family of fredrick washington

FAMILY OF FREDRICK WASHINGTON (WASH) WILLIAMS AND MAHALEY HAMMAR

(Podium at Salem Irene Cemetery built by Wash Williams)

FREDRICK WASHINGTON (WASH) WILLIAMS was born July 21, 1821 in Tennessee, and died November 30, 1893 in Navarro County, Texas.  He is buried at the Salem Irene Cemetery Irene, Hill County,  Texas.  He married (1) MAHALEY HAMMER November 18, 1841 in Jasper County, Missouri, daughter of JACOB HAMMAR and MARY ONSTOTT.  She was born about 1817 in Indiana, and died before 1852 in Navarro County, Texas.  He married (2) FRANCES E. (FANNIE) ESTES November 21, 1852 in Navarro County, Texas-at the home of George Estes; by Pleasant Yell, M.G., daughter of HIRAM ESTES and LUCY RICHARDSON.  She was born February 13, 1821 in Boueff, Franklin County, Missouri, and died October 05, 1903 in Colorado City, Mitchell County, Texas.  She buried in the Salem Irene Cemetery, Irene, Hill County Texas.

Notes for FREDRICK WASHINGTON (WASH) WILLIAMS:

INFORMATION TAKEN FROM OLD NORTHWEST TEXAS, HISTORICAL-STATISTICAL-BIOGRAPHICAL, NAVARRO COUNTY TEXAS 1846-1860 COMPILED BY NANCY SAMUELS AND BARBARA KNOX, PUBLISHED BY THE FORT WORTH GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY. FOR REFERENCES TO MATERIALS IN WHICH DATA WAS GLEANED FROM, GO TO THOMAS AND NANCY WILLIAMS.

"Born around 1821 in Tennessee; appears on Barksdale's 1845 Peters Colony Roster as arriving prior to July 1, 1845. Connor (who interpreted the name only as Frederick Williams) states that Williams received a 640 acre certificate which he sold, the land later being patented in Ellis County. We find one 320 acre Frederick Williams survey in Ellis County, but are not sure to which Frederick it relates. A biography of one of his sons states that F.W. Williams was born in 1819 in North Carolina and lived for many years in Pike County, Missouri, where he married Fannie Estes and came to Texas in 1845 'locating a head right of 640 acres on the Trinity River...neighbors were Graham, Howard, Robinson and Wleton (Melton) families...was the father of eight children.

Fred W. Williams married his first wife in Missouri around 1840 Mahaley (probably George, see p. 432), who died in Navarro County, Texas prior to 1852 leaving 5 or 6 children. Williams married his second wife in Navarro County, Texas November 21, 1852, Mrs. Frances "Fannie" Lee, widow of Lilburn K. Lee, daughter of Hiram Estes (see p. 420). In the F.W.Williams household in 1860, Hiram and Lucy (enumerated as Williams) were Fannie's Lee children, not Williams (see p. 495).  Known children of Frederick Williams:

 John David Williams Mary E. Williams,  Nancy Eveline Williams,  Thomas Jacob Williams,  Sarah F. Williams,  George W. Williams,  William L. Williams,  Ora V. Williams,  James M. Williams"

FROM A HISTORY OF HILL COUNTY, TEXAS, PUBLISHED BY THE HILL COUNTY HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION.

"Large elm tree thickets were numerous south of Irene. Many pieces of furniture built from the wood of those thickets are now in the homes of people in Irene. These pieces of furniture were built by Wash Williams.

Wash also served as a private in the Civil War, joining the 28th Brigade, Texas Militia under Captain J.W.P. Doyle, organized August 17, 1861."

Fredrick Washington (Wash) Williams is buried in the Salem Irene Cemetery, Irene, Hill County, Texas along with his second wife, Frances Estes Lee Williams and daughter Nancy Eveline Williams Reed as well as Nancy's husband, Frances Marion Reed and many other family members from the Merrells, Reeds and Lees.

