91st PA: Theodore A Hope

Theodore A Hope

Before the war

He was born in 1837/38, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, probably to John Hope and Sarah [unknown family name]. [sources: date: 5 (25 in 1863), 24 (26), 30 (22 in 1860), 32 (12 in 1850), 33 (26 in April 1865), 38 (36 in 1874). place: 5, 24, 30, 32, 38. parents: 25, 30, 32, 40]

In 1850, he was living in ward 4, Moyamensing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was living with John and Sarah Hope (presumably his parents), and with Robert and Hannah Hope (presumably his siblings). He had attended school within the year. [source: 32]

In 1860, he was living in the 1st ward of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was living with Sarah Hope (presumably his mother), Hannah Hope (presumably his sister), along with William Irvin and his family. He was a carpenter, and owned $100 in personal property. [source: 30]

When he enlisted, he was a carpenter, and was living in Philadelphia. [sources: 5, 24]

Description

When he enlisted, he was 5 feet 8-3/4 inches tall, had a dark complexion, blue eyes, and dark hair. [sources: 5, 24 (5'9", sandy complexion, blue eyes, brown hair)]

During the war

He enlisted and was mustered into service as a sergeant in company E on 20 August 1861, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was mustered into service by Lieutenant Swann (perhaps this is related to his re-enlisting). He was appointed sergeant on 10 September 1861. [sources: 1, 5 (reenlisted?), 6, 24 (private), 43 (sgt)]

On 23 August 1863, he returned to duty from corps headquarters. On 26 August 1863, Sinex reported that he had been on duty as Provost Guard at Corps Headquarters, and had returned. [sources: 12, 22]

He fought, as a sergeant, in the battle of Gettysburg. [source: 11]

He re-enlisted as a veteran volunteer, on 24 December 1863, in Bealton Virginia. He was reenlisted by Lt Carpenter [perhaps William H Carpenter, lt, co K]. [sources: 1, 5, 24 (26 Dec 63)]

He left Alexandria, Virginia, with Francis Gregory, on 2 May 1864. They arrived at Culpepper on 3 May 1864. They left Culpepper on the 4th. When they stopped at Brandy Station, and could not learn where the regiment was, the provost marshall told them to follow the 5th corps wagon train until they found the regiment, which they did on 9 May 1864. He was arrested by order of General Ayres on 9 May 1864, but was released from arrest on 28 June 1864, because the regimental headquarters did not have a copy of the order placing him under arrest. He still had to face a court martial. I have no other record of the charges or the court martial. [sources: 7, 13]

On 29 June 1864, Colonel Gregory requested that he be mustered out, so that he could be remustered in as first lieutenant of company E. He had received a commission from Governor Curtin on 9 June 1864, dated 7 April 1864, and his promotion to first lieutenant apparently was effective 7 April 1864. [sources: 14, 19]

He was discharged effective 1 July 1864, to allow him to accept a commission. He was mustered in as a first lieutenant on 2 July 1864. [sources: 1, 3, 5, 6, 8, 19 (which also records him as a second lieutenant, with no elaboration), 24, 26]

On 21 August 1864, he helped Alexander Earnest off the field, after Earnest was shot in the head. Earnest died a few minutes later. [source: 36]

On 24 September 1864, he was appointed to a board of survey to determine how much government property John Hamill was responsible for. On 27 September 1864, Matthew Hall was ordered to turn over to him the ordnance, ordnance stores, and other property in company E On 28 September 1864, James Closson was ordered to turn over to him company H's surplus ordnance and ordnance stores. [sources: 9, 16, 17]

On 21 October 1864, near Peeble's Farm, Virginia, he relieved John Hamill, who was charged with being drunk while on picket duty. He later testified for Hamill at his court-martial, claiming that Hamill appeared to have been drinking but was not drunk, was able to carry out his duty, and gave him a complete and accurate report of the details of the picket. [source: 27, 28]

He was promoted to captain on 31 October 1864. [sources: 1, 2, 3, 5, 24]

