91st PA: Andrew Brown

Andrew Brown

Before the war

He was born on 13 February 1843, in Tyrone, Ireland, to Andrew Brown and Susan McAnna. His parents were married on 24 June 1825, in the Parish of Cappagh [?], County Tyrone, Ireland. [sources: date: 17; 9 (21 in 1861), 37 (18 in 1860). place: 9, 37. parents: 17, 37]

On 11 September 1843, his mother, Susan Brown, died, in County Tyrone, Ireland. [source: 17]

In 1854, his family (including him) emigrated to the United States (with others, including Mary and Thomas Todd). [source: 17]

From about 1859 until he enlisted, he was an apprentice morocco finisher, and earned $5 per week, which he gave to his sister Eliza for household expenses. [source: 17]

In 1860, he was living in ward 11, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was living with his father Andrew, and with Mary, Elizabeth, and Charles (presumably siblings). He was a morocco dyer. [source: 37]

Description

When he enlisted, he was 5 feet 10-1/2 inches tall, and had a fair complexion, blue eyes, and brown hair. He had a scar on the side of his left eye. [source: 9]

During the war

He enlisted and was mustered into service on 27 August 1861. He was enlisted for three years, at Philadelphia, by Colonel Reiff. He was a private, in company C. [sources: 1, 9, 10 (Lt Col Reiff), 16, 17 (mustered in 25 September)]

On 29 March 1862, he wrote a letter to his father and sister, from Washington DC. He complained he had received only two letters from them since arriving, although he had sent a letter every week. They all had new light blue pants, and were going to get new Belgian rifles. They were guarding the railroad station, the prison (presumably the Old Capital Prison), the Long Bridge, and Chain Bridge, and the Barracks. He mentions that he didn't need cough drops, since he wasn't coughing, and that butter, bread, cheese, and sausage were 'the right thing to send', but since he was expecting to be paid soon, they shouldn't send any more now. (Perhaps that's a list of what they sent him in William McNally's box, for which he thanks them.) He mentions seeing several people from different regiments, one of whom was astonished at how nice Brown's place was: 'we have no less than five door mats for each house'. He mentions that William Mcanally (C), James McCollough (C), and John Harvey (C) are all well, and send their respects to their folks, and sends his own respects to a long list of people. [source: 18]

On 14 April 1862, he wrote a letter to his father and sister, from Washington DC. They were camped at Carroll Hill (owned by a granddaughter of Charles Carroll, who was one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence). The paymaster had paid them for four months. Company C was on guard at the prison (presumably the Old Capital Prison), but was paid when they returned for supplies. He had sent them $45 by Adams Express, which cost him 25 cents. [source: 23]

On 17 April 1862, he wrote a letter to his father and sister, from Carroll Hill Barracks, Washington, DC. He told them that he had sent them $45 by Adams Express, and asked them to let him know if they hadn't received it. They had guard duty every fourth day, and had a pass to visit Washington DC on other days. He and John Harvey had visited several other men, and visited some forts along the way. He ends by giving respects to various people, as usual. [source: 19]

On 5 May 1862, he wrote a letter to his father and sister, from Alexandria. He had received a box with food, including eggs that 'were a little out of shape', and a cake that 'was Excellent Especially to me that Knowed [sic] who made it. They had moved to new quarters; he was in 'a splendid house' that had 'Eleven Rooms'. He was fishing daily with the fishing line they sent. He also warned them about an ongoing scam:

if any Body should stop in and tell you that the [sic] are coming down here and ask you to send anything to me dont [sic] do it[.] there is a fellow now in Philadelphia that used to Be our quarter masters sargent[.] he has been to two or three of the mens [sic] houses and got ten dollars from one Eight from another and got apples cakes tobacco segars and several other things from different People[.] he also went to the family of one of the men that died down here and asked them to give him some money to pay the Expenses of fetching him to Philadelphia[.] the [sic] gave him some and that was the last the [sic] seen [sic] of him[.]

And he ends with the usual long list of people to whom he sent his respects. [source: 24]

On 16 June 1862, he wrote a letter to his father and sister, from Alexandria, Virginia. He had received stamps and 'the paper you sent with Col Wallace'. He apparently had sent a 'likeness' of himself with William Sheifer (C). He noted that the day before some women from Alexandria started bringing Confederate prisoners 'fries cakes coffee and everything else the[y] wanted'. When they 'began to get sassy and talk for Jeff Davis', the regiment arrested two, but let them go when they promised not to do it again. Colonel Gregory also took possession of an Episcopal Church, during a service, since they had refused to pray for the president. Company C's flag was 'wav[ing] out of the Second Story'; it was destined to be used as a hospital. (See 'A day in Alexandria' for a similar event involving a Baptist church.) He asked for 'two cakes of silver soap ... for cleaning Brass', which would cost 6-10 cents per cake. He suggested sending it with Sheifer, whom they could see at the '[United] States hose house'. He gave his respects to many people, as usual. [source: 28]

On 4 August 1862, he wrote a letter to his father and sister, from Alexandria, Virginia. He expresses pleasure that one of them is recovering from a severe illness, and that Tommy is in the hospital at Newport News. They had guard duty once every three days, and had batallion drill every afternoon, boasting that 'we are now one of the best drilled regiments in the service'. He claims General Wadsworth (who was commanding the military defences of Washington) was so pleased with them they wouldn't be leaving quickly (which proved false!). Apparently, his father or sister had teased him about getting photographs; he replied he was getting them for his lovers! A visitor, Mrs Delavue, hadn't brought shirts to him; he noted they could send them by express for about twentyfive cents. He closed by giving his respects to various people by name. [source: 21]

On 26 August 1862, he wrote a letter to his father and sister, from Camp near Cloud Mills, Virginia. He reports that they arrived last Friday (22 August 1862), and were camped 'on the side of a hill along with the rest of the division'. They were expecting to leave for Warrenton that afternoon; the company goods were being moved to the railroad to be shipped. He sent a box by Adams Express with everything he couldn't carry, including old clothes. And he closes as usual by giving his respects to a long list of people. [source: 29]

On 30 January 1863, he wrote a letter to his father and sister, from camp near Falmouth, Virginia. The paymaster had paid them for four months. $45 was waiting for them at the home of C F Diehl at 624 North 16th Street (above Wallace, betweeen Coates and Green Streets). Presumably Brown sent it with James B Diehl (C F Diehl's son), who was 1st lieutenant of company D but was absent, serving as aide-de-camp to Brigadier General Erastus B Tyler. (He helpfully notes that 'Diehl' was pronounced 'deal'.) And he closes by sending his respects to everyone who asked about him (but not, this time, to a long list of named people). [source: 25]

On 9 February 1863, he wrote a letter to his father and sister, from Camp near Falmouth Virginia. He noted that Harnden's Express had resumed accepting goods for the Army of the Potomac, and asked that they send a pen knife and small carpenter's hatchet in the box they were planning to send. (They could send 'the certificate of the box' with their next letter.) Otherwise, since he was sending the letter with Ambrose Baker (who was going home on a ten-day furlough that began on 10 February 1863), they should send them with Baker. They had changed camps, and were now about one-and-one-half miles from their old camp. Finally, he mentioned many people to whom he gave his respects. [source: 22]

On 14 February 1863, he wrote a letter to his father and sister, from Camp near Falmouth, Virginia. He said the food wasn't as bad as they thought, with fresh bread four times a week, onions and potatoes twice a week, and good coffee--even better than the coffee at home. He did admit that they hadn't had tea since leaving Warrenton. The weather had been mild, with several snows that didn't last long. Their quarters were very comfortable and warm--he had 'a fine log house built with a large fireplace in it'. He reported a rumor that Colonel Gregory was going to be reappointed military governor of Alexandria. And he suggested that his father should save money, and buy a horse and cart, and work with Thomas; that would let him be his own boss. (The fact that he says, 'tell my father' etc., suggests that the letter was read by his sister; perhaps his father couldn't read.) He offered to send $50 to help. He reported that everyone was well, and gave his love to various people. [source: 20]

He may have been declared a deserter on 27 February 1863. [source: 2]

On 3 March 1863, he wrote a letter to his father and sister, from camp near Falmouth, Virginia. He had received the box they sent, and the things they sent with Baker. Everything was in good shape except for the loaf of bread, which was a little moldy; the cake was very good; the needle case, stockings, sausages, and writing paper were good, but he 'was particularly pleased to again make the acquaintance of the black pitcher'. The boots were good but too large for marching (since 'when too big the[y] slip up and down and take the skin off'--but when he inserted insoles from an old pair of shoes they fit perfectly. They had just had an inspection, and been mustered for pay. Everyone was doing well; Jim McCullough wanted them to tell his wife where to buy the boots so she could get boots for him. He closed, as usual, by giving his respects to many people. [source: 35]

On 3 April 1863, he wrote a letter to his father and sister, from camp near Falmouth, Virginia. Their division had had a grand review on the 2nd by generals Meade and Humphrey, and the army was going to have a grand muster on the 10th to find out how many drafted men were needed to bring each regiment up to 1000 men. Sergeant W H Myers (C) had been discharged. He had been sick since the Battle of Fredericksburg; the regiment was on picket, but he was left behind on guard. They probably were not going to be sent back to Alexandria. They were going to have target practice twice a week and drill four hours a day. Bill McNally wanted his mother to send him two half bent sewing awls; McNally, Jim McCullough, John Harvey, and the rest were all doing well and sent their respects to 'all the folks'. He also mentioned many personal notes, along with saying that Bill mcNally and Jim McCullough sent their respects. [source: 36]

