91st PA: Henry G Mathers

Henry G Mathers

Before the war

He was born in 1842/43, in Philadelphia Pennsylvania, to Peter Mathers and Frederica [unknown family name]. [sources: date: 2 (18 in 1861), 12 (6 in 1850), 13 (16 in 1860). place: 2, 12, 13. parents: 9, 12, 13]

In 1850, he was living in ward 2, Moyamensing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was living with his parents Peter and Frederica Mathers, his siblings Louise, Elizabeth, and Catharine, and two others. He had attended school within the year. [source: 12]

In 1860, he was living in ward 4, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was a baker. He was living with his mother Fredk Mathes, siblings Louise, Lizzie, Kate, Edward, Francis, and Caroline, and two others. He had attended school within the year. [source: 13]

On 5 January 1855, his father, Peter Mathers, died. [source: 9]

When he enlisted, he was a grocer. He worked in a grocery owned by his mother, which (however) she had borrowed money from Godfrey Goeckler to stock. His work was worth about $5 per week, which he gave to his mother. After he enlisted, she was unable to make money with the store, and had to close it. [sources: 2, 9]

Description

When he enlisted in 1861, he was 5 feet 6 inches tall, had a light complexion, grey eyes, and light hair. [source: 2]

During the war

He enlisted and was mustered into service for three years in company E on 28 August 1861, at Philadelphia Pennsylvania. He was enlisted by Captain Lentz, and mustered into service by Colonel Reiff. [sources: 1, 2, 7, 25, 26, 27]

On 28 January 1862, he sent his mother a letter, from Washington, DC. He mentioned that Camp Stanton was more hilly than Camp Chase--but also 'very healthy'! They had been drilled enough 'that it took all the laziness out of Jos. Budd (E)! But when he was writing they were just sitting around a stove, writing letters, smoking pipes, and playing cards. Someone in company F had stolen $30 from a private in a different regiment and left his post, and was to be courtmartialed on the next day. (I haven't found any other references to this court; perhaps it was a regimental court martial, not a general court martial.) He also said that he would send money by Adams Express when they were paid, which he expected to happen the next week. [source: 16]

On 11 February 1862, he sent his mother a letter, from Washington, DC. He sent her $20, after paying the sutler $1, purchasing a pair of boots for $3, and keeping some for spending money. He sent the money with Alderman Lentz, brother of Captain John Lentz (E), 'who takes all the boy[']s money home for them[,] which I think is the safest way'. As he does frequently in the extant letters, he apologizes for not writing more (barely filling three of the four pages available), claiming that there was no interesting news. [source: 21]

On 12 April 1862, he sent his mother a letter, from Washington, DC. He sent her $15, his pay less his debt to the sutler and washwoman, and promised to send her all his pay in 2 months. He told her that he was quartered 'in a large house right opposite the Capitol', with Francis D Harrigan (E) and James Williams (E), whom he described as 'two perfect gentlemen'. [source: 23]

On 15 April 1862, he sent his mother a letter, from Washington, DC. He was worried since she hadn't responded to his previous letter (or perhaps to two previous letters?). He had sent his mother money, and couldn't send more because he had to pay what he owed the sutler and washwoman. He also noted that Jim Wilson robbed two of the men of $21 after payday, and then left. (I have not found a Jim Wilson in the regiment; perhaps he was someone visiting from home.) [source: 18]

On 20 April 1862, he sent his mother a letter, from Washington, DC. He reassured her that he wasn't going to disgrace himself by taking "french leave", and that they were having a very happy Easter Sunday, with plenty of eggnog, boiled eggs, and salt pork. He also described the shooting of Jesse Wharton and the evening exercise that preceded it:

we had quite a surprise last night. word came that the Rebels were marching on to Washington, when the National Guards. and two cavalry and one Artillery Regiment were ordered out[.] Our Regiment also received the same orders and off we started on a double quick for the Long Bridge expecting a fight for sure. but when we arrived there we found it was a false report. and we were greatly disappointed. but I think our boys will have a shot at the Rebels yet:

One of the Rebel prisoners at the prison was shot by One of our Regiment yesterday: for not keeping his head in the window and cursing the Guard. the Ball went clean through him and lodged in the cealing [sic]: every one of them ought to be served in the same manner:

[source: 19]

On 4 June 1862, he sent his mother a letter, from Washington, DC. He had sent them money after being paid on the previous Saturday, and enclosed a reproduction of a Confederate banknote. Bob Miller (presumably Robert Miller (E)) had received a letter from his father, and claimed that 'the girls are greatly anxious to hear from us'--but, alas, didn't mention which girls. He was optimistic, missed home, and referred to family and friends. [source: 17]

On 12 March 1863, he was sent to the division hospital. [source: 4]

On 22 March 1863, he sent his mother $20 by Adams Express. [source 9]

He was discharged on 30 March 1863 on surgeon's certificate of disability, at a camp near Falmouth, Virginia. He was a private, in company E. [sources: 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 25, 26, 27]

On 17 July 1863, he was drafted, and mustered into company A of the 90th Pennsylvania infantry, as a private. [source: 9]