On 21 November 1864, he certified that Charles Haughey (E) was wounded in battle on 12 May 1864, and was presumed dead, although they had not received any official information about him since then. His undated letter to Haughey's widow Ellen is presumably from the same date. [source: 37]

On 26 November 1864, he certified that William Dougherty had served in company E, and had been killed in action on 27 October 1864. [source: 37]

On 18 January 1865, he went on leave; it expired on 2 February 1865. [source: 20, citing SO 16, Army of the Potomac]

On 9 March 1865, he certified that Alexander Earnest had served in company E and been killed at Weldon Railroad on 21 August 1864. [source: 36]

On 16 March 1865, he was the senior captain present. While Eli Sellers was at a court martial, he was in command. Sellers returned while the regiment was paraded for review in front of the Division Hospital. Hope said something like "I suppose I'm relieved. I may get out of this", but Sellers ordered him to take command of the first division. [source: 23]

On 22 March 1865, he was appointed to a regimental court martial to try John Wright (G) during March 1865. [source: 18]

On 23 March 1865, from Hatcher's Run, Virginia, he certified that David W Hewett served in company E, was wounded in action at Spottsylvania Virginia on 14 May 1864, and died that day of those wounds. [source: 34]

He was wounded in the chest on 31 March 1865 in action. The ball entered three inches about his right nipple, and penetrated into the lung. He spat up a significant amount of blood shortly after being wounded. [sources: 1 (roster & p.193)--a bad wound, according to Walter (4), 33]

On 31 March 1865, John Graham was ordered to take command of company E and receipt to Hope for all property. [source: 10]

On 27 April 1865, Sellers recommended that he received a brevet appointment "[f]or meritorious conduct during the late campaign". [source: 15]

On 29 April 1865, he was admitted to Charles A Leale's ward. The wound had healed, but he had extensive pus between the lungs and his chest wall. In the middle of May, he spat up thirty ounces (presumably fluid ounces?) of pus. Less than a week later, he began improving, and continued to improve until he left Washington DC. [source: 33]

He was discharged on 28 October 1865 by general order. He was Captain of company E. [sources: 1, 24 (surgeon's certificate of disability), 43]

After the war

On 25 November 1865, he applied successfully for a pension. [sources: 25, 29]

Between 1860 and 1870, his mother seems to have married Shubert Iseminger. He had (apparently) been married to Catharine [unknown family name], and had at least five children: Anna (b. 1836/37), Alfred (b. 1842/43), Frances (b. 1835/37), Kate (b. Feb/Mar 1850), and Ida (b. 1851/52). [source: 41, 42]

In 1870, he was living at 604 Christian Street, ward 2, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was living with (probably) his mother Sarah, her second husband Shubert Iseminger, and others. [source: 40]

In 1870-1871, he was part of the firm Hope & Chew, carpenters (with John E Chew). They worked from 1718 Christian, and he lived at 606 Christian Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. [source: 39]

In 1872, he was a carpenter at 1718 Christian, living at 606 Christian Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. [source: 39]

In 1873-4, he was a builder at 1718 Christian, living at 606 Christian Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. [source: 39]

On 24 September 1874, he died, at 606 Christian Street, ward 2, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He died of anasarca. On 26 September 1874, he was buried at the 6th street Union Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. [source: 38]

On 24 December 1911 [?], his mother, Sarah Iseminger [?], applied successfully for a pension. [sources: 25, 29]

Sources

1 Bates, Samuel Penniman. History of Pennsylvania volunteers, 1861-5. Harrisburg: B. Singerly, state printer, 1869-71. 5 volumes. 'Ninety-first regiment', volume 3, pages 186-233. (In the roster, and p.193.)

2 Official Army Register

3 list of commissioned officers, company E

4 Thomas F Walter, 'Personal recollections and experiences of an obscure soldier', Grand Army Scout and Soldiers' Mail v.4 #1 p.2.

