91st PA--William Harris Carpenter

William Harris Carpenter

William Carpenter (supplied by Marvin Noll--thanks!)

Before the war

He was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on 9 June 1837, to Samuel P Carpenter (b. ca 1814) and Jane Holmes Harris (born 8 August 1814, probably in Philadelphia Pennsylvania to William Harris (6 January 1781-30 January 1841) and Maria Loder (19 June 1792-1 May 1847), died 27 August 1909). [sources: date: 4, 54, 58, 59 (13 in 1850), 61. place: 4, 54, 58, 59, 61. parents: 32, 59]

In 1850, he was living in ward 3, Spring Garden, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was living with his (presumed) parents Samuel and Janus [?], his (presumed) siblings Kate, Charles, Anna, Frank, and Marion, and with Eliza Douglass. He had attended school within the year. [source: 59]

He was taken by his family to Centre County, Pennsylvania, when he was 8 years old. [source: 4]

When he was 14 years old, he was apprenticed to his Uncle John Harris, to learn the tanner's trade. [source: 4]

He returned to Philadelphia after three years, and attended school. He was a student when the war broke out. [source: 4]

During the war

He enlisted on 18 April 1861, for three months, as a private in company D of the 17th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry (one of the initial three-month regiments). The company mustered in on 25 April 1861. He mustered out with the company on 2 August 1861, at Philadelphia Pennsylvania. [sources: 4, 34, 43 (mustered out July 1861), 44, 50, 52]

He was mustered into service on 12 September 1861 [or 7 Oct 1861]. He was in company D. [sources: 1, 4 (12 Sep), 43 (11 Sep), 52, 62 (sgt, co.D)]

He was promoted to fourth sergeant on 8 October 1861. [sources: 4, 41]

Starting 10 February 1863, he was absent on furlough for ten days. On 21 February 1863, he had returned. [sources: 26, 27]

He fought at the Battle of Gettysburg. He was then a sergeant. [source: 47]

On 27 April 1863, the regimental quartermaster, David H Lentz, told him that the Regimental Adjutant, Benjamin Tayman, had detailed him to take charge of the Brigade Pioneer Corps knapsacks and rations. He collected them and placed them in the appropriate wagon. However, because of lack of time, he didn't mark the men's names on their knapsacks. When neither the Regimental Quartermaster nor the Acting Brigade Quartermaster knew what was to be done with the wagon, he asked the Brigade Commander, General Tyler, who said that he wanted it to move in the Brigade's rear. Carpenter then asked Colonel Gregory to be relieved, so that he could be with his company. Colonel Gregory asked by whose order Carpenter had been detailed, and on hearing that it was by the Adjutant's order, he told Carpenter to have the Adjutant detail someone to relieve him. Carpenter then found Tayman, and told him that he was to be relieved, by Colonel Gregory's order. (His testimony does not make clear whether he told Tayman that Tayman had to detail someone to relieve him.) After retrieving his sword from the wagon, Carpenter reported to the Regimental Quartermaster, saying that he had been relieved, and the Quartermaster said he thought that Lieutenant Snyder was to relieve him. Carpenter checked with Snyder, who denied having been relieved, and then checked with the Adjutant whether he had been relieved, and the Adjutant said he had, but didn't say who was to replace him. [source: 53]

On 28 April 1863, he was ordered to report to General Tyler, who wanted to know what had happened to the wagon. Carpenter said he didn't know, and that he had been relieved by order of Colonel Gregory. General Tyler then send for Colonel Gregory, who said that he did not know that Carpenter had been detailed by the General's orders. Gregory asked Tyler if he wanted Carpenter to find the wagon and bring it to the Brigade. General Tyler initially said that he did not, and sent Carpenter to rejoin the 91st, but about fifteen minutes later sent for Carpenter, and ordered him to retrieve the wagon as quickly as possible. [source: 53]

Carpenter found the wagon at the old camp, and returned to the Brigade, at Hartwood Church, with the wagon. He thought that none of the knapsacks had been disturbed. General Tyler ordered him to distribute the knapsacks as soon as possible, which Tayman did after the regiment camped at Kelly's Ford. However, some men weren't willing to come, because they were exhausted. He distributed the knapsacks, asking men to identify theirs, and left a guard on the others. [source: 53]