On 22 November 1863, he sent his mother a letter, from Camp near Bealton Station, Virginia. He sent her $20 by Adams Express. He had heard that David Lentz was ill (perhaps David G Lentz (E), who was sent to a general hospital on 4 November 1863). Otherwise the letter is about friends and family. [source: 24]

On 21 January 1864, he sent one of his sisters a letter, from Culpepper Court House, Virginia. He told her that the boots, apparently a gift from Mr Janney, 'fit like a T'. He described the army's inactivity, and talked about friends and family. [source: 22]

On 8 February 1864, he sent one of his sisters a letter, from Camp near Culpepper, Virginia. He says that since Joe Budd has reenlisted, he'd better visit. (The records I have about Budd don't mention his reenlisting.) The 90th had been on a long march, but hadn't engaged the Confederates. He was optimistic the war would end that fall. They were in log huts, eight men in each hut. He had access to newspapers from other men in his tent, and didn't need her to send him the New York Ledger. He also mentions friends and family. [source: 20]

On 26 February 1864, he sent his mother a letter, from Camp near Culpepper, Virginia. He mentioned hearing that the 91st's Lieutenant Baker had resigned (which he actually did on 5 March 1864, though no doubt he had submitted his resignation before it was accepted), and that he had sent $40 by Adams Express. They were not drilling very much, which he appreciated since they were less exposed to the severe weather they had been experiencing. He told her that he preferred the 91st to the 90th Pennsylvania:

I do not like this Regiment as much as I did the other one. The officers seem to be down on us because we are enlisted [?]. [B]ut for my part I do not care a snap of my finger for any of them. I think that I can take care of myself without ... any of their help.

He mentioned a grand review the previous week, with many visitors from Washington, including officers' wives, news about the construction of a new street railway in Philadelphia on his mother's street (which 'will make 9th street rather more noise than it was'), and mentioned various people. [source: 14]

On 30 April 1864, he sent his mother a letter, from Camp near Mitchell's Station. Besides references to family and friends, he mentioned that they had moved from log houses to picket tents, had 'thrown away' their big coats, which they didn't need in warm weather, and were expecting to start the year's campaign soon. He was confident they would win, and anticipated the war's ending that summer if they 'whip[ped]' the Confederates 'in the next Battle'. He enclosed $20. [source: 15]

On 18 June 1864, he was wounded in action, before Petersburg, Virginia. [source: 9 (18 July according to his mother's application, but 18 June according to the Adjutant General's report]

On 24 July 1864, he died, at David's Island, New York. He died of his wounds. He was a private, in company E. He was buried in the Trinity United Church of Christ Cemetery, Collegeville, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. [sources: 6, 8 (Schwenkville, Montgomery Cty PA), 9]

After the war

On 4 October 1864, his mother, Frederica Mathers, successfully applied from Pennsylvania for a pension. Her post-office address was 621 S 9th St, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She owned the property, but had a $1500 mortgage on it, for which she owed interest of $90 every six months (and hadn't been able to pay off any of the mortgage). Her taxes in 1865 were $40.81, along with (apparently) $11 in water tax. By 1867, she had had to sell the property since she couldn't pay the taxes and mortgage; she sold it for $4,000, and used all but $700 of that $4,000 to pay off her debts. Her application was supported by Joseph H Budd (E) among others. Her application was accepted on 14 August 1867, and she received $8 per month, retroactive to 22 July 1864. (The examining clerk was Charles T Cotton.) [sources: 9, 10, 11]

Payment of Frederica Mathers' pension was suspended on 4 December 1875, and resumed on 25 January 1876. Since her attorney was Joseph E Devitt and Company, this was undoubtedly because they had executed documents improperly. [source: 9]

On 29 January 1904, his mother died. [source: 9]

Sources

1 Bates, Samuel Penniman. History of Pennsylvania volunteers, 1861-5. Harrisburg: B. Singerly, state printer, 1869-71. 5 volumes. 'Ninety-first regiment', volume 3, pages 186-233. (In the roster)

2 descriptive roll, company E, entry 56 (Henry Mathers)

3 company E, register of men discharged, number 18 (Henry Mathes)

4 consolidated morning report, 91st PA, 12 March 1863 (Henry Matthers [?]; the 'r' could be a 'w', but the only Mathews in company E is Francis Matthews, who deserted in 1861 and apparently never returned)

5 consolidated morning report, 91st PA, 30 March 1863 (Private Mathers [?]; again, the 'r' could be a 'w')

6 Find a grave, memorial 26313524 (accessed 25 September 2010)] (H. G. Mathers) [identification is confirmed by a reference on the tombstone to Co. E 91st Pa Inf; unfortunately, it does not list dates]

7 index to compiled service records of volunteer Union soldiers who served in organizations from the state of Pennsylvania (Henry G Mathers)

8 headstones provided for deceased Union Civil War veterans, 1879-1903 (Henry G Mathers)

9 dependent's pension certificate file, WC 98,917 (Frederica Mathers mother of Henry George Mathers (90th Pennsylania!))