5 company E descriptive roll, number 3 (Theodore A Hope)

6 list of non-commissioned officers, company E

7 special order 53, headquarters, 91st Pennsylvania Infantry, 28 June 1864

8 special order 160, headquarters, 5th army corps, 3 July 1864

9 special order 84, headquarters 91st Pennsylvania Infantry, 24 September 1864

10 special order [blank], headquarters, 91st Pennsylvania Infantry, 31 March 1865

11 Pennsylvania Memorial, 91st Pennsylvania plaque, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania (Theodore A Hope)

12 letter, Sinex to Marvin, 26 August 1863

13 letter, F Gregory to Tayman, 20 June 1864

14 letter, Gregory to Bennett, 29 June 1864

15 letter, Sellers to Farnsworth, 27 April 1865

16 special order 87, HQ 91st PA, 27 September 1864

17 special order [unnumbered], HQ 91st PA, 28 September 1864

18 special order 19, HQ 91st PA, 22 March 1865

19 regimental descriptive book

20 undated officers' furlough list, in regimental letter, order, guard, and furlough book (Theo A Hope)

21 [undated and untitled chart with officers' names] (two references: Theo A Hope, and Capt Hope)

22 consolidated morning report, 91st PA, 23 August 1863 (Sergt Hope)

23 record of Joseph Gilbert's court martial

24 Civil War Veterans' Card File, available at the Pennsylvania State Archives, searched 6 May 2004 (Theodore A Hope)

25 pension index, by name (Theodore A Hope)

26 consolidated morning report, 6 July 1864 (Sergt Hope)

27 letter, John Hamill to Secretary of War, 11 February 1875 (Lieut Hope)

28 court-martial record, John Hamill (Theodore A Hope)

29 pension index, by regiment, 91st PA Infantry, company E (Theodore A Hope)

30 1860 US census, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 1st ward, mnicrofilm series M653, film 1151, page 500 = 326 handwritten (Theodore Hope)

31 [deleted]

32 1850 US census, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Moyamensing, ward 4, microfilm series M432, film 809, pages 416 verso - 417 recto = 828-829 handwritten (Theodore Hope)

33 'Spontaneous cure of empyema, by discharge per bronchi', in Charles A Leale, 'Observations on thoracentesis (thoracentesis--paracentesis thoracis)', Transactions of the New York Academy of Medicine, 2nd series, volume 1 (1874), pages 254-280 at 267-268 (Captain TAH)

34 [abstract of statement], in widow's pension certificate file, National Archives and Records Administration, RG 15, certificate WC52232, Elizabeth Dixey Hewitt, widow of David W Hewett (Theodore A Hope)

35 abstract of widow's pension certificate file, National Archives and Records Administration, record group 15, application WC 62,83, Anna B Fitzpatrick widow of William Dougherty (Theodore A Hope)

36 dependents' pension certificate file, National Archives and Records Administration, record group 15, certificate WC 85,780 (James O Earnest et al. minor children of Alexander O Earnest) (Theodore A Hope)

37 certificate and undated letter, Captain Theodore Hope to Mrs Ellen Haughey, about her husband's death, in dependent's pension certificate file, Ellen Haughey guardian of Susan and Michael Haughey, certificate 94,799 (Theodore Hope)

38 death register, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1874, page 55 (Theodore A Hope)

39 Philadelphia city directories

40 1870 US census, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, ward 2, district 6, 2nd enumeration, microfilm series M593, film 1416, page 432 verso = 36 handwritten (Theo B Hope)

41 1860 US census (not transcribed), Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, ward 2, microfilm series M653, film 1152, page 260 = 260 handwritten (FamilySearch reference (accessed 23 Jul 12)) (Shubert Iseminger)

42 1850 US census (not transcribed), Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Southwark, ward 4, microfilm series M432, film 822, page 252 recto (available on FamilySearch (accessed 23 Jul 12)) (Shubert Iseminger)

43 index to compiled service records of volunteer Union soldiers who served in organizations from the state of Pennsylvania (Theodore A Hope)