On the next morning (29 April 1863), Colonel O'Brien (34th Pennsylvania) claimed that some of his men had not received their knapsacks. Carpenter took them to the wagon, and distributed the remaining knapsacks, including several that the men did not claim, which they took to replace lost knapsacks. Carpenter noticed that some knapsacks had been removed, although the driver denied that anyone had taken any. He thought that four or five were missing. [source: 53]

He was promoted to first lieutenant of company K effective 26 March 1863, replacing Lewis Matlack. Sinex requested on 18 June 1863 that he be discharged to become a commissioned officer, having received his commission on 26 March 1863, and having been acting as a commissioned officer since then. On 5 July 1863, the regiment received an order from the Fifth Corps Headquarters (Major General Sykes), dated 28 June 1863, discharging him, at camp in the field. [sources: 3, 4, 22, 29 (which incorrectly reports him as promoted; this is corrected on the 30th's report), 30 (crossed out), 31, 42]

On 25 May 1863, he testified at the court martial of Benjamin Tayman, about the events of 27 April 1863. [source: 53]

He accompanied a detail of men assigned to provost duty on 12 August 1863. [source: 7]

On 18 August 1863, he was on picket duty. On 20 August 1863, he was transferred from company I to company K. [sources: 35, 36]

On 27 August 1863, he ordered William Dougherty (E) or William Dougherty (E) placed under arrest. [source: 37]

He commanded a picket on 28 August 1863. On the 28th, he was also detailed to bring recruits from the railroad station to the camp. [sources: 8, 9]

On 7 September 1863, he led a picket detail. [source: 10]

He was relieved from command of company I on 28 September 1863, and ordered to report to Captain Casner for duty. He may have accompanied a picket detail on the same day. [sources: 6, 12]

A detail under his command collected 225 muskets, some time before 3 October 1863. [source: 5]

First Lieutenant W H Carpenter, company K was assigned to company D on 15 December 1863. [sources: 13, 38]

On 23 December 1863, Sinex appointed him recruiting officer. He enlisted soldiers who re-enlisted as veteran volunteers on 24 December 1863. [sources: 6, 14]

He was transferred on 17 February 1864. (Where he was transferred to is not clear.) [source: 39]

On 13 March 1864, he was commanding company D, and on 15 March 1864. But on 15 March 1864, he was relieved from command of company D, and assigned to command of company A. [sources: 15, 16, 17]

He was wounded on 12 May 1864 at Spottsylvania Court House, Virginia. On 18 May 1864, his leave of absence was extended for 20 days, by surgeon's certificate. He forwarded that letter to the Assistant Adjutant General on 11 June 1864, from his residence at 1028 Brown Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. [sources: 1, 4, 33, 48]

He was promoted on 11 August 1864 to captain of company D. [sources: 1, 2, 4, 40, 45, 50, 52 (4 Aug)]

On 13 August 1864, he reported for duty, and assumed command of his company. [source: 21]

He was wounded while on picket, as reported on 6 September 1864. [source: 46]

On 6 September 1864, he was the only commissioned officer in company D. [source: 19]

On 19 September 1864 he was at Officers' hospital, Bedloe's Island, New York, and requested a transfer to Officers' Hospital, Philadelphia, near his family. On 27 September 1864 he was ordered transfered to Officers' Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. [sources: 4, 33]

On 15 October 1864, he requested a 20-day leave of absence, on surgeon's certificate. [source: 33]

On 5 December 1864 he was detailed as a member of a general court martial, convened at Philadelphia Pennsylvania, by special order 293 from the headquarters of the Department of the Susquehanna at Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. [source: 20]

He was still officially in command of company D on 14 February 1865, but George Coster was actually in command later in the month. On 17 February 1865, Sellers asked that he be returned to the 91st for duty, because company D had no commissioned officers present. [sources: 18, 20]

On 23 March 1865, he was assigned to command of company D and ordered to receipt to George Coster for all property. On 28 March 1865, Captain John Partenheimer was ordered to turn over his surplus ordnance and ordnance stores to Carpenter, who was to give him receipts for it. [source: 23, 24]

On 13 June 1865, he requested a 15-day leave of absence, because of serious illness in his family. On 16 June 1865, he went on a leave, which expired on 1 July 1865. [source: 28 (citing SO 133 HQ 5th Corps), 33]

On 26 June 1865, he was detailed as acting regimental quartermaster, because Archibald Nimmo had been appointed acting assistant quartermaster for the 5th corps. [source: 25]

He mustered out with his company on 10 July 1865. He was captain of company D. [sources: 1, 4, 43, 50, 62]

After the war

After the troops were disbanded, he held a position in the quartermaster's department. [source: 4]

He was married to Esther Melvin, in St Louis, Missouri, on 2 February 1869, by Reverend R.R. Pierce. She was born on 2 June 1850, in Ohio. They had nine children, who were all born in Clinton, Henry County, Missouri.