10 pension index, by name (Henry G Mathers, A 90 Pa Inf)

11 pension index, by unit (Henry G Mathers, A 90 Pa Inf)

12 1850 US census, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Moyamensing, ward 2, microfilm series M432, film 809, page 237 recto = 47 handwritten (FamilySearch) (Henry Mathers)

13 1860 US census, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, ward 4, western division, microfilm series M653, film 1154, page 956 = 150 handwritten (FamilySearch) (Henry Mathes)

14 letter, Henry Mathes to his mother, 26 February 1864, Camp near Culpepper VA (Henry Mathes)

15 letter, Henry Mathes to mother, 30 April 1864, Camp near Mitchell's Station (Henry Mathes)

16 letter, Henry [Mathes] to his mother, 28 Jan [1862], Washington (Henry [Mathes])

17 letter, HG Mathes to his mother, 4 June 1862, Alexandria VA (H G Mathes)

18 letter, Henry G Mathes to his mother, 15 April [1862], Washington DC (Henry G Mathes)

19 letter, H G Mathes to his mother, 20 April [1862], Washington DC (H G Mathes)

20 letter, Henry G Mathes to one of his sisters, 8 Feb 1864, camp near Culpepper (Henry G Mathes)

21 letter, Henry G. Mathes to his mother, 11 February [1862], Washington (Henry G Mathes)

22 letter, Henry G Mathes to one of his sisters, 21 January 1864 (Henry G Mathes)

23 letter, Henry G Mathes to his mother, 12 April [1862], Washington (Henry G Mathes)

24 letter, Henry G Mathes to his mother, 22 November 1863, Camp near Bealton Station (Henry G Mathes)

25 index to compiled service records of volunteer Union soldiers who served in organizations from the state of Pennsylvania (Henry G Mathieus)

26 index to compiled service records of volunteer Union soldiers who served in organizations from the state of Pennsylvania (Henry G Mathiews)

27 index to compiled service records of volunteer Union soldiers who served in organizations from the state of Pennsylvania (Henry G Mathes)

Sources checked unsuccessfully

pension index, by name
Ancestry index (accessed March 2007)
Bates, History of Pennsylania Volunteers, volume 3 (90th Pennsylvania, company A)
available on Making of America (accessed 21 December 2014)
ARIAS (90th PA)
see Mathers and Mather (accessed 21 December 2014)
1870 US census
FamilySearch index (accessed 22 December 2014)
his mother, Frederica Mathes, is living on South 12th Street, in Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, ward 3, district 10, microfilm series M593, film 1389, page 589 verso = 72 handwritten (see also Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, ward 3, page 203 = 75 handwritten (2nd enumeration) (FamilySearch)), with her children Louisa (24), Lizzie (22), Kate (20), Edward (18), Fannie (16), and Carrie (14), along with John, Emma, and Arthur Westwood
1880 US census
FamilySearch index (accessed 22 December 2014)
his mother is living in Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, ward 3, district 10, microfilm series T9, film 1185, page 448 = 25 A handwritten (FamilySearch) (Fredericka Mathes), with her children Lizzie E (30), Kate A (28), Fanny L (26), and Carrie C (24)
1890 US census, veterans schedules
FamilySearch index (accessed 22 December 2014)
1900 US census
FamilySearch index (accessed 22 December 2014)
his mother, Fredericka L Mathes, is living in ward 26, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, enumeration district 629, microfilm series T623, film 1468, page 188 = 4 B handwritten, with her daughter Elizabeth Mathes (53), daughter Frances Sadler (47), grandson James Leroy Sadler (3), daughter Caroline Parkhurst (45), and granddaughter Fredericka Parkhurts (14) (FamilySearch)
1910 US census
FamilySearch index (accessed 22 December 2014)
1920 US census
FamilySearch index (accessed 22 December 2014)
1930 US census
FamilySearch index (accessed 22 December 2014)
1940 US census
FamilySearch index (accessed 22 December 2014)

Display



Henry Mathers in the 91st PA database

1850 census

[1850 US census, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Moyamensing, ward 2, microfilm series M432, film 809, page 237 recto = 47 handwritten (FamilySearch) (Henry Mathers)]
[identification is confirmed by references in the dependent's pension certificate file abstracted below to (1) his father's and (2) his mother's names]
line89101112131415
Dwellings visited76       
Families visited87       
NamePeter MathersFrederica doHenry doLouise doElizabeth doCatharine doJohn BlackAgnes Summer [??]
Age29276539/122322
Sexmfmfffmf
Colorwwwwwwww
Occupation of males over 15 yearsBaker     Baker 
Real estate owned3500       
BirthplaceGermanydoPennsylvaniadododoGermanydo
Married within year        
Attended school within year  1     
Over 20 & can't read/write        
Deaf, dumb, blind, etc.        

