91st PA: Isaiah Collins

Isaiah Collins

Before the war

He was born on 16 March 1840, in Bedford County, Pennsylvania, to Andrew Collins and Eliza Walter. [sources: date: 7, 19; 4 (24 in 1864), 9 (12 in 1850), 10 (20 in 1860). place: 4, 9, 10. parents: 7]

In 1850, he was living in Southampton Township, Bedford County, Pennsylvania. He was living with Andrew and Eliza Collins and others. He had attended school within the year. [source: 9]

In 1860, he was living in Southampton Township, Bedford County, Pennsylvania. He was living with Eliza Collins and others. He was a farm laborer. [source: 10]

On 23 March 1862, he married Barbara Tewell, in Southampton Township, Bedford County, Pennsylvania. They were married by James Pennell. She was born on 1 September 1837, in Bedford County, Pennsylvania, to Moses Tewell and Mary Gordon. They had three known children:

John W Geary Collins was born about a week after General John W Geary was elected governor of Pennsylvania, and was named after him. [sources: 7, 11, 13 (0 children, 0 living in 1900), 17, 19, 20]

When he enlisted, he was a farmer. [source: 4]

Description

When he enlisted, he was 5 feet 8-1/2 inches tall, and had a fa[ir?] complexion, blue eyes, and light hair. [source: 4]

During the war

He was drafted from the sixteenth congressional district. He enlisted and was mustered into service on 21 September 1864. He enlisted for one year, at Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. (He reported to Chambersburg with Isaac W Smith and Thomas Hymes (I). While they were on the way, Collins told Hymes '[t]hat he was a sound and healthy man and would be compelled to go, as he had no claim for exemption'.) He was a private in company F. [sources: 1, 4, 5 (Oct 64), 16, 17]

His messmate, Isaac W Smith (F), later said:

that some time about the first of November this affiant and the said Collins participated in an advance upon the Weldon Railroad; that the marching was very heavy, and the weather inclement; that on said march the said Collins first manifested sympoms of diarrhea, which continued up to the 28th of March, 1865, when the said Collins and this affiant were sent to the 5th Corp Hospital, at City Point, Va., where they remained until about the first of April when they were removed to "Soldiers' Rest" in the same place, where they remained until about the 14th of April 1865, when they joined their command, and remained with it until discharged; that the said Collins appeared to be weak and suffering more or less from diarrhea up to the date of said discharge.

[source: 17]

On 28 March 1865, he was admitted to the 1st Division Hospital, Fifth Army Corps, and was transferred to the Depot Field Hospital, 5th Army Corps, at City Point, Virginia. He was admitted for treatment of acute bronchitis. [source: 17]

On 29 March 1865, he was returned to duty. [source: 17]

He was discharged near Washington DC by general order on 1 June 1865. He was a private, in company F. [sources: 1, 3, 5 (May 65), 16, 17 (30 May 65)]

After the war

On 8 February 1867, he died. He died of incipient phthisis (and perhaps also diarrhea). He was buried in the Mount Zion Graveyard, in Southampton Township, Bedford County, Pennsylvania. His grave has a Grand Army of the Republic star and flag. [sources: 2, 7, 8 (Mount Zion Christian Cemetery, Chaneysville, Bedford Cty PA), 17]

On 18 August 1869, his widow, Barbara Collins, successfully applied from Pennsylvania for a pension. Her witnesses included Moses Tewell and John Johnson, and Isaac W Smith. Her original attorney was Joseph R Durborrow, of Bedford, Pennsylvania, later replaced by James A Morgan. She was admitted on 6 June 1870, and received a pension of $8 per month, plus $2 for each child less than sixteen, retroactive to 8 February 1867. [sources: 6, 15, 17]

On 27 December 1869, someone sent a letter to the Pension Office under the name 'P.M.'. This person alleged that the neighbors of "Smith", whom he did not live near, report 'that he draws a pension on account of blindness and ... that it is only a pretence'. PM claimed he did not know whether that was true, but was 'aware that he is a considerable Rebel to his Government'. I do not know who Smith was, or whether the Pension Office took any action on PM's claims about him. But PM added a note about Barbara Collins' application for pension:

There is an application depending [sic] for Pension through J R Durborry [?] of Bedford Pa. for a pension for Barbary [sic] Collins Widow of Isaiah Collins a private in the 91st Pa Vols. She is not entitled to any Pension. her husband taken [sic] sick and died a considerable time after he was home discharged out of the army and his mother and Brothers say he was stouter after his return from the army than ever before, and he said so himself and done larger days work [sic]. If you write his mother Eliza Collins - His Brother James Collins they will vouch to [sic] these facts and they have threatened to write the Pension Office about it. they say his widow is not entitled to any Pension. The widow lives at Home with her father and her three children and her father is in good circumstances. In fact think [sic] he is the wealthiest man in the County and is him [sic] that is trying to get the pension. I do not write the above out of any Ill feelings towards any of the parties, but it would be an outrageous thing If she was [sic] to receive a pension. I could write you the character of the witnesses or [sic] a heart of stone, but will write no more. please do not Expose me about this matter. I have wrote [?] you facts for your Guidance, and I can bring the Whole Community to substanciate [sic] that there never ought any [sic] Pension to be granted in this Case.

[source: 21]

In 1870, his widow, Barbary Collins, was living in Southampton Township, Bedford County, Pennsylvania. She was living with her children Francis, Ester, and John, along with two others. [source: 11]

On 1 February 1875, someone in the Pension Office must have noticed the reference in PM's letter to Barbara Collins. The letter has written on it, 'Extract filed in case Feb. 1, 1875'. No doubt beause of this, an investigation was ordered. [source: 21]

On 17 April 1875, Special Agent W H Corkhill investigated PM's complaint, and recommended that Barbara Collins be dropped from the pension rolls. He interviewed Jacob Potts, Susannah Morse, Isaiah's mother Eliza, Isaiah's brothers James and Elijah, Isaac Collins, and Dr Thomas B Robasson. Potts allegedly claimed that Collins had a cough for some years before enlisting. Morse claimed that Collins frequently visited his brother in October 1865, when he was confined to bed with consumption (in her house because he had married one of her nieces). Eliza and James claimed that Isaiah's father had lung disease:

[He] was always troubled with an affliction of the Lungs, + that he the father had but one sound Lung, the other being partially destroyed. But that the father died of Typhoid fever[.]

According to Eliza and James, Isaiah did not have lung disease before enlisting, but seemed as healthy as ever when he returned, and told them (at different times) that serving in the army had improved his health. They and Elijah testified that Isaiah and worked as usual at all the manual labor involved in farming until October 1866. Isaac Collins reported that he was healthy in summer 1865, was plowing with a hill-side plow, and reported that his health was as good as ever. Finally, Dr Robasson reported that he had no records about Collins; his practice was to destroy the pass books with his accounts when the accounts were settled, since the information was 'of use no longer'. [sources: 17]

In his Corkhill correctly noted that Barbara Collins had presented little evidence for her claim. (But the evidence from his mess-mate Isaac W Smith and the physician Dr Robasson seems to me relatively high-quality evidence.) Corkhill correctly summarizes the evidence he gathered as inconsistent with Barbara Collins' claims, and with the testimony of Smith and Robasson. He denigrates the physician's testimony in this way:

from the service Dr Robasson says he attended the soldier in his last illness. "That said Collins shortly after his discharge from the US as a soldier died." the Dr in his second statement says A short time after his discharge he was called to see him. found him suffering[.] some idea of what the Dr. means by the word "shortly" may be seen when it is remembered [?] that the soldier did not die until about twenty months after his discharge + yet the Dr says "he died shortly after discharge".