[sources: 32, 51, 54 (32 years in 1900; 9 children, 6 alive in 1900), 60 (9 children, 6 alive in 1910), 61]

In 1880, he was living in Clinton, Henry County, Missouri. He was living with his wife Ester, children Jennie, Harry, and Annie, and sister Mary. He was a lumber dealer. [source: 56]

On 22 June 1886, he applied successfully for a pension. [sources: 44, 50, 52]

In 1890, he was living in Bethlehem Township, Henry County, Missouri (post office Clinton). He had been wounded by gun shots in the hip and right arm. [source: 43]

In 1899, he was quoted in an ad for Doctor Branaman. According to the ad, he developed severe bronchitis during the Civil War, which was cured by Dr Branaman in 1896. Dr Branaman also cured his son Eugene's scarlet fever (with whooping cough and tonsilitis), and his wife's catarrh of the throat. [source: 49]

In 1900, he was living at 1712 Euclid Avenue, ward 9, Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri. He was living with his wife Ester and children Jennie, Allen, Mary, and Eugene. He was a tobacco salesman, and had been out of work for ten months in the previous year. [source: 54]

In 1910, he was (probably) living at 1306 Missouri Avenue, ward 4, East St Louis, St Clair County, Illinois. He was living with his wife Esther, son Eugene, and two boarders. He was a liquor dealer. [source: 60]

In 1920, he was living in the Kansas State Soldiers' Home, in Ford County, Kansas. He was living with his wife Esther. [source: 55]

On 24 September 1925, he died, in San Bernardino, California. He was buried at the Mountain View Cemetery, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, California, on 26 September 1925. [sources: 4, 50 (21 Sep), 52 (21 Sep), 58 (24 Sep)]

On 12 October 1925, his widow, Esther Carpenter, applied successfully from California for a pension. [sources: 44, 50, 52]

In 1928, Esther Carpenter, his widow, was living at 358 Burt Street, San Bernardino, California. She needed regular help because of general neuritis and weakness; she also had ventral hernia and serious rectocele. She had no property, her pension was her only income, and no one was legally obligated to support her. The House Committee recommended her pension be increased to $50 per month. [source: 51]

In 1930, his widow, Ester, was living at 6565 Arlington, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California. She was living with her daughter Mary and Mary's family. [source: 57]

His wife died on 7 November 1939 in San Bernardino, California. [source: 32]

Researcher

Marvin Noll, marvinmn@angelfire.com. [note: e-mail to him at this address failed on 27 May 2013]

Sources

1 Bates, Samuel Penniman. History of Pennsylvania volunteers, 1861-5. Harrisburg: B. Singerly, state printer, 1869-71. 5 volumes. 'Ninety-first regiment', volume 3, pages 186-233. (In the roster)

2 Official Army Register

3 letter, Sinex to Marvin, 18 June 1863

4 e-mail, from Marvin Noll <marvinmn@angelfire.com>, 2 Dec 2000 (reporting information from the National Archives and from family)

5 letter, Gregory to Marvin, 3 October 1863

6 letter, Sinex to Marvin, December 1863

7 special order 57, HQ 91st PA, 12 August 1863

8 special order 62, HQ 91st PA, 28 August 1863

9 special order 63, HQ 91st PA, 28 August 1863

10 special order 74, HQ 91st PA, 7 September 1863

11 special order 95, HQ 91st PA, 28 September 1863

12 special order 98, HQ 91st PA, 28 September 1863

13 special order 114, HQ 91st PA, 15 December 1863

14 special order 121, HQ 91st PA, 23 December 1863

15 letter, Sinex to Breck, 14 March 1864

16 letter, Sinex to Breck, 15 March 1864

17 special order 20, HQ 91st PA, 15 March 1864

18 furlough document for George Rodearmel, 14 February 1865, provided by Dave Rodearmel, transcription and image

