: Joseph Knight
Father titles:
Mother name: Betsy Covert
Mother titles:
GSU film number: 2229969
Digital GS number: 4121289
Image number: 1342
Reference number: 18
Collection: Utah Death Certificates 1904-1956

BIOGRAPHY: Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847–1868
Knight, Martha Ann
Birth Date:  11 June 1833
Death Date:  10 Jan. 1919
Gender:  Female
Age:  17
Company: Benjamin Hawkins Company (1850)
Sources: Journal History, Supp. after 31 Dec. 1850, p. 2

Martha Ann Knight Van Orden Mills 1833-1919
https://familysearch.org/photos/stories/4691832
Contributed By Karen Payne1 · 22 January 2014
In 1829, while the work of translating was going on, the Lord sent a friend in time of need to give material assistance to the Prophet Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery. This was Joseph Knight, Sr. of Colesville, Broome County, New York. Having heard of the manner in which Joseph and Oliver were occupying their time, Mr. Knight brought them provisions from time to time a distance of some 30 miles and thus enabled them to continue their labor without interruption, which would have otherwise delayed the work. Persecution was very bitter at this time. In the spring of 1830, Joseph Smith, Oliver Cowdery, John and David Whitmer went to Colesville where they found a number of persons anxiously awaiting them and desiring baptism. Among those waiting were Joseph Knight, Sr., wife Polly Knight and son Joseph Knight, Jr. (E.C.H.) The fifth conference of the Church was held 4 August 1831 in Jackson County, Missouri. On the seventh, the Prophet attended the funeral of Polly Knight, wife of Joseph Knight, Sr. Her health had been failing for some time and she was very ill on the journey from Kirtland to Independence, but she had a strong desire to see the land of Zion. She lived to have that wish gratified and then she slept in peace. She was the first of the saints to pass away in that county. One of the granddaughters of this faithful family was Martha Ann, who was born 11 June 1833 at Kaw Township, Jackson County, Missouri to Joseph Knight, Jr. and Betsy Covert. Her parents came to Utah in the second company of 1850, which was organized four miles west of Council Bluffs on June 7th under Benjamin Hawkins. There were 150 wagons which arrived in Salt Lake on 9 September 1950. (Heart Throbs of the West, vol. 11.) According to Lydia and Milton Bair, Martha Ann did not talk much about herself but it is known that her mother died when she was very young. At 13 years of age, she ripped up an old suit of clothes for a pattern and made her father a new suit of clothes. They were so good, another man came and asked her to make him a suit. At about age 17 she worked in the home of President Brigham Young and became acquainted with his wives and children, whom she loved and respected very much. She was baptized 15 June 1841 and endowed 21 September 1855 at the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. She married Peter Edmund Van Orden in 1851. They were given land by the Church at Kaysville, Utah. Here in a covered wagon which was removed from its running gears and placed on the ground, then banked up with sod, they lived; and it was here that their first child, Mary Elizabeth, was born on 30 October 1852. Here they lived during that winter and perhaps longer, as many of the Saints had to live this way or in dugouts. She lived with Peter until she had one son and four daughters: Mary Elizabeth, Maria (died in 1863), Peter Edmund, Julia Ann, and Ellen. Times were very hard. Money was something that was very difficult to get hold of, so Peter left his wife and family and left the valley to get work. Peter considered Martha an “aristocrat” who had nice things all her life and he wanted her to have the same after their marriage. In order to make a living, he freighted by mule team and on one trip went clear up into Montana. He was gone for over a year and, having had no formal education, he was not one to write letters. He promised to contact her and send some money as soon as he could. Time passed and she never heard from him. It seemed that he had deserted her and their little family. She worked “out” to support her children and needed help but didn’t know where to turn. Martin Walderfin Mills (the owner of a sawmill) was infatuated with Martha Ann and kept besieging her with offers of marriage and telling her that she had been deserted by Peter. So Martha divorced Peter and married Mills on 2 November 1867. (They were to eventually have a son and three daughters.) Several months later a man came to see her and gave her a letter and some money that he had been carrying around for some time. He was supposed to have delivered it for Peter. Peter returned to find himself divorced and his wife