Dean Families of Early South-central PA

 

Dean Families of South-central Pennsylvania, About 1780 to 1810

 

Preface

            The paper below is one I wrote in early 2000.  At that point in time I had been searching Huntingdon Co., PA and surrounding counties for evidence of my ancestor, George Dean, for about four years.  I had collected piles of information and I felt I needed to organize it in some way.  The paper below is the result.  It was done more for my benefit than for the benefit of others.  I am publishing it here on the web in the hope that someone else can benefit from it.

            In October 2000 I spent more than a week in that part of Pennsylvania searching for evidence of my Dean ancestors, but with very little success.  After that I concentrated on researching the William Dean who is the subject of chapter 7 below.  While I have been quite successful in tracing him and a couple of generations of his descendants, I have not come any closer to identifying the parents and siblings of my George Dean.

            The material below is more than four years old.  I have discovered more information on some of the families and some errors, but I have not made any attempt to update or correct the paper.  I found one major error – the John Dean, subject of chapter 3, may not exist at all.  His existence was based largely on a statement in Africa’s History of Huntingdon Co., p. 321 which says “John Dean, a brother of Matthew, lived lower down the valley …”  An erratum at the end of the book which I did not notice until long after I had finished the paper corrects that to say “John Dean, a son of Matthew ...”  The e-mail addresses given in the paper are old and some may no longer work.  In some cases I have newer contact information.  If you are interested in updated information which I may have, please contact me.

            If any readers of this web page are descended from any of these families or if any readers have additional information on the families described, especially on the parents of the family outlined at the end of chapter 3 or any information at all about the strays listed at the end of chapter 4, I would love to have you contact me, Larry Dean:  ladean23  AT  gmail  DOT  com

            August 2004                            Larry Dean

 

  ---------------------------------------------------------------

What I Know and What I Don’t Know About

the Dean Families

of South-central and Other Parts of Pennsylvania,

About 1780 to 1810

by Lawrence A. Dean

DRAFT          1 March 2000         DRAFT

 

Contents--------page

            Purpose--------1

            Tentative Conclusions--------1

            Introduction--------2

        1. William and Jane Dean of Allegheny County--------3

                        (removed to Crawford County, Pennsylvania)

 2. Matthew and Rebecca Dean of (now*) Catharine Township, Blair County--------3

     (his wife and children were massacred by Indians)

    2a. John Dean, the surviving son of the above Matthew Dean--------6

 3. John Dean of Morris Township, Huntingdon County--------7

     (the brother of the above Matthew Dean)

 4. John and Deborah Dean and Alexander and Anne (Hamilton) Dean--------10

                        (and other Dean-s, all in or near the Borough of Huntingdon, Huntingdon County)

         5. Jacob and Nancy (Loveall)  Dean of (now*) Cass Township, Huntingdon County--------13

                        (and Jacob’s sons Jonathan, Zachariah and Enoch)

         6. John and Anne (Isett) Dean of (now*) Union Township, Huntingdon County--------17

                        (and John’s brothers Samuel and Thomas; John removed to the Raystown Branch)

  7. William Dean of (now*) Penn Township, Huntingdon County--------21

                        (original warrantee of land on the Raystown Branch)

  8. William and Martha (McNutt) Dean of Peters Township, Franklin County--------23

(killed in Revolutionary War, widow removed to Westmoreland Co., then to Indiana Co.)

  9. Samuel and Martha (Camp) Dean of Cumberland County--------23

                        (Revolutionary War soldier, removed to Fayette County)

10. Robert Dean of Allegany County, Maryland--------25

                        (Revolutionary War pensioner)

            References--------25

*Note.  County and Township boundaries changed before, during and after the time period covered.  In some cases footnotes have been added to indicate how these boundaries changed with time.

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Purpose.

            The purpose of this paper is to organize the information I have collected on various persons surnamed Dean who lived in western and south-central Pennsylvania about 1780 to 1810.  This information has been collected in a so far unsuccessful effort to identify the parents and siblings of my great great grandfather, George W. Dean, who was born 1786 in Pennsylvania.  This is a work in progress.  It will not be finished until I learn who my George W. Dean’s ancestors were.

 

Tentative Conclusions.

            The information compiled in this paper pretty well convinces me that the families described in Chapters 1, 2, 2a, 5, 6, 8, 9 and 10 are not the family of my ancestor.  I have a lot of information on the families of Chapters 1, 2, 2a, 5 and 6.  All the males born around 1786 in those families seem to be accounted for.  The only possibility for one of these to be the family of my ancestor would be that my George Dean was left out of his father’s will or that the compiler of what seems to be pretty complete information missed him. The William Dean of Chapter 8 died well before 1786.  The Samuel Dean of Chapter 9 was not married until 1790 and his wife would have been only 12 in 1786.  The wife of the Robert Dean of Chapter 10 would have been only six years of age in 1786.

I continue to be interested in the family of John Dean, brother of Matthew Dean, described in Chapter 3.  I don’t have a will or even an estate administration for him, and what I have on his children is fragmentary and speculative.  If he had sons or grandsons other than those identified in this paper, they could be my ancestor.  I would very much like to find a will for him or a comprehensive compilation of his descendants.  It does not seem possible that the John or Alexander Dean of Chapter 4 could have been George Dean’s father, but there are other Dean-s listed at the end of this chapter on whom I have insufficient information and would like more.  Based on what I have learned from this paper, the William Dean who was warranted land on the Raystown Branch, described in Chapter 7, is the person of most interest to me at present.  I definitely need more information on his family.  [Note: see William Dean of KY (about 1725-1825).]

 

Introduction.

            The inscription on George W. Dean’s gravestone in the Hawkesville Cemetery, Waterloo County, Ontario, Canada says he “died November 21, 1856, age 70 years, a native of Pennsylvania, Allaghany County” (spelled that way).  This would seem to say that he was born between November 21, 1785 and November 21, 1786 in Allegheny County Pennsylvania.  However, after much searching I am convinced he was not born in the present Allegheny County or in the much larger Allegheny County which was formed out of western Pennsylvania in 1788.

Since there is an Allegany County (spelled that way) adjacent to south-central Pennsylvania in Maryland, I considered the possibility that he was born there.

Or perhaps he was born in one of the Allegheny Townships in Pennsylvania—seven counties have such townships spelled one way or another.  Or maybe his birthplace was simply somewhere in or near the Allegheny Mountains in Pennsylvania.  I feel there must be some form of truth to this epitaph.

George W. Dean would have been 3 or 4 years of age when the 1790 census was recorded and 13 or 14 years of age when the 1800 census was recorded.  Thus he probably would have been enumerated in the household of his parents in both of these censuses.

            A Hoshal family history book says Elizabeth Hoshal, daughter of Henry Hoshal, married George Dean January 25, 1810. [ref. 1, p. 217]  Despite the fact that this book contains several errors concerning the life of this Henry Hoshal, I have no doubt that the two were married about then.  George W. Dean’s will and other records indicate a son named Henry Hoshel Dean was born to George W. Dean and his first wife about 1811 in Pennsylvania.  Census and other records indicate a Henry Hoshal/Hoshel was living in Shirley Township, Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania before, during and after the time of the 1810 census. [ref. 2, p. 348]  The court appointed Hugh Doyle to administer his estate of Henry Hoshell, late of Shirley Township, on 29 March 1828. [Huntingdon Co. will book #3, p. 242, FHL #1854232]

            By the time the census was taken in August 1810, George W. Dean would have been 23 or 24 years of age and, if the above information is correct, married to Elizabeth Hoshel.  In one of those unfortunate turns of genealogical fate, only the first initial of the heads of household were recorded in the 1810 census of Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania.  Perhaps George W. Dean was the head of household recorded in that census as “J. Dean” in the household next to “H. Hoshel” in Shirley Township, Huntingdon County.  The household of that “J. Dean” consisted of one male age 16 to 25, one female age 26 to 44 and one female under the age of 10.  The age of the adult female agrees with information in the Hoshal family history book which indicates Elizabeth “was born probably around 1780.” [ref. 1, p. 217]  The female child agrees with later Canadian census information which indicates that the first child of George W. Dean and his first wife was a girl named Martha, and that she was born in 1810 in Pennsylvania.

            George W. Dean, his wife and young children apparently removed from Pennsylvania to Canada sometime after March 1815 when another daughter was born in Pennsylvania and before February 1818 when another son was born in Thorold, Welland County, Ontario.  He and his family are recorded in various places in Ontario from that time onward.

            Warning.  Reader be prepared.  There were four heads of household named John Dean enumerated in the 1790 census in Huntingdon County.  In all, I have identified what I believe to be at least thirteen different persons named John Dean in this paper.  This is very confusing to say the least.

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Chapter 1.   William and Jane Dean of Allegheny County

                 (removed to Crawford County, Pennsylvania)

 

        On Apr. 21, 1789 the probate court of Allegheny County appointed Jane Dean and Abraham Dean to administer the estate of William Dean of Pitt Township, Allegheny County who “lately died intestate.”  The court record does not show the relationship of the administrators to the deceased.  The record includes an inventory of the estate of the deceased.  [Allegheny Co., PA will book #1, page 10, FHL #0858898]

        Jane Dean (1/1-3)† was recorded as head of household in the 1790 census in Plum Township, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania.  No other persons surnamed Dean was recorded in that census in Allegheny County.

Two persons surnamed Dean appeared on a 1791 tax list for Allegheny County: Jane Dean was taxed £5.0 in Plum Township and Joseph Dean was taxed £5.8.11 in Pitt Township.

        The Western Pennsylvania Genealogical Quarterly, vol. 7, No. 2, November 1980 contains an article, “The Origin of Crawford County,” by William B. Moore.  This article lists “William Dean and his brother-in-law Peter Shaw” among settlers of East Fairfield Township prior to 1800. [p. 46].

No persons surnamed Dean appeared in the 1800 census in Allegheny County.  A William Dean (1/0/1/1/0-2/0/1/0/0-0/0)appeared in MD (Mead?) Township, Crawford County.

In the 1810 census a Sam’l Dean (1/0/0/0/1-1/1/0/0/1-0/0)† was recorded as a head of household in Pitt Township and a Thomas Dean (2/0/0/1/0-1/0/0/1/0-0)† was recorded in the Borough of Pittsburgh.  I don’t know how or whether either of these people were related to the family described in this chapter.  The only head of household surnamed Dean in the 1810 census in Crawford County was William Dean in WY (Wayne?) Township, (2/2/0/1/0-3/2/1/1/0-0)†.

            The book, A Census of Pensioners for Revolutionary or Military Services, etc., lists the names of military pensioners who were enumerated in the 1840 census.  It includes William Dean, 69 years of age, living in a household headed by William Dean in Fairfield Township, Crawford County, Pennsylvania. [p. 124]

            In a 4 Mar 1999 e-mail to me, Randy May (rmaytime@aol.com) sent the following:  “here is a brief outline of William Dean; from the work of Crawford County Genealogy Society, vol. xiv, #1, by Wm. Moore.

1  William Dean  Abt. 1735 – Abt. 1788 Allegheny Co., Pitt Twp., Pa.

Revolutionary War veteran, granted tract 1601 for service

   +  Jane  Abt. 1735 – 5/1821 Fairfield Twp., Crawford Co., Pa.

2  Abraham Dean  Abt. 1757 –

appointed adm. of father’s estate in 1788

2  Sarah Dean   Abt. 1761 Pa. – 1813 Crawford Co., Pa.

   +   Peter Shaw  Abt. 1760 Glasglow, Scotland – 1828

2  Esther Dean    Abt. 1765 –

   +  Alexander Dempster  Abt. 1765

2  Agnes Dean    Abt. 1770 – Abt. 1799

   +  Severin Bolt   1762 – Bef. 1901

2  William Dean   1774 – 1847 Crawford Co., Pa.

came to Crawford Co., from Westmoreland Co., Pa. in 1794

   +  Jane McClelland   1776 – 1854 Crawford Co., Pa.”

            In a 21 May 1997 e-mail to me, Colleen Frank (frankm@worldaccessnet.com) gave me the names and birth dates of the thirteen children of the younger William and Jane Dean.  The children were born between 1795 and 1818.  None were named George.

 

† Note: See note at end of References for the meaning of these census numbers.

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Chapter 2. Matthew and Rebecca Dean of (now*) Catharine Township, Blair* County

          (his wife and children were massacred by Indians)

 

            There is quite a bit of information available on this family beginning with the massacre of the wife and children of Matthew Dean in 1780 and ending with Matthew’s great grandson, the prominent Judge John Dean (in 1883).

            The name of Matthew Dean appeared in several tax lists in Frankstown Township Bedford County as follows: 1776 taxed £6.8 on uncultivated land and £5.5 provincial tax; 1779 taxed on 200 acres, 2 horses and 2 cattle; 1783 and 1784 taxed on 300 acres. [ref. 8, p. 121, 200, 267, 297]

            Matthew Dean was sworn in as a justice of the Court of Quarter Sessions in Bedford County on Feb 12, 1779. [ref. 2, p. 7]

            The massacre of the family of Matthew Dean in the fall of 1780 is recorded in many books. [ref. 2, p.321; ref. 3, p. 95-6; ref. 4., p. 278-284; ref. 5., p. 203]  Matthew Dean’s family consisted of himself, his wife, and eight children, with the prospect of another (child) being added to the family in a day or two.  Matthew Dean’s wife and four of their children were in the house and were killed by Indians.  According to some accounts, the father was with his two boys and two oldest daughters in a corn field near the house and survived the massacre. [ref. 2, p.321; ref. 4., p. 278-284]  This story does not agree with the will of Matthew Dean made less than a year after the massacre which indicates that one son, John, and three daughters, Margaret, Rebecca and Elizabeth survived him.

The residence of Matthew Dean was located in the Canoe Valley, a half mile from Lowry’s Fort which was about three miles southwest of Water Street. [ref. 2, p. 20, ref. 4, p. 279]  Matthew Dean’s house stood on the bank of a small stream, about five rods southeast of the present (in 1883) residence of Thomas Cunning. [ref. 3, p. 95]

Reference 5 includes a section written by Judge John Dean (great grandson of Matthew Dean) which contains several bits of family genealogy, including the following: “Matthew Dean came to Pennsylvania about the year 1760 from Ireland.” [ref. 5, p. 202]

            A 20 Apr 1997 e-mail from Frank Thorlton (Hartslog@aol.com) and several more-recent e-mails from others tell about a monument to the memory of the Matthew Dean family which was erected in 1909 at the Keller Cemetery in (now*) Catharine Township, Blair County.  It reads: “Rebecca Wife / Two Children / Samuel and Infant Daughter / Massacred by Indians October 1780 / Matthew Husband Died April 1781 / and Is Buried In The Hartslog Cemetery / Four Children John, Margaret Means / Rebecca Caldwell and / Elizabeth Caldwell / Escaped the Massacre / Dedicated September 9th 1909 / DEAN.”  According to several other sources, four children were killed in the massacre.

A brother of Matthew Dean, John Dean, lived "down the valley" from his brother. [ref. 2, p. 321].  See Chapter 3 below for more information about this John Dean.

The publication Abstracts of Wills, Administrations, Renunciations, Citations for Bedford County, Pennsylvania, abstracted from Will Book, Vol. I, contains the following information: “DEAN, Mathew, late of Frankstown Twp.  Will dated Apr 17 1781: Prob Apr 28 1781.  Names: son John plantation adj Michael Cryders; plantation I lived on in

Frankstown Twp to be sold and money equally divided amongst daus: Margaret, Rebeckah, and Elizabeth Dean.  Exr: trusty friends Samuel Anderson, John Canan.  Wit: William Watson, Hugh Mitchell, John Mitchell.” [p. 31]

            The 1787 tax list in the original township of Tyrone included John Dean as a single freeman with 298 Acres.  [ref. 3, p. 231]  This probably was the surviving son of Matthew Dean.