19 letter, Sellers to Bennett, 6 September 1864

20 letter, Sellers to Morgan, 17 February 1865

21 special order 71, HQ 91st PA, 13 August 1864

22 regimental descriptive book

23 special order 21, HQ 91st PA, 23 March 1865

24 special order 24, HQ 91st PA, 28 March 1865

25 special order 37, HQ 91st PA, 26 June 1865

26 consolidated morning report, 10 February 1863

27 consolidated morning report, 21 February 1863 (Sergt Carpenter)

28 undated officers' furlough list, in regimental letter, order, guard, and furlough book (Wm H Carpenter)

29 consolidated morning report, 91st PA, 27 March 1863 (Sergt Carpenter)

30 consolidated morning report, 91st PA, 28 March 1863 (Sergt Carpenter) [crossed out, presumably because it repeats the 27th entry]

31 special orders received, #4 (Sergt Carpenter)

32 e-mail, Marvin Noll, 8 Dec 02

33 letters about extending his leave of absence (thanks to Marvin Noll for them!)

34 Bates (see #1) p.164 (17th PA) (William H Carpenter)

35 consolidated morning report, 91st PA, 18 August 1863 (Lieut Carpenter)

36 consolidated morning report, 91st PA, 20 Aug 1863 (Lieut Carpenter)

37 consolidated morning report, 91st PA, 27 August 1863 (Lieut Carpenter)

38 consolidated morning report, 91st PA, 18 December 1863 (1st Lieut Carpenter)

39 consolidated morning report, 91st PA, 17 February 1864 (#2) (L[t] Carpenter)

40 company D, list of commissioned officers (William H Carpenter)

41 company D, list of non-commissioned officers (William H Carpenter)

42 company D, register of men discharged (William H Carpenter)

43 1890 US census, veterans' schedule, Missouri, Henry County, Bethlehem Township, supervisor's district 6, enumeration district 78, page 1 (William Carpenter)

44 pension index, by name (William H Carpenter)

45 consolidated morning report, 91st Pennsylvania, 13 October 1864 (William H Carpenter)

46 consolidated morning report, 91st Pennsylvania, 6 September 1864 (Capt Carpenter)

47 Pennsylvania Memorial, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania (Wm H Carpenter)

48 'The Ninety-first Pennsylvania volunteers', Philadelphia Inquirer 8 June 1864 page 3 (Wm H Carpenter)

49 'Positive cure of disease' [advertisement], The Denver Evening Post (Denver, Colorado), 18 Jun 1899, page 8, column 3 (W H Carpenter)

50 pension index, by regiment, 91st PA Infantry, company D (William H Carpenter)

51 House Report 1928: 'Pensions and increase of pensions for certain soldiers, sailors, and marines of the Civil War, etc. December 5, 1928'. Serial Set volume 8982, session volume B, 70th Congress, 2nd Session (William H Carpenter)

52 pension index, by regiment, 91st PA Infantry, company K (William H Carpenter)

53 National Archives and Records Administration, Record Group 153: Records of the Office of the Judge Advocate General (Army), 1792-1982, general court martial, 25 May 1863 (William H Carpenter)

54 1900 US census, Missouri, Jackson County, Kansas City, ward 9, supervisor's district 5, enumeration district 104, microfilm series T623, film 863, page 221 = 5 A handwritten (Wm H Carpenter)

55 1920 US census, Kansas, Ford County, Kansas State Soldiers' Home, supervisor's district 7, enumeration district 60, microfilm series T625, film 532, page 208 = 3 A handwritten (Wm H Carpenter)

56 1880 US census, Missouri, Henry County, Clinton, supervisor's district 6, enumeration district 173, microfilm series T9, film 689, pages 351 = 26 B handwritten to 352 = 27 C handwritten (Wm H Carpenter)

57 1930 US census, California, Los Angeles County, Los Angeles City, supervisor's district 19, enumeration district 19-544, microfilm series T626, film 153, page 47 = 5 A handwritten (Ester Carpenter)

58 Find a grave, memorial 44663680, created by Pat Callahan, added 22 Nov 2009, accessed 14 January 2011 (William Carpenter)