Now, Corkhill refers to two statements by Robasson, and I found only one (dated 14 May 1870). But in that statement, Robasson clearly says that he saw Collins shortly after he returned from the Army 'and found him labouring under Chronic Diarrhoea, and incipient Phthisis, from effects of which disease he died'. That statement clearly does not claim that Collins died shortly after returning. Further, on 2 September 1880, Jacob Potts testified that in fact he did not know whether Collins before or after enlisting, and was actually in Ohio for three years beginning Spring 1863; while the signature on his affidavit before Corkhill is his, the statement wasn't read to him or written in his presence, and 'at a time affiant was out of the house cutting some wood he requiested affiant to sign it and he done so the signature Jacob Potts is his[;] that affiant was very anxious to be rid of him at the time [two illegible words] putting him out of the house ... he was intoxicated'. [source: 17]

On 20 May 1875, the Pension Office's Medical Division apparently recommended dropping Barbara Collins. The Special Services Division rated Corkhill's investigation 'Fair', which was the intermediate possibility, between 'Thorough' and 'Insufficient'. [sources: 17]

And on 1 June 1875, the Pension Office instructed the pension agent to drop Barbara Collins, because the 'soldier did not die of disease contracted in the service'. They notified Barbara Collins on 31 May 1875, and sent a letter to W C Smith on 22 June 1875. [sources: 17]

On 1 May 1879, the Pension Office sent Barbara Collins a letter. [sources: 17]

On 14 March 1880, Barbara Collins applied for readmission to the pension rolls, claiming:

That she was dropped from the pension rolls for some reason which to her was unknown, That she has no knowledge of any proposed or [illegible] investigation; that she was never notified that an investigation was proposed or intended and that without any knowledge or information on her part she is informed that a report was made to the pension department containing a certain statement of facts upon which the Commissioner of Pensions ordered that her name be stricken from the rolls, That from the information she has received as to the report or the alleged investigation and the statements made in said report, she is led to believe that the statement of facts made in said report are false, and that parties made affiants under a misapprehension and without knowing the contents of the papers to which they were sworn; That she now has in her possession a letter from one Jacob Potts in which he denies having made any affidavit and declares that the Agent who appeared to be investigating the matter interrogated him on the subject and that he told him he knew nothing of the matter; That Potts stated the same facts to affiant verbally and further told your affiant that the agent at the time was intoxicated[.]

She offered to provide 'abundant testimony' supporting her claims. [source: 17]

On 14 May 1880, in response to Barbara Collins' letter, someone at the Pension Office wrote:

It is alleged + I fear it may be true that the investigation in this case may not have been entirely fare [sic]. Please examine the papers and inform John M Coffrith [??] H + R whether another investigation should not be had - + tell me what you think

[source: 17]

Special Agent M E Jenks was sent to investigate. On 21-23 September 1880, he interviewed many witnesses: Lewis M Smith (I), Leonard S Tewell, Barbara Collins, Jacob Potts, David Tewell, Mary Tewell, Zack A Shaffer, John Johnson, Elijah Collins, Susannah Morse, Israel Bennet, Isaac Collins, and Dr Thomas P Robosson. Rather than summarize each bit of evidence, I will quote Jenk's thoughts:

I called at the residence of Dr Robisson Sept 21 on my way from Cumberland to the residence of claimant[.] I was informed he was from home. The claimant asked me if I had seen the Dr[.] I told her no, would call on him on my return to Cumberland. When I visited the Dr residence [sic] again Sept 23 I found him in Conversation with Daniel Tewell a near neighbour of claimant (Ev herewith)[.] Immediately after I entered the Drs [sic] house Mr Tewell instructed him to step out with him a moment[.] After an absence of about 15 minutes the Dr returned[.] I then stated the nature of my business to the Dr. He was in no manner surprised said he could not state anything different from his affidavit filed in the claim[.] had I that affidavit. I did not have said affidavit with me, and answered no. He then desired to see his affidavit before Mr Corkhill. I allowed him to read the same. He said yes that was all true but, he further told Mr Corkhill, that all his knowledge of the facts in the case was expressed in his former affidavit. I asked him if he would re-affirm his testimony before Mr Corkhill, he said yes. I wrote an affidavit to that effect, but he declined to sign it and said he preferred writing his own statement. I found the Dr a pleasant agreeable gentleman[.] I have no evidence that Mr Tewell spoke to him relative to Mrs Collins [sic] claim. I however mention the facts.'

...

In justice to Mr Corkhill I would say I am of the opinion he made an honest investigation. If the evidence filed by him is untrue it is the fault of the witnesses. With the exception of Jacob Potts such witnesses as I saw reaffirm their testimony. And they made substantially the same statements before I read their testimony to them[.] In reference to Mr Potts I would state he volunteered the information that Mr Corkhill staid [sic] all night in his house[.] I mention the fact to show his statement herewith is somewhat inconsistant.

Eliza Collins the mother of the soldier died quite recently[.] I made an earnest effort to procure the evidence of James Collins Mr Bowman with whom he recently made his home told me had gone to Bedford[,] that although he expected him back his return was indefinate [sic]. For some slight reasons that came to my notice I suspected he was kept out of the way intentionally.

I soon learned after arriving at Chaneysville the investigation would be troublesome and unsatisfactory as the matter had been much talked of and that persons who knew all the facts would not testify

Amos Collins the soldiers [sic] uncle always lived near him said he could not testify in the claim knew nothing of the condition of his health prior to enlistment or subsequent to service[.] knew nothing of his death or the cause thereof.

Ex Sheriff Lashly Abner Tewell Thomas Tewell + Moses Tewell knew just as much as Amos Collins. they could not testify. they all lived near the soldier

The country in the vicinity of the late residence of the soldier is thinly settled[.] I was assured by Isaac M Bennet very few of the original settlers now lived in the vicinity[.] There is much ill feeling between claimant + her family, and the Collins family. The same being the result of a law suit in the settlement of an estate

I saw such witnesses as the claimant desired[;] told her that the evidence was against her. She desired me to see Daniel Tewell, Mr Schaeffer Jacob Potts Isaac M Bennett + Dr Robisson[] She also hoped the testimony of Abraham, David and Phillip Ritchey now residing near Sullivan "Moultrey" Co Illinois would be obtained as they lived near the soldier for years. I have no doubt they will be notified

I do not think I have had a fair chance in this investigation[.] I do not think some of claimants [sic] friends and advisers have acted wisely[.] I have obtained the best evidence I could under the circumstances[.] I would state I have no positive evidence of any unfair or improper action on the part of the claimant or her friends. at the same time I have an opinion in the matter that is unfavorable to fair dealings[.]

I would mention when I called at the house of Elijah Collins he remarked I expected to see you today. As a man called at my house last night and tried to "pump" me about what testimony I would give in case any one called to see me in relation to Barbara Collins [sic] claim.

Isaac Collins said he knew an agent was in the neighbourhood. These persons live in isolated localities. that is some distance from the claimaint: The distance is not so great but two mountains has [sic] to be crossed the roads are [illegible]'

The Special Services Division rated Jenks' investigation 'fair', and noted: 'In view of the Agent's effort in the case a fair rating is given'. [sources: 17, 24, 25]

Despite Jenks' skepticism, on 22 November 1880, someone recommended restoring Barabara Collins' pension. And she was readmitted 22 November 1880, and received a pension of $8 per month, plus $2 per month for each child under 16, retroactive to 4 March 1875. [source: 17]

In 1880, his widow, Barbara Collins, was living in Southampton Township, Bedford County, Pennsylvania. She was living with Mary Tewell, and with her children Francis, Ester, and John. [source: 12]

Beginning 19 March 1886, Barbara Collins received a pension of $12 per month. The certificate was dated 1 May 1886. [source: 18]

In 1890, his widow, Barbara Collins, was living in Southampton Township, Bedford County, Pennsylvania. She was receiving a pension. [source: 5]

In 1900, his widow, Barbara Collins, was living in Southampton Township, Bedford County, Pennsylvania. She was living with her son John and his family. [source: 13]

In 1910, his widow, Barbara Collins, was living in Southampton Township, Bedford County, Pennsylvania. She was living with her son John and his family. [source: 14]

On 26 September 1915, his widow Barbara Tewell, died, in Southampton, Bedford County, Pennsylvania. She died of chronic interstitial nephritis, which she had had for three years. On 28 September 1915, she was buried, in Mt Zion Cemetery, Southampton Township, Bedford County, Pennsylvania. [sources: 7, 8, 17, 18, 19, 20]