1860 census

[1860 US census, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, ward 4, western division, microfilm series M653, film 1154, page 956 = 150 handwritten (FamilySearch) (Henry Mathes)]
[identification is confirmed; see the note on the 1850 census entry transcribed above]
line3456789101112
Dwelling number902         
Family number1116         
NameFredk Mathes [sic]Henry "Louise "Lizzie "Kate "Edwd "Francis "Caroline "Adam UlmFredk Arnold
Age39161412108642419
SexFMF""MF"M"
Color          
OccupationWidowBaker      Baker 
Value of real estate owned2000         
Value of personal estate200         
Place of birthGermanyPenn""""""Germany"
Married within year          
Attended school within year1 [sic]11111    
Cannot read & write          
Deaf, dumb, blind, etc. -         

index to compiled service records

[index to compiled service records of volunteer Union soldiers who served in organizations from the state of Pennsylvania]
[transcribed 14 December 2014, from Fold3]


Mathers, Henry G
Co. E, 91 Pennsylvania Inf.
Pvt | Pvt
REFERENCE CARD.
Original filed under
Mathieus, Henry G

GENERAL INDEX CARD.


[card 2, transcribed 2 January 2015]

Mathieus Henry G
Co. E, 91 Pennsylvania Inf.
Pvt | Pvt
See also [blank]

GENERAL INDEX CARD.


[card 3, transcribed 3 January 2015]

Mathiews, Henry G.
Co. E, 91 Pennsylvania Inf.
Pvt | Pvt
REFERENCE CARD.
Original filed under
Mathieus Henry G

GENERAL INDEX CARD.


[card 4, transcribed 3 January 2015]

Mathes, Henry G.
Co. E, 91 Pennsylvania Inf.
Pvt | Pvt
REFERENCE CARD.
Original filed under
Mathieus, Henry G.

GENERAL INDEX CARD.

headstones provided for deceased Civil War veterans

[headstones provided for deceased Union Civil War veterans, 1879-1903]
[transcribed 15 Dec 14, from Ancestry]


Mathers, Henry G.
Pvt, Co. E, 91st Regt.
Pa Inf.
Cemetery [blank]
at Schwenkville [sic]
Montgomery Co Pa.
Grave [blank]
Date of death July 24 - 1864.
Headstone supplied by
[illegible] Brothers
[illegible]
Contract dated [illegible] 9, 1888.

letter, 26 February 1864

[letter, Henry Mathes to his mother, 26 February 1864, Camp near Culpepper VA]
[transcribed 23 December 2014, from pension certificate file, image 28 on Fold3]


[several words are written, along with an apparent doodle, above the location and to the left of the date, and the date and place are also copied on a second line (which I haven't transcribed); I can read only the following two lines:]
Kate Mathes.
Kate

Feb 26th 1864
Camp near Culpepper Va.

My Dear mother,

I received your welcome letter on the 21st and I am glad to hear that you are all well as this leaves me. We had a grand review last week last week [sic] by our Corps Commander[.] it was a grand sight to see thousand [sic] of men marching along the plain. there was [sic] a great many persons present from Washington[.] amongst them were some ladies (wives of officers)[.] the whole affair passed off very pleasantly. I see by the papers that they intend laying a track on 7th and 9th St to run up 9th and down 7th[.] it will make 9th street rather more noisy than it was[.] One of the [manuscript page 2] boys told me that he seen [sic] an account of the resignation of Lieut Baker of the 91st P.V. I am glad to hear that the children are getting along so well at school. I would be pleased to get a letter from sister Carrie. I sent you 40 dollars by Adams Express. I sent it day before yesterday which was on the 24th[.] write and let me know if you got it. there is two months more coming to us which will be due on [sic] the middle of next month. We have had some pretty severe weather lately but as we do not have much drilling to do at present we are not as much exposed. somehow I do not like this Regiment as much as I did the other one. The officers seem to be down on us because we are enlisted [?]. but for my part I do not care a snap of my finger for any of them. I think that I can take [manuscript page 3] care of myself without of [sic] any of their help. When you write let me know how Geo. Rush is getting along. give my respects to Mrs. Randall and all enquiring friends. give my love to Sisters and Brother and take a good share for yourself and I remain your affectionate son.

Henry G. Mathes
Henry G. Mathes.
[the name is written in two different handwritings]

letter, 30 April 1864

[letter, Henry Mathes to mother, 30 April 1864, Camp near Mitchell's Station]
[transcribed 23 December 2014, from the pension certificate file, images 30-31 on Fold3]


Camp near Mitchell's Station April 30th 1864

My dear Mother,

I received your welcome letter on the 25th and I am glad to hear that you are all well as this leaves me. I am sorry to hear that Mrs. Quinn met with such a misfortune to lose 2 of her children. We were on picket when I received your letter. We have again moved camp[.] We moved out of our log-houses and we are now in our shelter-tents. I expect it wont [sic] be long before we will comence [sic] active operations, as everything is in readiness for the coming campaign. troops are continually arriving. Burnside is expected here with 40.000 men[.] among them are some negro troops. I think if we whip them in the next Battle that this summer will end the war. You say that Uncle Louis is engaged to be [manuscript page 2] married[.] it is as you say all the fools are not dead yet. I hope that he made a good choice. So Mr. Geokler has commenced Baking business again. Well he is a Queer sort of a fellow[;] he cannot content himself at anything. I suppose you was [sic] surprised to see Albert Leitz [?]. he must be a fine looking fellow by this time and I suppose that he has plenty of ding-bats. I should [have] liked to have seen him. the weather is getting to be very warm down here. from the hill where we are encamped we can see the Rebels [sic] plain. the Army places entire confidence in Gen. Grant[.] if he does as well with the Army of the Potomac as he did in the western Army I have no doubt but what we will be victorious. We have thrown away the Big Coats as we do not need them this warm weather. have they commenc[ed] to lay the tracks of the 7th and 9th street railway yet? of which there [manuscription page 3] was some talk some time ago of [sic]. I am glad to hear that the children are getting along so well at school. do you hear anything from Vogels [sic] family yet and how they are getting along. enclosed I send you twenty dollars[.] I had no chance to send it by express so I send it by mail. I hope you will get it safe. I also received a letter from Thys [??] Perpignan which I will answer in a few days. give my love to Sisters and Brother. And take a double share for yourself and I remain your affectionate son.