remarried. He tried to persuade Martha to leave Mills and return to him. It is believed the two would have reconciled but they weren’t given a chance to talk alone to come to any decision. Mills was supposedly of a very “stingy” nature and Martha Ann would have to wait until he left the house before she dared fill her apron with biscuits she’d made and take them outside and feed the children before his return home. When daughter Mary Elizabeth moved away from this home, she was able to obtain her education. Martha Ann and Martin were called on a mission to the area of Lake Mead, Nevada (The Muddy Mission). Mills eventually deserted Martha and no one seems to know the reason for this. The following letters were written by Martha home to her sister from the Muddy Mission. (Submitted by Ida Ashton Ercanbrack and published in Treasures of Pioneer History, vol. 5, pp. 197-201.) St. Thomas December 15, 1869 Dear Sister, We have arrived at our destination at last and I thought I would write and let you know how we got along. We are all well but me and I feel terribly used up, but my washing is done thank fortune. We had very good luck to get here with all our teams. It is more than everybody does. I thought we had a very hard road to travel when we got to Beaver, so much uphill, so many mountains to climb. Brother Sheppard’s folks laughed at me and said I would know what bad roads were before I got to my journey’s end, and I have surely found out. I could not think there was such places on the earth. When we had come over a rocky ridge, we came up with a man that had had a wheel broke and had no tools so we camped and let him have some. He made his wheel and set his own tire and started in the morning before we did. We went about three miles and the tire on the wagon I drove broke and we had to camp. Martin walked about two miles and found a blacksmith at the settlement where Snow lives. Then he cut a pole and dragged the wagon with the wheel on a pole. He thought the horses wouldn’t have to pull harder than that, but they have. He got the wheel fixed and got about a mile and a half and the tire broke again. He took it back and got it patched, then came back and took the wheel and I took matches and hatchet and went back to water about half a mile and he set the tire himself. We started again and got about six miles from everybody and the tire broke again. While he was thinking what to do, a man came up with an old wheel. He helped put it on and we started again but being delayed so much we could not get to the settlement that night. After dark we had the first heavy sand to go over. The wind blowed very cold and the baby cried all the time. When we came to the sand the horses could not pull the wagon, so Martin went on and left me and the baby to sleep. By the time he got back with the oxen the sand was a mile long. We camped that night without water. The next day we got to Benington (now Leeds, Wash. Co.), got the tire mended again and Martin wet it again. Martin got sick of his mules and traded them for a yoke of oxen and thirty dollars. That is how I got to drive the horses. He traded Grey to Robert Smith for a cow and a calf and a yearling steer and fifteen dollars in corn and molasses. The next settlement was Washington. There he lost an ox, stayed a week and hunted for his ox every day. Took out seven hundred pounds of goods out of the wagon and left at Robert Smiths and went over to St. George. There he got in company with Henry Barney and Joseph Kesler and traveled with them over to this place. When we left St. George, we went six miles to the Clara, and took dinner with cousin Sam. That was the last settlement that afternoon. Brother Barney offered to drive the oxen and it seemed like my trouble was all over. I don’t think I will ever be catched driving team again with a baby to care for. (This baby was born May 13, 1869.) We crossed the Clara so many times we could not count but the men thought it was over a hundred. It is about such a stream as Provo when it is high. It has been a great deal wider and deeper. We traveled 30 miles and came to the Beaver Dam. There has been a small settlement there but the water has washed them out entirely there. The hills are as strait up and down as they can be. The big wagon ran back in the water 3 times before we could get the oxen to think they could get up. We sat up half the night, unloaded the wagon, dug a hole and buried a lot of things and left a lot laying out in the brush and then our loads were too heavy. When we left there I had to do some walking. Martin would say I must not walk but the horses could not go only a few rods at a time without resting and then I would get out. The Rio Virgin, when we came to that, it was very heavy pulling. It is a