On 3 May 1863, he was wounded in action, at Chancellorsville, Virginia. On 7 May 1863, he was reported missing in action. On 17 May 1863, he was reported to be in the Corps Hospital as a paroled prisoner. [sources: 3, 4, 13 (wounded and missing), 17]

On 31 May 1863, he wrote a letter to his father, from the 5th Corps Hospital, near Acquia Creek. He reported that they had 'very poor attendance and very little to eat except what we have to buy'--only 'pork potatoes and sour bread'. His wound was healing 'and with proper care would soon get well'. He thought that someone from the Sanitary Committee [sic; presumably Commission], who had visited him, was going to arrange for him to go home, but it hadn't happened yet. The regiment had been paid yesterday, but he didn't have any way of sending his money home. The regiment was doing guard duty on the railroad, from Potomac Creek bridge to Stoneman's Switch--he said that 'all the boys hope to be kept at the same kind of duty until next August'. He did have regular visitors, including McNally, McCullough, and all the boys. And despite complaining about the 'poor attendance', and wanting to get away for 'better medical attendance', he also told his father not to come, 'for you could do me no good for I am not so bad but I am able to attend to myself'. Perhaps he really just wanted to spare his father the experience. [source: 27]

On the May-June 1863 muster roll, he was reported a paroled prisoner, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. [source: 17]

On 6 October 1863, he may have been reported regained from desertion. [source: 5]

On 5 March 1864, he wrote a letter to his father and sister, from camp at Warrington [sic; sc. Warrenton], Virginia. He said that he had been very ill but was hoping to be better in a few days. He had done only one day's duty since arriving. He was anticipating the 91st's arrival, but not eagerly:

Bin [sic] reported here that the Regt had left for here and we have bin [sic] expectin [sic] it down every Day but I don't [sic] cair [sic] if they never come for I am just as well of [sic] in the Regt that I am in as would be in the 91st

He had received paper, pencil, and thread, and was comfortable, with log huts, and a double blanket he received at Convalescent Camp, but asked that they send stamps and money. [source: 30]

On 31 March 1864, he wrote a letter to his father and sister. He initially asked them to sent a razor, putting two papers around it and three stamps, 'for they may find it out', but at the end he reported getting the razor, pens, and holder, although the pens weren't heavy and stiff enough. If they had money to spare, he asked that they send him some. They had apparently asked him some question about his rank:

you wanted to know if I was corporal yet[.] I dont [sic] know what made you think I wasnt [sic] for I think I deserved it more lately than ever[.]

Perhaps he had recently been promoted; in any event, he added later:

you might send me down my stripes in a paper as they may make me draw ones in place of them[.]

He had had nearly two dozen eggs on Easter Sunday. He reported that 'all the boys here are well', including Jim McCullough, Bill McNally, and John Harvey. And he gave his respects to many people, as usual. [source: 31]

On 18 April 1864, he wrote a letter to his father and sister, from Warrenton Junction, Virginia. He had received his stripes. He was obviously in a bad mood. Apparently, they were unhappy with his request for money:

you say I might not have been so short about the money. its [sic] not verry [sic] often I ask for money. but when I do ask for it. I want it especially when its [sic] my own[.] every time I get my clothes washed it costs me 30 cents. paper. envelopes. ink. and stamps. about 1 dollar a month and I suppose you know it cost [sic] me some thing for victuals when I was sick. and as I dont [sic] intend to starrve [sic] yet awhile it costs me some thing yet. And you know as well as I do how far two dollars would go.

He also complains that they might as well not write at all, if they're going to avoid giving him news because Jane Moran sent him the news. And he asks them to tell James Nugent 'what his lieing [sic] father said about' him', '[a]nd what I think of him'. The sutlers and extra baggage had been sent to the rear. (Presumably they were preparing for the forthcoming campaign; the 91st actually broke camp on 30 April 1864.) He closes by sending his respects to many people, as usual, and closes as usual, by saying that he is their 'affectionate son and Brother'. And adds that 'Fleming [?] McCullough McNally + Harvey are well and send their respects to their folks'. [source: 32]

On the March-April 1864 muster roll, he was reported present. [source: 17]

He was promoted to corporal, probably after March 1864. [source: 7]

On 28 April 1864, he wrote a letter to his father and sister, from Warrenton Junction. He asked them to send him postage stamps, and 'two pairs of leather shoe laces', which they could get 'in Green st opposite the alley'. He insisted he wasn't angry about the money (see his letter of 18 April 1864). He saw no sign they would be leaving soon. And he mentioned many people, as usual, including men who were well and wished to be remembered 'to all their folks', in particular James McCullough (C), and Bill McNally (C), and John Harvey (C) Andy Fleming (E) also had visited; he had received his father's letter, and was doing well. [source: 26]

On 7 June 1864, he wrote a letter to his father and sister, from Coal [sic] Harbor, Virginia. He complained that he had sent five or six letters and received only one. He asked them to send money, writing paper, envelopes, stamps, needles, and thread--'the sooner you send paper the sooner you will get letters'. The regiment was on part of the Gaines' farm, only two miles from Gaines' house, 'where Tommy was taken prisoner before he died'. They were resting, for the first day since the campaign began, in the rear of the Second Corps, but out of shell range. He describes their last movement in this way:

we had quite a time of it getting away from our last position[.] the rebels kept up a heavy skirmishing all the time to see if we were still there[.] just before we left they made an attack on the left, which extended along the whole line in front of us[.] their picket made an advance but ours drove them back[.] as soon as all was quiet we started off. it took us all night to go five miles and arrived [sic] here yesterday morning after daylight[.] we are getting reorganized and getting new clothes[.]

(Lentz described the movement in this way: 'a slow and tedious march; skirmishing with the enemy, forcing him at each conflict to retire'.) He noted they had been transferred to the first brigade (commanded by Colonel Gregory), second division (which occurred on 5 June 1864). He thought their brigade had lost more men than any other brigade; the 140th New York, for example, had been reduced from 650 men to 170; the second regulars had about 40 men; the 11th had 64 men including hospital stewards. The 91st had been the smallest regiment in the brigade; it was now the largest of the nine regiments, four of which were zouave regiments (but unfortunately he doesn't mention which). One private in the 91st had been killed, and a captain and a lieutenant wounded, none from company C. All the men were doing well, including Jim McCullough, Bill McNally, John Harvey, and Andy Fleming. [source: 33]

On 17 June 1864, he wrote a letter to his father and sister, from camp near Petersburg, Virginia. He describes the campaign in some detail:

we crossed the James river yesterday in steamboats[.] the wagons + artillery came across on a pontoon bridge[.] the river where we crossed it is nearly as wide as the delaware [sic] or about the same size as the Potomac at Alexandria[.] we got here last night at twelve oclock [sic]. the second and ninth corps were fighting here all day yesterday and the [sic] are fighting still[.] it is reported we have taken part of their works and some prisoners and guns[.] we are now back in the first Division. Griffin sent for us and the 155th[.] we are now in the 2nd Brigade, Switzers [sic]. he is a good man and is colonel of the 62nd P.V[.] .... it was verry [sic] dusty marching yesterday[.] .... one of the rebel prisoners just passed and says he belongs to Johnsons [sic] army and says we gave them a right smart licking this morning[.] .... when I write next I hope it will be from Petersburg. it is the second city in size in Virginia[.] we are laying in the rear in reserve[.]

He also noted that Bill McNally was well, but had received only two letters since the campaign started. He asked them to let Bill's wife know that he was doing well, but hadn't had enough to eat--like everyone else! And to tell him 'how the boys are getting along' in her next letter. Jim [McCullough] was doing better. And 'Andy Fleming is well and sends his respects to his father and his most perticular [sic] friend'. Brown closes by giving his respects to many people, and offering his love to them. [source: 34]

He was wounded 19 June 1864 near Petersburg, Virginia. He died on 19 June 1864 of those wounds. He was a corporal, in company C. [sources: 1, 7 (killed in action 18 Jun 64), 8 (died of wounds, 18 Jun 64), 9 (killed in action 18 Jun 64), 10 (died 19 Jun 64 of wounds), 11, 14 (wounded and missing (?)), 16 (pvt), 17 (died 20 or 22 Jun [according to Surgeon Kier] in field hospital)]

His body was buried on the field. He was buried in the National Cemetery at City Point, section E division 1 grave 64. The Record of the Federal Dead lists him as being originally buried on Prince George Road, one-half mile east of Meade Station; other soldiers from this same area were moved to Poplar Grove Cemetery, but most of them are now listed as unknown soldiers at Poplar Grove. [sources: 1, 6, 8]

After the war

On 18 June 1869, his father, Andrew Brown, applied successfully from Pennsylvania for a pension, under the Act of 14 July 1862 as amended by the Act of 6 June 1866. His post office address was 532 Brook Street, below Green Street, Philadelphia. Michael Harvey and Mary Todd (both of Philadelphia) were witnesses. The evidence showed that he once sent $25 home by Captain Parsons, sent $50 by Adams Express, and sent $15 by letter. The pension application was accepted on 20 September 1869, and he received a pension of $8 per month retroactive to 19 June 1864. [sources: 12, 15, 17]

On 15 December 1875, the Pension Bureau instructed the Pension Agent to suspend payment, apparently because his attorney, James E Devitt and Company, executed the documents improperly. [source: 17]

On 29 June 1876, he (apparently) asked the Pension Bureau about his claim. [source: 17]