On 13 October 1915, their son J G Collins sent a letter to the Pension Office, asking that the pension due her be sent to him, to pay off a $50 doctor bill for her. On 20 October 1915, the Pension Office sent a reimbursement blank to J G Collins. The pension certificate file does not refer further to a reimbursement request from him. [source: 17]

Sources

1 Bates, Samuel Penniman. History of Pennsylvania volunteers, 1861-5. Harrisburg: B. Singerly, state printer, 1869-71. 5 volumes. 'Ninety-first regiment', volume 3, pages 186-233. (In the roster) (Isaiah Collins)

2 message, from David and Carol Eddleman, 24 October 2002, on PABEDFOR list at RootsWeb, transcribing burial list from the Bedford Inquirer, 22 May 1908 (Isaiah Collins)

3 company F, register of men discharged (Isaah [?] Collins)

4 company F, second descriptive roll, #33 (Isaac [sic] Collins)

5 1890 US census, veterans' schedule, Pennsylvania, Bedford County, Southampton Township, supervisor's district 7, enumeration district 89, page 1 (Isaiah Collins)

6 pension index, by regiment, 91st PA Infantry, company F (Isaiah Collins)

7 'Michael S Caldwell's genealogy database as of 23 January 2011', a gedcom, available on RootsWeb WorldConnect, contact Michael, last updated 23 January 2011, accessed 5 February 2011 [citing James Smith Esq. 1760-1861 of Bedford County Pennsylvania and his descendants] (Isaiah Collins)

8 Find a grave, memorial 16835480, created by Kat, added 29 November 2006, accessed 5 February 2011 (Isaiah Collins)

9 1850 US census, Pennsylvania, Bedford County, Southampton Township, microfilm series M432, film 751, page 150 verso = 300 handwritten (Isaiah Collins)

10 1860 US census, Pennsylvania, Bedford County, Southampton Township, post office Ebbensville, microfilm series M653, film 1072, page 548 = 8 handwritten (Isah [sic] Collins)

11 1870 US census, Pennsylvania, Bedford County, Southampton Township, post office Chaneysville, microfilm series M593, film 1304, page 626 = 17 handwritten (Barbary Collins)

12 1880 US census, Pennsylvania, Bedford County, Southampton Township, supervisor's district 8, enumeration district 236, microfilm series T9, film 1098, page 335 = 23 C handwritten (Barbara Collins)

13 1900 US census, Pennsylvania, Bedford County, Southampton Township, supervisor's district 13, enumeration district 31, microfilm series T623, film 1376, page 161 = 10 A handwritten (Barbara Collins)

14 1910 US census, Pennsylvania, Bedford County, Southampton Township #3, supervisor's district 16, enumeration district 28, microfilm series T624, film 1312, page 3 = 3 A handwritten (Barbara Collins)

15 pension index, by name (Isaiah Collins)

16 index to compiled service records of volunteer Union soldiers who served in organizations from the state of Pennsylvania (Isaiah Collins)

17 abstract of widow's pension certificate file, National Archives and Records Administration, record group 15, WC 143,246 (Barbara Tewell widow of Isaiah Collins)

18 US Veterans Administration pension payment cards (Barbara Collins widow of Isaiah Collins)

19 'Isaiah Collins', in Hutchinson family tree (an Ancestry family tree), owner huguette23, accessed 1 Jan 2015 [this tree includes photos of Isaiah Collins and of Barbara Collins] (Isaiah Collins)

20 death certificate, Bedford County Pennsylvania, file 92623, 26 September 1915 (Barbara Collins)

21 letter, P.M. to Commissioner, Pension Office, 27 December 1869

22 M Corkhill, report of investigation, undated, but probably April-May 1875 (Isiah Collins)

23 Lewis M Smith, testimony, 21 September 1880 (Isaiah Collins)

24 statement by M E Jenks [about Dr Robosson], 23 (?) September 1880

25 statement by M E Jenks, 23 (?) September 1880 (Isiah Collins)

Sources checked unsuccessfully

1920 US census
FamilySearch index (accessed 4 February 2011)
1930 US census
Footnote (now Fold3) index (accessed 5 February 2011)
1940 US census
FamilySearch index (accessed 1 Jan 15)
records of headstones of deceased Union veterans, 1879-1903
FamilySearch index (accessed 1 Jan 15)
headstone applications for US military veterans, 1925-1949
FamilySearch index (accessed 1 Jan 15)
Pennsylvania, veterans burial cards, 1777-1999
Ancestry index (accessed 1 Jan 15)

Display



Isaiah Collins in the 91st PA database

1850 census

[1850 US census, Pennsylvania, Bedford County, Southampton Township, microfilm series M432, film 751, page 150 verso = 300 handwritten]
[identification is confirmed, by (1) the location, and (2) the references in the widow's pension certificate file abstracted below to his mother Eliza (65 in 1875), and brothers James (42 in 1875), John T, and Elijah (31 in 1880)]
line1516171819202122
Dwellings visited109       
Families visited109       
NameAndrew CollinsEliza "James "Sarah "Martha "Isaiah "John "Elijah "
Age45381816131292
Sexmfmffmmm
Color        
Occupation of males over 15 yearsFarmer "     
Real estate owned1500       
Birthplace" [sc. Penna]"""""""
Married within year        
Attended school within year  1111  
Over 20 & can't read/write        
Deaf, dumb, blind, etc.        

1860 census

[1860 US census, Pennsylvania, Bedford County, Southampton Township, post office Ebbensville, microfilm series M653, film 1072, page 548 = 8 handwritten]
[identification is confirmed; see the note on the 1850 census entry transcribed above]
line7891011121314
Dwelling number549       
Family number522       
NameEliza CollinsJames "Sarah "Martha "Isah [sic] "John "Elijah "Samuel Jos "
Age502624222018118
Sexfmffmmmm
Color        
Occupation Farm LabServing"Farm Lab" "  
Value of real estate owned1000       
Value of personal estate500       
Place of birthMdPenna""""""
Married within year        
Attended school within year     11 
Cannot read & write        
Deaf, dumb, blind, etc.        

1870 census

[1870 US census, Pennsylvania, Bedford County, Southampton Township, post office Chaneysville, microfilm series M593, film 1304, page 626 = 17 handwritten]
[identification is confirmed by references in the widow's pension certificate file abstract below to (1) the location, (2) his wife's name and age, and (3) his children's names and ages]
line282930313233
Dwelling-house number127     
Family number127     
NameCollins Barbary [sic]- Francis F- Ester- John W. G.Johnson MaryLeasure Tommy
Age327536915
SexFFFMFM
ColorWWWWWW
OccupationHouse KeepingAt HomeAt HomeAt HomeLiving with BrotherWorking on Farm
Real estate value500     
Personal estate value100     
BirthplacePaPaPaPaPaPa
Father foreign born      
Mother foreign born      
Birth month if born within year      
Marriage month if married within year      
Attended school past year 11   
Can't read      
Can't write      
Deaf, dumb, blind, etc.      
Male US citizen at least 21 years old      
Male US citizen at least 21 years old who can't vote ...      