larger river than Provo and with a quicksand bottom. If a wagon stands five minutes they have to dig it out. We had to dig ours out once and have a yolk of cattle to help pull. We had to cross the river seventeen times and we are on the same side now that we commenced on. Some places he had to go down the stream from a quarter to a half mile. If the horses got ever so tired they could not rest till we got out of the stream. The last day it was deep sand or the river nearly all the way. I walked a mile and a half. When we came to the trail it was four miles over and eight around and we had to cross the river six times, so I took the basket, with a candle, milk, matches and squares and me and the children started off alone through the sand. We had to climb a mountain between four and five hundred feet high. Several places we would have to crawl up one at a time and then lift the baby up, but we got to the settlement before the teams that night. I could hardly get up alone that day. Sister Barney and Sister Kesler and me put our good things together and made dinner. The next day Martin got a little mud house about twelve feet square, a ground floor. I nailed a white cloth for a window and hung up a bed tick for a door, and I feel as proud as anybody that has a big house in Provo. We got here Thursday and Monday I hired a squaw and commenced washing. She and I washed all day Monday and I washed all day Tuesday. Yesterday I borrowed a table and ironed all the time that I could set up and last night I was sick all night. I got tired of the squaw. She brought three here for breakfast and five for dinner. She helped them to bread, in spite of all I could do. Some of the neighbors told her that I did not like it and would not hire her again, so she came here today and said she would not fetch any more Indians to eat my bread. Martin hauled two little jags of wood. He did not like that so he started for the cedars. It will take him four days if he has good luck. When he gets back, he wants to go to Washington. The men have nearly all left now, they want to go and get something to make them a New Year’s dinner. If Martin goes, I shall have to spend my Christmas and New Year’s alone for he will not get back in time. I expect you want to know what I think of this thorny country. I am glad to find a resting place and I don’t know as I shall ever go back. Martin says he don’t feel like he should ever want to try that road again unless he is obliged to, but if ever we do come back I expect we shall be thorny for that is the fashion down here. There is the mesquite we burn, the briars stick out in every direction; the muscrew the same, the flowers or seeds look like a bench screw; and then the muscratch, if you get any of that on you it will stay there until it has a scratch; and then there’s the devil’s pin cushion, the largest are about like the beehives painted on the President’s house, from three to seven in a bunch, all sizes. The soap root is as sharp and stiff as a pitchfork. Then there is the Joshua, a tree from three to six feet high, the thorns on that are longer, but sharp and stiff as thorns. The green grows up and the dry ones turn down. The dry ones are as sharp as the green. The Sand burrs — a body can’t hardly stir without something sticking in them. The houses has little red ants so thick they could not well be thicker. Lice, bedbugs, and fleas in nowhere, for the ants eat them up. A good many have had to leave their houses, they was so thick. There is no fruit trees grows here, no potatoes. They can raise squash, beets, onions and grapes. When they got close enough to eat the Indians steal them. They can hardly raise bread enough to eat. There is a salt mine close by. They get that and peddle it through the northern settlements to get what they want. They get their lumber at St. George and Washington, which is 80 miles. There is no good houses here, there is no feed until we raise lucern. It makes it hard for a newcomer. The folks here I like. They stay here and make the best of it, because they were sent. Brother Woodruff has a son here. His wife has called with Sister Fuller. Several have called but I have not returned many for I have not had time. I told Martin I was going to write to you and he said he wished you would send it to his mother, for he has not had time to write and he said he had not found out the particulars yet. He is waiting to see something good to write. I expect the Lord will bless the land for our sakes. The folks in Provo don’t know what work is to what they do down here. When anybody works hard and can see anything they have accomplished it is encouraging. Well, I think you will be satisfied with the length of this letter and I hope you will answer it soon for I would like to