            Three land sales are recorded on pages 378, 426 and 451 of Huntingdon County Deed Book G-1 [FHL #0854204].  These record the sale in August 1799 of various parts of the land Matthew Dean willed to his three daughters.  The executor, John Canan, apparently believed it was advisable to make the surviving children of Matthew Dean parties to these sales, so these deeds include the words: “John Dean the only son of Matthew Dean at his decease and Elizabeth the wife of the said John Dean, Hugh Means and Margaret his wife, David Caldwell and Rebekah his wife, and Samuel Caldwell and Elizabeth his wife; the said Margaret, Rebekah and Elizabeth being the three only daughters of the said Matthew Dean” (surviving at his decease).  Elizabeth, the wife of John Dean, signed her name Betsey Dean.  Three hundred acres of land “lying a small distance northwardly of the Frankstown branch of (the) Juniata (River)” are described by metes and bounds. The purchaser in one sale was Anthony Johnston, in another the purchaser was John Fergus, and in the third the purchasers were Samuel Fergus and Thomas McClelland.

            The DAR Patriot Index, Centennial Edition, 1994, contains the following information:  “DEAN, Matthew: b c.1731 IR d 4-22-1781 PA  m Rebecca --- Sol PS PA.”  “PA” means Pennsylvania in both cases; “IR” means Ireland; “Sol” means soldier with no further details such as rank known; and “PS” means patriotic service as opposed to military service. [p. 803]

            A chapter in Reference 6 titled “Sketches of Revolutionary War Veterans” includes the following: “Dean, John  Enlisted at Barrie (sic - Barree?), as a Private in Captain William Simonton’s Bedford County Militia and engaged in scouting parties along the frontier against the Indians.  Born 1762, resided in Huntingdon County in 1833.”  [ref. 6, p. 34]

            Abstracts of Revolutionary War Pension Files has this entry:  “DEAN, John, S12751, PA Line, appl 18 Apr 1833 Huntingdon Cty PA aged 69 a res of Morris Twnshp NJ (sic?), sol lived in Bedford (now Huntingdon) Cty PA & enl at a Fort near the Juniata River in Hartsley (sic-Hartslog) Valley in said cty, in late 1780 sol’s mother, 2 bros and 1 sister were killed by the Indians, sol was b 1763 in York Cty PA, after the Rev War sol lived at Charlesburg (can’t find such a place in atlas) in Franklin Cty PA for 4 or 5 yrs then moved to Huntingdon Cty PA.” [ref 15, p. 927]

            An Apr. 7, 1808 land record indicates that John Dean and his wife, Elizabeth (who signed her name as Betsey), sold to Anthony Johnson for 27 pounds “certain lands which the late Matthew Dean devised to his son, John, in his last will and testament.”  These lands were described as adjoining the lands of Michael Keller and Anthony Johnson. [Huntingdon Co. Deed Book L-1, p. 492 FHL #0854206]

            The 1995 Year Book of the Pennsylvania Society of the Sons of the American Revolution contains the birth, marriage and death dates of David Caldwell and his wife, Rebecca Dean, and one line of their descent.  It indicates that David Caldwell was a “Pvt., Bedford Co. Pa. Mil” in the Revolutionary War. [ref. 14, p. 141]

            The following marriages were performed by the Rev. John Johnston, pastor of the Hart’s Log and Shaver’s Creek Presbyterian congregations beginning in November 1787 and of the Huntingdon congregation soon thereafter: [ref. 2, p. 56]

                        Jan. 13, 1789                 David Caldwell and Rebecca Dean

         May 8, 1792                Hugh Means and Margaret Dean

         Aug. 2, 1796               John Dean and Elizabeth Smith

         Nov. 28, 1797              Samuel Caldwell and Margaret Dean

The first two are obviously marriages of two of the surviving daughters of Matthew Dean.  I believe the third is the marriage of the surviving son of Matthew Dean.  There seems to be a mistake in the given name of the bride in the fourth marriage, as other sources indicate that Samuel Caldwell married Elizabeth Dean on this date.

            Also from the records of the Rev. John Johnston: the death on Apr. 28, 1813 of Maj. David Caldwell, near Alexandria. [ref. 2, p. 492]

            From Reference 2 comes this information: Hugh Means, a native of Delaware, received a patent in 1769 for a tract on Shaver’s Creek.  After living there a few years he purchased a large tract of land in Morris, a part of which is now (in 1883) known as the Tussey farm, on which he died.  He was married to a daughter of Matthew Dean, and reared three daughters who married David Tussey, of Morris; Thomas M. Owens, of Warrior’s Mark; and Evan Crane, of Franklin. [ref.2, p. 322]

            In an 18 Jan 2000 e-mail to me Marge Wilcox (mwilcox@ismi.net) said that her ancestor, Christian Craine was the brother of Evan N. Crane who married Sarah Means, daughter of Hugh and Margaret (Dean) Means on 19 Mar 1822 in the Presbyterian Church in Huntingdon.  She also quoted from the will of Hugh Means which names daughters Elizabeth Tussey, Margaret Owens and Sarah Crane, but no sons.  John Dean was a witness to the will.

            The Hon. Judge John Dean, president judge of the Twenty-fourth Judicial District (in 1883) was born at Williamsburg, Blair Co., Feb. 15, 1835.  His father was Matthew Dean, his grandfather (was) John Dean, of Water Street, in Huntingdon County (in 1883), and his great-grandfather (was) Matthew Dean. [ref. 3, p. 83]  Mr. John Dean, a cousin of the judge resides (in 1883) near Williamsburg.  His father, Samuel Dean, was a well-known citizen of the county, serving as associate judge and in other official capacities. [ref. 3, p. 96]

It was probably this Judge John Dean who was admitted to the bar 16 Aug 1861. [ref. 2, p. 65]

            In 1830 the name of Samuel Dean appeared in the tax list for Woodberry Township. [ref. 3, p. 242]

In the period 1831 through1869 the name of Samuel Dean appeared eleven times among the supervisors and other officers of Woodberry Township. [ref. 3, p. 244]  The name of Samuel Dean was mentioned in connection with the Presbytery of Huntingdon in 1843, 1849 and 1877. [ref. 3, p. 252-3]

            The tax-paying inhabitants of the village of Williamsburg in 1840 included a Matthew Dean. [ref. 3, p. 246]

            A John Dean was the auditor of Woodberry Township in 1866. [ref. 3, p. 244]

The following chart gives what I know of the relationships of the descendants of Matthew Dean:

            1  Matthew Dean  b. Abt. 1731 in Ireland  d: Apr 1781 in Frankstown Twp., Huntingdon, PA

   +  Rebecca ???  d: Oct 1780 in Frankstown Twp., Huntingdon, PA

2  John Dean   b: 1763 in York Co., PA)

   +m. 2 Aug 1796  Elizabeth "Betsey" Smith                                                )  this information

        3  Samuel Dean                                                                                  )  is repeated

                4  John Dean  “of” near Williamsburg, Blair Co., PA in 1883            )  in Chapter 2a

3  Matthew Dean                                                                                 )  below

4  Judge John Dean  b: 15 Feb 1835 in Williamsburg, Blair Co., PA  )

2  Margaret Dean  b: Abt. 1768  d: Abt. 1848

   +m. 8 May 1792  Hugh Means  b: in Delaware  d: Aug 1827 in Morris Twp., Huntingdon Co., PA

3  Elizabeth Means

   +  David Tussey  b: 1783 nr. Alexandria, Huntingdon Co., PA

       3  Margaret Means

   +  Thomas M. Owens

       3  Sarah Means

          +m: 19 Mar 1822  Evan N. Crane

2  Rebecca Dean  b: 13 Mar 1770  d: Jan 1829

   +m: 13 Jan 1789  Maj. David Caldwell  b: 8 May 1762  d: 28 Apr 1813

                                  (son of Robert Caldwell, brother of Samuel Caldwell, below)

3  Robert Caldwell  b. 20 Sep 1789, d. in infancy

3  Robert2 Caldwell           more in ref. 2, p. 414

3  John Caldwell  b: 1 Sep 1792  d. in infancy

3  Samuel Caldwell

3  Elizabeth "Betsey" Caldwell  b: 4 May 1796        more in ref. 14, p. 141

   +m: 3 May 1814  William Johnston  b: 25 Feb 1786

3  Matthew Caldwell  b: 1 Jul 1798    d: 14 Jun 1813

3  Margaret Caldwell

3  David Caldwell

3  Rebecca Caldwell         more in ref. 2, p. 414

3  William Caldwell                       more in ref. 2, p. 414

3  John Caldwell  b: 17 Oct 1809, d. young

3  Mary Ann Caldwell  b: 19 Mar 1812, d. young

2  Elizabeth Dean

   +m: 28 Nov 1797  Samuel Caldwell  b. aft. 1765

                                  (son of Robert Caldwell, brother of Maj. David Caldwell, above)

3  Elizabeth Caldwell

   +m. ??? Moore

3  ??? Caldwell (dau)

   +m. ??? Connelly

 

*Note: The area in which Matthew Dean resided was in Frankstown Township, Bedford County in 1780.  After Huntingdon County was formed from part of Bedford County in 1787 the area was in Tyrone Township.  It was in Morris Township when that township was created in 1794 and in Catharine Township when it and Blair County were created in 1846.  The area where he resided is very close to the border between Catharine and Morris Townships, hence close to the border between Blair and Huntingdon Counties.

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Chapter 2a. John Dean, the surviving son of the above Matthew Dean

 

            The information on John Dean, the son of Matthew Dean, in the foregoing Chapter 2 seems pretty solid.  What follows in this Chapter 2a about the same John Dean is based on the assumption that the will quoted below is his.  Moreover it must overcome what appears to be an error in Reference 2.  Still, I think it is probably correct.

The periodical Your Family Tree contains a list of deaths as entered in the Session Books of the Alexandria and Hartslog Presbyterian Congregation at Alexandria, (now*) Porter Township, Huntingdon County.  This list includes “Dean, John Esq. who died Apr. 8, 1835” and “Dean, Rebecca who died May 25, 1832.” [ref. 12, Summer 1969, p. 80]  I don’t have a birth date for John Dean, brother of Matthew Dean, but Matthew would have been about 104 years of age in 1835.  John Dean, son of Matthew Dean, would have been 72 years of age on this date.  Therefore I think this entry was for John Dean, the son of Matthew Dean, not Matthew’s brother.  I don’t know who this Rebecca Dean was.  Perhaps this entry was an erroneous recording or transcription of the name of John’s wife, Elizabeth, who signed her name Betsey.  Or someone else.  Both Rebecca and Dean were common in this place at this time.

            The last will and testament of John Dean was filed with the court in April 1835. [Huntingdon County Will Book No. 3, page 470. FHL #0854232]  In his will John Dean of Morris Township left (conditionally) to his son Robert the farm and improvements on which he now resides, consisting of 180 acres; he provided that his daughters Mary Roller and Rebecca may remain in the house with his son, Robert, so long as they remain single; he left (conditionally) to his son-in-law, William Love, the farm and improvements on which he (William Love) now resides, consisting of 160 acres; he gave $1000 each to his son, Matthew Dean, and to his daughters Eliza intermarried with William Love, Mary Roller widow of Caleb Roller, Margaret intermarried with Thomas Patterson, and Rebecca Dean; and he gave all the remainder of his estate, real,  personal and mixed, equally to his sons Samuel and Robert.

            In Reference 2, J. Simpson Africa says “John Dean a brother of Matthew … was the father … of a daughter married to William Love …” [p. 321]  If I am correct about this John Dean being the son of Matthew not his brother, then this statement is in error.

            On a microfilm of records titled “Church and cemetery records, bible records, 1766-1938” prepared by the Standing Stone Chapter of the DAR [FHL #0900626], I found a typed page extracted from the “Love family bible.”  Among other things, this page says William Love and Mary W. McCrim were married 4 Nov. 1824; William Love and Eliza Dean were married 8 Apr 1830; William Love was born 15 Oct 1798; Mary Love, wife of William Love, was born 8 Aug 1797; Eliza Love, wife of William Love, was born 24 Aug 1800 and died 12 Aug 1851.

            In October 1839 the court appointed Samuel Dean and Joshua Roller (according to Reference 3, p. 233, Joshua was the next younger brother of Caleb Roller) to administer the estate of William Love, late of Morris Township, Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania. [Huntingdon County Will Book No. 4, page 159, FHL # 0854232]

            Also in October 1839 the will of Robert Dean, late of Morris Township, was filed with the court [Huntingdon County Will Book No. 4, page 159, FHL # 0854232].  This will was made in September 1839.  In it Robert Dean left his household property to his wife, Rebecca, and appointed his wife to be the guardian of his only child, Nancy Jane Dean.  He appointed “his esteemed friends, James Dysart and John M. Tussey,” guardians of the estate of his daughter, Nancy Jane, until she becomes eighteen years of age.  He directed his executors to sell all of his real estate and to release his brother-in-law, Samuel Bender, from money owed Robert in return for a release of a claim arising from the will of Robert’s father, John Dean. (This only fits with the information above if Samuel Bender married Robert’s sister, Rebecca, between 1835 and 1839.)  Robert appointed his brother, Samuel Dean, and “his esteemed friend,” William Caldwell, executors of his last will.

            In January 1842 Rebecca Dean, guardian of Nancy Jane Dean, and James Dysart and John M. Tussey, guardians of the estate of said Nancy Jane Dean, petitioned the Court, saying that Samuel Dean and William Caldwell were mismanaging the estate of Robert Dean and asking that Samuel Dean and William Caldwell be discharged from their executorship. [Huntingdon County Orphan’s Court, book E, p. 334, FHL #0900590]

            In August 1843 the will of Rebecca Dean, late of Tyrone Township, Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania was filed with the court [Huntingdon County Will Book No. 4, page 159, FHL # 0854232].  This will was made in June 1843.  Apparently Rebecca had inherited property from her father because she directed in her will that all of her interest in her father’s estate be divided between her children, Nancy Jane and Clarinda Adaline Dean.  (Does this mean that Rebecca was pregnant with Clarinda Adaline when her husband, Robert, made his will and called Nancy Jane his only child?)  In her will, Rebecca bequeathed her mother, Nancy Morrow, $200 or, optionally, a part of Rebecca’s household property.  She appointed her brother, James Morrow, to be executor of her will.

            James Morrow, the youngest son of Robert Morrow, married Nancy Stewart, and lived on the John M. Tussey place in Tyrone Township until his death in 1841 at age 56.  His widow died in 1870, age 83 years.  Their daughter, Rebecca, married Robert Dean. [ref. 3, p. 232]

            Joseph Moore lived on the present (in 1883) Robert Morrow place in Tyrone Township before the Revolution.  He died about 1807 leaving a family of six daughters.  The second daughter, Jane, married Phillip Roller of Morris.  The third daughter, Nancy, married John Dean of Morris Township. [ref. 3, p. 232]  (Don’t know which John Dean of Morris Township this was, but this might have been early enough to be the brother of Matthew Dean.)

            Phillip Roller married Jane Moore and they had fourteen children.  The second son, Caleb, married Mary Dean and settled on Clear Creek (in Tyrone Township?). [ref. 3, p. 233]

            The following outline descendant chart gives vital information compiled from the information above plus the information already presented in Chapter 2.

1  John Dean  b: 1763 in York Co., PA  d: Apr 1835 in Huntingdon Co., PA

               +m. 2 Aug 1796  Elizabeth "Betsey" Smith

2  Samuel Dean                      d. aft 1842 in prob. Morris Twp., Huntingdon Co., PA

       3  John Dean “of” near Williamsburg, Blair Co. in 1883

2  Robert Dean                        d: Sep 1839 in Morris Twp., Huntingdon Co., PA

   +  Rebecca Morrow  d: Aug 1843 in Tyrone Twp., Huntingdon Co., PA

                             (sister of James Morrow, daughter of James and Nancy Morrow)

3  Nancy Jane Dean         b: 1821-1839

3  Clarinda Adaline Dean  b: Prob. Aft. 1839

2  Eliza Dean  b: 24 Aug 1800   d: 12 Aug 1851

   +m: 8 Apr 1830  William Love  b: 15 Oct 1798  d: Oct 1839 in Morris Twp., Huntingdon, PA

2  Mary Dean

   +  Caleb Roller      d: 1 Jun 1826 in Huntingdon Co., PA

                      (son of Phillip and Jane (Moore) Roller of Tyrone Twp.)