Henry G. Mathes.

letter, 28 January [1862]

[letter, 28 Jan [1862], Washington, Henry [Mathes] to his mother]
[transcribed 23 December 2014, from the pension certificate file, images 32-33 on Fold3]
[the handwriting is faded and at places hard to read]


Washington Jan. 28
Dear Mother

After leaving the city of Washington we took a march to camp which is about 2 miles from the city [crossed-out words: on a][.] We are encamped on a beautiful hill overlooking the city and surrounding camps. the country is very hilly and undulating. but very healthy. several of us took a walk around the country and visited several forts and encampments. among which were Fort Saratoga and Col. Birney's Regiment. we are encamped on the same field with the 37th Penna Regiment and a New Jersey Regiment [manuscript page 2] When we want a pass to go to Washington we must have it signed by the Col. and also the Brigadier General. One of the privates in Co F stole 30 dollars from a private in the New Jersey Regiment and also left his post. he was caught and will be Court martialled to morrow [sic]. we do now know how long we will be encamped here: but as soon a[s] we get into a brigade we will soon [sic] be on the move. But no matter where we go I shall always expect to hear from home. We expect to be paid in about a week: I will then send it home by Adams Express: It is raining very hard today: we all sit around the stove [manuscript page 3] writing letters smoking pip[e]s and playing cards. to day is just 5 months that I have been enlisted: and we all expect to be home in 5 months to come[.] Our Camp is named Stanton after the new Sec. of War. I dont [sic] beleive [sic] I ever felt better in my life as [sic] I do now and so do all the Boys[.] we have got so much drilling that it took all the laziness out of Jos. Budd [?] [presumably Joseph Budd (E)]. we have not got such a level ground to drill upon as Camp Chase but up and down hill among Blackberry Bushes and Stumps: as it is now time for me to go on guard I must bring my letter to a close: Give my love to all enquiring friends and take a double share for yourself[.] [manuscript page 4] and give my love to Eddie and my dear sisters. When you sent a letter direct it as follows:


Henry G Mathes in care
Camp Stanton
91st Regt [illegible]

Henry

in your next letter please send me a few postage stamps

letter, 4 June 1862

[letter, H G Mathes to his mother, 4 June 1862, Alexandria VA]
[transcribed 23 December 2014, from the pension certificate file, images 34-35 on Fold3]


Alexandria June 4th 1862.

My Dear Mother.

I received your welcome letter yesterday and was glad to hear that you are all well as this letter leaves me. We were paid off on Saturday and I suppose you have received the $15.00 by this time. There is not a day passes but I think of home and how you are all getting along. I should like to get a furlough but it is [manuscript page 2] very hard to do so at present on account of not knowing how soon we will move: It is raining very hard at present and has been so all night: but it is what we need: I suppose by the time this letter reaches you our troops will have possession of Richmond[.] then we may expect a speedy return home! I have not received a letter from John Scheidt since we have been in Alexandria. I wrote one to him last week but he has not answered it yet. [manuscript page 3] Bob. Miller received a letter from his father yesterday[.] [presumably Robert Miller (E)] he says that the girls are greatly anxious to hear from us: Enclosed is a fac simile [sic] of a Confederate Bank Note[.] You must excuse my short letter, as really I do not know what to write. the Boys all send their best respects to you all. give my love to Eddie and sisters and Charlie Smith, and all enquiring freinds [sic]. and take a double share for yourself and I remain your affectionate son

H. G. Mathes

[manuscript page 4, written in a different hand]

I certify the within to be correct that it was written by Henry G. Mathes late Priv. Co. "E" 91 P.V. to his mother on the date specified and I am cognizant of said facts by having seen him write it and mail it to his mother.

J H Budd [presumably Joseph H Budd (E)]
Late Priv Co E. 91 P.V.

letter, 15 April [1862]

[letter, 15 April [1862], Washington DC, Henry G Mathes to his mother]
[transcribed 23 December 2014, from the pension certificate file, images 36-37 on Fold3]


Washington April 15th

Dear Mother,

I take this present opportunity of writeing [sic] to you to let you know that I am well and I hope these few lines will find you all the same[.] this makes the 2nd letter that I have written and not yet received an answer which makes me feel worried. I suppose you have heard of the robbery that Jim Wilson committed heare [sic] the night -- the night after pay day he slept in the room with some of the men and in the middle of the [manuscript page 2] night he got up and stole 15 dollars from one man and 6 from another and then left for parts unknown: they have telegraphed on to Phila from [sic] him and if he gets caught he will get what he deserves. I suppose who [sic] have also received the money I sent you by this time[.] I would have sent more but I had to pay my debts first such as I owed to the Suttler [sic] and washwoman. Several of our men have taken french leave. we have very easy times just now: give my love to Mrs Krider and family and to all enquiring [manuscript page 3] friends[.] give my love to Sisters and Brother and Keep a double share for yourself and I remain your ever affectionate son[.]