1880 census

[1880 US census, Pennsylvania, Bedford County, Southampton Township, supervisor's district 8, enumeration district 236, microfilm series T9, film 1098, page 335 = 23 C handwritten]
[identification is confirmed; see the note on the 1870 census entry abstracted above]
line23456
street name     
house number     
dwelling visit #     
family visit #192    
nameTewell MaryCollins Barbara- Francis- Ester- John W.
colorWWWWW
sexFFMFM
age6642171513
month born if born in year     
relationship  SonDaughterSon
single  111
married     
widowed/divorced11   
married during year     
occupationKeeping houseAt homeFarm laborerAt homeWork on farm
months unemployed     
currently ill?     
blind     
deaf/dumb     
idiotic     
insane     
disabled     
school this year   11
can't read1    
can't write1    
birthplacePaPaPaPaPa
father's birthplacePaPaPaPaPa
mother's birthplacePaPaPaPaPa

1890 census, veterans schedule

[1890 US census, veterans' schedule, Pennsylvania, Bedford County, Southampton Township, supervisor's district 7, enumeration district 89, page 1]
[identification is confirmed by reference to his service in the 91st]

[line] 5
[house] 62
[family] 66
[name] Barbara Collins widow of Isaiah Collins
[rank] Private
[company] F
[unit] 91 P V
[enlistment date] Oct 1864
[discharge date] May 1865
[length of service] [blank] years, 8 months, [blank] days
[post office address] Chaneysville Pa
[disability incurred] [blank]
[remarks] Pensioned

1900 census

[1900 US census, Pennsylvania, Bedford County, Southampton Township, supervisor's district 13, enumeration district 31, microfilm series T623, film 1376, page 161 = 10 A handwritten]
[identification is confirmed by (1) the location (see the 1890 veterans schedule transcribed above), (2) Barbara's name and age, and (3) John's name and age (see the 1880 census entry transcribed above, and the widow's pension certificate file)]
line3031323334
street     
house number     
dwelling number169    
family number173    
nameCollins John G.- Agnes H.- McKinley- Sylva M- Barbara
relationshipHeadWifeSonDaughterMother
colorWWWWW
sexM FMFF
birth dateOct 1866Sept 1868 [?]Mar 1895Apr 1899Sept 1837
age33315162
married?MMSSWd
# years married66   
mother of how many children? 3  0
# of children living 2  0
birthplacePennsylvaniaPennsylvaniaPennsylvaniaPennsylvaniaPennsylvania
father's birthplacePennsylvaniaPennsylvaniaPennsylvaniaPennsylvaniaPennsylvania
mother's birthplacePennsylvaniaPennsylvaniaPennsylvaniaPennsylvaniaPennsylvania
immigration year     
# years in USA     
naturalized citizen?     
occupationFarmer    
# months not employed0    
# months in school     
can readyesyes  yes
can writeyesyes  yes
speaks Englishyesyes  yes
owned/rentedO    
free or mortgagedF    
farm/houseF    
# of farm schedule113    

1910 census

[1910 US census, Pennsylvania, Bedford County, Southampton Township #3, supervisor's district 16, enumeration district 28, microfilm series T624, film 1312, page 3 = 3 A handwritten]
[identification is confirmed; see the note on the 1900 census entry transcribed above]
line4647484950
street     
house nr     
dwelling nr48    
family nr48    
nameCollins, John W.- [illegible; may be 'Obelena A.']- , McKinley- Sylva M.- Barbara
relationshipHeadWifeSonDaughterMother
sexMFMFF
colorWWWWW
age42 40151072
marital statusM1M1SSWd
#years present marriage1616   
mother of # children 3   
mother of # living children 2   
birthplacePennsylvaniaPennsylvaniaPennsylvaniaPennsylvaniaPennsylvania
father's birthplacePennsylvaniaPennsylvaniaPennsylvaniaPennsylvaniaPennsylvania
mother's birthplacePennsylvaniaPennsylvaniaPennsylvaniaPennsylvaniaPennsylvania
immigrated     
naturalized/alien     
speaks EnglishEnglishEnglishEnglishEnglishEnglish
occupationFarmerNoneFarm LaborerNoneNone
nature of industry etc.Home farm Home farm  
employer etc.Emp W  
out of work 15 Apr 1910?     
# weeks out of work 1909     
can readyesyesyesyesyes
can writeyesyesyesyesyes
school since 1 Sep 09  yesyes 
owned/rentedR    
owned free or mortagaged     
farm/houseH    
nr on farm schedule32    
civil war vet     
blind     
deaf & dumb     

index to compiled service records

[index to compiled service records of volunteer Union soldiers who served in organizations from the state of Pennsylvania]
[transcribed 23 Mar 2014, from Fold3]


Collins Isaiah
Co. F, 91 Pennsylvania Inf.
Pvt | Pvt
See also [blank]

GENERAL INDEX CARD.

letter from P.M.

[letter, P.M. to Commissioner, Pension Office, 27 December 1869]
[in dependent's pension certificate file, WC 143,246, Barbara Collins widow of Isaiah Collins]
[transcribed 4 January 2015, from page 49 of file on Fold3]
[Written over the letter, in a different hand: 'Extract filed in case Feb. 1, 1875.' I do not know how to explain the delay from 1869 to 1875]


Elbinsville P.O.
Bedford Co Pa

Dec 27th 1869

Hon Com. Pensions

Sir

I can not [sic] say but little in regard to Smith[.] he does not live close my [sic] place. It is reported by his neghbors [sic] that he draws a pension on account of blindness and it is said that it is only a pretence, and that he only does so in order to draw his pension[.] how it is I cannot say. I am aware that he is a considerable Rebel to his Government.

There is an application depending [sic] for Pension through J R Durborry [?] of Bedford Pa. for a pension for Barbary [sic] Collins Widow of Isaiah Collins a private in the 91st Pa Vols. She is not entitled to any Pension. her husband taken [sic] sick and died a considerable time after he was home discharged out of the army and his mother and Brothers say he was stouter after his return from the army than ever before, and he said so himself and done larger days work [sic]. If you write his mother Eliza Collins - His Brother James Collins they will vouch to [sic] these facts and they have threatened to write the Pension Office about it. they say his widow is not entitled to any Pension. The widow lives at Home with her father and her three children and her father is in good circumstances. In fact think [sic] he is the wealthiest man in the County and is him [sic] that is trying to get the pension. I do not write the above out of any Ill feelings towards any of the parties, but it would be an outrageous thing If she was [sic] to receive a pension. I could write you the character of the witnesses or [sic] a heart of stone, but will write no more. please do not Expose me about this matter. I have wrote [?] you facts for your Guidance, and I can bring the Whole Community to substanciate [sic] that there never ought any [sic] Pension to be granted in this Case.

P.M.


[the following note is crossed out]
Smith George
30-12-69
P.M. Knows nothing personally but hears that Smith pretends blindness

Barbary Collins
Wid. of Isaiah
91st Pa.

Disease which caused death (Ch. Diarrhoea) probably contracted subsequent to service.

Learn cause of death.

Bentn [?]
Feb 10 /75

Jenks' statement about Robosson

[statement by M E Jenks, 23 (?) September 1880]
[in widow's pension certificate file, WC 143,246, Barbara Collins widow of Isaiah Collins, F 91st PA Infantry]
[transcribed 11 January 2015, from Fold3; image 85]


I called at the residence of Dr Robisson Sept 21 on my way from Cumberland to the residence of claimant[.] I was informed he was from home. The claimant asked me if I had seen the Dr[.] I told her no, would call on him on my return to Cumberland. When I visited the Dr residence [sic] again Sept 23 I found him in Conversation with Daniel Tewell a near neighbour of claimant (Ev herewith)[.] Immediately after I entered the Drs [sic] house Mr Tewell instructed him to step out with him a moment[.] After an absence of about 15 minutes the Dr returned[.] I then stated the nature of my business to the Dr. He was in no manner surprised said he could not state anything different from his affidavit filed in the claim[.] had I that affidavit. I did not have said affidavit with me, and answered no. He then desired to see his affidavit before Mr Corkhill. I allowed him to read the same. He said yes that was all true but, he further told Mr Corkhill, that all his knowledge of the facts in the case was expressed in his former affidavit. I asked him if he would re-affirm his testimony before Mr Corkhill, he said yes. I wrote an affidavit to that effect, but he declined to sign it and said he preferred writing his own statement. I found the Dr a pleasant agreeable gentleman[.] I have no evidence that Mr Tewell spoke to him relative to Mrs Collins [sic] claim. I however mention the facts.'

Jenks' statement about his investigation

[statement by M E Jenks]
[in widow's pension certificate file, WC 143,246, Barbara Collins widow of Isaiah Collins, F 91st PA Infantry]
[transcribed 11 January 2015, from Fold3; image 86-88]

In justice to Mr Corkhill I would say I am of the opinion he made an honest investigation. If the evidence filed by him is untrue it is the fault of the witnesses. With the exception of Jacob Potts such witnesses as I saw reaffirm their testimony. And they made substantially the same statements before I read their testimony to them[.] In reference to Mr Potts I would state he volunteered the information that Mr Corkhill staid [sic] all night in his house[.] I mention the fact to show his statement herewith is somewhat inconsistant.