2  Margaret Dean

   +  Thomas Patterson

2  Matthew Dean

          3  Judge John Dean  b: 15 Feb 1835 in Williamsburg, Blair Co., PA

2  Rebecca Dean

   +m: Bet. Apr 1835 – Oct 1839  Samuel Bender  (that this Rebecca Dean married Samuel Bender is

based on information in the will of John Dean that he had an unmarried daughter, Rebecca, and information in the will of Robert Dean that he had a brother-in-law, Samuel Bender.)

 

† Note: See note at end of References for the meaning of these census numbers.

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Chapter 3. John Dean of Morris Township, Huntingdon County

          (the brother of the above Matthew Dean)

 

            The bits of information relating this John Dean to his descendants are questionable.  One item even appears to be in error.  In this chapter I have speculated on who I think were his descendants.

            Reference 2 says: “John Dean, a brother of Matthew (described in Chapter 2 above), lived lower down the (Canoe) valley, on what is now (in 1883) known as the Tippery Place, above the ‘bottomless cave.’  He also was a prominent man, taking an active interest in public matters and religious interests, being one of the early elders of the old Hart’s Log Church.  He was the father of sons named Robert and Samuel, both of whom removed, and of a daughter married to William Love, who was an inn-keeper at Water Street.” [p. 321]  I believe that this source erred in saying that this John Dean was the father of a daughter who married William Love.  See a discussion of this in the preceding Chapter 2a.

            The book Mother Cumberland, Tracing Your Ancestors in South-Central Pennsylvania by Raymond M. Bell contains information about the Pennsylvania militia during the Revolutionary War.  The book lists the names of the officers in charge of the militia units from Cumberland, Bedford and other counties in south-central Pennsylvania.  Capt. William Simonton of Frankstown Township was the officer in charge of Company 1 of the Third Battalion of northern Bedford County when it was formed in 1777.  When it was reorganized as the Second Battalion in 1781, Capt. John Dean of Huntingdon Township was the officer in charge of Company 3.  This was probably the brother of Matthew Dean.  Capt. John Thirlton (sic-Thorlton) of Huntingdon Township was the officer in charge of Company 4. [p. 25-6]

            Huntingdon County was formed from part of Bedford County in 1787 and the first three county commissioners were elected at that time.  One of these was John Dean. [ref. 2, p. 70, 207]  A good guess would be that this was the brother of Matthew.

            In September 1787 work was begun on a meeting house for the Hart’s Log (Presbyterian) Church.  A site was selected about a mile north of Alexandria, or near where John Throlton (sic-Thorlton) and James McGuineas now (in 1883) live.  Among the first subscribers to the new church was John Canan.  Among the first board of trustees were John Throlton (sic) and David Caldwell.  John Dean and others were soon added.  James Dean and Thomas McCune were among the first board of elders elected in September 1787.  In 1796 David Caldwell and John Dean were elected members of the sessions.   The Rev. John Johnston was chosen permanent pastor of the congregation in November 1787 and remained in that position about thirty-six years. [ref. 2, p. 432]  In 1830 the Hart’s Log and Alexandria congregations merged to form the present (in 1883) Alexandria Church.  The first session of elders had among them John Dean from the Hart’s Log part. [ref. 2, p. 433]

            In 1790 a John Dean was a supervisor of roads in Tyrone Township. [ref. 3, p. 235]  In 1797-99 a John Dean was an overseer of the poor in Morris Township, and in 1803 a John Dean was a supervisor of roads in Morris Township. [ref. 2, p. 324]  (Were these the brother or the surviving son of Matthew Dean or neither?)

            The first United States census was taken in 1790.  Four John Dean-s were recorded in Huntingdon County in that census.  That census was not reported by townships in Huntingdon County, but the order in which the households were recorded gives some clue as to the location of the people recorded in it.  I believe the John Dean (2/2-1)† who was recorded near heads of household named Thomas McCune and John Thornton (sic- Thorlton) was probably the brother of Matthew Dean.  John Dean, the son of Matthew, was about 27 years of age but not yet married.  He apparently was not a head of household in 1790.

            In 1796 a John Dean was taxed on a saw mill and 180 acres in Morris Township, (now*) Blair County.  In 1812 he was again taxed on the 180 acres.  (Was this the brother or the surviving son of Matthew Dean?)  A John Dean was an Overseer of the Poor in Morris Township in 1797-99 and a road supervisor in 1803. [ref. 2. p. 323-4]

            The United States Direct Tax of 1798 (known as the window tax) for the part of Huntingdon County which included Frankstown, Morris and Allegheny Townships listed persons named John Dean twice: the first time as the owner and occupant of a log house 18 by 22 feet, one story, 1 window, 6 lights (window panes) plus a log barn 24 by 26 feet, and 40 perches of land, total value $120; and the second time as the owner and occupant of one shop, 16 by 20 feet, one “cabbin” 14 by 16 feet, and a sawmill, total valuation $72, and 289 acres of land in Morris Township valued at $929.  This property was described as being “D adj. Ja’s McCune.”  (In 1794 Robert Dean married Abigail McCune, daughter of James McCune.)  Possibly the house, barn and 40 perches belonged to the son of Matthew; the shop, cabin, sawmill and 289 acres belonged to the brother of Matthew.  This is a guess based on the 289 acres being adjacent to James McCune.

            In the 1800 census a John Dean (1/1/1/1/1-0/1/0/1/0-0/0)† was recorded in Morris Township and a Robert Dean (1/0/0/1/1-2/0/2/0/0-0/0)† was recorded in the Town of Alexandria.  This is puzzling.  Both these households have a male over age 44 but neither John, the son of Matthew, nor Robert, the son of John brother of Matthew, were old enough to be in this category.  I would guess that John, brother of Matthew, was still living and is the older male in one of these households.

The only head of household surnamed Dean in the 1810 census in Morris Township was J. Dean (1/1/0/1/1-3/0/0/1/na)†.  Only the first initial of the heads of household were recorded in the 1810 census of Huntingdon County.  I believe this was John Dean the son of Matthew.  Based in the information below, Robert Dean removed from the area in 1806.

            In an  8 Mar 1998 e-mail message and several recent messages to me from Harry Werner (HCWERNER@aol.com) he said his ancestor Robert Dean, born about 1766, was the son of John Dean the brother of Matthew Dean described in Chapter 2.  He says his ancestor Robert Dean married Abigail McCune in Huntingdon County and removed to Jefferson County, Ohio in 1806.  There is quite a bit of evidence to support the contention that this Robert was the son of John Dean, brother of Matthew.

            Reference 2 gives a list of marriages performed by the Rev. John Johnston, pastor of the Hart’s Log and Shaver’s Creek Presbyterian congregations beginning in November 1787 and of the Huntingdon congregation soon thereafter:  Among these is the marriage on Apr. 24, 1794 of Robert Dean and Abigail McCune. [p. 56]

            In March 1797 Robert Dean and Joseph Smith obtained authority from the General Assembly of Huntingdon County to erect a wing-dam on the south side of the Frankstown Branch of the Juniata River. [ref. 2, p. 30 and ref. 16, item 305]

            Two land sales by Robert Dean and Abigail his wife of Huntingdon Township are recorded in Huntingdon County Deed Books.  The first of these was recorded in Huntingdon County Deed Book K-1, page 9.  It is the sale on 30 Apr 1804 by Robert Dean and Abigail his wife of Huntingdon Township to John Isenberg of the same place of 221 acres 142 perches of land situate on the south side of the Frankstown Branch of the Juniata in the same township and county adjacent to the lands of David Caldwell and Charles Caldwell.  This was land devised 8 Jul 1796 from Charles Caldwell dec’d to Robert Caldwell who with his wife Mary sold the same to Robert Dean 8 Nov 1802.  A Robert Caldwell, probably this one, was the father of Samuel and Maj. David Caldwell who married two of the surviving daughters of Matthew Dean,

            the second of these land sales was recorded In Huntingdon County Deed Book V-2, page 573.  It is the sale on 27 May 1805 by Robert Dean and wife Abigail of Huntingdon Township to Andrew Magee of the Town of Hunt­ingdon of lot #12 in the Town of Alexandria.  (This deed was not recorded until Jan 1868, hence Deed Book V-2.)

An entry in the DAR Lineage Books gives the ancestors of member #116821 back to James McCune who was a private, 7th company, 1st battalion, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania militia, under Capt. Joseph Brady and Col. James Dunlop.  He was born near Philadelphia, died 1808 in Huntingdon County, PA.  He married Elizabeth Rotherham.  Their son, Joseph McCune (1762-1803), married 1793 Mary Shannon. [ref. 13, vol. 117, p. 257]  According to Harry Werner this James McCune was the father of Abigail McCune who married Robert Dean.

Another entry in the DAR Lineage Books gives the ancestors of member #148698 back to John Canan (1746-1831) who was a Lieutenant, 1777, in the Pennsylvania Line.  He was born in Ireland; died in Williamsburg, Pa.  He married 1775 Margery Dean (1760-1815).  Moses Canan (1784-1863) was their son.  He married in 1807 Mary Henderson (1785-1833). [ref. 13, vol. 149, p. 216]  Similar information is given in a SAR publication. [ref. 14, p. 325]  I believe this John Canan was the executor of the estate of Matthew Dean in 1799.  I don’t know how this Margery Dean was related to the other Dean-s in this paper, but based on where and when John Canan lived and died I believe it is likely that she was the daughter of John Dean, brother of Matthew Dean.  I am going to show her as such in the outline descendant chart below.

            The periodical Your Family Tree gives information copied from a Jackson family bible.  Deaths recorded therein are: John Canan, Sr. died 20 Oct 1831 in his 88th year; Margery Canan died Aug 1815; John Canan died 20 Jan 1830; Sarah Canan died May 1800; James Dean died Nov 1795.  Some of the people whose deaths were recorded in this bible, but not any of the above, were buried in the Holliday Burial Ground, next to Hollidaysburg, Blair County. [ref. 12, Summer 1969, p. 71]

            Farther down the stream (in the Hart’s Log Valley?), on the present (in 1883) Sprankle farm, lived John Canan, one of the most enterprising citizens in the county in his day.  He owned large tracts of land, and was engaged in numerous business enterprises.  Col. John Canan became a citizen of Williamsburg in the latter part of his life, but at his death was buried in the Canan graveyard, on the farm belonging to his brother Henry, and which is now (in 1883) the property of Collins Hamer.  His death occurred about 1832.  His oldest son, Moses, commanded a company in the war of 1812, and as an attorney-at-law died in Ebensburg.  Other sons, James, John, Henry, Robert, and Samuel, the youngest born in 1801, removed from the township at an early day.  The daughters married James Gray, the founder of Graysport, now Spruce Creek, and the Rev. William McIlvain, the latter had for her second husband Thomas Jackson, son of George Jackson, of Logan township. [ref. 2, p. 410]

            Captain Moses Canan was the commander of a company raised in Alexandria in June of 1812.  It was known as the ”The Juniata Volunteers.”  John Canan was a Sergeant and Henry Canan was a Private in this company. [ref. 6 p. 58]

            In about 1810 John Dean and Christian Hannah of Morris Township were the executors of the will of James McCune.  They sold two tracts of land from the estate of James McCune to Michael Hoyhman(?) of Franklin Township.  These two tracts of land were in Morris Township on the north side of the Franklin Branch of the Juniata River about two miles above Water Street. [Huntingdon County Deed Book M-1, p. 444]  Was this executor the John Dean, brother of Matthew?

            According to the e-mail mentioned above and several follow-up Jan 2000 e-mails to me from Harry Werner, his ancestor, Robert Dean, removed from Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania to Warren Twp., Jefferson County, Ohio in 1806.  Harry Werner says that In 1856, after the death of Robert Dean, his wife Abigail and the children went west to Crawford County, Ohio.

The following outline descendant chart is a combination of information given above and information supplied by Harry Werner.  Some of these family relationships are just guesses (as noted below).

       1  John Dean                 (brother of Matthew Dean)

                2  James Dean      d: Nov 1795               (just a guess that he was the son of this John based

on his death having been recorded in the same bible with Margery)

                2  Margery Dean  b: 1760  d: Aug 1815   (just a guess that she was the daughter of this John)

                    +m: 1775  John Canan  b: Oct 1746 in Ireland  d: 20 Jan 1831 in Williamsburg, PA

(He was a Lieutenant in the Pennsylvania Line, 1777)

                          3  Moses Canan  b: 1 Mar 1784  d: 29 Sep 1863 in Ebensburg, Cambria Co., PA

(He was a Captain in charge of “The Juniata Volunteers” of Alexandria in the War of 1812)

        +m: 1807  Mary Henderson  b: 1785  d: 1833

                          3  John Canan  d: 20 Jan 1830

                          3  Sarah Canan d: May 1800

                          3  see text above for info on sons named James, Henry, Robert and Samuel and two daughters.

                 2  Robert Dean  b: Abt. 1766  d: 1850-1856 in Warren Twp., Jefferson Co., OH  (per Harry Werner)

      +m: 24 Apr 1794  Abigail McCune  b: 11 Sep 1773 in New Castle Co., DE  

d: 12 Jan 1866 in Crawford Co., OH

                                                     (her father was James McCune of Morris Twp., originally

                  from Mill Creek Hundred, Newcastle Co., DE)

                   3  Elizabeth Dean          b: Abt. 1795 in Huntingdon Co., PA        

                   3  Catherine Dean          b: Abt. 1797 in Huntingdon Co., PA        

                   3  James Dean  b: Abt. 1799 in Huntingdon Co., PA        

                   3  William Dean b: Abt. 1801 in Huntingdon Co., PA        

                   3  Abraham Dean           b: 3 Oct 1803 in Huntingdon Co., PA  d: 16 Jan 1879 in Crawford Co., OH

                        m1: Elizabeth Robertson  b: 25 Dec 1799  d: 29 Aug 1845 in Crawford Co., OH

                        m2: 23 Dec 1845  Margaret McIntyre  b: in PA

                    3  Robert Dean  b: Abt. 1804 in Huntingdon Co., PA        

                    3  Samuel Dean b: Abt. 1806 in Jefferson Co., OH           

                    3  Sophia Dean  b: 19 Nov 1811 in Jefferson Co., OH  d: 19 Jun 1859 in Crawford Co., OH

                        +  William A. Robertson  b: 27 May 1809 in OH

                    3  Margery Dean            b: 19 Feb 1815 in Jefferson Co., OH

            2  Samuel Dean             (based on the statement in Reference 2 that John was the father

of sons named Robert and Samuel, both of whom removed)

 

† Note: See note at end of References for the meaning of these census numbers.

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Chapter 4. John and Deborah Dean and Alexander and Anne (Hamilton) Dean

                 (and other Dean-s, all in or near the Borough of Huntingdon, Huntingdon County)

 

            The one of the earliest references I found to the Dean family in the Borough of Huntingdon is as follows: About 1774, Dr. William Smith preached one Sabbath at Standing Stone (later called the Borough of Huntingdon), and published a notice that he would baptize the children that might be presented.  To the surprise of all, about eighty children were baptized in one day.  Among those baptized were the children of several well-known families, including Dean. [ref. 2, p. 436-7]

            Among the settlers of (now*) Porter Township as early as 1772 was James Dean who lived on the north side of the Frankstown Branch. [ref. 2, p. 409]

            The April 1775 The Court of Quarter Session for Barree Township appointed James Dean constable. [ref. 2, p. 6, ref. 17, p. 6]

            The names of several persons surnamed Dean appeared in the tax lists of Barree Township, (then*) Bedford County.  At that time Barree Township encompassed a large part of what is now north eastern Huntingdon County.

In 1774 James Dean was taxed £11. [ref. 8, p. 74]

In 1775 and 1776 James Dean was taxed £2.0. [ref. 8, p. 106, 135]

            In 1779 James Dean was taxed on 2 horses and 2 cattle, John Dean was taxed on 2 horses and 2 cattle, and John Dean, a single freeman, was taxed on 1 horse. [ref. 8, p. 193, 197]  This seems to indicate there were two different John Dean-s.