Sources checked unsuccessfully

1880 US census
Ancestry and FamilySearch indices (accessed 23 July 2012)
1890 US census, veterans' schedules
Ancestry index (accessed May 2007)
1900 US census
Ancestry and FamilySearch indices (accessed 23 July 2012)
1910 US census
Ancestry and FamilySearch indices (accessed 23 July 2012)
1920 US census
Ancestry and FamilySearch indices (accessed 23 July 2012)
1930 US census
Ancestry and FamilySearch indices (accessed 23 July 2012)
Records of headstones of deceased Union veterans, 1879-1903
FamilySearch index (accessed 18 Feb 12)
applications for headstones for military veterans, 1925-1941
FamilySearch index (accessed 18 Feb 12)
Pennsylvania veterans' burial cards
Ancestry index (accessed 3 April 2012)
Find a grave
accessed 4 Oct 10, and again 22 Jul 12 (checking cemetery directly)
Philadelphia Inquirer
checked death notices (on GenealogyBank) on 24 September 1874 (p.4), 25 September 1874 (p.5), 26 September 1874 (p.4)
Philadelphia Public Ledger
checked death notices (on GenealogyBank) on 24 September 1874 page 2

Display


Theodore A Hope in the 91st PA gedcom on RootsWeb WorldConnect

Theodore A Hope in the 91st PA database

1850 census

[1850 US census, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Moyamensing, ward 4, microfilm series M432, film 809, pages 416 verso - 417 recto = 828-829 handwritten]
[available on FamilySearch]
[identification is uncertain, based on the absence of other candidates]
line40414212
Dwellings visited306    
Families visited349    
NameJohn HopeRobert "Theodore "Sarah HopeHannah "
Age441412353
SexMMMff
Color     
Occupation of males over 15 yearslaborer  none 
Real estate owned     
BirthplaceScotdPenna"Penna"
Married within year     
Attended school within year 11  
Over 20 & can't read/write     
Deaf, dumb, blind, etc.     

1860 census

[1860 US census, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 1st ward, mnicrofilm series M653, film 1151, page 500 = 326 handwritten]
[FamilySearch entry]
[identification is uncertain, based on the absence of other candidates]
line9101112131415
Dwelling number2173      
Family number2511      
NameSarah HopeTheodore "Hannah "William IrvinDelorah "James M. C. "John W. "
Age382213282681
Sexfmfmfmm
Color       
OccupationSeamstressCarpenter Ropemaker   
Value of real estate owned       
Value of personal estate200100 100   
Place of birth" [sc. Penna]""""""
Married within year       
Attended school within year  1  1 
Cannot read & write       
Deaf, dumb, blind, etc.       

1870 census

[1870 US census, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, ward 2, district 6, 2nd enumeration, microfilm series M593, film 1416, page 432 verso = 36 handwritten]
[identification is uncertain; see the 1860 census entry transcribed above]
[that this is the Theodore A Hope in the 1870 Gopsill's diretory at 606 Christian is pretty clear; note Francis Iseminger in the same household, Christian Wolf (shoemaker h 604 Christian) and Louis Costabel (tailor h 604 Christian) in the preceding household, and William Longa (h 604 Christian) several households earlier]
[note also that the page is headed 'Christian Street']
[note that his mother Sarah Iseminger applied for a pension after his death]
line20212223242526
Dwelling-house number604      
Family number[blank]      
NameIseminger Shubert" Sarah" Kate" Ida" FrancisHope Theo [?] BBaker Sarah
[the last letter of Hope's personal name is unclear]
Age55502018262930
SexMFFFMMF
Color       
Occupation       
Real estate value       
Personal estate value       
Birthplace       
Father foreign born       
Mother foreign born       
Birth month if born within year       
Marriage month if married within year       
Attended school past year       
Can't read       
Can't write       
Deaf, dumb, blind, etc.       
Male US citizen at least 21 years old       
Male US citizen at least 21 years old who can't vote ...       

index to compiled service records

[index to compiled service records of volunteer Union soldiers who served in organizations from the state of Pennsylvania]
[transcribed 14 June 2014, from Fold3]


Hope, Theodore A
Co. E, 91 Pennsylvania Inf.
Sgt.| Capt.
See also [blank]

GENERAL INDEX CARD.