On 12 September 1876, Special Agent W F Eaton investigated Brown's pension claim. Andrew Brown was living with his daughter Eliza Ferry at 1910 Darien Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Brown himself admitted that he was able to support himself when he applied for the pension, though he hadn't been able to for three years. He worked constantly, and earned $5 to $7 per week, which was the same amount other people doing similar work earned. Other people, including his former employer, James Gormly (who employed him from 1854 to 1864), testified similarly. His son Andrew did give him money, but it wasn't needed to support them, and he had saved about $800, which was gone. [source: 17]

On 14 September 1876, Brown apparently applied again for a pension. [source: 17]

On 15 September 1876, Special Agent W F Eaton submitted the evidence he had collected, and concluded that Brown's application had no merit. [source: 17]

On 29 September 1876, the Pension Bureau told the Pension Agent to drop Andrew Brown (the father) from the pension rolls, since he wasn't disabled when Andrew Brown (the soldier) died. Section 12 of the Act of 6 June 1866, which extended eligibility for pensions to fathers, required that the fathers 'were dependent upon him for support in whole or in part'. The evidence showed clearly that Brown gave his family money, but that his father was able to support himself without Brown's help. The pension certificate file does not mention prosecuting Brown for fraud. Why they didn't prosecute him isn't clear to me--perhaps the fact that he wasn't properly sworn meant that he hadn't technically committed perjury, or perhaps his being old and destitute earned him freedom from prosecution, or perhaps 'dependence' was ambiguous enough that he could have claimed he reasonably believed his son was dependent on him, since his son did give him money. [source: 17]

On 13 October 1876, the Pension Bureau told Brown that they could not tell him who the affiants were. (This suggests he didn't realize that his testimony alone would have been enough to disqualify him.) [source: 17]

Sources

1 Bates, Samuel Penniman. History of Pennsylvania volunteers, 1861-5. Harrisburg: B. Singerly, state printer, 1869-71. 5 volumes. 'Ninety-first regiment', volume 3, pages 186-233. (In the roster) (Andrew Brown)

2 consolidated morning report, 91st PA, 27 February 1863 (Private Brown; this could be Conrad Brown)

3 consolidated morning report, 91st PA, 7 May 1863 (Corpl Brown)

4 consolidated morning report, 91st PA, 17 May 1863 (Corpl Brown)

5 consolidated morning report, 91st PA, 6 October 1863 (Pri Brown; this could be Conrad Brown)

6 Poplar Grove Cemetery records (thanks to Elizabeth Dinger-Glisan for the information!) (Andrew Brown)

7 company C, List of non-commissioned officers, page 2, corporals (Andrew Brown)

8 company C, register of deaths (Andrew Brown)

9 company C, descriptive roll, number 20 (Andrew Brown)

10 company C, untitled list, probably of status at muster out, entry 81 (Andrew Brown)

11 consolidated morning report, 91st Pennsylvania, 29 June 1864 (Corpl Brown)

12 pension index, by regiment, 91st PA Infantry, company C (Andrew Brown)

13 'The ninety-first Pennsylvania volunteers', Philadelphia Press, Wednesday 13 May 1863, page 2 (Andrew Brown)

14 'The Ninety-first Pennsylvania at Chancellorville', Philadelphia Inquirer 13 May 1863, page 8 (Andrew Brown)

15 pension index, by name (accessed 4 October 2013, on Ancestry) (Andrew Brown)

16 index to compiled service records of volunteer Union soldiers who served in organizations from the state of Pennsylvania (Andrew Brown)

17 abstract of dependent's pension certificate file, WC 134972 (Andrew Brown, father of Andrew Brown)

18 letter, Andrew Brown to his father and sister, 29 March 1862, Washington DC (Andrew Brown)

19 letter, Andrew Brown to his father and sister, 17 April 1862, Carroll Hill Barracks Washington DC (Andrew Brown)

20 letter, Andrew Brown to father and sister, 14 February [1863] (Andrew Brown)

21 letter, Andrew Brown to father and sister, 4 August 1862, Alexandria Virginia (Andrew Brown)

22 letter, Andrew Brown to his father and sister, 9 February 1862 [sic; sc. 1863], Camp near Falmouth Va (Andrew Brown)

23 letter, Andrew Brown to father and sister, 14 April 1862, Washington DC (Andrew Brown)

24 letter, Andrew Brown to father and sister, 5 May 1862, Alexandria (Andrew Brown)

25 letter, Andrew Brown to his father and sister, 30 January [1863], Camp near Falmouth Virginia (Andrew Brown)

26 letter, Andrew Brown to his father and sister, 28 April [1864], Warrenton Junction (Andrew Brown)

27 letter, Andrew Brown to his father, 31 May 1863, 5th Corps Hospital, near Acquia Creek (Andrew Brown)

28 letter, Andrew Brown to his father and sister, 16 June [1862], Alexandria Va (Andrew Brown)

29 letter, Andrew Brown to his father and sister, 26 August [1862], Camp near Cloud Mills Va (Andrew Brown)

30 letter, Andrew Brown to his father and sister, 5 March 1864, Camp at Warrington Junction Virginia (Andrew Brown)

31 letter, Andrew Brown to his father and sister, 31 March 1864, Warrenton Junction (Andrew Brown)

32 letter, Andrew Brown to his father and sister, 18 April 1864, Warrenton Junction, VA (Andrew Brown)

33 letter, Andrew Brown to his father and sister, 7 June 1864, Coal [sic] Harbor VA (Andrew Brown)

34 letter, Andrew Brown to his father and sister, 17 June 1864, Camp near Petersburg Va (Andrew Brown)

35 letter, Andrew Brown to his father and sister, 3 March [1863], camp near Falmouth VA (Andrew Brown)

36 letter, Andrew Brown to his father and sister, 3 April [1863], Camp near Falmouth Virginia (Andrew Brown)

37 1860 US census, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, ward 11, division 1, microfilm series M653, film 1161, pages 805 = 107 handwritten (FamilySearch) (Andrew Brown)



[The Historical Society of Pennsylvania has this entry on their web page: Brown, Andrew, Letterbook (1862-64), Co. C, 91st PA, Collection no 82. I have not seen this.]

Sources checked unsuccessfully

1850, 1870-1940 US census
since the evidence in the pension certificate file is clear, and determining whether any Andrew Brown is mine would be difficult, I haven't checked these
Pennsylvania, veterans burial cards, 1777-1999
Ancestry index (accessed 29 December 2014)
records of headstones of deceased Union veterans, 1879-1903
FamilySearch index (accessed 29 December 2014)

Display



Andrew Brown in the 91st PA database

1860 census

[1860 US census, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, ward 11, division 1, microfilm series M653, film 1161, pages 805 = 107 handwritten (FamilySearch)]
[identification is confirmed by the pension certificate file abstracted below, since (1) his apparent father's name and occupation, Elizabeth's name, his occupation, and the Thomas and Jane in the next household all match]
[I did not transcribe the other family at this residence, headed by Edward and Brigitte Hanade [?] (Ancestry index) or Hauad [?] (FamilySearch index)]
[note that the next residence is headed by Thomas Brown (33, labourer, born Ireland), with Jane (38, born Ireland), Mary (5 born PA), Susan (2 born PA), and Jane G (5 months, b. PA)]
line3637383940
Dwelling number[592]    
Family number[674]    
NameAndrew BrownMaryElizabethAndrewCharles
Age4521201818
[the second digit of Mary's age is unclear]
Sexmffmm
Color     
OccupationLabourer  Morocco Dyer [?] 
Value of real estate owned     
Value of personal estate     
Place of birthIrelandDoDoDoDo
Married within year     
Attended school within year     
Cannot read & write     
Deaf, dumb, blind, etc.     

index to compiled service records

[index to compiled service records of volunteer Union soldiers who served in organizations from the state of Pennsylvania]
[transcribed 15 Mar 2014, from Fold3]


Brown Andrew
Co. C, 91 Pennsylvania Inf.
Pvt. | Pvt.
See also [blank]

GENERAL INDEX CARD.

letter, 29 March 1862, Andrew Brown to father and sister

[letter, Andrew Brown to his father and sister, 29 March 1862, Washington DC]
[transcribed from images 16 - 17 in the pension file, available on Fold3, 29 June 2014]


Washington March 29th 1862
Dear Father and Sister

I Received the things you Sent me in William McAnallys [sic] box and I am verry [sic] much oblidged [sic] to you for them[.] you Complain of not getting any letters from me[.] I wrote one every week Since I Came here and I Received only two letters from you[.] I went to See tommy [sic] the day before yesterday[.] they are encamped on Meridian hill about two mile [sic] and a half from our Camp[.] the [sic] were getting paid when I got there[.] he showed me a letter he got from you[.] the [sic] expect to go away Soon[.] he is Coming to see me before he goes[.] James Gallagher was over to our camp on the 26th[.] the whole Brigade formerly Commanded by General Baker arrived here last monday [sic] and left yesterday for alexandria [sic][.] while the [sic] were here I went to see them[.] I was in Cap. harveys [sic] tent along with Joseph Mchugh [sic] about two hours[.] I also Seen [sic] Frank McLaughlin Mike McAleer and littly tommy that used to work in Stawarts[.] frank mclaughlin [sic] promised to Come to See me but he did not do it[.] Jim Gallagher was astonished to See us have Such a nice place[.] we have no less than five door mats for each house[.] the whole division of General Casey went down passed [sic] our Camp yesterday[.] the [sic] Crossed the long Bridge to Alexandria[.] the [sic] are joined there by Bakers [sic] Brigade and all of them goes [sic] to fortress Monroe [manuscript page 2] in all about 60000 men[.] you may expect to hear of Stirring news from there Soon[.] All of us Received a new pair of light blue pants[.] we are also going to get new belgian Rifles[.] we are guarding the Railroad Station the Prison the long and Chain Bridges and the Barracks where the Soldiers Stopd [?][.] we have it verry [sic[ nice here now[.] William Mcanally James McCollough John Harvey are well and Sent their Respects to all the folks[.] give my Respects to all the folks thomas and Jane James Margaret and Arthur Roseann and Patrick and Charles Orr [?] Martha Mary Harvey Mary Carlin Susan and Mary Kelley Edward and Biddy Harvey and all enquiring friends[.] no more at present[.] but i [sic] remain your affectionate Son and brother[.]