In 1783 John Dean was taxed £14.7 on 100 acres as a non-resident. [ref. 8, p. 219]

Beginning in 1783, tax lists were compiled for Huntingdon Township, (then*) Bedford County, and the following persons appeared in that list: James Dean was taxed £6.0 on 2 horses, 2 cattle and 1 sheep, William Dean was taxed £10.0, Alexander Dean was taxed £1.0 as a single freeman, and John Dean was taxed £1.17.10 on 1 horse and 1 head of cattle. [ref. 8, p. 221, 223]

The 1784 “Return of Lands and Number of Inhabitants” for Huntingdon Township showed James Dean with 0 houses occupied by 8 white persons and William Dean with 1 house occupied by 7 white persons. [ref. 8, p. 294]

            North of the Little Juniata River in Franklin Township, Abraham Dean was issued a warrant on 2 Sep 1784 for land at the Great Falls of Spruce Creek. [ref. 2, p. 268]

            The 1785 tax list for Huntingdon Township, (then*) Bedford County includes: John Dean and Alexander Dean, single freeman, and James Dean. [ref. 18, p. 88]

            Reference 2 says: at the organization of Huntingdon County in 1787 there lived in the original widely extended Huntingdon Township the following persons with the land shown.  This long list includes: Elbridge Dean, village property; John Dean, village property and 200 acres from a warrant; James Dean, 202 acres from a warrant; and Abraham Dean, no property shown. [ref. 2, p. 329]

            The names of the following persons appeared on the 1788 tax list in Huntingdon Township which in 1787 became part of Huntingdon County: James Dean was taxed £8.4 on 212 acres, 1 horse and 2 cattle, Abraham Dean was taxed £10 on 2 horses and 1 head of cattle, and John Dean was taxed £11.5 on 1 horse. [ref. 8, p. 328]

The 1788 tax assessment in Huntingdon (town) shows John Dean, taxed on 2 houses, 4½ lots, 1 horse and 1 cow.  This tax assessment also includes a list of the original (1783) and the present (1788) owners of acreage within the Borough of Huntingdon.  On this list are: 4¾ acres originally owned by John Patton, now owned by Alexander Dean; 2½ acres originally owned by John Dean, now owned by John Dean or Mr. McLain; and 2 acres originally owned by Charles Brotherline, now owned by John Dean.  John Dean was one of the two commissioners who approved and signed this 1788 tax assessment. [ref. 2, p. 442]

            The Rev. John Johnston became the pastor of the Huntingdon congregation (of the Presbyterian Church) soon after November 1787.  Not very long after that he purchased the property at the southeastern  corner of Penn and Second Streets and lived there until his death in 1823.  His neighbors included the Deans on the southeastern corner of Penn and Third streets. [ref. 2, p. 56 & 461]  Under “Early Buildings,” Reference 2 notes that John Dean lived at Nos. 321 and 323 on the north side of Penn Street in the Borough of Huntingdon. [p. 446]

            The officers of the original township of Huntingdon included: Constables – 1791 James Dean; Overseers of the Poor – 1790 James Dean, Alexander Dean, 1795 Alexander Dean; Appraisers – 1790, John Dean, 1792, James Dean; Supervisors of Roads – 1815 Jonathan Dean. [ref 2, p. 284]

            Much of what I know of the John and Alexander Dean of the Borough of Huntingdon comes from records of the purchase and sale of several lots in the borough in 1786, 1788 and 1789 and the subsequent sale and transfer of those lots at various times through 1810, as described below.

            Land records show that John and Alexander Dean jointly purchased four lots and a part of a fifth lot in the Borough of Huntingdon in 1786 and 1788.  Lots 23, 142 and 143 were purchased on 9 Aug 1786 from the original subdivider, William Smith (was this the same person as the Dr. William Smith above?).  Part of lot 62 was purchased 10 Aug 1786 from Charles Brotherline and wife.  Lot 131 was purchased on 21 Apr 1788 from Edward Wilkin. [Huntingdon County Deed Book A-1, pages 15, 22, 63, FHL #0900617]

            On 17 Feb 1789 Alexander Dean purchased from George Guthrie a lot on the north side of Allegany Street in the Borough of Huntingdon for £50. [Huntingdon County Deed Book A-1, p. 157, FHL #0900617]  Unfortunately, I did not record the number of this lot in my notes of that transaction.

            In a document dated July 6, 1789, Alexander Dean and John Dean each committed to paying £1 5s. per year for the support of the Presbyterian Church at the town of Huntingdon. [ref. 2, p.460]

            In 1790 a public school was founded in the Borough and Alexander Dean was named as one of the trustees. [ref. 2, p. 483]

            In the first United States census taken in 1790, an Alexander Dean (1/1-2-0/1)†  was recorded in Huntingdon County.  Interestingly, there was a slave recorded in this household.  The 1790 census was not reported by townships in Huntingdon County, but since there was only one Alexander Dean recorded in the county, this must be the Alexander Dean in the Borough of Huntingdon.  Enumerated fourteen households from this Alexander Dean was a John Dean (1/1-2)†, and 53 households further down the census Shusannah Dean (2/2-3)† was enumerated as a head of household.  I believe that this John and this Alexander were the persons described in this chapter.  I do not known how or whether this Shusannah was related to them.  In that 1790 census, James Dean (3/1-4)† and Abraham Dean (1/2-2)† were enumerated in adjacent households.  They may have resided in Barree Township or in the Borough of Huntingdon.  I do not have any knowledge of how or whether they were related to the other Dean families of that time and place.

            On 10 Jul 1792 the court of Huntingdon County appointed Debora Dean and Alexander Dean to administer the estate of John Dean, late of the Township of Huntingdon, Yeoman, deceased.  The court instructed that an inventory be exhibited within three months and a reckoning of their administration in a year. [Huntingdon County Will Book #1, p. 36 FHL #1854231]  (But see court-ordered citation in 1813, below.)

            In 1797 Alexander Dean was listed as a Hotel-keeper in the Borough of Huntingdon, Huntingdon County. [ref. 2, p. 489]

            The United States Direct Tax of 1798 (known as the window tax) for the part of Huntingdon County which included Huntingdon, Barree and West Townships listed a number of persons surnamed Dean.  It listed Alexander Dean as the owner of a log and brick building, 68 by 64 feet, two story, with 31 windows and 365 lights (window panes); valuation $2500.  This was one of the largest and highest-valued buildings listed in that locality.  Also listed as belonging to Alexander Dean were a 16 by 18 foot kitchen, value $20, and a 30 by 32 foot stable, value $40.  It also listed Alexander Dean as the owner of two lots in Alexandria, 50 by 200 feet adjoining Sam’l Steel, 100 acres of land adjoining Jn’o Cannan Esq, and 70 acres of land adjoining Dav’d Llyd, total valuation $205.

            Listed as belonging to John Dean, dec’d, were two vacant lots each 50 by 200 feet, 100 acres of land adjoining Jn’o Launder(?) Esq., and 70 acres of land adjoining Dav’d Llyd, total valuation $185.  John Dean was also listed as the owner and Daniel Rothrach(?) as the occupant of a log building 30 by 35 feet , 2 story, 12 windows, 144 lights, and a log kitchen, 15 by 18 feet, one story, one window, 12 lights, total valuation $620.

            James Dean was listed as the owner of 422 acres 112 perches of land, Abraham Dean was listed as the owner of 395 acres 69 perches of land, and Robert Dean was listed as the owner of 393 acres 33 perches of land.  Each of these three tracts of land were described as unoccupied, situated on the headwaters of Shavers and Stone (Standing Stone?) Creeks, and being valued at $400.

            Robert Dean also owned other property in this taxing district: a log building 26 by 30 feet, 2 story, 13 windows, 156 lights, a log kitchen 14 by 18 feet, a log stable 18 by 20 feet, and a log “cabbin” 18 by 20 feet, total valuation $700, a lot 60 by 200 feet in Alexandria 1st(?) and 122 acres of land adjoining William Willson, total valuation $36.

            Because of the mention of the town of Alexandria, I believe some of these people, especially Robert Dean, may be the same people described in Chapter 3.

In the 1800 census an Alexander Dean (2/2/1/1/0-1/1/2/2/1-1/0)† was recorded as a head of household in the Borough of Huntingdon.  Note that there was an other-than-white free person recorded in this household.  No other heads of household surnamed Dean were recorded in Huntingdon Township or the Borough of Huntingdon in this census.  As stated in Chapter 3, a John Dean was recorded in Morris Township and a Robert Dean was recorded in the Town of Alexandria in this census.

About 1805 an effort was made to raise money for a house of worship for the “German Lutheran Congrega­tion” in the Borough of Huntingdon.  Among the names of the subscribers on a paper dated Feb. 19, 1806 were Alex. Dean and Robert Dean. [ref. 2, p. 457]

On 7 Jul 1806 Alexander Dean sold the four and a half lots in the Borough of Huntingdon to his mother-in-law, Mary Hamilton, for $500.  In that deed Alexander Dean was a Merchant of the Borough of Huntingdon.  The deed includes a statement that Alexander and John Dean formerly held these lots as tenants in common and that John Dean was “now deceased.”  That deed provides that after the natural lifetime of Mary Hamilton the ownership of these lots will go to Alexander’s wife, Anne, and their children William, Alexander Jr., Julian and John Adams Dean, but the deed also provides that Mary Hamilton may dispose of the pieces of land involved as she see fit or in her will.  (Too complicated for me to understand.) [Huntingdon County Deed Book L-1, page 209, FHL #0854206]

            In Nov 1809 a William Dean was admitted to the Bar in Huntingdon County. [ref. 2, p. 65]  I have a sneaking suspicion that this was the son of John and Deborah Dean; watch the plot unfold in the following paragraphs.

On 2 Dec 1809 Mary Hamilton, the mother-in-law of Alexander Dean, sold “the several lots or undivided half parts of lots with appurtenances and buildings thereon” in the Borough of Huntingdon to William Dean for $1. [Huntingdon County Deed Book M-1, p. 244, FHL # 0854206]  Unfortunately my photocopy of this indenture does not include the part of it which recites the lot numbers.

Also on 2 Dec 1809 several people surnamed Dean executed a seemingly unnecessarily long and complicated indenture involving two lots in the Borough of Huntingdon.  The party of the first part was William J. Dean and Jane Dean, heirs at law of John Dean late of the Borough of Huntingdon, and Deborah Dean, widow of the said John Dean.  The party of the second part was William Dean, Esq. attorney at law.  The indenture began by noting that the parties “now stand seized in fee simple tenants in common” in lots 142 and 143 in the Borough of Huntingdon.  The indenture resolves the apparent problem by granting lot number 142 to the party of the first part and lot number 143 to the party of the second part. [Huntingdon County Deed Book M-1, p. 244, FHL # 0854206]

Also on 2 Dec 1809 William J. Dean and Jane Dean, heirs at law of John Dean late of the Borough of Huntingdon, and Deborah Dean, widow of the said John Dean, sold lot number 142 in the Borough of Huntingdon together with the buildings on it to John McCabe for $50. [Huntingdon County Deed Book M-1, p. 236, FHL # 0854206]

On 8 May 1810 William Dean sold a lot in the Borough of Huntingdon to Martin Graffius for $66. [Huntingdon County Deed Book M-1, p. 274, FHL # 0854206]  Unfortunately, I failed to note the number of this lot in my notes.

The only head of household surnamed Dean in the 1810 census in Huntingdon Township or Borough was A. Dean (3/0/4/0/1-1/1/0/1/2-0)† in the Borough of Huntingdon.  Only the first initial of the heads of household were recorded in the 1810 census of Huntingdon County, but this very probably was Alexander Dean.  Since it is known that Alexander Dean operated a hotel, some of these household members may have been boarders.

            In 1812 (at the beginning of the War of 1812), Dr. Alexander Dean of the Borough of Huntingdon was appointed surgeon of the Second Pennsylvania Regiment commanded by Col. John Purviance. [ref. 2, p. 108]

            On 7 Jun 1813 the court issued, apparently at the request of a William Dean, a citation to Alexander Dean and Deborah Dean calling for the settlement of the estate of John Dean, dec’d.  A note in the court record indicated this citation was served by the sheriff on 26 June, and the settlement was put off to the 9th day of July next. [Huntingdon County Will Book #1, p. 115 FHL #1854231]

            In 1815, the year following the formation of Porter Township, the following were among the citizens in the township: Jonathan Dean, 100 acres and William Dean the owner of a village lot or house. [ref. 2, p. 423]  William Dean was a constable for the township in 1816-18. [ref. 2, p. 424]

            On 13 Apr 1829 letters of administration were granted to Moses Robeson on the estate of William Dean late of Porter Township (nailer) who died intestate.  On 11 April, Mary Dean, widow of the deceased, renounced her right to the administration of her husband’s estate.  One of the sureties to the appointment of Moses Robeson was James Morrow. [Huntingdon Co. Will Book #3, p. 279, FHL #0854232]

The above information fails to give a clear picture of how or whether these various Dean-s were related to each other except that Deborah definitely was the widow of John.  The William J. Dean and Jane Dean, heirs at law of John Dean dec’d were probably the children of John and Deborah Dean.  This John and Alexander seem to be close to the same age and closely related, at least in business dealings.  John was taxed as a single freeman in 1779 and 1785; Alexander was taxed as a single freeman in 1783 and 1785.  Both were enumerated in the 1790 census with the same family age distribution, (1/1-2)†, which seems to indicate that each of them were married by that time and had two young children, a son and a daughter.  Based on all of this, I believe they were brothers.  The following outline descendant chart is based on these assumptions.  The person who fits best in age and location as a possible father of John and Alexander would be the John Dean described in Chapter 3.

The following is what I have on the descendants of John Dean and Alexander Dean, brothers:

        1  John Dean  b. Abt. 1758  d: Jul 1792. in Borough of Huntingdon, Huntingdon, PA

            + m: Abt 1786  Deborah ???

               2  William J. Dean  b. Bef. 1790 in Prob. Borough of Huntingdon, Huntingdon Co., PA

               2  Jane Dean   b. Bef. 1790 in Prob. Borough of Huntingdon, Huntingdon Co., PA

1  Alexander Dean  b. Abt. 1762

   + m: Abt. 1786  Anne Hamilton    (daughter of Mary Hamilton)

 2  William Dean           b: Prob. Bef. 1790 in Prob. Borough of Huntingdon, Huntingdon Co., PA    

 2  a daughter     b. Bef. 1790 in Prob. Borough of Huntingdon, Huntingdon Co., PA

 2  Alexander Dean, Jr. b: Prob. Bef. 1800 in Prob. Borough of Huntingdon, Huntingdon Co., PA

 2  Julian Dean             b: Bef. Abt. 1804 in Prob. Borough of Huntingdon, Huntingdon Co., PA

 2  John Adams Dean   b: Bef. 1806 in Prob. Borough of Huntingdon, Huntingdon Co., PA

    the 1800 and 1810 censuses indicate that Alexander and Anne Dean had at least one other daughter.

        I don’t know how the other persons surnamed Dean in this chapter were related to John and Alexander or to each other, if at all.  The following is a list of such people.

          1  James Dean  –  This could be the same person as the James Dean of Chapter 3.

          1  Abraham Dean

                                  James and Abraham Dean were enumerated next to each other in the 1790 census.

          1  Robert Dean  –  I believe this is probably the same person as the Robert Dean of Chapter 3.

                                  James, Abraham and Robert Dean were taxed on similar tracts of unoccupied land in 1798.

          1  John Dean  –  it appears there was a John Dean other than the one who died in 1792, at least in 1779.

          1  William Dean  –  There was at least one person by this name in this area as early as 1783 and as late

as 1829.