Eliza Collins the mother of the soldier died quite recently[.] I made an earnest effort to procure the evidence of James Collins Mr Bowman with whom he recently made his home told me had gone to Bedford[,] that although he expected him back his return was indefinate [sic]. For some slight reasons that came to my notice I suspected he was kept out of the way intentionally.

I soon learned after arriving at Chaneysville the investigation would be troublesome and unsatisfactory as the matter had been much talked of and that persons who knew all the facts would not testify

Amos Collins the soldiers [sic] uncle always lived near him said he could not testify in the claim knew nothing of the condition of his health prior to enlistment or subsequent to service[.] knew nothing of his death or the cause thereof.

Ex Sheriff Lashly Abner Tewell Thomas Tewell + Moses Tewell knew just as much as Amos Collins. they could not testify. they all lived near the soldier

The country in the vicinity of the late residence of the soldier is thinly settled[.] I was assured by Isaac M Bennet very few of the original settlers now lived in the vicinity[.] There is much ill feeling between claimant + her family, and the Collins family. The same being the result of a law suit in the settlement of an estate

I saw such witnesses as the claimant desired[;] told her that the evidence was against her. She desired me to see Daniel Tewell, Mr Schaeffer Jacob Potts Isaac M Bennett + Dr Robisson[] She also hoped the testimony of Abraham, David and Phillip Ritchey now residing near Sullivan "Moultrey" CCo Illinois would be obtained as they lived near the soldier for years. I have no doubt they will be notified

I do not think I have had a fair chance in this investigation[.] I do not think some of claimants [sic] friends and advisers have acted wisely[.] I have obtained the best evidence I could under the circumstances[.] I would state I have no positive evidence of any unfair or improper action on the part of the claimant or her friends. at the same time I have an opinion in the matter that is unfavorable to fair dealings[.]

I would mention when I called at the house of Elijah Collins he remarked I expected to see you today. As a man called at my house last night and tried to "pump" me about what testimony I would give in case any one called to see me in relation to Barbara Collins [sic] claim.

Isaac Collins said he knew an agent was in the neighbourhood. These persons live in isolated localities. that is some distance from the claimaint: The distance is not so great but two mountains has [sic] to be crossed the roads are [illegible]'

special agent Corkhill's summary

[M Corkhill, report of investigation, undated, but probably 1875]
[in widow's pension certificate file, WC 143,246, Barbara Collins widow of Isaiah Collins, F 91st PA Infantry]
[transcribed 8 January 2015, from Fold3; images 53-57]
[Corkhill misinterprets Robosson's testimony; Robosson claimed in his statement of 14 May 1870 that 'A short time after the return of said Collins from the service aforesaid he was called in to see him, the said Isaiah Collins, and found him labouring under Chronic Diarrhoea, and incipient Phthisis, from effects of which disease he died'--which does not claim that Collins died a short time after his return from service]


Case of Barbara Collins Pa 143246
Widow of Isaiah Collins
Priv Co F. 91st Reg. Pa Vol
residence Elbinsville Bedford Co Pa


Hon J Th [?] Baller Com of Pen

Sir

I have the honor most respectfully to submit the following report of my investigation of the above case[.] Isiah [sic] Collins the husband of Pensioner was mustered as a prv. of Co. F 91st Reg Pa Vols on 21st Sept. 1864 for one year. Generally mustered out on May 30 1865 "No evidence of Disability"[.] The widow in her application for pension filed 16th August 1869 declares among other things that her Husband Isiah Collins died on or about the 8th day February 1867 of Chronic Diarrhea contracted in the line of duty in the service of the United States.

There is but little evidence on file in support of this claim. Thomas Hymes swears on the 26th August 1869 "That he accompanied the said Collins to Chambersburg when he was Drafted[.] On the way Collins told him that he was a sound healthy man and would be compelled to go as he had no claim for exemption" Isaac W Smith swears 24th August 1869. That Soldier was a sound healthy man before he entered the service[.] That he and soldier were sent to the 5th Corps Hospital at City Point Va. were then removed to Soldiers rest in same place where they remained until about the 14th April 1865 when they joined their command + remained with it until discharge. That said Collins appeared to be really suffering more or less from Diarrhea up to the date of their discharge"[.] Thomas P Robasson has two sworn statements on file on 20th Feb 1869 declares that he attended the soldier in his Last Illness[.] That shortly after his discharge from the U.S. Service he died of Lung disease + Diarrhea which he undoubtedly contracted in the service of the U.S. his next statement date 14th May 1870 A short time after the return of said Collins from the service he was called to see him the said Collins. found him labouring under Chronic Diarrhea and incipient Phthisis of which disease he died

John Johnson + Abner Tewell swear August 26th 1869 that they saw Soldier after his death and that they attended his funeral. That is the amount of the Evidence on file in support of the claim.

The attention of the Hon Com is now called to the testimony of such witnesses as have been examined by the Agent. The most important of which is that of the Mother + Brother of the soldier. Jacob Potts knew but little in refference [sic] to the case. Exhibit A. Miss Maize has know [sic] the family a long time. says the soldier called frequently at her house to see a sick [illegible] Thought soldier in as good health after his return from the Army as he had been before see Exhibit B. Eliza + James Collins mother + Brother of soldier declare that soldier returned home about the 9th June 1865 that he was then in as good health as he had ever been. at different time [sic] declared that the Army serivce had improved his health. say soldier made a full hand [?] in all kinds of hearvest [sic] work without a murmur of a days [sic] sickness. health continued good until the month of Oct 1866 when he complained of pains in Breast + shoulder[.] declare his first Medical treatment to have been in Nov. 1866. and Death to have occurred 8th Feb 1867. See Exhibit C

Elijah Collins Brother of Soldier says he regarded soldier as in better health after his return from the serv. than it had been before, made a full hand all through hearvest [sic][.] says the soldier was not unwell until about the month of Novem 1866. at which time he called upon Dr Robasson [?] for Medicine + advice see Exhibit D

Isaac Collins declares that soldier told him that his health was as good + that he felt as stout as he ever did in his Life. this conversation occurred in August 1865 - see Exhibit E

Thomas P Robasson MD can not say much about the case. has no record of his services see Exhibit F

From the Testimony herewith presented it is clear to the mind of your Agent that the soldier did not die of any disease contracted in the U.S. Service. according to the Testimony of the Mother + two Brothers of the soldier he arrived at home about the 9th Jun 1865. was not a day sick until about the month of Oct. or Nov. 1866. at least 18 months after his discharge from the service Dr Robasson says he attended the soldier in his last illness. "That said Collins shortly after his discharge from the US as a soldier died." the Dr in his second statement says A short time after his discharge he was called to see him. found him suffering[.] some idea of what the Dr. means by the word "shortly" may be seen when it is remembered [?] that the soldier did not die until about twenty months after his discharge + yet the Dr says "he died shortly after discharge". Your Agent took no testimony in refference [sic] to the ages of children[.] was not instructed to do so. in fact i did not deem this necessary. It is the opinon of the Agent. that Isaiah Collins. Prv Co F. 91 Regt Pa Vols. did not die of any disease contracted while in the US Service. and therefore recommends [sic[ that the name of Barbara Collins be Dropped from the Pension Rolls

I am sir
Respectfully
Your
Obt ser

M Corkhill
Special Agent

Smith's testimony

[Lewis M Smith, testimony, 21 September 1880]
[in widow's pension certificate file, WC 143,246, Barbara Collins widow of Isaiah Collins, F 91st PA Infantry]
[transcribed 10 January 2015, from Fold3; image 66]