Much of the information on the Thomas and Nancy Dill Williams lineage and also the James and Nancy Latham George lineage was given to me by Richard Williams of Albuquerque, New Mexico and Charles Adair of Waco, Texas.

FROM THE CONFEDERATE GUNS OF NAVARRO COUNTY BY JOHN W. SPENCER, 1986, THE TEXAS PRESS, CORSICANA, TEXAS

"CHAPTER IV - DRESDEN'S TEXAS CAVALRY COMPANY, COMPANY I, 19TH TEXAS CAVALRY REGIMENT

Company I of the 19th Texas Cavalry Regiment enlisted at Dresden, Texas, on April 2, 1982, with Samuel Wright as Captain, Robert A. Younger as first lieutenant, and four second lieutenants: Nicholas T. Sneed, Robert J. Wright, Robert D. Bills, and T.M. Williams. Captain Wright resigned in March 1863, and was succeeded by Nicholas Sneed as captain. Lieutenant Robert Younger also resigned in 1863.

This company of Navarro County horsemen served with one of Texas's most famous cavalry organizations-Parson's Texas Cavalry Brigade. It was composed of the 19th Texas Cavalry, the 12th Texas Cavalry, the 21st Texas Cavalry, and Morgan's Texas Cavalry Battalion. Morgan's outfit included Captain B.D. McKie's company of cavalrymen from Navarro County.

The service of Parson's Texas Cavalry Brigade consisted mainly in scouting, advanced picket duty for the army behind it, and in being the eyes of the Trans-Mississippi Department. The regiments and companies of the brigade were sometimes stretched out as much as one hundred miles, where they further divided into squads of two to five men.

Commander of the 19th Texas was Colonel Nathaniel M. Burford, who had come to Texas in 1846. Burford had been in a law partnership in Dallas with John H. Reagan, served as district attorney of Dallas County, and was appointed district judge in 1856. The brigade fought in 48 distinct engagements, mostly independent and unsupported, never sustaining a defeat, except with the ironclads on the Red River, and in the last battle of the Red River Campaign, the Battle of Yellow Bayou in Louisiana. The brigade operated from Cape Girardeau in southeast Missouri southward to the mouth of the Red River. One of the highlights of the brigade was the capture of the entire First Wisconsin Cavalry Battalion of about 600 men.

FORMATION OF COMPANY I

The Navarro County men enlisted in Company I of the 19th Texas Cavalry in April 1862. By June 20, the graybacks were on the march to Dallas where they began regimental drill at Camp Stonewall Jackson. From Dallas, they went to Plano, and left that area on July 13, 1862 towards Paris, camping on Pine Creek near that city. Remaining in that area until about the first part of August, they then marched to the Red River. Later, they went on to a point a few miles northeast of Clarkesville, Texas, where they camped until August 27, 1862.

DRESDEN'S TEXAS CAVALRY COMPANY - COMPANY I, 19TH TEXAS CAVALRY REGIMENT

Williams, F.W., age 43. He enlisted January 5, 1864 at Spring Hill. He was 5'7" tall, had a fair complexion, hazel eyes and gray hair. He was a wheelwright. He was discharged on September 5, 1864.

Notes for MAHALEY HAMMAR:

According to Williams family researcher, Richard Williams of Albuquerque, New Mexico, Mahaley was not a member of the George family, but her surname instead was Hammer, daughter of Jacob Hammer.

In looking into early Missouri Territorial land records, there was a Jacob Hammer who received land in early 1817-1819 St. Charles area, Missouri.  There is also a Jacob Hammar that is found in Jasper County, Missouri records who died about 1855.

Old family members would call her Mother Hammers.  There is a stone at the Salem Irene Cemetery with her name on it, however, as the cemetery was not in existence at the time of her death, it is likely a memorial stone rather than her actual place of burial.

CHILDREN OF FREDRICK WASHINGTON (WASH) WILLIAMS AND MAHALEY HAMMAR

 

CHILDREN OF FREDRICK WASHINGTON (WASH) WILLIAMS AND FRANCES E. (FANNY) ESTES

 

 

      

 

L.L. Kight 2002