59 1850 US census, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Spring Garden, ward 3, microfilm series M432, film 818, page 42 verso = 85 [?] handwritten (FamilySearch) (Wm H Carpenter)

60 1910 US census, Illinois, St Clair County, East St Louis, ward 4, enumeration district 116, microfilm series T624, film 322, page 221 = 7 B handwritten (FamilySearch) (Willard Carpenter)

61 'Shoemaker in-laws and outlaws', a gedcom, available on RootsWeb WorldConnect, contact Lonnie Shoemaker, updated 16 May 2013, accessed 26 May 2013 (William Harry Carpenter)

62 index to compiled service records of volunteer Union soldiers who served in organizations from the state of Pennsylvania (William H Carpenter)

Sources checked unsuccessfully

1860 US census
Ancestry and FamilySearch indices (accessed 26 May 2013)
he is not living with his parents (Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, ward 14, division 1 (microfilm series M653, film 1164, page 246 = 246 handwritten) (FamilySearch)
1870 US census
FamilySearch and Ancestry indices (accessed 26 May 2013)
applications for headstones for military veterans, 1925-1941
FamilySearch index (accessed 27 May 2013)

Display


William Harris Carpenter in the 91st PA gedcom on RootsWeb WorldConnect

William Harris Carpenter in the 91st PA database

1850 census

[1850 US census, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Spring Garden, ward 3, microfilm series M432, film 818, page 42 verso = 85 [?] handwritten (FamilySearch)]
[identification is uncertain]
line111213141516171819
Dwellings visited566        
Families visited621        
NameSamuel CarpenterJanus [??] DoWm H DoKate DoCharles DoAnna DoFrank DoMarion DoEliza Douglass
Age3535139643118
SexMFMFMFMFF
Color         
Occupation of males over 15 yearsBook Keeper        
Real estate owned         
BirthplacePennsylvaniaDoDoDoDoDoDoDoIreland
Married within year         
Attended school within year  11111  
Over 20 & can't read/write         
Deaf, dumb, blind, etc.         

1880 census

[1880 US census, Missouri, Henry County, Clinton, supervisor's district 6, enumeration district 173, microfilm series T9, film 689, pages 351 = 26 B handwritten to 352 = 27 C handwritten]
[identification is likely, since his wife's name matches the widow's name in the pension index by name (entry # 44 above)]
line4748495012
street nameOhio  
house number      
dwelling visit #      
family visit #241     
nameCarpenter Wm H.- Ester- Jennie- Harry- Annie- Mary
colorWWWWWW
sexMFFMFF
age393095128 [?]
month born if born in year      
relationship WifeDaughterSonDaughterSister
single      
married11    
widowed/divorced      
married during year      
occupationLumber DealerKeeping HouseAt Home" "At HomeClerk in Store
months unemployed      
currently ill?      
blind      
deaf/dumb      
idiotic      
insane      
disabled      
school this year  1   
can't read      
can't write      
birthplacePennsylMissouri""MissouriPennsyl
father's birthplacePennsylOhioPennsyl"Pennsyl"
mother's birthplacePennsylMissouri""MissouriPennsyl

1890 census, veterans schedule

[1890 US census, veterans' schedule, Missouri, Henry County, Bethlehem Township, supervisor's district 6, enumeration district 78, page 1]
[identification is confirmed]

[line] 6
[house] 45
[family] 46
[name] Carpenter William
[rank] Private
[company] D
[unit] 17 Pa H.A.
[enlistment date] = Apl 1861
[discharge date] = July 1861
[length of service] x years, 3 months, x days

[rank] Captain
[company] D
[unit] 91 Pa Inf
[enlistment date] 11 Sept 1861
[discharge date] 10 July 1865
[length of service] 3 years, 10 months, x days

[post office address] Clinton do [sc. Henry Co Mo]
[disability incurred] Wounded by gun shots in hip + right arm
[remarks] [blank]