Henry G. Mathes

Co E. 91st Regt. P.V
Washington D.C

[manuscript page 4, written in a different hand and upside down]

State of Pennsylvania, County of Philadelphia

On this 23rd day of October 1866 before me Fred. G. Wolbert a Prothy Court Common Pleas. personally appeared Joseph H. Budd who having been first by me duly sworn according to law deposes and says that the within letter was written by the soldier to his mother in the month of April 1862--deponent having been present and seen him write the within and mail it to his mother


J. H. Budd
Late Priv Co E 91 P.V.

Sworn and Subscribed to before me the day and year within written
Fred. G. Wolbert
Prothy

letter, 20 April [1862]

[letter, H G Mathes to his mother, 20 April [1862], Washington DC]
[transcribed 23 December 2014, from the pension certificate file, images 38-39 on Fold3]


Washington Sunday April 20th

Dear Mother

I received your welcome letter yesterday and was glad to hear you were all well, as this letter leaves me. you wanted to know if I kept back any money for myself. I kept a couple of dollars which will last me for a while. you also mentioned in your letter of several of our boys being home on a french leave: you need not be afraid of me disgracing myself by doing as they did: for I will not come home untill [sic] I come with an honorable discarge [sic][.] [manuscript page 2] the National Guards arrived in this city on friday [sic] from Baltimore[.] they are quarted [sic; sc. quartered] at the Soldiers Retreat.

we had quite a surprise last night. word came that the Rebels were marching on to Washington, when the National Guards. and two cavalry and one Artillery Regiment were ordered out[.] Our Regiment also received the same orders and off we started on a double quick for the Long Bridge expecting a fight for sure. but when we arrived there we found it was a false report. and we were greatly disappointed. but I think our boys will have a shot at [manuscript page 3] the Rebels yet: One of the Rebel prisoners at the prison was shot by One of our Regiment yesterday: for not keeping his head in the window and cursing the Guard. [see the shooting of Jesse Wharton; according to the other evidence I have, he was shot on the 20th; I therefore suspect that Mathers finished the letter on the 21st without noting he had switched days] the Ball went clean through him and lodged in the cealing [sic]: every one of them ought to be served in the same manner: we are spending Easter Sunday very happy we have plenty of Egg Nogg and plenty of boiled Eggs. and salt pork: as it is now getting late I must bring my short letter to a close. give my love to Sisters and Brother. and all enquiring friends and keep a double share for yourself[.] and I remain your [manuscript page 4] ever affectionate son


H. G. Mathes
Co. E. 91st Regt. P.V.
Washington D.C

letter, 8 Feb 1864

[letter, Henry G Mathers to one of his sisters, 8 Feb 1864, camp near Culpepper]
[transcribed 23 December 2014, from the pension certificate file, images 40-41 on Fold3]


Feb. 8th 1864.

Camp near Culpepper
My Dear Sister.

Your welcome letter came to hand on the 5th and I am glad to hear that you are all well as this leaves me. I am sorry to hear of Charles Kryder's [?] death but it did not come unexpected. [Charles A Kryder died on 16 January 1864; see his death record] It struck me when you wrote that Joe Budd had reenlisted. he had better come down in my Company. We have just returned from a long march to the front and back again. The 2nd corp [sic] had a slight engagement with them but we did not get into it although we seen [sic] the whole of the fight. We are now encamped about two miles outside of Culpeper. We are now in log- [manuscript page 2] huts 8 of us in one of them. And a gay party we are: I have not received a letter from Mr Janney for some time. is Kate yet at his store? There are 3 regiments out of our Brigade that have reenlisted[.] they are as follows[:] the 88th and 11th Pennsylvania and the 97th N. York[.] no man can reenlist who has not served two years in one Regiment[.] You mentioned about sending me the New York Ledger." [sic] I am much obliged to you. but I have read all the papers as some of the Boys in the tent take them. It is the general impression in the Army that next summer and fall will wind up this Rebellion. the Rebels are coming into our lines on an average of 10 a day. If Gen. Grant only succeeds in his undertaking. the Army of the Potomac will do the rest. [manuscript page 3] I am sorry that we have not been paid off. as I would like to send some money to mother. We will be paid off some time in March. How are the children getting along at school[?] You mentioned about Henry Virden and Jina [?] Eldridge getting married. I think it is almost time for me to follow suit. I see by the papers that there will be a draft on the 10th of March[.] that will make the big-bugs shell out their greenbacks or shoulder a musket[.] You must excuse my short letter as the fact is news of any intrest [sic] is very scarce[.] give my love to all enquiring friends also to Mother, sisters, and Brother Tommy. and take a good share for yourself and I remain your affectionate Brother[.]