          1  Elbridge Dean  –  This name appears only once – in 1787

          1  Jonathan Dean  –  This name does not appear in this area until 1815

 

* Note: The Borough of Huntingdon was called “Standing Stone” at first.  Before 1771 this area was in Barree Township, Cumberland County.  In 1771 Bedford County was made from the part of Cumberland County and this area was in Barree Township, Bedford County.  By 1780 Huntingdon Township was made from the southern part of Barree Township, and the Borough of Huntingdon was on the boundary between these two townships. In 1787 Huntingdon County was made from part of Bedford County and the area was in Huntingdon County.  The area that once was Barree and Huntingdon Townships is now divided into 13 townships.

 

† Note: See note at end of References for the meaning of these census numbers.

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Chapter 5. Jacob and Nancy (Loveall)  Dean of (now*) Cass Township, Huntingdon County

                                    (and Jacob’s sons Jonathan, Zachariah and Enoch)

 

            There was a Jacob Dean listed as an “inmate” in the 1773, 1774 and 1776 tax assessments for Dublin Township, Bedford County. [ref. 8, p. 11, 71, 142]  In 1770 Dublin Township was immediately east of the area that by 1880 became Hopewell Township.  Names of others in these tax lists include Lawrence Swope, Robeson Chilcoat, Samuel Thompson and Jonathan Loveall.  No other Jacob, Jonathan, Zachariah or Enoch Dean appears in any of the tax lists I have seen for this area.

Families neighboring the John Dean discussed in the previous chapter in the northern portion of the Trough Creek Valley: (from north to south, more or less) were Richard Chilcott, John Wright, William Estep, James Estep, Michael Mierley, Michael, John, David and Jacob Bumgartner, Samuel Pheasant, and Jacob Dean and his sons Jonathan, Zachariah and Enoch. [ref. 2, p. 371]

Jacob Dean commenced an improvement in 1784 on what is now (in 1883) the Abraham Shore farm, and Jonathan Dean commenced an improvement on the adjoining farm to the southwest in 1791. [ref. 2, p. 237]

            A map of the original land warrants and surveys of this area [The Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Map #B-107] show two tracts lying about a quarter mile west of the Little Trough Creek and just south of the northern boundary of what is now Cass Township.  The more northerly of these, comprising 252 acres 19 perches, was warranted on Mar. 17, 1795 to Jacob Dean. [Land record C-41-168]  Adjacent to the south side of this property were 271 acres 76 perches warranted on Dec. 27, 1794 to Jonathan Dean. [Land record C-64-32]  The 197 acres 116 perches originally warranted to Michael Baumgardner adjoined Jacob Dean’s land on the north.  The 277 acres originally warranted to James McClelland was a mile and a half to the east on the other side of the Little Trough Creek.  This area is a very short distance south of the village of Calvin.  A couple of miles farther east of Little Trough Creek, straddling the line between the present Cass and Union Townships, is another tract of land consisting of 403 acres 27 perches which the map shows was warranted to Jacob Dean on Mar. 22, 1794 [Land record C-47-99].  It appears from other maps of the area that this land may be on Sideling Hill or beyond it in Smith Valley.

            In the first United States census taken in 1790, a Jacob Dean (2/2-7)† was recorded in Huntingdon County.  The 1790 census for Huntingdon County was not reported by townships, but I believe this was the Jacob Dean described in this chapter.

            The Huntingdon Baptist Church was organized about 1800.  Among the early members were Jacob and Jonathan Dean and William Lovell.  The place of worship was during many years the house of Jacob Dean, three miles northwest from Cassville.  The present (in 1883) house of worship was erected in 1825 on land donated by Mr. Dean. [ref. 2, p. 240]

            A school was taught by Jonathan Dean in a house on the farm now (in 1883) occupied by Clayton Greenland.  Dean was a surveyor, and among his pupils were many of the residents of the valley now (in 1883) passed away. [ref. 2, p. 241]

            Listed among the officers of Union Township were the following: Supervisors – 1792 Jacob Dean, 1797 Jonathan Dean; Overseers of the Poor – 1796 Jacob Dean, 1801 Jacob Dean, 1813 Zachary Dean, 1852 and 1853 William Dean; and Constables – 1866-67 Thomas Dean. [ref. 2, p. 374]

            The United States Direct Tax of 1798 (known as the window tax) for the part of Huntingdon County which included (then*) Hopewell, Woodbury and Union Townships listed Jacob Dean as the owner of 1 log building, 22 by 36 feet, 2 story, 2 windows, 33 lights (window panes), and ¼ acre of land, total valuation $110.  It also listed Jacob Dean with 1 barn, 20 by 50 feet, valuation $30, 1 Stillhouse, 18 by 20 feet, valuation $8, and 250 acres in Union Twp., adjoining Morris Greenland, valuation $413.   It also listed Jonathan Dean with 1 house, 14 by 16 feet, valuation $10, 1 barn, 20 by 50 feet, valuation $60, and 200 acres adjoining the above Jacob Dean, valuation $370.  It also listed Zachariah Dean with 1 house, 12 by 14 feet, valuation $14, 1 outhouse, 18 by 26 feet, valuation $30, and 150 acres adjoining Jac. Dean, valuation $185.

In the 1800 census there were three heads of households in (then*) Union Township who were probably members of this family: Jacob Dean (0/2/0/0/1-1/2/1/1/1-0/0)†; Jonathan Dean (2/0/0/1/0-2/2/0/1/0-0/0)†; and Zachariah Dean (3/0/0/1/0-1/0/1/0/0-0/0)†.  Jacob and Jonathan were recorded next to each other; Zachariah was one intervening household away.

            The only resident of the village of Chilcoatstown (now Cassville) in 1803 was William Lovell who kept a public house.  The settlers in the Trough Creek Valley at that time included Jacob Dean. [ref. 2, p. 238]

            The records of the Mill Creek Baptist Church in (now*) Brady Township contain the following information – In about 1800 a log meeting-house was built on Mill Creek, two miles from its mouth.  In 1806 its members included Eleanor Dean, William Dean and Jonathan Dean.  In 1809 Jonathan Dean was chosen treasurer.  Jonathan Dean was the first clerk of the church. [ref. 2, p. 227]  Since Brady Township is some distance from the Trough Creek Valley, these people may or not be of the family described in this chapter.

Only the first initial of the heads of household were recorded in the 1810 census of Huntingdon County.  In this census there were four heads of households in (then*) Union Township who were probably of this family: S. Dean (0/0/0/0/0-0/2/0/1/na)†; J. Dean (0/0/0/0/1-0/0/na)†; Z. Dean (2/3/0/1/1/-3/0/1/na)†; and E. Dean (1/0/0/1/0-2/0/1/1/na)†.  S. Dean, J. Dean and Z. Dean were enumerated in adjacent households while E. Dean was one intervening household away from the others.

            Ed McClelland’s web page (see URL below) has some additional information on certain members of this family.  It says “David and Joshua enlisted in the Revolutionary War but never returned; it is believed they were killed.”  (But see contrary information on Joshua below.)  This web page includes a quote from The History of Lawrence County, Pa. published 1877, p. 106:  “On the farm now belonging to the heirs of Zacharia Dean, a cabin was built and a small clearing made previous to 1815.  That year Mr. Dean came from Huntingdon and settled on the place, having purchased a two-hundred-acre tract.  …  Dean was originally from the State of Maryland.  Jacob Dean came the next year, 1816, and located on a portion of the above tract about five years afterwards.”  (Per an e-mail from Lucy Peterson, this was Zachariah’s son Jacob, not his father.)

            Ed McClelland’s web page also contains the following quotation, presumably also from the History of Lawrence County:  “Enoch Dean was the miller at what was later known as Kennedy’s Mill on the Slippery Rock Creek a couple miles from Harlansburg, up stream a few miles from McConnell’s Mill (now a state park).  Enoch had the mill after Mr. Fox, but died Feb. 5, 1851, after which his wife Jane deeded the property to Hosea Kennedy.”  This must have been Zachariah’s son, Enoch, not his brother, but the death date does not agree with other sources for that Enoch’s death date.

            Ed McClelland’s web page says “Zechariah settled three miles north of New Castle, on the New Castle – Mercer Road, but moved the next year (1818) to a farm near Harlansburg.”

            From these bits of information it is apparent that Jacob Dean’s son Zachariah removed from the Trough Creek Valley to (now*) Lawrence County, PA sometime between 1815 and 1818.  I don’t know when Jacob’s son Jonathan removed to that area of Pennsylvania, but it is certain that he did so sometime before January 1822 when his 18-year-old daughter, Eleanor, died there.  Per an e-mail from Lucy Peterson, Jacob’s son Enoch remained in Huntingdon County and is buried in the Trough Creek Baptist Cemetery.

            The last will and testament of Jacob Dean of Huntingdon County in the state of Pennsylvania was filed with the court in Huntingdon County on 13 Jan 1831.  The will had been made 9 May 1829.  It was witnessed by Caleb Greenland, Jr., Benjamin Greenland and Cornelius Posten.  In his will, Jacob left one-third of all his real and personal estate to his wife, Nancy.  He devised to his son, Enoch, his blacksmith tools and to his son, Zachariah, $114.50 more or less of a book account.  The remainder of his estate he divided equally among “my other children to wit. Jonathan Dean, Anna Chilcoat, Phebe Rogers, Hannah Loveall, Mary Starr, Sarah Corben, Ellender Bomgardner and Nancy Shone.”  He appointed his son-in-law John Chilcoat and Nathan Greenland as executors. [Huntingdon Co. Will Book #3, p. 334-5, FHL #1854232]

            I received a transcription of the will of Zachariah Dean (son of Jacob and Nancy Dean) via e-mail from Gerald B. McLaughlin on 20 Aug 1998.  From Lawrence County-Will Book #1, p. 104.  The last will and testament of Zachariah Dean, late of Scott Twp., Lawrence Co., PA, deceased.  Written 26 Oct 1857.  Probated 21 Apr 1862.  He leaves to his daughter, Nancy, the tract of land on which she now resides lying in Mill Creek Twp., Mercer Co., PA.  After her death it is to be divided between her two children, Jacob and Emaline, and he provides that their father, Benjamin Bumgartner, shall have his living off the said land on the condition that he abstain from drink.  Zachariah gives to each of his two grandsons named Zachariah $15, and he gives to his grandson Enoch Furman $5. (From other information it appears that this was Enoch Furman Dean.)  He instructs that all the remainder of his estate both real and personal be divided equally among “all my children to wit: my sons Enoch, Abner, and Noah and daughters Mary, Martha, Eliza, Allay, and my daughter-in-law Eliza Dean.  (This is the wife of Zachariah’s son, Jacob, who predeceased Zachariah.)  He instructs that all notes due be deducted, and again lists his “sons, sons-in-law, daughters and daughters-in-law” to wit: Enoch, Noah, Mary, Martha, Eliza, Allay, and Elizabeth Dean.  He appoints his sons, Abner and Noah, to be executors of his will.  Witnesses: Simeon Dean and Andrew Nelson.  (Simeon was a grandson of Zachariah, son of Jacob.)

            Several people, including Dick Frank (AFrank1028@aol.com), Chuck Dean (cndean@NOSPAMcomcast.net), Ed McClelland (ed.mcclelland@erols.com), Max James (insulatormaj1@juno.com), Lucy Peterson (lucyqp@msn.com), Bob Schmelzlem (ras@fairfieldi.com), and Gerald McLaughlin (real.estate.broker@MCIONE.com), have given me information on this family via e-mail.  There are also a couple of web sites which contain information on this family: Chuck Dean’s www.geocities.com/cndean/, and Ed McClelland’s http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~mcclell2/homepage/dean.htm .   I have assembled the following outline descendant chart from these sources plus the wills of Jacob Dean and his son, Zachariah.  In some cases I have had to choose among differing information.  This chart begins with the parents of the Jacob Dean who settled in the Trough Creek Valley.

1  John Dean  b: 1720 in Ireland  d: in Maryland  [he lived near the present Baltimore]

   +  Susanna West  b: in England  d: in Pennsylvania

2  David Dean [he served in the Revolutionary War, no further record]

2  Joshua Dean  b: 28 Feb 1744/45       [he served in the Revolutionary War]

   m. 15 Oct 1766  Susanna Loveall  b: Abt. 1745 in Baltimore Co., MD

          3  Jacob Dean  b: 23 Jun 1774

          3  Molly Dean  b: 23 Jun 1774

          3  Temperance Dean  b: 1776

          3  John Dean, II  b: Abt. 1778

2  Jacob Dean  b: 3 Mar 1746/47 in Maryland  d: Jan 1831 in Huntingdon Co., PA

   +m: 1770     Nancy Loveall               

3  Jonathan Dean b: 1768 d: 4 Apr 1837 in Harlansburg, Lawrence Co., PA

   +  Eleanor Thompson  b: 1773    d: 30 Oct 1847

4  Aaron Dean  b: 28 May 1793         

   +m: 31 Aug 1813   Leah Steel                    

4  Mary Dean            b: 6 Jul 1795      d: 21 Jan 1859 in Butler Co., PA

    +  Robert Hampson                      

4  Jacob Dean  b: 1796          d: 1840 in Harlansburg, Lawrence Co., PA

4  Phebe Dean          b: 18 Nov 1797   d: 3 Oct 1883 in Butler Co., PA

   +  Thomas Cooper             

4  Susanna Dean      b: 18 Jul 1799    d: 25 Mar 1825 in Harlansburg, Lawrence Co., PA

4  William Thompson Dean    b: 25 Feb 1800  d: 26 Mar 1884

    +  Mary Harlan Vogan                   

4  Eleanor Dean        b: 9 Dec 1803    d: 11 Jan 1822 in Harlansburg, Lawrence Co., PA

4  Nancy Dean          b: Abt. 1808      d: 25 Sep 1883 in Butler Co., PA

3  Zachariah Dean  b: 14 Apr 1772 in MD  d: 16 Apr 1862 in Harlansburg, Lawrence Co., PA

   +m: Abt. 1792   Allie Thompson  b: 9 Jun 1774     d: 24 Jun 1847

4  Enoch Dean  b: 6 Sep 1793 in Huntingdon Co., PA  d: 23 Jan 1862 in Mercer Co., MO

   +  Hannah Kelley

  *2nd Wife of Enoch Dean:

   +  Mrs. Jane Harlan, nee Hogue

4  Nancy Dean          b: Abt. 1794

   +  Benjamin Baumgartner

4  Jacob Dean           b: 18 Jul 1795   d: 1840

   +  Eliza Loveall      b: 1794 d: 1879

4  Abner Dean           b: 1798 d: 1878

   +  Susannah Remley

  *2nd Wife of Abner Dean:

   +  Elizabeth Whitman

4  Mary A. Dean  b: 7 Apr 1800  d: 4 Feb 1869

   +  Alexander Rodgers

4  Noah Dean  b: 22 Jul 1804 d: 24 May 1870 in Harlansburg, Lawrence Co., PA

   +m: 3 Nov 1825      Elizabeth Emery            b: 1803 d: 9 Oct 1884

4  Martha Dean         b: Abt. 1806     

   +  Samuel Davis

  *2nd Husband of Martha Dean:

   +  Joseph Smith

4  Jonathan Dean  b: 1809

4  Eliza Dean            b: Abt. 1810

   +  Elijah Moor

4  Allie Dean b: 1814 d: 1892

   +  Thomas Wilson Rodgers

3  Anna Dean      

   +  John Chilcoat

3  Phebe Dean

   +  ??? Rogers

3  Hannah Dean

   +  ??? Loveall

3  Mary Dean 

   +  ??? Starr

3  Ellender Dean 

   +  ??? Bomgardner

3  Nancy Dean  d: 1843

3  Enoch Dean  d: 27 Feb 1867 in Cass Twp., Huntingdon Co., PA

   +  Mary ???