'Spontaneous cure of empyema, by discharge per bronchi'

['Spontaneous cure of empyema, by discharge per bronchi', in Charles A Leale, 'Observations on thoracentesis (thoracentesis--paracentesis thoracis)', Transactions of the New York Academy of Medicine, 2nd series, volume 1 (1874), pages 254-280 at 267-268]
[I have transcribed only the relevant case report]

CASE XIV. Spontaneous Cure of Empyema, by Discharge per Bronchi.--Nicmeyer states that "a penetration of the empyema into the lungs, and its discharge by way of the bronchi, sometimes happen," but that a recovery in such instances is rare. In my notes I have the account of one such, where as much as thirty ounces was ejected in a single day, yet in [sic] sixteen months afterward the patient was in good health. The history in brief is as follows:

Captain T.A.H., Ninety-first Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers, aged twenty-six years. Penetrating gunshot-wound of lung; ball entered three inches above the nipple, right side, and lodged in the parenchyma of the lung; he had considerable haemoptysis shortly after reception of wound. April 29, 1865, he was admitted to my ward; the wound had entirely healed; he had extensive empyema. About the middle of May following, during a violent paroxysm of coughing, he was nearly strangled by a large quantity of pus, which ran from his mouth. Knowing that it must have come through the bronchial tubes, I requested the nurse to save all that came away in the [page 268] following twenty-four hours, and found it measured thirty ounces. His attacks of pleurodynia were relieved by morphine. In less than a week after the discharge of pus by mouth he commenced to improve, and so continued until he left Washington. I heard from him a year and four months afterward, when he stated that he was entirely well, and an active business-man in Philadelphia.

Philadelphia city directories

[Philadelphia city directories]
[transcribed all Theodore Hope's from the listed directories, 22 July 2012, from Fold3]
1870 Gopsill's Philadelphia directory, page 763
Hope Theodore, clerk, 101 S 3d, h 309 Christian
Hope Theodore A. (Hope & Chew), h 606 Christian
Hope & Chew (Theodore A. Hope & John E. Chew), carpenters, 1718 Christian
1871 Gopsill's Philadelphia directory, page 733
Hope Theodore, clerk, 101 S 3d, h 309 Christian
Hope Theodore A. (Hope & Chew), h 606 Christian
Hope & Chew (THeodore A. Hope & John E. Chew), carpents s. 1718 Christian
1872 Gopsill's Philadelphia directory, page 690
Hope Theodore A., carpenter, 1718 & h 606 Christian
1873 Gopsill's Philadelphia directory, page 670
Hope Theodore A., builder, 1718 & h 606 Christian
1874 Gopsill's Philadelphia directory, page 664
Hope Theodore A., builder, 1718 Christian h 606 Christian
1875 Gopsill's Philadelphia directory, page 735
Hope Theodore W., tel operator, h 763 S 2d

death register

[death register, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1874, page 55]
[transcribed 22 July 2012, from FamilySearch]
[identification is uncertain, based on the absence of other candidates]
DATE OF Registration" " [sc. October 5]
NAME OF DECEASEDTheodore A Hope
COLOR" [sc. WHITE]
SEX" [sc. MALE]
AGE36 " [sc. yrs]
Condition" [sc. SINGLE]
Date of Death" [sc. Sept] 24
CAUSE OF DEATHAnasarca
ATTENDING PHYSICIANC Ernest Kamerly
OCCUPATION OF DECEASED[blank]
Where BornPhila
When a Minor, Name of Father and Mother[blank]
WARD2
STREET AND No.606 Christian
DATE OF BURIAL" [sc. Sept] 26
PLACE OF BURIAL" [sc. Union 6" St.]

top of document | home
revised 14 Jun 14
contact Harry Ide at hide1@unl.edu with comments or questions