Henry. G. Mathes

letter, 11 February [1862]

[letter, Henry G. Mathes to his mother, 11 February [1862], Washington]
[transcribed 23 December 2014, from the pension certificate file, pages 42-43 on Fold3]


Washington Feb 11th

Dear Mother

Enclosed I send you 20 dollars part of my pay[.] We received 2 months pay and I owned [sic] the Sutler 1 dollar and bought a pair of boots in Washington for 3 dollars and kept the rest for spending money[.] we expect to be paid again in March. I received your welcome letter to day [sic] also the one from Chas. Smith and one from John Scheidt[.] I expect that I will get the box to night [sic] or to morrow [sic] morning. I send the money [manuscript page 2] with Alderman Lentz who takes all the boys [sic] money home for them which I think is the safest way. we have got fine weather and I hope it will continue so. we heard heavy firing last night on the potomac [sic] which I suppose was the rebels firing on the vessels manning the blockade[.] I have not much to put in my letters as there is nothing but the same thing going on from one day to the other. I am well and hope you are all the same. Give my best respects to Mrs Krider and family[.] tell Bill Bond he must write first. Kiss all the children for me and take [manuscript page 3] one for yourself

Your Affectionate Son
Henry. G. Mathes

p.S. [sic]

As soon as I get the Box i [sic] will let you know. Write and tell me if you get this 20 dollars

H.G.M

[written sideways at the bottom of the page:]

Tell Carrie Souders I will think it hard of her if she dont [sic] write

Give my love to Mrs Cartledge and family

letter, 21 January 1864

[letter, Henry G Mathes to one of his sisters, 21 January 1864]
[transcribed 23 December 2014, from the pension certificate file, pages 44-45 on Fold3]


Jan 21st 1864
Culpepper Court House Va

My Dear Sister

I received your welcome letter last Sunday and I am glad to hear that you are all well as this leaves me. You asked how the Boots fitted [sic] me. they fit like a T[.] I am sorry to hear that Charles Kryder is so low. but I hope that he may be spared a good while yet. You mentioned in your letter that Mr. Steiner had paid you a visit. You also stated that he was trying to get Lizzie a situation at Horstmans[.] What sort of a store is Horstmans: [sic] and what would she have to do there! [sic] The Army is now lying quit [sic] on account of the roads being in a bad condition for [manuscript page 2] marching. The 1st corp [sic] (that is the corp [sic] in which our Regiment is) is lying around Culpepper. We do not expect to be paid until about the middle of March on account of the paymaster being to [sic] busy in paying off the reEnlisted men. but when I do get paid it will be a Big pile[.] I will then have 6 months coming to me. I have written a letter to Mr Janney in which I thanked him kindly for the Boots. We have had some severe weather lately. One day snow. And the rain. We are still in the Church and we have some fine times as long as it lasts. The last week over 200 Rebels swam across the river and gave themselves up to our men[.] they are now confined in Culpepper jail: News are [sic] so scarce that I hardly know what [manuscript page 3] to write. so I must bring my short letter to a close. give my love to Mother, Sisters, and Brother and take a good share for yourself[.] and I remain your affectionate Brother.

Henry. G. Mathes

P.S How about the honey yesterday
H.G.M

Co. A " 90th " P.V

letter, 12 April [1862]

[letter, Henry G Mathes to his mother, 12 April [1862], Washington]
[transcribed 23 December 2014, from the pension certificate file, pp.46-47 on Fold3]


Washington April 12th

Dear Mother

Enclosed I send you 15 dollars[.] I would have sent you more but we all had to pay the Sutler and Washwoman[.] there is now almost 2 months more coming to us then I will send you all[.] we are now quarted [sic; sc. quartered] in a large house right opposite the Capitol[.] I am in a room with Harrigan [presumably Francis D Harrigan (E)] and Williams [probably James Williams (E)] who are two perfect gentlemen[.] I am right well at present and I hope these few lines will find you all the same[.] give my love to all [manuscript page 2] enquiring freinds [sic][.] give my love to sisters and brother and take a double share for yourself and I remain your affectionate son

Henry G. Mathes

letter, 22 November 1863

[letter, Henry G Mathes to his mother, 22 November 1863, Camp near Bealton Station]
[transcribed 23 December 2014, from the pension certificate file, pages 48-49]


Nov. 22nd 1863
Camp near Bealton Station

My Dear Mother.