4  Elijah Dean

4  Nancy Dean

4  Jane Dean  b: 13 Mar 1809 in Cass Twp., Huntingdon Co., PA  d: 27 Dec 1864 in Mapleton Depot, Huntingdon Co., PA

   +m: 19 Jul 1829  Matthew Fairman Campbell  b: 1801  d: 1888

3  Sarah Dean  b: 1788  d: 1870

   + Caleb Corbin

2  Deborah Dean         b: 6 Feb 1749/50            [she remained in Maryland]

2  William Dean           b: 30 Aug 1753

2  Dinah Dean             b: 23 Jan 1757   [she remained in Maryland]

            The information that John Dean was originally from Ireland and that his wife Susanna West was originally from England is on both web pages mentioned above, but has been questioned by Lucy Peterson.  Both web pages give the death place of Jacob who died in 1831 as Lawrence County, PA, but it is fairly certain that he never removed from Huntingdon County.  The comments in brackets following the names of John Dean and his children are from a Nov. 6, 1998 e-mail to the Dean mail list from Lucy Peterson.  In that e-mail she reported she had found this information in a publication called “Deans of Dorchester” compiled by a Mrs. Howard Wilbur Dean of New Castle, PA.  This source also says there was one son named Isaiah (sic) who was not listed in Jacob’s will and probably died young.  In a 17 Jan 2000 e-mail to me Lucy Peterson gave me the information in the outline descendant chart above on the marriage and children of Joshua Dean.  This information came from “Trough Creek Valley Families, Part 1” by Doris Rex Schutte.

 

* Note: The part of the Trough Creek Valley south of the village of Calvin is now in Cass Township, Huntingdon County.  Union Township was made from part of Hopewell Township in 1791 and Cass Township was made from part of Union Township in 1843.  This area was in Cumberland County before 1771.  In 1771 Bedford County was made from the part of Cumberland County and this area was in Hopewell Township, Bedford County.  In 1787 Huntingdon County was made from part of Bedford County and the area was in Hopewell Township, Huntingdon County.  The locations around Harlansburg, PA referred to in this chapter were in Mercer County, Pennsylvania from 1800 until 1849 when Lawrence County was formed from parts of Beaver and Mercer Counties.

 

† Note: See note at end of References for the meaning of these census numbers.

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Chapter 6. John and Anne (Isett)  Dean of (now*) Union Township, Huntingdon County

                 (and John’s brothers Samuel and Thomas; John removed to the Raystown Branch)

 

            Reference 7 states: “Trough Creek Valley was settled chiefly by immigrants from the State of Maryland …” and goes on: “Among the earliest settlers were the Lilleys, Lucketts, Fitzsimmons, Corbins, Drennans, Brownings, Caldwells, Deans, Bomgartners, Curfmans, McClains, Chilcotts, Greenlands, Stevers and Robinsons.” [ref. 7, first page of chapter XLIII]

            Referring to (now*) Union Township, Reference 2 says “This portion of Huntingdon County was settled almost wholly by immigrants from Maryland, who came over Indian trails …” [p. 371]

            John Dean was one of the first, if not the first person, who effected a permanent settlement on the waters of Little Trough Creek.  He commenced an improvement a short distance northeast of the present village of Calvin in October 1772. [ref. 2, p. 373]

            Mr. Dean first came alone and erected a cabin in pioneer style.  He then returned to Maryland for his wife, and they traveled over an Indian trail, bringing their effects on the backs of a horse and two cows. [ref. 2, p. 373]

            Samuel, a brother of John Dean, settled in 1773 higher up and on the western side of the creek, and the next year Thomas, another brother, made an improvement on the eastern side of the same stream. [ref. 2, p. 373]

            In the fall of 1777, on account of an alarm of Indian massacres, John and his family fled to a place of greater security.  Samuel and Thomas Dean also fled during the Indian troubles.  The latter died of smallpox and the former did not return, but sold his improvement right to Samuel Lilly who never lived on it and sold it to John Wright.  When affairs became more settled John Dean and his family returned. [ref. 2, p. 373]

            A map of the original land warrants and surveys of this area [The Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Map #B-107] show 396½ acres and 39 perches were warranted to John Dean (recorded as John Dain, but other sources strongly indicate this was John Dean) on November 3, 1785 [Land record A-70-299].  This property extends about 1¼ miles east-to-west and about ½ mile north-to-south.  It lies of both sides of the Little Trough Creek and appears to span the flat parts of the valley width.

            The same map shows 296 acres and 160 perches warranted to Samuel Lilley Feb. 25, 1788 [Land record C-118-52].  This property adjoins the entire north boundary of the land warranted to John Dean.  Presumably this was the land originally improved and sold by John’s brother, Samuel.

The same map shows another piece of property about two miles farther north (upstream on the Little Trough Creek) warranted to John Dain. This property consisted of 402 acres and 92 perches.  It was warranted on Mar. 5, 1784 [Land record C-64-1].  This probably was a person by the name of John Dain.  A person by that name was recorded in the 1800 census in Hopewell Township.

Families neighboring John Dean in the northern portion of the Trough Creek Valley: (from north to south, more or less) Richard Chilcott, John Wright, William Estep, James Estep, Michael Mierley, Michael, John, David and Jacob Bumgartner, Samuel Pheasant, and Jacob Dean and his sons Jonathan, Zachariah and Enoch.  John Wright purchased about 300 acres of land lying on both sides of Little Trough Creek from Samuel Lilly.  This had been improved in 1773 or 1774 by Samuel Dean. [ref. 2, p. 371-2]

            Land records indicate that John Dean of Hopewell Township sold the northern half of his original land warrant on 5 Jun. 1787 to Peter Reilly for the sum of one hundred pounds.  The parties to the sale were “of Bedford* County, Hopewell* Township, State of Pennsylvania.”  The property sold was described as “containing one hundred and ninety eight acres” and “being one half of the tract of land granted by Patent to the aforesaid John.”  The first two legs of the metes and bounds description are exactly the same as the original warrant, and those legs are described as lying “by the land of Thomas Lilly.”  The beginning and ending points of this description are given as a white oak at the foot of Sideling Hill. [Huntingdon County Deed Book C-1, p. 111, FHL #0900618]  Sideling Hill bounds the Trough Creek Valley on the east.  On 7 Jan 1804 Ann Dean executed a quit claim to any rights she may have had to this property because she was not named as a grantee in the 1787 sale. [Huntingdon County Deed Book I-1, p. 426]

            The first United States census was taken in 1790.  Four John Dean-s were recorded in Huntingdon County in that census.  That census was not recorded by townships in Huntingdon County, but the order in which the households were recorded gives some clue as to the location of the people recorded in it.  Judging by the people who were recorded near them, two of these John Dean-s were probably in Hopewell Township.  One of them, John Dean (2/4-3)† was enumerated in the next household to William Dean (2/3-4)† and near others named Joseph Norrise (sic-Norris), William Shirley and Richard Dowling.  Based this, I believe this John Dean was enumerated on or near the land on the Raystown Branch warranted to William Dean in 1787.  The age distribution of the household of this John Dean strongly indicates to me that he was the John Dean described in this chapter.  For more information about the William Dean enumerated next to him see Chapter 7.

According to Reference 2, John Dean and his family resided on his original land claim in the Trough Creek Valley until he sold to Michael Mierley about 1794.  At that time John Dean and his family removed to the Raystown Branch. [p. 373]  If the John Dean in the 1790 census on the Raystown Branch is this John Dean, then he must have removed from the Trough Creek Valley before, not after, 1790.  The sale of his land on the Little Trough Creek may have occurred in 1794.

            The other John Dean who probably resided in Hopewell Township was John Dean (1/0-2)†.  He was recorded near heads of household named Jonathan Loveall, Richard Chilcoat and Lawrence Sope (sic-Swope).  This strongly indicates to me that he lived in the Trough Creek Valley.  I am having a hard time figuring out who he was.  Perhaps he was the John Dain who was warranted 402+ acres of land along the upper Little Trough Creek in 1784.  Supporting this theory is the fact that a John Dain (2/0/0/1/0-2/0/0/1/0-0/0)† was enumerated in Hopewell Township in the 1800 census.  From these age distributions it appears quite possible that these were the same family.

            Another possibility is that the John Dean (1/0-2)† was the person described in the following paragraph.  He was supposed to have been in (then*) Bedford County from after the Revolutionary War until 1810.  There were no John Dean-s enumerated in the 1790 census in Bedford County, and all of the John Dean-s enumerated in Huntingdon County except this one seem to be accounted for.

Abstracts of Revolutionary War Pension Files has this entry: “Dean, John, Jane, R2800, sol appl 15 Oct 1833 Gallatin Cty KY aged 71, sol enl in Bedford Cty PA a few miles from the lead mines, sol was b in 1763 in state of MD, after the Rev War sol lived in Bedford Cty PA until 1810 then moved to Gallatin Cty KY, wid appl 6 May 1844 Carroll Cty KY aged 82 on the 9 Mar 1844, sol & wid had m 2 Jan 1805, sol d 5 Mar 1841, sol’s sis Mrs. Eleanor Haines was aged 69 in 1844 a res of Carroll Cty KY.” [ref. 15, p. 927]  In addition, my notes taken from the microfilm of this file at the Seattle National Archives indicate that he enlisted March 1779, served under Capt. Shaver, Col. John Piper and in 1780 under Sam’l Thompson.  In conflict with the abstract, my notes indicate that, based on a statement by his sister, he married Jane on 2 Jan 1785.  (need to check my notes)

The United States Direct Tax of 1798 (known as the window tax) for the part of Huntingdon County which included Hopewell, Woodbury and Union Townships listed John Dean as the owner of one house, 14 by 18 feet, valuation $6, one Outhouse, 8 by 10 feet, valuation $2, and 240 acres situated “D adj. Jn’o Reed,” valuation $741.  It is difficult to say whether this property was in the Trough Creek Valley or near the Raystown Branch as a John Reed was recorded in the 1790 census in what appears to be the Trough Creek Valley and the map of original warrants on the Raystown Branch shows some land of John Reed near the land originally warranted to William Dean.

The 1798 window tax also listed Catharine Dean as the owner of 275 acres of unoccupied land on Little Trough Creek, valuation $275.  She may have been the daughter or daughter-in-law of the John Dean described in this chapter.  (John’s son, Thomas, had a wife named Catherine.)

            John Dean’s wife was Ann B. Isett.  They had six sons and one daughter, all of whom reached mature age, and were the progenitors of numerous representatives of this region. [ref. 2, p. 373]

In the 1800 census only one head of household named Dean, a John Dean (0/1/4/1/1-0/0/1/0/1-0/0)†, was recorded in Hopewell Township.  The age distribution of this family matches incredibly well with what is know of the family described in this chapter.  I believe they were located on the Raystown Branch when this census was taken.

Unfortunately, only the first initial of the heads of household were recorded in the 1810 census of Huntingdon County.  In that census the following were recorded in Hopewell Township: S. Deen (1/0/0/1/0-0/0/1/1/0)†, J. Dean (0/0/0/1/1-0/1/1/0/1)† and S. Dean (3/0/0/1/0-1/0/0/1/0)†.  S. Deen and J. Dean were in adjacent households and S. Dean was enumerated eight households away.  I believe J. Dean was the John Dean described in this chapter, his wife and the part of their family remaining at home.  One of the S. Dean-s was probably his son Samuel and the other S. Dean was probably an erroneous recording of another of his sons.  Based on the names of others recorded nearby, I believe they were enumerated on the Raystown Branch in this census.

            John Dean of Hopewell Township, Huntingdon County  made his last will and testament on Dec. 10, 1819.  It was filed with the court May 15, 1821.  In his will, John Dean left “his beloved wife, Ann Dean all of his estate, both real and personal,” and he directed that after her death his estate be equally divided among his six sons, Samuel, Thomas, John, William, Isaac and James.  He appointed William Dean and Lawrence Swoope to be executors of his will. [Huntingdon County Will Book #1, p. 305-6, FHL #0854231]  (Was this the William Dean described in Chapter 7, John’s son William, or someone else?)

            John Dean of the Raystown Branch died Apr. 9, 1821 in the 82nd year of his age. [ref. 2, p. 492]  The death of “Mrs. Dean, wife of John Dean” occurred Jun. 25, 1826. [ref.2, p. 493]

            The sale for $81 of a tract of land consisting of 82 acres 95 perches was made 10 Nov 1825.  The grantor was Benjamin R. Morgan Esquire of the City of Philadelphia acting through his attorney, Thomas Jackson, and the grantee was Catharine Dean, widow of Thomas Dean dec’d, and her two eldest sons, William Dean and Thomas Dean, all of Hopewell Township, Huntingdon County.  This tract of land was situate in Hopewell Township and was described by metes and bounds as passing by the lands of Wray(?) Maize(?) and Richard Dowling, being part of the larger tract of land warranted 25 Mar 1794 and surveyed on 29 Aug 1794 to Hugh Morrison. [Huntingdon County Deed Book U-1, p. 482, FHL #0854211]  I have looked at maps and other resources but have not been able to locate this tract of land from this description.  Since land in the Trough Creek Valley should have been described as being in Union Township in 1825, it was probably not located there.

            The sale for $100 by John Dean to William Dean of John’s rights to the one-sixth of the estate of John Dean deceased of Hopewell township, Huntingdon County was made 17 Feb 1828.  This sale refers to the last will and testament of the said John Dean deceased dated 10 Dec 1819.  At that time John Dean, the grantor, was “of Jefferson County, Ohio.” [Huntingdon County Deed Book U-1, p. 481 FHL #0854211]  Without doubt, the grantor was the son John Dean described in this chapter, and I believe the grantee was probably his brother William.  Unfortunately there is no further description of the land in this indenture.

            David Dean of Walker Township, Huntingdon County made his last will on 8 Apr 1839, and it was filed for probate on 11 May 1839.  In it he bequeaths his personal estate and his one-ninth interest in the real estate of his father, Thomas Dean, to his wife, Mary Dean.  He mentions his brothers, James Dean and Alexander Dean in his will, and he appoints his wife, Mary, and his uncle, William Dean, as executors of his will. [Huntingdon County Will Book #4, p. 136, FHL #0854232]

            In Nov 1840 David Speak, intermarried with Mary Dean, petitioned the Orphans’ Court regarding settlement of the estate of David Dean. [Huntingdon County Orphans’ Court Book E, p. 223, FHL #0900589]

            In June 1841 Thomas Dean, son of Thomas Dean dec’d, petitioned the Orphans’ Court for an inquest into the valuation of his father’s estate.  This petition names Catharine the widow of Thomas dec’d, and children William, Thomas, Nancy intermarried with Cornelius Decker, John, Rachel intermarried with James McCall, James, Mary and Alexander, and it describes the property of Thomas Dean dec’d as about two hundred acres situate in Walker Township, Huntingdon County bounded by lands of Michael Speck, William Dowland and Jacob Hefner having erected thereon a two story log house with other out houses and barn.  Catharine, Thomas, James, John, Alexander and Mary all reside in Walker township.  Nancy resides in Henderson township.  The residence of William is not mentioned, and the township in which Rachel resides is unreadable. [Huntingdon County Orphans’ Court Book E, p. 268-9, FHL #0900589]

            On 11 Nov 1841 the Orphans’ Court confirmed the settlement of the estate of David Dean, late of Walker Township, by William Dean. [Huntingdon County Orphans’ Court Book E, p. 304, FHL #0900589]

            In discussing the pioneer settlers of Brady Township, Reference 2 says Peter Vandevender died in Brady Township.  He had four sons including Isaac.  Isaac married Mary Enyeart and lived in McConnellstown until his death in 1844 at age sixty-four years.  One of his seven daughters (name not given) married John Dean. [p. 219]  (A good guess would be that this was John Dean, the son of Thomas Dean and the grandson of John Dean of this chapter.  McConnellstown is in Walker Township where the siblings of this John Dean were known to be, and the age of this daughter would about match the age this John Dean.)

            In discussing the pioneer settlers of Juniata Township, Reference 2 says John Ridenour reared ten children and died in 1852.  His daughter, Lydia, is (in 1883) the widow of Thomas Dean and his daughter Sophia is the widow of William Dean. [p. 302]  The information below on the Ridenour Cemetery seems to support this relationship with regard to Lydia Ridenour.  In the outline descendant chart below I have shown these two Ridenour daughters as wives of Thomas and William Dean.