hear from you. I think when you are tired you can sit down and read the ledger and here I could not get such a thing if I tried. I have drank tea ever since I left Provo, but I am going to quit now. The water here ain’t bad to take so that is no excuse. Well I must close. Give my love to all and write soon as you get this. Respectfully, Martha Mills This is a copy of the original letter written by Sister Mills to her sister telling of their release from the mission. St. Thomas October 23, 1870 Dear Sister, I thought I would write a few lines to you. I received yours about two weeks ago and was very glad to hear from you. We are very busy fixing to move to Washington. We want to get off this week. I am glad enough to get out of this place but I dread traveling over such awful roads. I did think I would stay till spring and fat the hog, but Martin thinks another trip down here would be worth more than the hog, so I am busy getting ready. I expect we shall have some cold weather before we get there, but I guess it will be as pleasant as it would be in the spring and when we get there we won’t have to dread any longer. I expect Martin will make the trip out to Kanab as soon as he gets settled a little. We shall leave Joseph Young’s mother in the house so it won’t be alone and if we can’t do better than we have here, we might as well dig a hole and get in. Brother Snow sent a letter here after the President was at St. George, releasing all that wanted to leave and they are all leaving the upper Muddy and that leaves no range for stock for this place. They all feel very happy about leaving. It will make plenty of bread for what’s left, for they don’t take their wheat with them and scarcely any furniture with them. October 25 It has rained two days and the house leaks very bad, so I can’t quilt. All you send me after this send to Washington City, Washington County, Utah. I must close for Martin is waiting to take this to the office. Write as often as you can and give my love to all inquiring friends. Julia will write next time. Martha Mills Quoting Lydia: “I cannot pass without telling what I observed of the dear little pioneer woman, Martha Ann. I was born and raised just three miles from the Bair Ranch and knew her quite well. She was lovely, gracious, kind and understanding. Whatever she did was well done and right. She was near 83 years old when I first met her. She was a small-boned woman and weighed less than 100 pounds when I knew her; about 5’ 4’ tall with dark hair and eyes. She was very industrious and had many talents, being an excellent cook, seamstress, and soap maker. She made hominy, mincemeat, and rendered out lard. She had a big iron kettle on a tripod. She gathered her own wood to feed the fire as she made soap or rendered lard. She wore a waist apron made of gingham and she would fill this full of broken pieces of wood and carry it into the house. She pieced many wool quilt tops and did real nice stitches when she quilted quilts. She spun and carded her own wool to fill them which was called wool bats. She took spool thread and made many yards of knit lace for pillow cases and sheets. In the winter she was busy knitting stockings for all the family. It was a thrill to see her mending. “She was well educated for those times and read whenever time permitted. She always read good books and never trash. Some I remember which she read were Innocents Abroad and Go West by Mark Twain, newspapers and other books. She loved reading history and about other countries. I remember I borrowed several books for her to read and she would read until she could hardly see. “Martha Ann loved to eat and enjoyed watermelons and grapes as they reminded her of the years spent in St. George, or ‘Dixie’ as she called it. She was a loyal American citizen and was glad when women were permitted to vote. Her moral standards were very high and her faith was very forceful. She was very neat in her personal appearance. She wore high-necked dresses and combed her hair in a ‘bob’ on top of her head. The dresses came to her ankles and the sleeves to her wrist. She wore a white apron on Sundays and checked ones on weekdays. “Although she was 83 years old before I met her, I have never had a friend whose company I enjoyed more. In her last years she would come to my home and tell me her experiences of pioneer life. How I wish I had written them down. She had a keen sense of humor. She would be silent rather than tell a falsehood. To me she was a very wonderful person. She had endured hardship, sorrow, disappointment but was always kind, modest, considerate, and helpful to those in need, never complaining, even on her sick bed which lasted several months. She died of dropsy at her daughter Mary’s home on 10 January 1918 at Cove, Utah. I