'that he was Pri Co I 91st Pa Vols was well acquainted with Isaiah Collins Pr Co I same Regt had no personal acquaintance with said soldier prior to his enlistment. Has recollection that when said soldier joined the Regt he was to all appearance a stout healthy man with no apparant disease. Cannot now recollect the time when or the place where he joined the Regiment. Thinks he first saw him at Carlisle just before he joined the Regt. That affiant saw said soldier occasionaly [sic] after he joined his company and so far as he remember his health continued good to the time when the Regiment was in front of Petersburgh [sic] Va. In the fall of 1864. Remembers being in his company and remembers he complained of being sick w the Diarrhoea. Saw him daily while the Regt was in front of Petersburgh [sic] He looked badly he complained of Diarrhoea continuously, He was in Hospital a short time. He continued to complain of Diarrhoea so long as he remained in the service. the greater part of the time he was unfit for duty. He was pale looking and emaciated and evidently quite weak when mustered out, about May or June 1865. Knew him from the date of his discharge to his death. he always was complaining of Diarhhoea he done [sic] but little work of any kind was informed he died of Diarhoea cannot give the date of his death cannot remember if he ever [?] had a cough. Was told he died of Diarrhoea and believe such as the fact. Never heard he died of Typhoid fever or consumption.'

widow's pension certificate file

[widow's pension certificate file, National Archives and Records Administration, record group 15, WC 143,246, Barbara Tewell widow of Isaiah Collins]
[abstracted from 96 pages on Fold3, 1 January 2015]
23 March 1862
married Barbara Tewell in Southampton Township, Bedford County PA by Rev Jas Pennell (pp.7, 10)
3 children under 16: Francis Thomas (born 20 Dec 1862), Esther (born 8 Oct 1864), John W Geary (born 17 Oct 1866) (pp.7, 51)
21 Sep 1864
drafted and mustered
Nov 1864
Isaac W Smith, his messmate, swore that during the advance on Weldon RailRoad they were subjected to great exposure and the said Private Collins became sick with diarrhoia, which continued until they were both sent to hospital on 28 March 1865 [see pp.45-46 abstracted below]
28 Mar 1865
admitted to 1st division hospital, 5th Army Corps (p.9)
transferred to Depot Field Hospital 5th Army Corp, City Point, VA, for treatment of acute bronchitis (p.9)
29 Mar 1865
returned to duty (p.9)
30 May 1865
mustered out
8 Feb 1867
died of diarrhoea and incipient phthisis, contracted in the service (p.7 [declaration, chronic diarrhea])
died in Southampton Twp Bedford County PA (p.7)
16 August 1869
Barbara Collins swore that she had applied for pension, and applied for additional pension under the act of 25 July 1866--she had not remarried, had three children (as above), etc. (p.51)
witnesses Moses Tewell and John Johnson (pp.51-52)
18 August 1869
Barbara Collins applied for a pension (with minor children) under the act of 14 July 1862 (p.7)
31 years old, resident of Southampton Township, Bedford County, post office Elbinsville Bedford County PA (p.7)
original agent: Joseph R Durborrow, Bedford, PA (p.7)
witnesses: Moses Tewell, John Johnson (Southampton Two, Bedford Cty PA) (p.7)
agent Jas A Morgan (by 4 May 1870--see p.22)
dated 16 Aug 1869 (p.7)
passed 6 June 1870, certificate for $8 per month plus $2 additional for each child less than 16, retroactive to 8 Feb 1867 (pp.5, 20)
Wm J Hynes examiner (p.5)
24 Aug 1869
Isaac W Smith (Southampton Twp) swore that he was intimately acquainted with Isaiah Collins for at least 6 years before he was drafted, that he was sound and healthy then, 'that this affiant reported to Chambersburg in company with said Collins, and were both held to service and ordered to report to the Company and Regiment aforesaid; that some time about the first of November this affiant and the said Collins participated in an advance upon the Weldon Railroad; that the marching was very heavy, and the weather inclement; that on said march the said Collins first manifested symptoms of diarrhea, which continued up to the 28th of March, 1865, when the said Collins and this affiant were send to the 5th Corps Hospital, at City Point, Va., where they remained until about the first of April when they were removed to "Soldiers' Rest" in the same place, where they remained until about the 14th of April 1865, when they joined their command, and remained with it until discharged; that the said Collins appeared to be weak and suffering more or less from diarrhea up to the date of said discharge;' (pp.45-46)
he was Collins' messmate 'throughout his entire term of service' (p.46)
26 Aug 1869
Rev James Pennell, Southampton Twp, Bedford County PA, swore that he married Isaiah Collins and Barbara Tewell, in Southampton Township, Bedford County, Pennsylvania, on 23 March 1862 (p.10)
26 Aug 1869
Mary Tewell, Southampton Twp, swore that she is Barbara Collins' mother, that she was present at Francis Thomas Collins' birth on 20 Dec 1862, the attendant physician has since moved; she was also present at Esther's birth on 8 Oct 1864 (born at her--Mary's--residence), no physician was present, but a midwife (Nancy Elbin) was (pp.12-13)
26 Aug 1869
Nancy Elbin, Southampton Twp, swore that she is a regular midwife, and was present at Esther Collins' birth on 8 Oct 1864 (p.14)
26 Aug 1869
Hetty Moss, Southampton Twp, swore that she assisted Barbara Collins on 17 Oct 1866 at the birth of John W Geary Collins, which she remembers because it was about a week after the election of Gen John W Geary as PA governor, after whom the child was named, that no physician was present, that she is a midwife (p.16)
26 Aug 1869
John Johnson and Abner Tewell (both of Southampton Twp) swore that Isaiah Collins died on 8 Feb 1867, that they attended his funeral and saw the body (p.30)
26 Aug 1869
Barbara Collins (Elbinsville) swore that she hasn't been able to locate the surgeon who treated Isaiah in the Army, or any of his company's commissioned officers, that she has been told he was treated at City Point VA General Hospital in March 1865, that he was sound and healthy before enlisting, that the physician who assisted at Francis Thomas's birth has moved to parts unknown and no physicians assisted at the other births (pp.37-38)
26 Aug 1869
Thomas Hines (Southampton Twp) swore that he was intimately acquainted with Isaiah Collins for 10 years, that Collins was sound and healthy before enlisting, 'that he accompanied said Collins to Chambersburg when drafted; and on the way thither said Collins said to this affiant: That he was a sound and healthy man and would be compelled to go, as he had no claim for exemption' (p.43)
14 September 1869
the Pension Office sent circular 6 to the Surgeon General (p.22)
17 November 1869
the Surgeon General's Office reported the above-summarized information to the Pension Office (p.9)
2 December 1869
the Pension Office wrote for a physician's diagnosis of the cause of death and Collins' health at discharge (p.22)
27 Dec 1869
letter from 'P.M.' transcribed above (p.49)
on the next image (the other side of the letter?) a note from 1869 mentions only his reference to Smith; a note about Barbara Collins is dated 10 Feb 1875 (p.50)
4 May 1870
the Pension Office wrote 'as above' [presumably = 2 Dec 1869?] to Morgan (p.22)
14 May 1870
Dr Thomas P Robosson of Flintstone County Md swore that he was intimately acquainted with Isaiah Collins before he enlisted, that Collins was sound and healthy, that he saw Collins shortly after he returned from the Army 'and found him labouring under Chronic Diarrhoea, and incipient Phthisis, from effects of which disease he died' (p.34)
[undated, probably 1875]
special agent Corkhill investigated the case, and recommended dropping Barbara Collins (pp.53-57; see transcription of his report above)
10 April 1875
Jacob Potts, 37, Pina Creek, Bedford County, testified to Corkhill that he was a farmer and blacksmith, had lived in that neighborhood all his life, and had known Isaiah Collins [the name seems to be written as 'Colling'] from his boyhood, for at least 15 years. was a close intimate of him. knew he had a cough for some years before enlisting. Potts didn't see him immediately after his return, and knows nothing of the cause of his death (p.91)
12 April 1875
Susanah Morse, 52, Pina Creek, Bedford County, testified to Corkhill that 'She is a Maiden Lady', had lived their her whole life, knew Barbara Collins from birth, was intimately acquainted with Isaiah Collins, that one of his brothers married a niece of hers, that the brother was confined to bed at her house from 4 October 1865 to 29 October 1865, that he had consumption, that the soldier called on him frequently, that he did other work, and that she thought he was as healthy as she had ever seen him (p.92)
Eliza and James Collins, 65 and 42, Purcell PO, Bedford County, testified to Corkhill that they are Collins' mother and brother, the soldier's father 'was always troubled with an affliction of the Lungs, + that he the father had but one sound Lung, the other being partially destroyed. But that the father died of Typhoid fever[.] Affiants further declare that the Brother of Soldier (John T. Collins) died of Lung Disease on 15th December 1865. These Affiants further declare that the soldier had not had an attack of Lung disease before he entered the service. Affiants further declare that the soldier returned home about the 10th day of June 1865' and seemed as healthy as ever, and that he told them at various times that the service had improved his health, that he worked on the farm until the harvest, that he 'made a full hand at ... all kinds of Manual Labour usual in farming', with any murmur or day's sickness, until October 1866, when he complained of pains in his breast and shoulder, which continued until he died on 8 February 1867. his first medical treatment was in October 1866 (p.93)
Elijah Collins, 26, Purcell PO, Bedford County, testified to Corkhill that he was Collins' brother, that about when Collins returned from the Army about 9 June 1865 he looked as healthy as ever, and that he worked with Isaiah on the farm until seeding time, that he 'made a full hand at Mowing, Cradling, Binding, + all kinds of work', that he never heard a murmur or complaint until November 1866 when he complained of being unwell, that Isaiah wasn't under medical treatment until November 1866 (p.94)
Isaac Collins, 32, Elbinsville PA, testified to Corkhill that he had known Barbara and Isaiah Collins for about 20 years, that he saw them in summer 1865 (probably August), that Isaiah was plowing with a hill-side plough, that he talked to Isaiah for about an hour about the war, and Isaiah told him that his health was as good as ever, and that he appeared to be healthy then (p.95)
Thomas B Robasson MD, [no age given], of Flintstone, Alleghany County MD, testified to Corkhill that he is practicing physician for the community, where he had lived about 16 years, that he had known Barbara Collins for some years, and had some knowledge of Isaiah, he didn't know anything positively about his disability or treatment, and had no record of Collins in his book, that he keeps a pass book and when the accounts in it are settled he destroys it since it is 'of use no longer' (p.96)
17 April 1875
'Money Recovered' (p.90)
Corkhill recommended that she be dropped (p.90)
20 May 1875
recommended dropping her (p.90)
since the page includes a note referring the case to Dr Hood Med Div [?] asking whether the death was contracted in the service, I suspect that was his answer (p.90)
the investigation was rated 'Fair' (from three explicitly stated choices: Thorough, Fair, Insufficient (p.90))
31 May 1875
'Finance to drop, Pensioner notified' (p.21)
1 June 1875
'Pen agent to Drop' 'soldier did not die of disease contracted in the service' (p.21)
22 June 1875
the Pension Office apparently sent a letter (?) to W C Smith (p.21)
1 May 1879