            Later in the discussion of pioneer settlers of Juniata Township, Reference 2 says: “In the same locality (as David and Samuel Reed who settled on the ridge), on the present Lisinger farm, lived William Dean, the father of James and Thomas Dean.  Another William Dean was an early settler on the ridge. His house was destroyed by fire while occupied by two of his daughters.  One was burned to death, and the other sustained severe injuries.” [p. 303]  I have not used this relationship between James and Thomas Dean and their father in the outline descendant chart below because I am cannot determine which generation these people belonged to.

            The following names are listed in the information on Walker Township in Reference 2: Road Supervisors – 1837 William Dean, 1843 Thomas Dean, 1845 John Dean; Directors of the Common School – 1842 John Dean, 1845 William Dean.  John Dean was a keeper of a public house sometime before 1876. [p. 382-6]

            The following were listed as residents of Juniata Township in 1857: Thomas Dean with 163 acres, William Dean with 146 acres and John R. Dean as a single man. [ref. 2, p. 304]  Officers of Juniata Township after its creation in 1856 were: Road Supervisors – 1863 William Dean, 1864 Thomas Dean; School Directors – 1858 William Dean, 1861 Thomas Dean. [ref. 2, p. 304-5]

            The following cemetery information appears to be pertinent to this family.  From “Church and cemetery records, bible records, 1766-1938,” compiled by the Standing Stone Chapter DAR. [FHL #0900626]

            Dean Cemetery, located in Juniata Twp. about 3 miles south from Hawn’s bridge, just off Twp. Rt. #31032.

                        Dean, Alexander  d. 21 Nov 1888 age 63-7-0  (b. Apr 1825)

                        two brownstone markers – babies of Abraham and Hannah (Norris) Dean

            Old Grubb Cemetery (called Dean Cemetery by the Corps of Engineers), located just above Dr. Wehrle’s

cottage on Raystown Dam

                        Dean, William  d. 8 Mar 1853  age 71-7-0  (b. Aug 1781)

                        Dean, Thomas  d. 22 Apr 1823  age 47 yrs    (b. 1776)

                        Dean, Catherine, w/o Thomas  d. 29 Oct 1862  age 79-8-12   (b. 17 Feb 1783)

                        and others all to be reinterred in White Church Cemetery

            Ritenour’s Cemetery, located 2 miles below Hawn’s bridge, Juniata Township

                        David, son of T. & L. Dean  died Feb 28, 1839, aged 4 years   (b. Feb 1835)

                        Jane, daughter of T. & L. Dean, died Nov. 23, 1836, aged 19 days    (b. 4 Nov 1836)

                        Rosan, daughter of T. & L. Dean, died Dec 30, 1843, aged 1 yr., 7 mos.    (b. May 1842)

                        Blanchey H., born July 31, 1886, died Mar 6, 1887

                        Levi R., son of T. & L. Dean, died Jan 15, 1862, aged 14 yrs., 1 mo., 11days    (b. 4 Dec 1847)

                        Thomas Dean died May 21 1872, aged 66 yrs, 4 mos., 18 days    (b. 3 Jan 1806)

                        Lydia, wife of Thomas Dean  born Aug 14, 1806, died Jul 3, 1887

                        John R. Dean  died May 29, 1893, aged 59 yrs., 9 mos., 6 days   (b. 23 Aug 1833)

                        also persons surnamed Ridenour and Hahn buried in this cemetery

            From the records of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers who reinterred the following graves before the reservoir behind Raystown Dam was filled in 1978.

            From the Dean  Cemetery (called Old Grubb Cemetery above), reinterred in White Church Cemetery

Catharine Dean  1783 – 1862    distantly related to Mrs. Della Briggs, Mifflin St. Huntingdon, PA

                        Thomas Dean            - 1823   distantly related to Mrs. Della Briggs, Mifflin St. Huntingdon, PA

                        William Dean  1782 – 1853     distantly related to Mrs. Della Briggs, Mifflin St. Huntingdon, PA

     and six graves of unknown persons

            From the Acker Cemetery, reinterred in White Church Cemetery

                        John B. Dean  1877 – 1899        uncle of Harold Dean, Hesston, PA

                        Vada Dean  1870 – 1892            uncle of Harold Dean, Hesston, PA

                        unmarked (Aden Dean)               grandparent of Harold Dean, Hesston, PA

                        unmarked (Hanna Dean)             grandparent of Harold Dean, Hesston, PA

         unmarked (Dean)                        sister of Mrs. Della Briggs, Mifflin St. Huntingdon, PA

                        unmarked (Dean)                       sister of Mrs. Della Briggs, Mifflin St. Huntingdon, PA

                        Caroline Dean 1868–1868 (sic)    grandmother of Mrs. Della Briggs, Mifflin St. Huntingdon, PA

                        Caroline E. Dean                        aunt of Mrs. Della Briggs, Mifflin St. Huntingdon, PA

                        Thomas G. Dean                        uncle of Mrs. Della Briggs, Mifflin St. Huntingdon, PA

                        and 153 other graves reinterred in various cemeteries, including the White Church cemetery

            The following bible record is probably pertinent to this family.  “Church and cemetery records, bible records, 1766-1938,” compiled by the Standing Stone Chapter DAR. [FHL #0900626] contains a typed page of information copied from the bible of Emma Dean (Mrs. Frank) Meader of Altoona, PA.  It contains birth, marriage and death dates of Abraham Dean who was born 22 June 1837, married Hannah Norris in Marklesburg, Pa. on 23 Mar 1865 and died 10 Mar 1894.  It also contains birth and death dates for Hannah and their twelve children.  Marklesburg is near the area where William Dean (see Chapter 7) was originally granted land on the Raystown Branch.  Two babies of this couple are buried in the Dean Cemetery, see above.  There was a Norris Cemetery a short distance from the Dean Cemetery.  Both of these cemeteries were reinterred by the Corps of Engineers.  Despite these apparent connections, I don’t know how or whether this Abraham Dean was related to the Dean family described in this chapter.

            There is a web page put up by Bill Walsh (www.geocities.com/Heartland/Prairie/4113/dean1.htm) which contains the text of a book titled “Country Cousins, Descendants of Samuel Dean” which gives the descendants of a Richard Dean, his two wives and their nine children.  According to that book, Richard’s first four children were William, John, Samuel and Thomas.  Only the descendants of Samuel are followed in that book, hence its title.  According to that web page, Richard died in 1788 at Sharpsburg, Washington County, Maryland.  His will was dated 14 Feb 1788 and recorded on 7 Apr 1788.  In it Richard bequeathed 2 shillings to each of his sons, William, John and Samuel, five shillings to each of five daughters, and five shillings to the legal representations of his son Thomas deceased.  He bequeathed all of his lands, house goods and chattels to his (second) wife Priscilla.

The web page indicates that Samuel Dean was born about 1751 in Maryland, married Gwendolyn James in 1773 and their first six children were born in Maryland between 1774 and 1784.  By the time their seventh child was born in 1791 the family had removed to Anderson District, South Carolina.  In an 11 Nov 1998 e-mail to me, Beverly Dean Peoples (bpeoples@mindspring.com) said that Louise Rourke, one of the authors of the book mentioned above, did say at one time that she thinks this Samuel Dean’s family may have been in Pennsylvania for a while.

Despite some contrary information on this web page about this John Dean, I believe the evidence indicates that Richard Dean’s sons John, Samuel and Thomas were the John Dean and his brothers Samuel and Thomas who, according to Reference 2, settled early in the Trough Creek Valley.  However, after reviewing the best evidence I could present for this case, Beverly Peoples said in a 24 Nov 1998 e-mail to me that she did not believe these were the same people.  Beverly Peoples seems to be very knowledgeable about this family, and I have accepted her opinion.

The following is the vital information I have on this family.

       1  John Dean     b. 1738 d: 9 Apr 1821 in Huntingdon Co., PA

           +  Ann B. Isett            d: 25 Jun 1826 in Huntingdon Co., PA

     2  Samuel Dean (b. say about 1774)

     2  Thomas Dean  b: 1776   d: 22 Apr 1823 in Huntingdon Co., PA

                + Catharine ???  b: 17 Feb 1783         d: 29 Oct 1862 in Huntingdon Co., PA

                         3  William Dean  b. Bef. about 1806  d: Bef. 1883

                             + Sophia Ridenour  d: Aft. 1883

                         3  Thomas Dean  b. 3 Jan 1806  d: 21 May 1872

                             +  Lydia Ridenour  b: 14 Aug 1806  d: 3 Jul 1887

                                         4  John R. Dean  b: 23 Aug 1833  d: 29 May 1893

                                         4  David Dean  b: Feb 1835  d: 28 Feb 1839

                                         4  Jane Dean  b: 4 Nov 1836  d: 23 Nov 1836

                                         4  Rosan Dean  b: May 1842  d: 30 Dec 1843

                                         4  Levi R. Dean  b: 4 Dec 1847  d: 15 Jan 1862

                          3  David Dean        d. May 1839 in Walker Twp., Huntingdon Co., PA

                              + Mary ???  (was she listed in the will of her father-in-law?)

                          3  Nancy Dean  b. Bef. about 1810

                               m: Bef. 1841  Cornelius Decker

                           3  John Dean  b. Bef. about 1812

                           3  Rachel Dean  b. Bef. about 1814

                                m: Bef. 1841  James McCall

                           3  James Dean  b. Bef. about 1816

                           3  Mary Dean  b. Bef. about 1818  (was this a daughter of Thomas or the wife of David?)

                           3  Alexander Dean  b. Bef. 1820

     2  John Dean                 (removed to Jefferson Co., OH before 1828) (b. say about 1778)

     2  William Dean  b: Aug 1781  d: 8 Mar 1853 in Huntingdon Co., PA

     2  Isaac Dean                (b. say about 1783)

     2  daughter Dean           (b. between 1775 and 1784 based on the 1800 census)

     2  James Dean  (b. say about 1785)

1  Samuel Dean

1  Thomas Dean

 

* Note: The part of the Trough Creek Valley near and north of the village of Calvin is now in Union Township, Huntingdon County.  Union Township was made from part of Hopewell Township in 1791.  Later Cass, Tod (now Todd) and Carbon Townships were made from parts of Union Township.  John Dean and family apparently removed from Union Township to the part of the Raystown Branch which was in Hopewell Township at that time (1794).  Hopewell Township was further divided when Penn Township was created in 1846 and Lincoln Township was created in 1866.  These areas were in Bedford County from 1771 until 1787 and Huntingdon County after 1787

 

† Note: See note at end of References for the meaning of these census numbers.

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Chapter 7. William Dean of (now*) Penn Township, Huntingdon County

                                    (original warrantee of land on the Raystown Branch)

 

            I have less information on this Dean family than most of the others in this paper.  I suspect there was some relationship between the William Dean of this chapter and the John Dean of Chapter 6.  Based on the age distributions of their families in the 1790 census, they may have been brothers.  Perhaps William was the brother of John, Samuel and Thomas, sons of Richard Dean, described in the book “Country Cousins, Descendants of Samuel Dean” mentioned in Chapter 6.

            The 1769 tax list for Barree Township lists one person surnamed Dean: William Deane, 50 acres, 6 acres cleared, 2 horses, 2 cows.  A footnote says he was supposed to have lived on the Raystown Branch, (now*) Penn Township. [ref. 2, p. 43]

            In 1773 William Dean was taxed £1.2.6 on uncultivated land in Hempfeld Township, Bedford County. [ref.8, p. 30]  Hempfeld/Hempfield was one of the original townships in Westmoreland County when it was formed from Bedford County in 1773.  Since this was, in those days, a considerable distance from Hopewell Township, this may or may not have been the William Dean described in this chapter.

            The names of several persons surnamed Dean appear in the tax lists of Hopewell Township, (then*) Bedford County as follows:

In 1775 William Dean was taxed £9.5 and John Dean was taxed £9.0. [ref. 8, p. 110]

In 1776 William Dean was taxed £3.2½ on uncultivated land and £2.2 provincial tax and John Dean was taxed £7.6 on uncultivated land and £1.0 provincial tax. [ref. 8, p. 149]

            In 1779 William Dean was taxed on 100 acres, 3 horses and 5 cattle, John Dean was taxed on 50 acres, 2 horses and 3 cattle, James Dean was taxed on 300 acres, and Tho’s Dean was taxed on 50 acres, 2 horses and 2 cattle. [ref. 8, p. 177]

In 1783 William Dean was taxed £1.9.5 on 100 acres, John Dean was taxed £5.9 on 100 acres, Thomas Dean was taxed £2.10 on 50 acres, Samuel Dean was taxed £5.9 on 100 acres. [ref. 8, p. 225]

The 1784 “Return of Lands and Number of Inhabitants” showed William Dean with 2 houses occupied by 11 white persons, John Dean with 1 house occupied by 1 white person, Thomas Dean with 1 house occupied by 1 white person, and Samuel Dean with 1 house occupied by 1 white person.  No acreage was indicated for any of these. [ref. 8, p. 304]

            The 1785 tax list for Hopewell Township, (then*) Bedford County includes: John Dean, 200 acres, and John Dean, a single freeman. [ref. 18, p. 86-7]

            A map of the original land warrants and surveys of this area [The Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Map #A-27] show two tracts originally warranted to a William Dean.  One tract consisting of 158 acres 150 perches was warranted to William Dean on Sep. 21, 1787.  The other tract adjoins the first one and consists of 168 acres 106 perches.  It was warranted to a William Dean on Feb 19, 1838 (50 years later!).  I do not know if these William Dean-s were related to each other.  These two tracts occupy an oxbow in the Raystown Branch which is located about a mile south of the present Penn–Juniata Township boundary.  This was in Hopewell Township until Penn Township was made from this part of Hopewell Township in 1846.

            The names of the following persons appeared on the 1788 tax list in Hopewell Township which in 1787 became part of Huntingdon County: William Dean was taxed £8.2 on 100 acres, 2 horses and 2 cattle, John Dean was taxed £7.3 on 190 acres, 2 horses and 1 head of cattle, John Dean was taxed £10.0 as a single freeman, and John Dean was taxed £5.8 on 402 acres as a non-resident. [ref. 8, p. 355, 358]  Reference 2 indicates that the 100 acres on which William Dean was taxed was from a warrant while the 190 acres on which John Dean was taxed was from a deed. [ref. 2, p. 290]

            The first United States census was taken in 1790.  That census was not recorded by townships, but the order in which the households were recorded gives some clue as to the location of the people recorded in it..  In that census William Dean (2/3-4)† was enumerated in the household next to a John Dean (2/4‑3)† (one of the four John Dean-s recorded in this census).  Other heads of household recorded nearby were Joseph Norrise (sic-Norris), William Shirley and Richard Dowling.  Based this, I believe these two Dean-s were enumerated on or near the land in Hopewell Township warranted to William Dean in 1787.

            Among the officers of Hopewell Township were: Constables – 1788 William Dean, 1813 John Dean, 1837 William Dean; and Overseers of the Poor – 1801 John Dean, Sr., 1846 William Dean. [ref. 2, p. 290]  (That’s interesting: John Dean, Sr.)  Some of these Dean-s may have been from the family described in Chapter 6.

            According to Reference 2, the John Dean described in Chapter 6 sold the land originally warranted to him on Little Trough Creek in 1794 and removed to the Raystown Branch. [p. 373]  Although I cannot find any descriptions of the land which that John Dean owned and devised to his sons when he made his will in 1819, I believe it is quite likely that it was near the tract originally warranted to this William Dean.  I believe this because the William, Thomas and Catharine Dean who were buried in the Dean Cemetery were two sons and a daughter-in-law of that John Dean, and the Dean Cemetery was located on the land warranted to this William Dean in 1787.  (See information on this cemetery in Chapter 6.)

            The United States Direct Tax of 1798 (known as the window tax) for the part of Huntingdon County which included (then*) Hopewell, Woodbury and Union Townships did not list any William Dean.  It did list John Dean as the owner of one house, 14 by 18 feet, valuation $6, one Outhouse, 8 by 10 feet, valuation $2, and 240 acres situated “D adj. Jn’o Reed,” valuation $741.  It is difficult to say whether this property was in the Trough Creek Valley or near the Raystown Branch as a John Reed was recorded in the 1790 census in what appears to be the Trough Creek Valley and the map of original warrants on the Raystown Branch shows some land of John Reed near the land originally warranted to William Dean.  For that reason I have included this information both here and in Chapter 6.