Andrew Brown

Direct to me in care of Capt Keyser Co C 91 Regt PV
Washington DC

I did not want the cough drops as I do not cough anymore[.] the Butter Bread Cheese and Sausage is the Right thing to Send[.] you need not Send any more to I [sic] tell you we expect to get paid Soon[.]

letter, 17 April 1862

[letter, Andrew Brown to his father and sister, 17 April 1862, Carroll Hill Barracks Washington DC]
[transcribed 28 June 2014, from images 19-20 of the pension file, on Fold3]


Carroll Hill Barracks
Washington April 17th 1862

Dear Father and Sister[,] I wrote you a letter on last Monday in which I informed you of us having been Paid [sic] on the Saturday Previous and I sent you 45 dollars by Adams express[.] if you have not got it write and let me know So that I will know what to do[.] the weather here at Present is verry [sic] warm[.] we have it verry [sic] nice here at Present[.] we go on guard every 4 days and when we come off we get a pass to go through Washington[.] the Capitol is the most Beautiful Building in the inside I ever saw[.] it is past [?] discripion [sic][.] all the other government Buildings are magnificent[.] in my next I will give you a discription [sic] of all the Public buildings in Washington[.] tuesday [sic] last John Harvey and I went to see John Cligget and William Beard[.] we visited Several forts on the way[,] one verry [sic] large[,] one alongside their camp mounts 16 guns[.] it commands Bennings [?] Bridge which crosses the Anacostia opposite to it[.] there is a line of Breastworks outside [manuscription page 2] the fort[.] +inside of the Breast works there is another line of defence[.] it consists of trees with their branches Sharpened[.] there is also a deep ditch around it which the [sic] can fill with water from a well in the inside[.] there is but one entrance to it and that is Commanded by two large guns[.] all the boys are well including myself[.] no more at Present[.] give my Respects to Thomas and Jane James. Arthur and Margeret Buck Mary & Harvey and Carlin Martha + Biddy and Ned Susan and Mary Kelly Charles Patrick and Roseann Orr [?]. Charles. James. Thomas. Mary and Sarah Todd and all enquiring friends[.] no more at Present but I Remain your Son and Brother

Andrew Brown

direct as before

write as Soon as you Receive this and let me know if you got the Money

letter, 14 February 1863

[letter, Andrew Brown to father and sister, 14 February [1863]]
[the year must be 1863; for example, the nine-months' troops the letter refers to were mustered out, and the 91st and 155th transferred, in May 1863]
[transcribed 29 June 2014, from images 21-22 of the pension certificate file, on Fold3]


February 14th
Camp near Falmouth Va

Dear Father + sister [sic]

I received your letter of february the 4th and was glad to find you all well[.] I have not got the box yet but expect to get it soon[.] we are not so bad off fo [sic] victuals as you think[.] we have fresh bread 4 times a week and onions and potatoes twice a week and the coffee is as good as I could get home[.] in fact I lik [sic] it better but its [sic] not as good as tea[.] we used to get tea regular [sic] but we did not get any since we left warrenton [sic][.] it has been very mild down here this winter[.] we have had snow several times but it did not last long[.] we have a fine log house built with a large fire place in it[.] it is verry [sic] comfortable and warm[.] you say you don't want me to be giving any of the things you sent me away[,] that I have little enough for myself[.] thats [sic] [manuscript page 2] not the way we do [sic] in our tent[.] when any one of us gets anything we always share it[.] I would have often went [sic] hungry if it was not for the men in the tent sharing with me and I will not be an exception to the rule[.] there is nothing going on here[.] if any interest [sic] at present[,] there is a rumour that colonel Gregory is appointed military governor of Alexandria again but I dont [sic] know how true it is[.] if so we will go back there[.] our whole division will be broke [sic] up when the nine months men go home[,] there being only two regiments of three years troops in the division[,] ours and the 155th[.] all the boys here are well at present[.] give my love to Thomas + Jane, James, William, Bella, and Atty Mary Harvey and Carlin Jane Moran Sarah Carlin Martha Hurn Kate Hughs Roseann Patrick and Charles Orr Mary and Susan Kelly the Todds and all enquiring friends[.] no more at present[.] [manuscript page 3] let me know how all the folks are getting along[.] tell my father to save what money he has and in a short time hell be able he'll be able to buy a horse and cart and work with Thomas[.] he wont [sic] have it go here and be his own boss[.] I will send him $50 dollars next pay day if he does[.] no more at present[.] I remain your son and Brother

Andrew Brown

letter, Andrew Brown to father and sister, 4 August 1862

[letter, Andrew Brown to father and sister, 4 August 1862, Alexandria Virginia]
[transcribed from pension certificate file, image 23 on Fold3, 5 July 2014]


Alexandria August 4th 1862
Dr father and sister

I am well at present and hope this will find you the same[.] I am glad to hear of you getting well of your severe sickness[.] I see by the philadelphia [sic] Enquirer [sic] that tommy is in the hospital at newport news [sic] near fortress Monroe[.] Mrs Delavue arrived here on Saturday morning[.] She said she hadnt [?] time to call for my shirts[.] you can send them down by express for about twenty five cents and be oblidged [sic] to nobody[.] I read that speech of trains in the enquirer nearly three weeks ago[.] you did not say whether you paid Roseann or not as I told you in my last letter[.] there is nothing going on here of any interest at present[.] we go on guard once in every three days and have Battalion drill every afternoon[.] we are now one of the best drilled regiments in the service[.] its [sic] not likely well [sic] leave here for some time if at all[.] general Wadsworth says we give more satisfaction than any regiment he has had yet[.] you want to know who I am getting my Photographs for[:] why my love-yers of course[,] who else[?] Give My Respects to Thomas and Jane William, James, Atty, Maggy, and Bella Mary Harvey and Carlin, Charles, Roseann, and Patrick Orr, Mary and Susan Kelly Ned and Biddy Harvey Marthy hurn Kate hughs Jane Moran Sarah Carlin and all enquiring friends[.] no more at present but I remain yours[.]

Andrew Brown

letter, 9 February 1863

[letter, Andrew Brown to his father and sister, 9 February 1862 [sic; sc. 1863], Camp near Falmouth Va]
[transcribed from pension certificate file, images 24-25 on Fold3]
[this letter is very light, and hard to read]
[since the regiment was in Washington DC in February 1862, and camped near Falmouth in February 1863, I assume the date is actually 9 February 1863; note also that Baker was on furlough beginning 10 February 1863]


February 9th 1862 [sic]
Camp near Falmouth Va

Dear Father + Sister

I received your letter dated February the 4th and was glad to find you all well[.] I see by the Enquirer [sic] the Hardens [?] express [?] have resumed taking freight for the army of the Potomac[.] [presumably Harnden's Express--see e.g. 'The Express Freight Companies' (accessed 5 July 2014)] if you had not sent the box before you get this letter send me a pen knife and a small carpenters [sic] hatchet with it[.] direct it as I told you[.] I send this letter with Corporal Ambrose Baker who is going home for ten days on a furlough[.] if the box is gone take the handle off the hatchet and wrap the penknife and it together and he will fitch [sic] it to me[.] you can send the certificate of the box down in the next letter if you have sent it already [?][.] we are now in our new camp about a [manuscript page 2] mile and a half from our old camp[.] I was over to see Jim Gallagher yesterday also little tommy [sic] and Frank McLoughlin and mike walker [?][.] the [sic] are well[.] I staid [sic] all night in Jims [sic] tent[.] all the boys here are well including myself[.] give my Respects to Thomas and Jane William James Atty Bella Mary Harvey and Carlin Patrick Rose Ann and Charles Orr Jane Abram Kate Hughs Martha Hurn Sarah Carlin Mary Kelly and Susan Edward and Bridget Harvey the Todds and all enquiring friends[.] no more at present[.] I remain your affectionate son and Brother[.]