the Pension Office sent a letter to the pensioner 'as per endorsement inside' (p.21)
just below that is this note: 'Paid to March 4" 1875' (p.21)
14 March 1880
Barbara Collins swore that she was a pensioner, 'That she was dropped from the pension rolls for some reason which to her was unknown, That she has no knowledge of any proposed or [illegible] investigation; that she was never notified that an investigation was proposed or intended and that without any knowledge or information on her part she is informed that a report was made to the pension department containing a certain statement of facts upon which the Commissioner of Pensions ordered that her name be stricken from the rolls, That from the information she has received as to the report or the alleged investigation and the statements made in said report, she is led to believe that the statement of facts made in said report are false, and that parties made affiants under a misapprehension and without knowing the contents of the papers to which they were sworn; That she now has in her possession a letter from one Jacob Potts in which he denies having made any affidavit and declares that the Agent who appeared to be investigating the matter interrogated him on the subject and that he told him he knew nothing of the matter; That Potts stated the same facts to affiant verbally and further told your affiant that the agent at the time was intoxicated' (pp.39-40)
she offered 'abundant testimony' that her initial statements were true, and asked that she be allowed to send testimony (p.40)
her post-office address: Chaneysville, Bedford County, PA (p.40)
in response, someone (the name is partly cut off) said 'It is alleged + I fear it may be true that the investigation in this case may not have been entirely fare [sic]. Please examine the papers and inform John M Coffrith [??] H + R whether another investigation should not be had - + tell me what you think' (p.42, stamped MAY 14 1880')
admitted 22 Nov 1880, J A Campton examiner; approved 26 Nov 1880 (p.3)
approved for $8 per month, retroactive to 4 March 1875, the date of last payment, plus $2 per month for each child under 16 (p.3)
21 September 1880
Lewis M Smith, 47, of Chaneysville, Bedford County, testified to M E Jenks [see above transcription] (pp.66-67)
Leonard S Tewell, 37, Chaneysville Bedford County, testified to ME Jenks that he was raised with his brother-in-law Isaiah Collins, lived near him, that he was sound and healthy before he enlisted, no cough, etc.; he worked with Collins at various times before he enlisted and he was always able to work a full day, and even boasted of his strength; affiant saw him the night he arrived home, immediately after his discharge, his health didn't appear good, he complained of being unwell, don't remember him complaining of any particular disease that night, but within a few days he complained of diarrhoea, looked pale and worn out, the diarrhoea grew continuously worse, he was never able to work, when he did work 'he was never a half a hand', became very thin, pale, emaciated, no appetite, died of diarrhea, never heard anyone say he died of consumption, thinks he coughed some, thinks he died of diarrhoea because he always complained of it and never of any other disease to affiant's knowledge (pp.70-71)
22 September 1880
Barbara Collins, 42, testified (at Chaneyville Bedford County PA) to special agent M E Jenks about various facts relevant to her eligibility, including that Isaiah Collins was a sound healthy man before he enlisted, that '[h]e was a farmer and cultivated his own land', did not have diarrhea, a cough, consumption, etc., but when he returned home in Spring 1865 he had diarrhea, got a little better but never well, and had diarrheat continually from the time he returned until he died, with the disease gradually growing worse overall until he died; he never worked more than halftime, and didn't work at all for the the last four months of his life; '[h]e was always pale weak and miserable with no energy or appetite', that he didn't have a cough, or consumption, that she never heard his disease referred to as 'consumpsion', that she believed he died of diarrhea, and 'never heard his death attributed to any other cause', that Dr Robosson was his only physician before or after the war, that during his last 3-4 months 'he then required the chamer constantly; his bowels would be moved from ten to 12 times during the night' (pp.60-61)
Jacob Potts, 43 resident of Mann Twp, testified at Mann Twp Bedford County PA to M E Jenks that he knew Isaiah Collins ('personally acquainted with', but 'personally' is crossed out), that he doesn't really know if Collins was ill or healthy before enlisting, that he didn't know Collins was married, that he (Potts) went to Ohio about Spring 1863, and returned after three years, that he therefore can't testify to Collins' condition when he returned from the war, and '[h]is recollection is they were taking him to his grave the day he returned from Ohio', that he heard read the affidavit he made to Corkhill on 10 April 1875 and the facts stated there are not true of his knowledge, that the statement wasn't read to him or written in his presence, that the agent wrote it, and 'at a time affiant was out of the house cutting some wood he requiested affiant to sign it and he done so the signature Jacob Potts is his[;] that affiant was very anxious to be rid of him at the time [two illegible words] putting him out of the house ... he was intoxicated' (p.62)
David Tewell, 52, of Elbinsville, testified to M E Jenks that he knew Isaiah Collins personally, and lived near him; before enlisting he was a healthy man; didn't know that he had consumption, lung disease, or diarrhea, '[h]e was a good hand to work', made a living from his farm, didn't see him right after his return, doesn't remember how healthy he was when he did see him, 'thinks he was sick a right smart time before he died' but don't know the cause of his death, can't remember his appearance (p.64)
Mary Tewell, 66, Southampton, Bedford Cty, testified to M E Jenks that her son-in-law Isaiah Collins was healthy before enlisting, never heard him complain of any sickness, didn't know him to have diarrhoea or consumption, looked healthy, supported his family by his labor, never noticed him having a cough; same him immediately when he returned, doesn't remember exactly how healthy he was, but he was sick and confined to the house, doesn't know the cause, doesn't know the cause of his death, cannot testify he continually had diarrhoea (p.72)
Zack A Shaffer, 54, Mann Twp Bedford Cty, testified to M E Jenks that he knew and lived near Isaiah Collins before he enlisted, that he was then healthy, didn't have a cough, diarrhea, or other disease, supported his family by his labor, industrious, good ability to labor; when he returned he complained of a breast disease and had a bad cough, much reduced in flesh, pale, continued like that until he died, couldn't work nearly as well after the war, couldn't work most of the time, always had a cough, always supposed he died of consumption, thinks most neighbors believe that, doesn't know about diarrhoea, Collins 'was confined to the house a right smart time before he died' (p.68)
John Johnson, 70, Southampton, Bedford County, testified to M E Jenks that he was well acquainted with and lived not far from Isaiah Collins, and Colins was apparently healthy before enlisting 'at the same time he was not a robust looking man' 'He was a good hand to work', never heard him complain of diarrhoea or other disease or noted a cough, saw that he was drafted, saw him very soon after he returned, he didn't look as good as before enlistment, looked worried, pale, don't know what disease he had, remember his death, don't know the cause or how long he was sick (p.74)
Elijah Collins, 31, Mann Twp, Bedford County, testified to M E Jenks that he heard his testimony to Corkhill read and reaffirms it, he is fully aware [?] his said brother had a severe spell of Pleurisy before enlistment, but he was too young to remember much of it', but to the best of his recollection his general health was good, was able to work, was generally healthy before enlisting, and his health was just as good when he returned to about Nov 1866, don't remember diarrhea, that he died of consumption, in Feb 1867, can't describe his last sickness (p.78)
Susannah Morse, [no age given], Mann Two, Bedford County, testified to M E Jenks that she was well acquainted with Isaiah Collins before he enlisted and lived near him, she knows he then complained of a weak breast, knows of no other disease, saw him immediately after he returned, he looked just as well as before, that she heard read her testimony before Corkhill and the facts are true of her own knowledge, that Collins died of consumption (p.80)
Israel Bennet, 51, Elbinsville, Bedford County, testified to M E Jenks that he was well acquainted with Isaiah Collins from his infancy, and always lived near him, that he certainlyi didn't complain of a weak heart before enlisting, his appearancy and health seems as good as any man's, he was industrious, and supported his family himself, don't remember his ever having a cough, for 18 months immediately after the war he appeared to be as healthy as before, he worked about the same, never heard him complain of diarrhoea, never noticed a cough until his last illness, that he always thought he died of consumption, that he became sick two or three months before dying, 'if he was ever seriously sick before that affiant has no knowledge of the fact, other than he was for years complaining of a weak heart' (p.82)
23 Sep 1880
Isaac Collins, 37, Elbinsville Bedford County PA testified to ME Jenks that he heard his testimony before Corkhill read and it reflects his knowlege and he reaffirms it, in particular that he never knew Collins to be ill before the fall prior to his death, and he did 'a good deal of hard work after the war', think he got a cold that fall 'which ended in consumption'. never heard him complain of diarrhoea. before enlisting 'he was considered to be the healthiest and stoutest man of his family' (p.76)
Thomas P Robosson, 43, Flintstone Alleghany County MD, testified before M E Jenks that he didn't have a record of Isaiah Collins' case and remembers it only faintly, that he doesn't transfer medical accounts from the visiting list to the ledger if they're settled quickly, and he presumes Collins' account was so settled, that he refers to his first statement, which was made when the case was clear to him (p.84)
26 Sept 1880
Special Agent M E Jenks submitted the evidence he had collected (p.36)
the transmittal level gives her PO address as Chaneysville Bedford Cty PA; it's sent from Cumberland MD (p.36)
it also notes that Corkhill previously investigated the claim, that the claimant hadn't remarried, and that the minor children all seemed to be about the represented ages (p.36)
28 Sep 1880
A F Kingsley actg chief of S S [sc. Special Services] Division, '[r]espectfully referred to Mr Van Neater Chief [illegible] Div for his action' (p.89)
'In view of the Agent's effort in the case a fair rating is given' (p.89)
'Investigation: Fair'
22 Nov 1880
someone recommended restoring the pension (p.29)
7 Dec 1880
the Pension Agent was to transfer [her pension?] to Pittsburgh (p.21)
a new certificate was issued dated 7 Dec 1880, for $8 per month + $2 for each child under 16, retroactive to 4 March 1875 (p.8)
13 Oct 1915
J G Collins sent a letter to the Pension Office asking that the pension due her (3 months minus 8 days) be sent to J G Collins, her son and executor, at Flintstone MD to pay off a $50 doctor bill for her (pp.25-26)
16 Oct 1915
Barbara Collins (Flintstone MD) was dropped from the pension rolls (pp.18, 59)
last paid at $12 to 4 July 1915 (p.18)
she died on 26 Sept 1915 (pp.18, 23 [letter from the postmaster])
check 8765602 dated 4 Oct 1915 canceled (p.18)
20 October 1915
the Pension Office sent a reimbursement blank to J G Collins (p.59)