            In the discussion of pioneer settlers of Juniata Township, Reference 2 says: “In the same locality (as David and Samuel Reed who settled on the ridge), on the present Lisinger farm, lived William Dean, the father of James and Thomas Dean.  Another William Dean was an early settler on the ridge. His house was destroyed by fire while occupied by two of his daughters.  One was burned to death, and the other sustained severe injuries.” [p. 303]  This is not very helpful information, and it but seems to be the only information on the William Dean of this chapter contained anywhere in Reference 2.

No William Dean was recorded in the 1800 census in all of Huntingdon County and only one head of house­hold named Dean, a John Dean (0/1/4/1/1-0/0/1/0/1-0/0)†, was recorded in Hopewell Township.  I am pretty sure this John Dean was the one described in Chapter 6.

            No William Dean or W. Dean was recorded in the 1810 census of Huntingdon County, but one William Dean was recorded in Miflin County.  (need to get age distribution)  The J. Dean (0/0/0/1/1-0/1/1/0/1)†, recorded in Hopewell Township appears to be the John Dean described in Chapter 6.

       In 1833 there was a master carpenter by the name of William P. Dean in (now*) Cass Township. [ref. 2, p. 244]

 

* Note: The two tracts of land originally warranted to William Dean were on the west side of the Raystown Branch of the Juniata River about a mile south of the present Penn–Juniata Township boundary.  Before 1771 this area was in Cumberland County.  In 1771 Bedford County was made from the part of Cumberland County and this area was in Hopewell Township, Bedford County.  In 1787 Huntingdon County was made from part of Bedford County and the area was in Hopewell Township, Huntingdon County.  In 1846 Penn Township was formed from the northern part of Hopewell Township, and this area was then and is now in Penn Township, Huntingdon County.

 

† Note: See note at end of References for the meaning of these census numbers.

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Chapter 8. William and Martha (McNutt)  Dean of Peters Township, Franklin County

(killed in Revolutionary War, widow removed to Westmoreland Co., then to Indiana Co.)

 

            The Rev. John Stoever married William Dean and Martha McNutt by license at Hanover, Dauphin Co., PA, on June 16, 1763. [ref. 10, p. 205]  He was a Pvt. under Lieut. John Barr, January 1778.  He was killed on May 1, 1778 at the battle of Crooked Billet as a soldier under Capt. Robert McCoy.  According to Deed book #5, p. 16, Martha Dean and her children, Joseph, John, Jean, Elizabeth and Mary then of Armstrong Twp., Westmoreland Co., PA sold 100 acres of land in Peters Township., Franklin Co. to Richard Bard on October 29, 1795.  This land had previously been conveyed to William Dean by John McMath. [ref. 11, p. 73]

In her application for pension, his widow stated that she was the relict of Wm. Dean, late of Peters Twp., in Franklin County, that her husband was lately killed by the enemy, and that she was left with five orphan children. [ref. 11, p. 73]  The following was approved January 20, 1791: Of Martha Dean, Widow of William Dean, deceased, late of the Militia of the County of Franklin, for a pension amounting to fifty pounds, six shillings and three pence. [ref. 9, p. 3]  She appeared in Indiana County Orphans’ Court asking for continuation of her pension in 1809, 1810, 1812, 1813, 1815 and 1816. [ref. 12, vol. 1, p. 4, 98]

            In the first United States Census taken in 1790 a Marthow Dean (2/0-4)† was enumerated in Armstrong Township, Westmoreland County.  This was probably the Martha Dean described above.

            There was only one head of household surnamed Dean in the 1800 census in Westmoreland County, a Dennis Dean (0/0/0/1/0-0/0/0/1/0-0/0)† in SL (Salem?) Township.

            There were no heads of household surnamed Dean in Westmoreland County in the 1810 census, but there was a “Matha” Dean enumerated in Center Township, Indiana County in that census.  I don’t have the age distribution for this household.

            The will of John Dean of Centre Twp., Indiana County, PA was made on 25 Aug 1806 and filed for probate in 22 Sep 1806.  It leaves half of his estate to his wife, Martha, and the other half to his mother, his sisters Jane Dean, Eliz. Ross and Mary Dean and his nephew, William Dean who was under age 21.  Executors James Loughry and John Ross.  Land to be sold adj. Alex’r Ray on the waters of Altman’s Run. [Westmoreland Co. Will Book #1, p. 217]

            Two items from Genealogical Abstracts of the Laws of Pennsylvania for which I did not get dates: 1) John Dean and Mary Dean were appointed administrators of the estate of Joseph Dean, dec’d, who died intestate; & James McComb was appointed guardian of William Dean, minor child of Joseph Dean; all of Armstrong Twp., Indiana Co. [p. 128]; and 2) John Ross of Indiana Co., to sell land adj. to Alexander Ross in Centre Twp., Indiana Co., for the minor child of John Ross, John Dean Ross, who holds lands with James & Jane Sample & William & Mary Wilkins, heirs of William Dean, dec’d. [p. 243]

Descendants of William Dean

       1  William Dean d: 1 May 1778 in battle of Crooked Billet, PA

           +m: 16 Jun 1763   Martha McNutt  “of” Hanover, Dauphin Co., PA  d. Aft. 1816

     2  Joseph Dean  b. between 1763 and 1778  d. Bef. 1806

            3  William Dean  b. Bef. 1806

     2  John Dean  b. between 1763 and 1778  d. Sep 1806 in Centre Twp., Indiana Co., PA

        +m: Bef. 1806  Martha ???

     2  Jean/Jane Dean  b. between 1763 and 1778

        +m: Aft. 1806  James Sample

     2  Elizabeth Dean  b. between 1763 and 1778

        +m: Bef. 1806  John Ross

             3  John Dean Ross

     2  Mary Dean     b. between 1763 and 1778

        +m: Aft 1806  William Wilkins

 

† Note: See note at end of References for the meaning of these census numbers.

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Chapter 9. Samuel and Martha (Camp) Dean of Cumberland County

                                    (Revolutionary War soldier, removed to Fayette County)

 

            I became interested in this Dean family because a good water transportation route existed in those days via the Juniata River between what was at that time Cumberland County and the place on the Juniata River in Shirley Township where Henry Hoshel was known to own property in 1814.  Before Miflin County was made in 1789, Huntingdon and Cumberland Counties adjoined.

            There is quite a lot of information about this Samuel Dean because he was a soldier in the Revolutionary War and applied for a pension.

            According to an entry in the DAR Lineage Books, Samuel Dean (1760-1856) served several enlistments as private, 1779-83. under different commands, Pennsylvania troops.  He was born in Cumberland County; died in Fayette County, Pa.  One of his children was Levi Dean (1814-87) who married in 1833 Rachel Wright (1815-93).  They had a son named Hezekiah Dean, born 1806 (sic-1836/46).  Hezekiah’s daughter, Miss Maud Leslie Dean, was DAR member #107940. [ref. 13, vol. 108, p. 303]

            According to the 1995 Year Book of the Pennsylvania Society of the SAR, Samuel’s father was Samuel Dean, a Captain in Hart’s  Pennsylvania Flying Camp, who died in 1782.  According to this source, Samuel was a private in Miles’ Pennsylvania Rifle Regiment.  He was born 25 Dec 1760, died 1856, and married Martha Camp in 1790.  One of their children was Edward Dean, born 1 Mar 1811, died 8 Mar 1884, married in May 1830 Mary Ann Crawford who was born 19 Mar 1812 and died 13 Aug 1833.  Edward and Mary Ann had a daughter named Margaret Dean, born 7 Mar 1835.  Another of Samuel and Martha’s children was Thomas Dean, born 1810, died 1894, married in 1831 Jane Wright who was born 1814 and died 1864.  Thomas and Margaret had a daughter named Mary Ellen Dean, born 25 Apr 1858. [ref. 14,p. 372]

Abstracts of Revolutionary War Pension Files has this entry: “Dean, Samuel, R2806, PA Line, Appl 11 Sep 1845 Fayette Cty PA a  res of Wharton Twnshp PA, sol was b 25 Dec 1760 in Bedford Cty & lived there at enl, sol also srv as a sub for his father (not named) & also srv as a sub for his bro Thomas who had a family, sol’s father had srv up to 1778 & d of smallpox about the close of the Rev War, in 1845 sol was referred to as Samuel Dean, Sr., sol’s bro John Dean was killed at Gen’l Harmar’s defeat in 1790.” [ref. 15, p. 928]

            In the first United States Census taken in 1790 a Samuel Dean (2/0-2)† was enumerated in “the Eastern Portion” of Cumberland County.

            Two heads of households surnamed Dean were recorded in the 1800 census of Cumberland County: Samuel Dean in TR (Tyrone?) Township (2/0/0/0/1-1/0/0/0/2-0/0)† and Samuel Dean in DK (Dickinson?) Township (4/1/0/0/1-2/1/0/0/1-0/0)†.

No persons surnamed Dean appeared in the 1810 census of Cumberland County.  A Samuel Dean was recorded in Wharton Township, Fayette County.  (I did not get the age distribution of this family)

References 13 and 15 differ on whether he was born (in 1760) in Bedford or Cumberland County.  Actually, Bedford County did not exist until it was made from the western part of Cumberland County in 1771.  Reference 13 says he enlisted in Bedford County (in 1779).  This seems questionable since Reference 13 has the county of his birth wrong.  He was in Cumberland County in 1790 and 1800.  By 1810 he was in Fayette County where he applied for his pension in 1845.

            In an 11 Nov 1988 e-mail to me, Beverly Dean Peoples (bpeoples@mindspring.com) said she and others have questioned whether the Samuel Dean of Cumberland County might be the same person as the subject of the book titled “Country Cousins, Descendants of Samuel Dean.”  (See Chapter 6 for more information about this book.)  She said the authors of that book thoroughly researched the Samuel Dean of Cumberland County in order to answer that question, and they are sure these were two different persons.  However Beverly Peoples suggested that the Samuel Dean of Cumberland County might be the same as the brother of John Dean who made a claim to land in the Trough Creek Valley, sold it after Indian troubles and did not return.  (See Chapter 6.)  I do not believe that could be the case since the Samuel Dean of Trough Creek Valley made his claim to land in 1773 [ref. 2, p. 373] and the Samuel Dean of Cumberland County would have been only 13 years of age at that time.

        The following is an outline of the descendants of the Samuel Dean who died in 1782.

1  Samuel Dean  d: 1782     (a Captain in Hart’s  Pennsylvania Flying Camp)

     2  Samuel Dean  b: 25 Dec 1760 in Cumberland Co., PA  d: 1856 in Fayette Co., PA

                             (a Private in Miles’ Pennsylvania Rifle Regiment)

        +m: 1790  Martha Camp  b: 1774  d: 1854

          3  Samuel Dean  (shown here on basis of his father being known as Samuel Dean, Sr.)

          3  Thomas Dean  b: 1810  d: 1894

                             +m: 1831       Jane Wright       b: 1814 d: 1864

                                     4  Mary Ellen Dean  b: 25 Apr 1858  d: 11 Jun 1899

                         +m: 23 Dec 1874  Charles Henry Rankin  b: 8 Jul 1853  d: 24 Aug 1887

                          3  Edward Dean  b: 1 Mar 1811  d: 8 Mar 1884

                    +m: May 1830  Mary Ann Crawford  b: 19 Mar 1812  d: 13 Aug 1883

                4  Margaret Dean  b: 7 Mar 1835  d: 9 Feb 1910

                                         +m: Aug 1854  Abraham Thomas  b: 17 Jun 1821  d: 5 Apr 1899

            3  Levi Dean  b: 1814  d: 1887

                               +m: 1833  Rachel Wright  b: 1815  d: 1893

                 4  Hezekiah Dean  b: 1836

                            +m: 1868  Frances Jacobs  b: 1848  d: 1874

       2  Thomas Dean

              2  John Dean         (killed at Gen. Harmar’s defeat in 1790)

 

† Note: See note at end of References for the meaning of these census numbers.

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Chapter 10. Robert Dean of Allegany County, Maryland

                                    (Revolutionary War pensioner)

 

            Because of the gravestone inscription which says George W. Dean was born in Allaghany County, Pennsylvania and my inability to find him there, I considered the possibility that he was born in Allegany County Maryland.  Allegany County, Maryland, is directly adjacent to Bedford County, Pennsylvania.

            Unfortunately, the 1790 census for Allegany County, Maryland has been destroyed.  (Need to look at 1800 and 1810 censuses.)  There was a Joseph Dean in the 1820 census of Allegany County Maryland.  (Need to check p. 20 of this census.)

There was a Robert Dean who applied for a Revolutionary War pension in Allegany County, Maryland in 1818.  Abstracts of Revolutionary War Pension Files contains the following entry: “DEAN, Robert, S34742, MD Line, appl 20 Apr 1818 Allegany Cty MD aged 53, sol enl at Baltimore MD, in 1820 sol had a wife aged 40 & children; sons aged 11, 7 & 2 yrs & daughters aged 9 & 4 yrs.” [ref. 15, p. 928]

The book Maryland Pension Roll of 1835 gives a little more information about him.  He was a Private in the Maryland Line.  His pension started in April 1819 when he was, according to this source, 60 years of age.  He died July 12, 1823.

---------------------------------------

 

 

 

References

1.  The Family and Descendants of Henry Hoshal, 1650-1980, by Glenn Kilmer, privately published 1980 at Brantford, Ontario

2.  History of Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania Volume I, by J. Simpson Africa, published by Louis H. Everts 1883 at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

3.  History of Blair County, Pennsylvania Volume II, by J. Simpson Africa, published by Louis H. Everts 1883 at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

4.  History of the Early Settlement of the Juniata Valley by U. J. Jones, published by Floyd G. Hoenstine, Holidaysburg, Pennsylvania

5.  A History of Blair County by Tarring S. Davis, published 1931

6.  Military Services and Genealogical Records of Soldiers of Blair County, Pennsylvania by Floyd G. Hoenstine, published 1940

7.  History of Huntingdon County in the state of Pennsylvania : from the earliest times to the centennial anniversary of American independence, July 4, 1876 by Milton Scott Lytle

8.  The Pennsylvania Archives Third Series, Vol. 22

9.  The Pennsylvania Archives Sixth Series, Vol. 4

10 York County, Pennsylvania Church Records of the 18th Century compiled and edited by Marlene Strawser Bates and F. Edward Wright, pub. Family Line Publications, Westminster, Maryland.

11. American Revolutionary Soldiers of Franklin county, Pennsylvania compiled by Virginia Shannon Fendrick, published 1969 by the Historical Works Committee of the Franklin County Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution.

12. Your Family Tree, a periodical, published by the Historical Society of Indiana County, Pennsylvania

13. National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution, Lineage Books

14. The 1995 Year Book, Pennsylvania Society of the Sons of the American Revolution

15. Genealogical Abstracts of Revolutionary War Pension Files by Virgil D. White, pub 1990, National Historical Publishing Company

16. Abstracts of South Central Pennsylvania Newspapers 1796-1800, including information from the Pennsylvania Herald and York General Advertiser

17. The History and Genealogy of Bedford County

18. Bedford County Archives, vol. III

 

† The numbers in parentheses following the names of heads of household in the censuses are as follows: for the 1790 census: (free white males 16 years of age and upward / free white males under the age of 16 – all free white females – other free persons / slaves); for the 1800 and 1810 censuses: (free white males under the age of 10 / age 10 to 15 / 16 to 25 / 26 to 44 / 45 and upwards – same five columns for free white females – other free persons / slaves). “na” indicates missing data or data not available in the record from which I obtained my information.

 

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Use the links below to go to other Dean genealogy material

go to Dean Surname Genealogy home page

go to The Family of George W. Dean (1786-1856)

go to William Dean of KY (about 1735-1825)

go to John and Ann Dean of Huntingdon Co., PA

go to Y-DNA Results

contact me, Larry Dean:  ladean23  AT  gmail  DOT  com

last revised 20 October 2010