Andrew Brown

Good Bye

PS send me some post stamps and oblidge [sic]

letter, 14 April 1862

[letter, Andrew Brown to father and sister, 14 April 1862, Washington DC]
[transcribed from pension certificate file, image 26 on Fold3, 5 July 2014]


Washington April 14th 1862

Dear Father and Sister

I take this opportunity of Writing to you to let you know how I am getting along here[.] the Place We are encamped on is called Carroll hill[.] it is the Residence and Property of the grand daughter of Charles Carroll one of the Sighners [sic] of the declaration of Independance [sic]] but the most important event of the time is the coming of the Pay Master[.] that long looked for Personage has at length arrived[.] he was here yesterday and Paid the Regiment off[.] our Company was on guard at the Prison but when we came over for our supplies the [sic] Paid us[.] I immdetaley [sic] went over to the Adams Express Company and sent youse [sic] 45 00 dollars[.] I had to Pay 25 cents to send it[.] the [sic] Paid me four months[.] if you do not get it before you Receive this go down to the office Chesnut [sic] St above 3rd and the [sic] will give it to you[.] write as soon as you Receive it and let me know if it was all Right[.] give my Respects to all Enquiring Friends

No more at Present but I remain your Son and Brother

Andrew Brown

letter, 5 May 1862

[letter, Andrew Brown to father and sister, 5 May 1862, Alexandria]
[transcribed 5 July 2014 from pension certificate file, images 27-28 on Fold3]


Alexandria May 5th 1862

Dear Father + Sister

I Received the Box you sent me on Saturday last[.] the things were all Right Except the Eggs[.] the [sic] were a little out of shape[.] the cake was Excellent Especially to me that Knowed [sic] who made it[.] we are just after moving to our new quarters[.] it is a splendid house and has Eleven Rooms[.] the Fishing line you sent me was verry [sic] good[.] I am fishing with it Every day[.] if any Body should stop in and tell you that the [sic] are coming down here and ask you to send anything to me dont [sic] do it[.] there is a fellow now in Philadelphia that used to Be our quarter masters sargent[.] he has been to two or three of the mens [sic] houses and got ten dollars from one Eight from another and got apples cakes tobacco segars and several other things from different People[.] he also went to the family of one of the men that died down here and asked them to give him some money to pay the Expenses of fetching him to Philadelphia[.] the [sic] gave him some and that was the last the [sic] seen [sic] of him[.] give my Respects to thomas [sic] and Jane, Atty, and Mag, James + Bella Mary S harvey [sic] + Carlin Martha hurn [sic], Rose ann, Patrick, and Charles Orr, the Todds, Mary and Susan, Kelley ned, and Biddy harvey [sic], emma [sic], the fishers [sic] and all Enquiring friends[.] no more at present But [manuscript page 2] I remain your Son and Brother

Andrew Brown

direct as Before
all the Boys are well

letter, 30 January 1863 [?]

[letter, Andrew Brown to his father and sister, 30 January 1863, Camp near Falmouth Virginia]
[transcribed from pension certificate file, 5 July 2014, image 29 on Fold3]


Camp near Falmouth Va Jan 30th

Dear Father + Sister

The paymaster has been to see us and paid us four months pay[.] I received your letter of the 23rd and would have answered it before this but I was waiting for somebody to take my money home[.] go to mr C F Diehl pronounced deal no 624 north 16th Street above Wallace btween [sic] Coates and Green and he will give you 45 dollars from me[.] I would have sent you more but I owe $6.56 cents and I paid it[.] give the dollar enclosed in this letter to Mrs McMelly [?] for Bill to give to harriet [sic][.] go for the money when you get this letter[.] tell Eliza to go for it, as I sent it in her name[.] Mrs McNally and Biddy McCullough will go with you[.] no more at present give my respects to all enquiring Friends[.] I remain your affectionate Son and Brother[.]

Andrew Brown

letter, 28 April 1864

[letter, Andrew Brown to his father and sister, 28 April [1864], Warrenton Junction]
[transcribed from pension certificate file, 5 July 2014, images 30-31 on Fold3]


Warrenton Junction April 28th
Dear Father and Sister

I received yours of the 23rd and was glad to find you all well as this leave [sic] me at present and hope we may all continue so. Andy Fleming was here yesterday[.] he received his fathers [sic] letter[.] he is well[.] when you write send me some post stamps and two pairs of leather shoe laces. you will get them in Green st opposite the alley[.] there is nothing going on of any importance here at present[.] James McCullough Bill McNally John Harvey and all the rest of the men here are well and wish to be remembered to all their folks. you mistake in thinking me mad about the money[.] [see his letter of 18 April 1864] [manuscript page 2] give my respects to Thomas and Jane, Mary, Harvey, and Biddy, Annie Dempsey Maggie McDevit [?] Jane Moran Patrick Rose Anna and Charles. Orr the Todds and all Enquiring friends[.] This is all at present[.] I remain your Affectionate Son + brother ++c

Andrew Brown

Direct as before

there are no signs of us leaving here yet

letter, 31 May 1863

[letter, Andrew Brown to his father, 31 May 1863, 5th Corps Hospital, near Acquia Creek]
[transcribed 5 July 2014, from pension certificate file, images 32-33 on Fold3]


5th Corps Hospital
May 31st 1863
Near Acquia Creek

Dear Father

I received your ever welcomed letter of the 25th and was glad to hear you are all enjoying good health. I am getting along as well as could be expected under the circumstances[.] we have very poor attendance and very little to eat except what we have to buy. We are fed on pork potatoes and sour bread. I am anxious to get away from here so I can get better medical attendance. the wound is healing and with proper care would soon get well. There was one of the sanitary committee [sic] called to see me[.] he took my name company + regiment but I have heard nothing from him since [manuscript page 2] he was here on last monday [sic][.] I thought he intended to get me sent home[.] I hope they will send us home. We heard today there was to be a general inspection to morrow [sic] for the purpose of sending all the wounded to their respective states but there is [sic] so many reports we cant [sic] believe any of them. The division hospital has been moved and consolidated with the 2nd division. The regimen[t] was paid yesterday[.] I have no way to send my money home and came to the conclusion to [sic] keep it until we are sent away and I hope I will not have to wait much longer. The regiment is doing guard duty on the railroad from Potomac Creek bridge down to Stonemans Switch and all [manuscript page 3] the boys hope to be kept at the same kind of duty until next August one year. I received the letter with the money. The doctors have said nothing to me about the furlough you mention in your letter. John Clagget + Wm Baird was [sic] to see me to day [sic]. they brought me some jellies and other dillicacies [sic]. McNally McCollough and all the boys attend to my wants and furnish me with all I wish to eat. You need not come down here for you could do me no good for I am not so bad but I am able to attend to myself. if we get sent to Washington then I will get home[.] Give me love to all the folks and all inquiring friends[.] write soon

Your Son
Andrew Brown

[manuscript page 4]

P.S.
Please send me some postage stamps

Direct Corp A Brown 5th Corps Hospital 2nd division
Near Acquia Creek
Via Washington Va
D.C

letter, 16 June [1862]

[letter, Andrew Brown to his father and sister, 16 June [1862], Alexandria Va]
[transcribed 5 July 2014, from pension certificate file, images 34-35 on Fold3]


Alexandria Va June 16th

Dear Father and Sister

I am well and hope this will find you and all my friends the same[.] I received your letter of the 12th and was glad to find you all well[.] I got the stamps you sent me also the paper you sent with Col Wallace[.] I suppose by this time you got my likeness[.] I sent it with William Sheifer of our Company[.] you want to know if I got a letter from thomas [sic][.] if you mean little thomas [sic] I did not get a letter from him[.] we had a great time with a lot of secession prisoners yesterday[.] as soon as it was known that the [sic] were in town a great crowd of women gathered bringing fries cakes coffee and every thing else the [sic] wanted[.] at first we let them give it to them but the [sic] began to get sassy and talk for Jeff Davis[.] [manuscript page 2] we then arrested two of them but on their promising not to do it again we let them go[.] the Colonel took possession of an episcopal Church yesterday[,] the minister having refused to offer the prayer for the president of the Untied States[.] the Col went in when the [sic] were at Service and ordered them out which the [sic] were verry [sic] loth [sic] to do[.] it is only five or six doors from our quarters[.] it is now guarded by one of our men and Company Cs [sic] flag waves out of the Second Story[.] it is to be used for a hospital[.] give my Respects to thomas and Jane James Atty + Mag + Bella mary harvey mary Carlin ned + Biddy, martha hurn Charles Rose ann + Patrick orr the Todds Mary + Susan Kelly Kate hughs Jane Morean and all enquiring friends[.] Send two cakes of silver soap with Sheifer for cleaning Brass[.] yo [sic] can get it in a drug store[.] it will cost 6 or ten cens a cake[.] [manuscript page 3] you can see him at the States hose [?] house [??][.]

No more from your Son and Brother

Andrew Brown

letter, 26 August [1862]

[letter, Andrew Brown to his father and sister, 26 August [1862], Camp near Cloud Mills Va]
[transcribed 5 July 2014, from the pension certificate file, images 36-37 on Fold3]


Camp near Cloud Mills Va Augt 26
Dr Father + Sister

I take this opportunity of writing to you to let you know I am well hoping to find you all the same[.] we arrived here last friday and pitched our camp on the side of a hill along with the rest of the division[.] nearly all the division are here now and two of them have already left[.] there is [sic] eleven regts of Infantry and three Battries [sic] of artillerry [sic] six being from pennsylvania [sic] three from new york [sic] one from Indiana and one from Massachusetts[.] we are in the Second Brigade under command of general tyler [sic] as I am writing they are moving the company goods down to the railroad track for shipment and we expect to leave for warrenton [sic] this afternoon[.] I wrote you a letter the day before we let Alexandria and have received no answer yet[.] there was over 75 thousand troops passed over the Orange and Alexandria railroad including the divisions of hooker [sic] and Kearney of McClellans [sic] Army[.] Bill McNally Jim McCollough John Harvey and all the rest of the Boys are well including myself[.] I sent a box home by Adams express the day we left Alexandria with my old clothes and such other things as I could not carry no more at present[.] give my Respects to thomas and Jane William James Atty Mag and Bella Mary harvey and Carlin Charles Roseann + Patrick Orr Matha hurn [sic] Kate hughs [sic] Sarah Carlin Jane Moran Edward and Bridget harvey [sic] Mary and Susan Kelly [manuscript page 2] the Todds and all enquiring friends[.] direct to Alexandria or elsewhere[.] no more at present but I remain your Son and Brother