veterans administration pension payment cards

[US Veterans Administration pension payment cards, Barbara Collins widow of Isaiah Collins]
[transcribed 1 January 2015, from FamilySearch]


NAME: Collins, Barbara
Certificate No. 143246
ARMY WIDOW.
Law: GENERAL LAW.
Name of Soldier: Isaiah
Service: Pvt F 91 Pa
ISSUES.
CLASS.RATE.DATE OF COMENCEMENT.DATE OF CERTIFICATE.
 1219 Mar 18861 May 1886

MINORS--$2 PER MONTH ADDITIONAL. [blank]
Fees: [blank]
Transferred from: PITTSBURGH
Transferred to: [blank]
Died: 9/26/15
Bureau notified: OCT 22 1915
Remarks: Check No. 8765602 Dated OCT 4 1915 Canceled.
Former Roll No. 23 GL

death certificate, Barbara Collins

[death certificate, Bedford County Pennsylvania, file 92623, 26 September 1915, Barbara Collins]
[transcribed 1 January 2015, from Ancestry]


COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA.
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH
BUREAU OF VITAL STATISTICS.
File No. 92623
Registered No. 10
Registration District No. 219
Primary Registration District No. 2145
1. PLACE OF DEATH
County of Bedford
Township of Southampton
2. FULL NAME Barbara Collins

PERSONAL AND STATISTICAL PARTICULARS
3. SEX F
4. COLOR OR RACE White
5. Widowed
6. DATE OF BIRTH Sept 1 1837
7. AGE 78 yrs. [blank] mos. 26 ds.
8. OCCUPATION [blank]
9. BIRTHPLACE Bedford Co. Pa.
10. NAME OF FATHER Moses Tewell
11. BIRTHPLACE OF FATHER Bedford Co. Pa
12. MAIDEN NAME OF MOTHER Mary Gordon
13. BIRTHPLACE OF MOTHER Md.
14. THE ABOVE IS TRUE TO THE BEST OF MY KNOWLEDGE.
(Informant) J. G. Collins
(Address) Flintstone Md
15. Filed Oct 10 1915 A.L. Tewell Local Registrar

MEDICAL CERTIFICATE OF DEATH
16. DATE OF DEATH Sept 26 1915
17. I HEREBY CERTIFY, That I attended deceased from July 20 1915, to Sept. 26 1915, that I last saw her alive on Sept 23 1915, and that death occurred, on the date stated above, at 1:30 PM. The CAUSE OF DEATH was as follows: Chronic Interstitial Nephritis (Duration) 3 yrs. [blank] mos [blank] ds.
Contributory [blank]
(Signed) J A Gorrell M.D.
Sept 27 1915 (Address) Everett
18. LENGTH OF RESIDENCE (FOR HOSPITALS, INSTITUTIONS, TRANSIENTS OR RECENT RESIDENTS). [blank]
19. PLACE OF BURIAL OR REMOVAL Mt Zion
DATE OF BURIAL Sept 28 1915
20. UNDERTAKER N. H. Kuer
ADDRESS Chaneysville Pa

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revised 23 Mar 14
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