bow my head in memory of a lovely lady.” Martha Ann lived with both her son Edmund and daughter Mary Elizabeth during her declining years. She more than paid her way. She could do what all pioneer women could do and when in later life she didn’t need to keep doing all these things, she still kept busy. Grandson Milton remarks, “Our house wasn’t heated upstairs except a small stove in her room, but as her fire went out her room would get cold and she would get a large rock, put it on the stove to heat and take it to bed with her. Mother (Mary Elizabeth) said that as much as Martha had lived with Mary and Hyrum, she had never taken sides against either one in an argument. I remember when she came to live in our home. In the spring, she would build a fire outside and get the grease or fat that had accumulated in the winter from the pork and beef and many cans of lye and, with a big kettle, commence to make soap. She would make enough to do all our laundry for a year. She would put it out on boards to dry and then put it in sacks or boxes and store it away. She knit the woolen stockings for each of us children. She sewed carpet rags out of the worn-out clothing to be woven into carpets [rugs] and did many other things that took extra work in addition to helping with regular housework. She said, ‘This is the way I pay for my keep!’ “When land for homesteading under the Cary Act was opened up in Utah, [at age 60] she homesteaded 160 acres joining Hyrum Bair’s ranch for him. Hyrum built a cabin on this land and she lived in it until it was proved up and then a deed was made out to her and she became the owner.” There is some question as to whom Martha Ann is sealed to. It is believed she was sealed to a man named Windsor (president of the St. George temple). In those days, a lot of women were sealed to older men in order to entitle them to enter the celestial kingdom. However, Martha Ann never lived with him. Peter E. Van Orden was to marry again — one Sarah Ellen McPherson. After his second marriage, he once made the statement that Martha Ann was his one true love. A daughter by his second marriage never forgave her father for making that remark. In Faith of Our Fathers, Anthony W. Ivins tells of the Muddy Mission: The toil, fatigue, hunger, and tragedy which some of the early settlers of Southern Utah, Southern and Southwestern Nevada and Northern Arizona suffered will never be told. Those who endured them are gone. The fortitude of the brave men and women who were called to settle “The Muddy Valley” is not surpassed in the annals of this people. Those who lost their lives in obedience to this call are entitled to place among the martyrs for the truth. Attack by hostile Indians was not the only danger which confronted the early pioneers of Southern Utah and Southeastern Nevada. The country they were sent to reclaim was a desert, roads were well nigh impassible and feed for livestock, and teams was exceedingly scarce. Medicine and proper medical care were not obtainable and consequently many lives were lost from accident and disease which, under present conditions, might have been saved. In no part of the south did this condition prevail to a greater extent than in the Muddy Valley. It was a country of rocks and sand, ninety miles from St. George (the nearest settlement), and that only an outpost of civilization, and could be reached only over one of the most difficult roads on the continent. The southern route to California bore southwest to Cedar City to the Mountain Meadows and from there six miles southeast to Cane Springs, from which point it passed onto Magotsa and Santa Clara, which it followed to the present site of the copper smelter at Shem, where it turned south to Camp Springs, the only water between Santa Clara and the Beaver Dams on the Rio Virgin River, twenty-five miles away. From the Beaver Dams the road followed the Rio Virgin sixty miles to the present site of St. Thomas on the Muddy, crossing the river as many as forty times. Compiled by Lydia Bair and Karen Payne, typed October 1996
(TalbotAD 26 September 2015 This version states that Martha's mother died while she was very young, this is not accurate and the death date of her mother is proof of that. Martha was 33 when her mother passed away.)

MEDIA: U3066 - Martha Ann Knight Van Orden Mills Winsor d/o Joseph Darrell & Betsey Covert Knight - McDonald Family Tree - Public Trees Ancestry
U4260 - Mary Elizabeth, Martha Ann and Rhoda Caroline Knight ds/o Joseph & Polly Peck Knight - https://familysearch.org/photos/images/16974261
U4261 - Peter Edmund & Martha Ann Knight Van Orden and Family d/o Joseph Darrell & Betsey Covert Knight - https://familysearch.org/photos/images/5702064

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