Andrew Brown Jr

letter, 5 March 1864

[letter, Andrew Brown to his father and sister, 5 March 1864, Camp at Warrington Junction Virginia]
[transcribed 5 July 2014, from the pension certificate file, images 38-39 on Fold3]


Camp at Warrington [sic]
Junction Virginia

Mar 5th /64

Dear Father & Sister

I take the Plesure [sic] of wrighting [sic] these few lines to you hoping that they may find you and all the familey [sic] enjoying good helth [sic] but I am sorey [sic] to say that I have bin [sic] very sick for these last few Days but I trust in God that he will bring me all right in A few Days, I have answered [sic] your letter of the 21st, I have done one Days [sic] Duty since I have bin [sic] here but I don't [sic] no [sic] when I shall do any more as I feel very Bad at present[.] Mr. A. Flemings is still here By my persuasion and he Dos [sic] not regret it now[.] he sends his Respects to you, it has [manuscript page 2] Bin [sic] reported here that the Regt had left for here and we have bin [sic] expectin [sic] it down every Day but I don't [sic] cair [sic] if they never come for I am just as well of [sic] in the Regt that I am in as would be in the 91st

Dear Sister it gives me grait [sic] plesure [sic] to here [sic] from you and to now [sic] that you are well and I trust God in his kind mercies will continue you so[.] you speak of me geting [sic] out of dutey [sic] and Battle, Dear Sister if I was well I would not srink [sic] from eather [sic], but when I am not well, I shall not do enything [sic], for I will Reepe [sic] as much credit in the long Run

Dear Sister if you pleas [sic] send me some Stamps and some money as I can get nothing [manuscript page 3] Hear [sic] without the money, I Received the Paper Pensil [sic] and thread and I am very much oblige [sic] to you and you shall never be forgoton [sic], as to the comfort I am satisfied as I drue [sic] A Double Blanket at Convalesent [sic] Camp and we have log huts put up and I am perty [sic] comfortible [sic] for the presant [sic], Sister as I wright [sic] theas [sic] few lines to you I feel a grait [sic] deal Beter [sic] then [sic] I have for the last few Days enymore [sic] then I am a little weak and if I continue so I shall be all right in a few days[.] Give my Respects to Thomas & Familey [sic] & Marey [sic] Harvey Jane Moran Anna Dempsey Patric [sic] Rosan [sic] & Charles Orr Edward Harvey and Familey [sic] the Todds and [manuscript page 4] All inquiring Friends[.] I will Bring my few lines to A Close having no mere [sic] to say at present].

I Remain your Efectionet [sic] Son and Brother

Andrew Brown

letter, 31 March 1864

[letter, Andrew Brown to his father and sister, 31 March 1864, Warrenton Junction]
[transcribed 5 July 2014, from the pension certificate file, images 40-41 on Fold3]


March 31st /64
Warrenton Junction

Dear Father + Sister

I Received yours of the 25th and was glad to hear with the exception of Edward Harvey you were all well[.] poor man[.] I hope he is better off as there is nothing but trouble in this wicked world[.] you wanted to know if I was corporal yet[.] I dont [sic] know what made you think I wasnt [sic] for I think I deserved it more lately than ever[.] tell John Dempsey I have not got his letter yet nor the paper with the pens and holder in it[.] if you have not sent the razor yet put two papers around [manuscript page 3 sic; the top of manuscript page 2 includes this note: 'I made a mistake read the other side first'] it and three stamps for they may find it out[.] if Eliza Brown dont [sic] come to see you I wouldnt [sic] trouble my self any more about it[.] you want to know if I want any money[.] well a little at the present time wouldnt [sic] be out of place[.] you might ask thomas [sic] if he has any money of mine[.] if he has you might send me some[.] if not you need not mind sending any as I know you want all you have yourselves[.] there is nothing going on here of any Interist [sic] at present[.] all the boys here are well Jim McCullough Bill McNally John Harvey and all the rest Andy Fleming has not been here for two or [manuscript page 2 sic] three days[.] he was well then[.] I had a verry [sic] good time of it on Easter Sunday and got nearly two dozen of eggs[.] you might send me down my stripes in a paper as they may make me draw ones in place of them[.] give my Respects to Thomas and family, Mary Harvey Annie Dempsey Jane Moran John Dempsey Biddy Harvey Patrick Rose Ann and Charles Orr Maggie McDevit the Todds and all enquiring friends[.] I have just now got the paper with the razor and pens + holder[.] the holder is just the thing but the pens are not heavy and stiff enough[.] accept my love for yourselves and believe me [manuscript page 4] your affectionate son + Brother

Andrew Brown

Direct Co C 91st
5 Corps [illegible]

[written vertically, apparentlly in a different hand] Tells father to send him money

letter, 18 April 1864

[letter, Andrew Brown to his father and sister, 18 April 1864, Warrenton Junction, VA]
[transcribed 5 July 2014, from the pension certificate file, images 42-43 on Fold3]


April 18th /64
Warrenton Junction Va

Dear Father + Sister

I received yours of the 15th and was glad to find you all well as this leaves me at present. I also received the paper with my stripes in it. you say I might not have been so short about the money. its [sic] not verry [sic] often I ask for money. but when I do ask for it. I want it especially when its [sic] my own[.] every time I get my clothes washed it costs me 30 cents. paper. envelopes. ink. and stamps. about 1 dollar a month and I suppose you know it cost [sic] me some thing for victuals when I was sick. and as I dont sic] intend to starrve [sic] yet awhile it costs me [manuscript page 2] some thing yet. And you know as well as I do how far two dollars would go. even if they were good you say Jane Moran sends all the news to me. So there is no use of you telling me any. well if thats [sic] the case you might as well dispense with writing alltogether [sic] as you could get her to do it for you. if you see James Nugent again tell him what his lieing [sic, after a crossed-out 'lying'] father said about me. And what I think of him[.] I have been doing duty ever since I came down here except about two weeks I was sick. and dont [sic] expect to get home untill [sic] my time is out. except I get killed or wounded before that time which I dont [sic] expect[.] this is the first good day we have had for a long time but expect [manuscript page 3] we will have good weather from this out [sic] as it has rained steady [sic] for nearly two months[.] the Sutlers and all extra Baggage have been sent to the rear[.] convalescents and others are going down every day to the front[.] give my respects to Thomas + Jane Mary + Biddy Harvey Jane Moran Annie Dempsey + Maggie Mrs. Devit Mary + Susan Kelly Patrick Rose Ann + Charles Orr the Todds and all enquiring friends[.] no more at present[.] I remain your affectionate son and Brother[.]

Andrew Brown

Direct as Before

[manuscript page 4]

Fleming [??] McCullough [perhaps instead of 'Fleming' the word is 'Henry'??]/
McNally + Harvey
are well
and send their
respects
to their folks

letter, 7 June 1864

[letter, Andrew Brown to his father and sister, 7 June 1864]
[transcribed 6 July 2014 from the pension certificate file, images 44-45 on Fold3]


June 7th /64
Camp near Coal [sic] Harbor Va

Dear Father + sister

I received your ever welcome letter of the 25th, and the paper you sent, and was glad to find you all well, as this leaves me at present. this is the fifth, or sixth letter, I have wrote [sic] and got only one in return. this is the last I intend to write till I get an answer with writing paper, envelopes, + stamps[.] I wrote to you some time ago telling you to send me some money in small change, also some paper, needles + thread[.] you could put them in a newspaper and put two stamps on it[.] put a wrapper on the papers or the [sic] wont [sic] be fit to read when the [sic] get here[.] the sooner you send paper the [manuscript page 2] sooner you will get letters[.] I have borrowed all I am going to borrow[.] the men I get it from havent [sic] any for themselves and it would be out of reason to ask them for any more[.] we are now two miles from Gaines [sic] house where Tommy was taken prisoner before he died[.] in fact we are encamped on part of Gaines [sic] farm[.] we had quite a time of it getting away from our last position[.] the rebels kept up a heavy skirmishing all the time to see if we were still there[.] just before we left they made an attack on the left, which extended along the whole line in front of us[.] their picket made an advance but ours drove them back[.] as soon as all was quiet we started off. it took us all night to go five miles and arrived [sic] here yesterday morning after daylight[.] we are getting reorganized [manuscript page 3] and getting new clothes[.] I believe we are now the 1st Brigade 2nd Div[.] our Brigade is commanded by Colonel Gregory and the Division by Ayers formerly commanding out Brigade[.] I believe our late Brigade lost more than any in the Army[.] the 140 N.Y. left camp with 650 and now have 170[,] the second regulars have about 40[,] the 11th 64 men counting hospital stewards and all the others lost in proportion[.] ours was the smallest[;] it is now the largest[.] we have nine regts in the Brigade[.] the second is sent to do provost duty and we have the fifth N.Y. Zouaves in their place[.] there are four zouave regts in the Brigade[.] we lost one private killed one captain and one Lieutenant wounded[;] also three privates[.] none belonged to our company[.] all the men are well[,] Jim McCullough [manuscript page 4] Bill McNally John Harvey Andy Fleming and all the rest[.] This is the first days [sic] rest we have had since the campaign began[.] give my respects to Thomas Jane Moran Anne Dempsey and John, Patrick Rose Ann and Charles Orr Maggie McDevit the Todds and all enquiring friends[.] this is all at present[.] its [sic] now night and there are two bands playing alongside of us and any number of drum corps[.] we are in the rear of the Second Corps but out of range of shot [?] and [?] shell[.] you will see [?] I can spin a pretty good yarn[.] I remain your affectionate son and brother