1900 census

[1900 US census, Missouri, Jackson County, Kansas City, ward 9, supervisor's district 5, enumeration district 104, microfilm series T623, film 863, page 221 = 5 A handwritten]
[identification is likely, since his wife's name matches the widow's name in the pension index by name (entry # 44 above)]
line363738394041
streetEuclid Avenue
house number1712     
dwelling number86     
family number108     
nameCarpenter Wm H- Ester- Jennie- Allen F- Mary L- Eugene S
relationshipHeadWifeDaughterSonDaughterSon
colorWWWWWW
sexMFFMFM
birth dateJune 1837June 1850Nov 1869Feby 1883Feby 1886Oct 1894
age62593017145
married?MMMSSS
# years married32324   
mother of how many children? 92   
# of children living 62   
birthplacePennsylvaniaOhioMissouriMissouriMissouriMissouri
father's birthplacePennsylvaniaOhioPennsylvaniaPennsylvaniaPennsylvaniaPennsylvania
mother's birthplacePennsylvaniaGermanyOhioOhioOhioOhio
immigration year      
# years in USA      
naturalized citizen?      
occupationTobbaco [sic] Salesman  Day LaborerAt School 
# months not employed10  2  
# months in school    9 
can readYesYesYesYesYes 
can writeYesYesYesYesYes 
speaks EnglishYesYesYesYesYes 
owned/rentedR     
free or mortgaged      
farm/houseH     
# of farm schedule      

1910 census

[1910 US census, Illinois, St Clair County, East St Louis, ward 4, enumeration district 116, microfilm series T624, film 322, page 221 = 7 B handwritten (FamilySearch)]
[identification is uncertain; his wife's and son's name match the names in the 1900 census entry transcribed above, but his name is listed as 'Willard']
line6162636465
streetMissouri Ave
house nr1306    
dwelling nr13    
family nr5    
nameCarpenter Willard- Esther R- Eugene RMelvin WilliamMilitzer Francis
relationshipHeadWifeSonBoarderBoarder
sexMFMMF
colorWWWWW
age6360165845
marital statusM1M1SSS [?]
#years present marriage4242   
mother of # children 9   
mother of # living children 6   
birthplacePennsylvaniaIndianaMissouriMissouriGermany
father's birthplacePennsylvaniaOhioIndianaMissouriGermany
mother's birthplacePennsylvaniaGermanyOhioMissouriGermany
immigrated     
naturalized/alien     
speaks EnglishEnglishEnglishEnglishEnglishEnglish
occupationLiquor DealerNoneLaborerLaborerNone
nature of industry etc.Own Business FactoryFactory 
employer etc.Emp WW 
out of work 15 Apr 1910?No NoNo 
# weeks out of work 19090 00 
can readYesYesYesYesYes
can writeYesYesYesYesYes
school since 1 Sep 09     
owned/rentedR    
owned free or mortagaged     
farm/houseH    
nr on farm schedule     
civil war vetUA    
blind     
deaf & dumb     

1920 census

[1920 US census, Kansas, Ford County, Kansas State Soldiers' Home, supervisor's district 7, enumeration district 60, microfilm series T625, film 532, page 208 = 3 A handwritten]
[identification is likely, since his wife's name matches the widow's name in the pension index by name (entry # 44 above)]
line34
street  
house number74 
dwelling visit number2 
family visit number2 
nameCarpenter Wm H" Esther R
relationshipHeadWife
own/rentR 
free/mortgaged (if owned)  
sexMF
raceWW
age at last birthday8279
marital statusMM
year of immigration  
naturalized/alien  
year of naturalization  
attended school since Sept 1919  
can readYesYes
can writeYesYes
birth placePennsylvaniaIndiana
native language  
father's birthplacePennsylvaniaOhio
father's native language  
mother's birthplaceGermanyKentucky
mother's native languageGerman 
can speak EnglishYesyes
occupationNone 
industry, business  
employment status  
number of farm schedule  

1930 census

[1930 US census, California, Los Angeles County, Los Angeles City, supervisor's district 19, enumeration district 19-544, microfilm series T626, film 153, page 47 = 5 A handwritten]
[identification is probable, since (1) Mary's name, age, and birthplace match the Mary in the 1900 census entry transcribed above, and (2) the place matches William Carpenter's place of death]
line363738394041
streetArlington
house number6565     
dwelling visit #69     
family visit #70     
nameWaggoner Benj C- Mary L- Helen- Eugene- TheodoreCarpenter Ester
relationHeadWifedaughtersonsonmother in law
owned/rentedR     
value or rent$50.00     
radioR     
farmNo     
sexMFFMMF
colorWWWWWW
age474221171179
married?MMSSSS [sic]
age 1st marriage3419    
school/college since 9/29nonoyesyesyesno
can read & writeyesyesyesyesyesyes
birthplacePennsyvlaniaMissouriPennsylvaniaMissouriMissouriIndiana
father's birthplacePennsylvaniaPennsylvaniaMissouriPennsylvaniaPennsylvaniaGermany
mother's birthplacePennsylvaniaIndianaMissouriMissouriMissouriOhio
native language      
immigration year      
naturalization      
can speak EnglishYesYesYesYesYesYes
occupationClerkNoneNoneNoneNoneNone
industryBank     
worker classW     
at work yesterdayYes     
unemployment schedule #      
veteran?No     
war      
farm schedule #      