Andrew Brown Jr

Direct to 91st PVV 5th Corps via Washington

letter, 17 June 1864

[letter, Andrew Brown to his father and sister, 17 June 1864, Camp near Petersburg Va]
[transcribed 6 July 2014, from the pension certificate file, images 46-47 on Fold3]


June 17th /64

Camp Near Petersburg Va

Dear Father + sister

I take this opportunity of writing you a few lines to let you know that I am well and hope this may find you all the same[.] I wrote you a letter on the 13th which I suppose you have got before this[.] I received the money and all the other things you sent[.] the pepper and pills I havent [sic] got yet nor the pencil[.] we crossed the James river yesterday in steamboats[.] the wagons + artillery came across on a pontoon bridge[.] the river where we crossed it is nearly as wide as the delaware [sic] or about the same size as the Potomac at Alexandria[.] we got here last night at twelve oclock [sic]. the second and ninth corps were fighting here all day yesterday [manuscript page 2] and the [sic] are fighting still[.] it is reported we have taken part of their works and some prisoners and guns[.] we are now back in the first Division. Griffin sent for us and the 155th[.] we are now in the 2nd Brigade, Switzers [sic]. he is a good man and is colonel of the 62nd P.V[.] tell Bill McNallys [sic] wife he is well[.] he has not got but two letters since we started on the campaign[.] it was verry [sic] dusty marching yesterday[.] Bill says he hasnt [sic] had enough to eat since we started on this campaign + in fact he is not the only one as every body complains of not getting enough to eat. all the boys are well[.] Jim is a good deal better[.] one of the rebel prisoners just passed and says he belongs to Johnsons [sic] army and says we gave them [manuscript page 3] a right smart licking this morning[.] Bill says tell his wife to tell him in her next how the boys are getting along[.] Andy Fleming is well and sends his respects to his father and his most perticular [sic] friend. when I write next I hope it will be from Petersburg. it is the second city in size in Virginia[.] we are laying in the rear in reserve[.] this is all at present[.] tell Jane I havent [sic] got her letter yet[.] give my respects to Thomas + Jane James + Bella Mary Harvey Jane Moran Patrick Rose Ann + Charles Orr Annie and John Dempsey Maggie McDevit, Mrs Cria [??] the Todds + all enquiring friends[.] accept my love for yourselves and believe me your affectionate son + brother[.]

Andrew Brown

[manuscript page 4]

Direct Co C 91st PVV.
2nd Brigade 1st Divisi
5th Corps army of Potomac
via Washington DC

letter, 3 March [1863]

[letter, Andrew Brown to his father and sister, 3 March [1863], camp near Falmouth VA]
[transribed 6 July 2014, from the pension certificate file, image 48 on Fold3]


Camp Near Falmouth Va March 3rd

Dear Father + sister

I Received yours of the 25th and was glad to find by its contents you were all well as this leaves me at present[.] I received the box you sent and all the things were in pretty good order except the loaf of bread[.] it was a a little mouldy[.] the cake was verry [sic] good[.] also the shirts and handkerchiefs[.] the boots are just the thing but a size to [sic] large to march in[.] when too big the [sic] slip up and down and take the skin off[.] the fact I put a pair of in soles [sic] in them from a pair of old shoes and the [sic] now fit me first rate[.] the needle case Stockings and sausage were all right[.] also the writing paper[.] but I was particularly pleased to again make the acquaintance of the black pitcher[.] we are just after having an inspection and muster for pay[.] all the boys here are well at present including myself[.] there is nothing going on here of importance at present. Jim McCullough wants you to tell his wife where you bought the boots so he can get a pair like them[.] I have sent a letter informing you that I received the things you sent with Baker also the stamps you sent in the letter[.] give my Respects to Thomas and Jane, William, James, Atty, and Bella, Mary Harvey and Carlin Patrick Roseann and Charles Orr Jane Moran Kate Hughs Sarah Carlin and William, Martha Hurn Edward and Bridget Harvey Mary and Susan Kelly the Todds and all enquiring friends[.] no more at present but I remain your affectionate son and Brother[.]


Andrew Brown

Direct as Before

letter 3 April [1863]

[letter, Andrew Brown to his father and sister, 3 April [1863], Camp near Falmouth Virginia]
[transcribed 6 July 2014, from the pension certificate file, images 49-50 on Fold3]


April 3rd
Camp Near Falmouth Virginia

Dear Father and Sister

I Received yours of the 29th and was happy to find by its contents that you was [sic] all well as this leaves me at present[.] we had a grand review of our division yesterday by generals Mead [sic] and Humphrey. it was a fine day and the men looked well [sic][.] after forming in line of battle as is usual on such occasions we opened order and they rode along the front and rear ranks[.] we were then marched by them in column of companies[.] Seargent [sic] W H Myers of our company has got his discharge and went home[.] he has been sick since the battle of Fredericksburg[] our regt is now out in picket[.] I was on guard and was left behind[.] I received the stamps you sent in the letter also the papers and pills for which I am much oblidged [sic] to you[.] you say Susan or Mary Kelly never came to see you since Martha died[.] well you need not care[.] the [sic] never came to see you[.] the [sic] never gave you anything when the [sic] did come[.] its [sic] not likely well [sic] go to Alexandria again[.] there is to be a grand muster of the Army of the Potomac on the 10th to find out how many men is required to fill up all the regiments to the required standard[,] that is[,] one thousand men[.] the [sic] are to be filled with conscripts[.] you say it was two weeks since you got a letter from me[.] I can say the verry [sic] same thing to you[.] I was beginning to think you had forgot [sic] to write[.] tell mrs McNally to send Bill two half bent sewing awls the same as the others[.] Bill McNally Jim McCullough John Harvey and all the rest of the boys are well and send their respects to all their folks[.] the letters always lay three or four days at the different headquarters[.] thats [sic] what keeps them so long going home[.] we are to have target practice twice a week and drill 4 hours a day[.] give my respects to Thomas and Jane William, James, Bella, and Atty, Edward and Bridget Harvey Mary Harvey, and Carlin, Jane Moran, Kate Hughs, Patrick Roseann and Charles Orr and all enquiring friends[.] let me know what William James Atty and Bella are doing and where the [sic] are[.] [manuscript page 2] also how Thomas is getting along[.] I suppose he expects me to write to him[.] if so he should have answered the last letter I sent to him[.] Hugh McGonigle or Hudybuck as he was called was in our camp yesterday to see his Brother in law[.] he is in the 23rd PV and can tell as many lies as ever. he says he would like to see ned harvey [sic] drafted down here[.] Bill mcNally and Jim McCullough send their respects to you[.] accept my love for yourselves and believe me your most affectionate son and brother[.]


Andrew Brown

dependent's pension certificate file

[dependent's pension certificate file, WC 134972, Andrew Brown, father of Andrew Brown]
[abstracted from 74 images on Fold3, June 2014]
24 June 1825
Andrew Brown (father) married Susan McAnna, in Parish of Cappa [sic; perhaps Cappagh], County Tyrone, Ireland (pp.53, 63)
married by Rev Father McCaffrey (p.53)
McCaffrey and all witnesses to the marriage ceremony are dead (p.53)
11 September 1843
Andrew Brown's mother, Susan Brown, died in the County of Tyrone, Ireland (pp. 5, 6, 63)
ca 1859-1869
Andrew Brown (father) was physically unable to support himself (p.5)
1859-61
Andrew Brown (soldier) was a morocco finisher, and earned $5 per week (p.6)
he regularly gave his father money for support (p.6)
27 August 1861
Andrew Brown enlisted at Philadelphia (p.9)
21 August 1861 (p.63)
25 September 1861
Andrew Brown mustered in as private in C 91 PA (p.9)
9 February 1862
Andrew Brown wrote his father and sister a letter from Camp near Falmouth VA (see transcription above) (pp.24-25)
29 March 1862
Andrew Brown wrote his father and sister a letter (see transcription above) (pp.16-17)
14 April 1862
Andrew Brown wrote his father and sister a letter (see transcription above) (p.26)
17 April 1862
Andrew Brown wrote his father and sister a letter (see transcription above) (pp.18-19)
5 May 1862
Andrew Brown wrote his father and sister a letter (see transcription above) (pp.27-28)
16 June 1862
Andrew Brown wrote his father and sister a letter from Alexandria Va (see transcription above) (pp.34-35)
4 August 1862
Andrew Brown wrote his father and sister a letter (see transcription above) (p.23)
26 August 1862
Andrew Brown wrote his father and sister a letter from camp near Cloud Mills VA (see transcription above) (pp.36-37)
30 Jan 1863
Andrew Brown wrote his father and sister a letter (see transcription above) (p.29)
14 Feb 1863
Andrew Brown wrote his father and sister a letter (see transcription above) (pp.20-21)
3 Mar 1863
Andrew Brown wrote his father and sister a letter (see transcription above) (p.48)
3 Apr 1863
Andrew Brown wrote his father and sister a letter from camp near Falmouth VA (see transcription above) (pp.49-50)
3 May 1863
Andrew Brown corporal, wounded at Chancellorsville (p.9)
wounded in action at Chancellorsville on 2 May 1863 (p.63)
31 May 1863
Andrew Brown wrote his father a letter from the 5th corps hospital, near Acquia Creek (see transcription above) (pp.32-33)
May-June 1863
paroled prisoner at Philadelphia (p.9 citing May-Jun 63 muster roll)
March-April 1864
muster roll reports present (date returned not stated) (p.9)
5 March 1864
Andrew Brown wrote his father and sister a letter from Warrington [sic] Junction VA (see transcription above) (pp.38-39)
31 March 1864
Andrew Brown wrote his father and sister a letter from Warrenton Junction VA (see transcription above) (pp.40-41)
18 April 1864
Andrew Brown wrote his father and sister a letter from Warrenton Junction VA (see transcription above) (pp.42-43)
28 April 1864
Andrew Brown wrote his father and sister a letter from Warrenton Junction VA (see transcription above) (pp.30-31)
7 June 1864
Andrew Brown wrote his father and sister a letter from Cold Harbor VA (see transcription above) (pp.44-45)
17 June 1864
Andrew Brown wrote his father and sister a letter from camp near Petersburg VA (see transcription above) (pp.46-47)
18 June 1864
Andrew Brown wounded in action (p.9)
Surgeon General: severely wounded in battle at Petersburg 17, 18, or 19 June 1864 (p.10)
19 June 1864
Andrew Brown died (pp.5, 9, 10)
W G Kier reported him as died 22 June 1864, at the 1st division 5th corps field hospital, of gunshot wounds (p.10)
died in Field Hospital of gunshot wounds 20 June 1864 (p.63)
11 June 1869
Mary Todd and Thomas Todd (both residents of Philadelphia) swore that Andrew Brown, father of Andrew Brown, and Susan McAnna, his mother, were married at Cappa, Tyrone, Ireland, about 24 June 1825, that they knew Brown and McAnna for about ten years before their marriage, were not present at the ceremony, but knew that it took place, and the community knew they were married, that Andrew Brown was born on 13 February 1843, that Susan Brown died on 11 September 1843, that they attended her funeral, that they emigrated to America in 1854 [possibly 1834?], as did Andrew Brown, that they lived in his immediate neighborhood, and Andrew was recognized as Andrew's son by the community (p.55)
14 June 1869
A H Graham MD swore that he had known Andrew Brown (the claimant) for 15 years, that he was 70 years old, for the nine or ten years 'has been physicallyl unable to perform sufficient manual labor to gain a support owing to general debility and advanced age' (p.57)
18 June 1869
application 176,496 (p.12)
Andrew Brown, father of Andrew Brown applied for a pension under the Act of 14 July 1862 as amended by the Act of 6 June 1866 (p.5)
dated 11 June 1869 (p.5)
resident of Philadelphia, post office address 532 Brook St below Green St, Philadelphia (p.5)
70 years old (p.5)
witnesses: Michael Harvey and Mary Todd (of Philadelphia) (p.6)
Andrew Brown (son) once sent $25 home by Captain Parsons, and sent him $50 by Adams [Express], and $15 by letter (p.6)
attorney: Jas E Devitt + Co, 427 Walnut St, Philadelphia (pp.5, 12, 14)
admitted 20 September 1869, pension of $8 per month, retroactive to 19 June 1864 (pp.3, 14)
certificate 134,972, dated 28 Sep 1869 (pp.12, 14)
examining clerk: Charles T Cotton (p.3)
10 July 1869
the Adjutant General's Office sent the Pension Bureau the above-summarized information (p.9)
14 July 1869
the Pension Bureau received a response to circular 16 (p.13)
2 Sep 1869
the Surgeon General's Office sent the Pension Bureau the above-summarized information (p.10)
15 Dec 1875
the Pension Agent was to suspend payment (p.15)
29 June 1876
the pensioner enquired 'as to validity of ev. [?] + merits of claim' (p.15)
12 September 1876
Andrew Brown testified that he was 76, living at 1910 Darien St Philadelphia, 'that he has suffered from "Gravel" during all the time for (30) thirty years past, but that he has labored all of the time (except during the past (3) three years, during which time he has done no labor because he could not get it to do (not being considered strong) (p.65)
that he earned $5 to $7 per week, as much as other people doing similar work (p.65)
that 'he was considered a steady man and was kept constantly employed' (p.65)
that 'his earnings were sufficient for his support without the aid of the soldier' (p.65)
that the soldier was 19 when he enlisted, was an apprentice, and earned $5 per week; that he gave the money to his sister Eliza, but they weren't needed for support (p.65)
that he emigrated from County Tyrone in 1854 (p.65)
that he didn't remarry after his wife's death on 11 September 1843 (p.65)
'that all the papers in my case were made up at and in the office of J. E. Devitt + Co' (p.65)
12 September 1876
Jane Brown daughter-in-law of claimant testified that she didn't know her age, that she lived at 2229 North 4th St, Philadelphia, that she knew the claimant since the soldier was 7 months old, that she saw the claimant give him to a nurse after his mother's death, that the came to the US together and lived together until he enlisted, that the claimant hasn't remarried, that 'he has always been a well, hearty man, able to work, and did work and earn $7 per week during the lifetime of the soldier and since that time up to within three years since', that he earned enough to support himself, although the soldier did give him money, and that the claimant sent the soldier money, clothing, provisions, tobacco, etc; that claimant hasn't owned real estate, and owns only $50 or $60 in household furniture, that he lived with his married daughter, that he doesn't have any money left (p.66)
12 September 1876
Ann Barnett, 40 years old, living at 1365 Marlboro St, Philadelphia, testified that she had known Andrew Brown for 15 years, that he had been able to work and earn $7 per week until the last 4 years, that he lived with his daughter Eliza until she married in 1866, and lived with her and paid board to her after that, that he saved about $800 from his earnings but has now used all of that, that he owned no property except a little household furniture worth $50 or $60, that Eliza told her the soldier sent money to him, that he sent the soldier boxed of clothing and provisions twice, that the soldier was never married, and was always regarded as claimant's son, and that claimant wasn't married while she knew him (p.67)
12 September 1876
Robert Barnett, 38, resident of 1365 Marlboro St, testified that everything Ann Barnett testified is true (p.68)
12 September 1876
Sarah Evens, 37, 2232 Orrianna St Philadelphia, testified that the soldier wasn't married, that she knew him for 9 years before he enlisted, that he lived with his father, that the father was able to work during the soldier's lifetime, that she had heard the soldier sent the father money (p.69)
12 September 1876
Eliza Ferry (nee Brown), 37, 1910 Darien Street, Philadelphia, testified that she knows the soldier was her brother, that he was 19 when he enlisted, he worked as an apprentice and earned $5 per week, which he gave to her to be used in the family (p.70)
12 September 1876
James Gormly, 62, residing at Philadelphia, testified that Andrew Brown (the claimant) worked for him from 1854 to 1864, that he paid him $7 per week or as much as other men in the same work, he was an able-bodied man and earned enough to support himself (p.71)
12 September 1876
Ellen Morrison, 47, living at Elmira Place, Philadelphia, testified that she had known the claimant for 37 years, that the soldier was his and Susan McKenna's son (which she knows because she lived near them in Ireland), that the soldier's mother died in Ireland about 3 years ago, and he hadn't remarried (p.72)
12 September 1876
Francis Starr, 72, living at 305 Master St, Philadelphia, testified that he had known the claimant since 1819, that he married Susan McKenna about 1825, that the soldier was his legitimate son, that Susan died when the soldier was a small child (which he knows since he was a near neighbor then), that he hasn't remarried, that the soldier was never married, 'that claimant has always been a well hearty man, has been able to earn his own living until recently' (p.73)
14 September 1876
Andrew Brown, 76 years old, applied for a pension (p.63)
residence: 1910 Darien Street, Philadelphia, PA (p.63)
witnesses: Robert Barnett (SE Corner Belgrade and Marlborough St, Philadelphia) and Francis Starr (303 Master St Philadelphia PA) (p.63)
15 September 1876
Special Agent W F Eaton submitted the evidence he had obtained about Andrew Brown (pp.61-62)
he noted that Thomas and Mary Todd, and Dr A H Graham, were dead (p.62)
'I can see no merit in this case under provisions of Section 4707 of the Revised Statutes' (p.62)
exhibit A claimant's affidavit admitting he didn't need support until 1873
exhibit B affidavit of claimant's daughter-in-law Jane Brown
exhibit C Ann Barnett
exhibit D Robert Barnett
exhibit E Sarah Evans
exhibit F Eliza Ferry
exhibit G Games Gormley
exhibit H Ellen Morrison
exhibit I Francis Starr
soldiers' letters
the investigation was apparently regarded as 'Fair' (p.74)--I don't know whether that means that it was unbiased, or that it was of fair quality
27 Sept 1876
'R[ecords] + A[ccounts] to drop [?]. Pens. notified' (pp.15, 51)
he was dropped because the evidence showed that he 'was not disabled at time of soldier's death' (pp.51, 52)
29 September 1876
the Pension Agent was instructed to drop him from the rolls, since he was not disabled when the soldier died (p.15)
13 October 1876
the claimant was told that the affiants' names could not be given (p.15)

city directories

[Philadelphia city directory entries]
[transcribed 6 July 2014, from Fold3]
Biddle's 1860 Philadelphia directory, page 154
Brown Andrew laborer, 3 Steam Mill al
[no other Andrew Brown is living on Steam Mill Alley; no Andrwe Brown is a morocco dresser]
Biddle's 1861 Philadelphia directory, page 105
Brown Andrew, moroccodresser, 3 Steam Mill al
Brown Andrew, laborer, 3 Steam Mill al
Biddle's and McElroy's Philadephia directory, page 74
Brown Andrew, laborer, 607 Vincent
Brown Andrew, Jr., mor. dresser, 607 Vincent

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revised 14 Jun 14
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