index to compiled service records

[index to compiled service records of volunteer Union soldiers who served in organizations from the state of Pennsylvania]
[transcribed 17 Mar 2014, from Fold3]


Carpenter, William H.
Co. D, 91 Pennsylvania Inf.
Sergt. | Capt.
See also [blank]

GENERAL INDEX CARD.

[endorsement]

[source: 'Positive cure of disease' [advertisement], The Denver Evening Post (Denver, Colorado), 18 Jun 1899, page 8, column 3
[I transcribed only the part of the ad that was relevant to Carpenter]

POSITIVE CURE OF DISEASE.
DR. BRANAMAN CURES QUICKLY AND PERMANENTLY.
[...]
[picture]
W. H. Carpenter and Family 1712 1/2 Euclid Avenus, Kansas City, Mo., cured by Dr. Branaman.
Cures a Whole Family.

Here is a story that reads like a romance. It tells of a whole family brought into the comfort of health and happiness through the marvelous, scientific skill of Dr. Branaman. The man who writes it is a prominent citizen of Kansas City and a veteran of the civil war. Read what he says today:

"I contracted bronchitis during the civil war," remarked Mr. W. H. Carpenter, who was a member of Ninety-first Pa. Vol. "It developed into bronchial catarrh and eventually into asthma. I suffered tortures for twenty years from all the chronic symptoms of the disease; had pains all over my chest and stitches in the side, was all the time gasping for breath, and when I had one of those dreadful paroxysms of coughing I felt as though I would choke to death. I tried all manner of remedies, but without any benefit. I consulted many doctors, but secured no relief. Finally I began treatment under Dr. Branaman. This was three years ago, in 1896. Inside of six weeks I had regained my health, and the symptoms of the dreadful disease have never returned. When a person remembers that this was three years ago it proves conclusively that the Branaman treatment cures permanently.

"My little son Eugene had scarlet fever, which brough on whooping cough and tonsilitis, and the little fellow was almost dead from strangulation. We had several doctors treat him and three of them gave him up for death, but none benefited him until he began Dr. Branaman's treatment, which was about the time I was cured. He has never had a recurrence of the disease and he is today as strong and healthy as any boy in Kansas City.

"My wife had suffered quite a good deal with catarrh of the throat, but under Dr. Branaman's treatment she is once more enjoying the sunshine of health and strength.

"The Branaman treatment is a sure specific for disease.

"W. H. CARPENTER."

pension increase

[House Report 1928: 'Pensions and increase of pensions for certain soldiers, sailors, and marines of the Civil War, etc. December 5, 1928'. Serial Set volume 8982, session volume B, 70th Congress, 2nd Session.]
[page 249]

H. R. 2603. Esther Carpenter, aged 77 years, whose post-office address is 358 Burt Street, San Bernardino, Calif., is the widow of William H. Carpenter, late a first lieutenant, Company K, Ninety-first Regiment Pennsylvania Infantry, and a captain, Company D, Ninety-first Regiment Pennsylvania Infantry, from April 18 to August 2, 1861, and from September 24, 1861, to July 10, 1865, and who died September 21, 1925.

Claimant and the late soldier were married February 2, 1869.

She is now pensioned as the soldier's widow under certificate No. 967641.

The medical evidence filed in support of this bill indicates claimant is in condition to require regular aid and attendance of another person, by reason of afflication from general neuritis and weakness. She also suffers from ventral hernia and serious rectocele.

The evidence also shows that she has no means or property and that her pension is her only income.

No one is legally bound to her support.

It is recommended her pension be increased to $50 a month.


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revised 19 Mar 14
contact Harry Ide at hide1@unl.edu with comments or questions