I received your welcome letter yesterday and I was glad to hear that you were all well as this leaves me. You stated in your letter that Fannie was promoted to the 2nd div. Secondary[.] I suppose when I get home to find her a school teacher. and also see that Carrie is getting along first rate at school. I think she will make a smart woman. I am sorry to hear that you have to work so hard[.] if I was you I would quit for a while. for my sake anyhow. It quite surprised me when I seen [sic] in your letter an account of the Robbery of Mrs. [?] Krider. And also of Mr. [?] [manuscript page 2] Gengebach. I always thought that Quinn [?] Boy was a rascal[.] Keep Eddie away from him. I see that you have new neighb[ors.] I hope they are as agreeable as the last one. I wrote a letter a few days ago to Mr Janney[.] I expect an answer soon from him. I have not yet received the pants but I expect they will be here soon[.] things sent by Express do not [illegible] here as soon as those sent by mail[.] We were paid off a few days ago[.] there was 4 months due to me but I received but two. I sent you $20.00 to day [sic] by Adams Express. write to me when you get it. we will be paid again in January. I am sorry to hear of the sickness of David Lentz [perhaps this is David G Lentz (E)] and I hope he may be restored to health soon again. I have not much news of intrest [sic] to [manuscript page 3] write. The rebels occasionally make a dash at our pickets[.] But they generally get well peppered for their trouble. We have had quite a rain storm[.] it lasted two days but the weather is now fine again. look out that the thieves dont [sic] steal any thing from you like they did from Kryders[.] I would lke to have your likeness also some of the childrens[']. as I am writing my tent mate is frying potatoes and they smell so good that I think I will have to dive in for some. give my love to Sisters and Brother and all enquiring friends and take a good share for yourself and I remain your affectionate son.

Henry. G. Mathes

P.S Write as soon as you receive the money.
H.G.M.

dependent's pension certificate file

[dependent's pension certificate file, WC 98,917, Frederica Mathers mother of Henry George Mathers (90th Pennsylania!)]
[abstracted from 61 pages on Fold3, December 2014]
[NB: although the application does not mention his service in the 91st, the file includes letters written while he was a member of the 91st, which makes clear this is the Henry Mathers who served in the 91st]
5 January 1855
father, Peter Mathers, died (pp.3, 5)
28 January [1862]
Henry Mathes sent a letter to his mother, from Washington DC (pp.32-33 [see the transcription above])
11 February [1862]
Henry G Mathes sent a letter to his mother, from Washington DC (pp.42-43 [see the transcription above])
12 April 1862
Henry G Mathes sent a letter to his mother, from Washington DC (pp.46-47 [see the transcription above])
15 April 1862
Henry G Mathes sent a letter to his mother, from Washington DC (pp.36-37 [see the transcription above])
20 April 1862
H G Mathes sent a letter to his mother, from Washington DC (pp.38-39 [see the transcription above])
4 June 1862
Henry Mathes sent a letter to his mother, from Alexandria (pp.34-35 [see the transcription above])
22 Mar [?] 1863
Henry Mathers sent his mother $20 by Adams Express, apparently from 'Brandy [Station]' (p.20 [which is the receipt])
[the pension certificate file includes two other receipts, for $40 (pp.21-22) and $20 (pp.23-24), which aren't dated]
17 July 1863
Henry Mathes drafted at Philadelphia PA, and mustered into 90 PA volunteers as private (p.8)
22 Nov 1863
Henry G Mathes wrote a letter to his mother, from Camp near Bealton Station (pp.48-49 [see transcription above])
21 January 1864
Henry G Mathes wrote a letter to one of his sisters from Culpepper Court House VA (pp.44-45 [see transcription above])
8 February 1864
Henry G Mathes wrote a letter to one of his sisters from Camp near Culpepper (pp.40-41 [see transcription above])
26 February 1864
Henry Mathes wrote a letter to his mother from Camp near Culpepper, Virginia (pp.28-29 [see transcription above])
30 April 1864
Henry Mathes wrote a letter to his mother from Camp near Mitchell's Station, 30 April 1864 (pp.30-31 [see transcription above])
22 July 1864
'Died July 22.1864 of wounds recd. in action June 18. 1864.' (pp.3, 8 [citing Sep-Oct muster rolls of co. A 90th PA])
4 Oct 1864
Frederica Mathers, mother of Henry George Mathers A 90th PA, applied for a pension under the act of 14 JUly 1862 (p.3)
43 years old, resident of Philadelphia, post office address 621 S 9th Av [sic], Philadelphia (p.3)
Frederica had a small grocery store, for which Henry was clerk, worth $5 per week
Henry worked in grocery store for about 2 years before he enlisted, and earned $5 per week (p.5)
she depended 'upon the Arsenal work' (p.5)
Henry's help was indispensible, and she had to quit the business after he enlisted
Henry sent her money while in the army ($15, $20, $40)
Frederica owned some real estate ('a tenemant valued at the sum of $3000, upon which said tenement is a mortgage of $1500'), but it was heavily mortgaged, and sold to pay debts (p.5 [no mention of its being sold])
attorney: Jos E Devitt + Co (pp.4, 11)
witnesses: Ann Austin and Mary Lousia Goekele [?], both Philadelphia residents (p.5)
dated 3 Oct 1864 (p.3)
application 67,461 (pp.8, 13)
admitted 14 August 1867, for $8 per month, retroactive to 22 July 1864 (pp.2, 11)
certificate dated 30 Augst 1867 (p.11)
Chas T Cotton, examining clerk (p.2)
23 Oct 1864
Joseph H Budd testified that he lived at 4 Hewitts Place Philadelphia, was honorably discharged from E 91 PA, that is well acquainted with Frederica Mathers mother of Henry (late private E 91 PA and then private A 90 PA), that he had known both for six years, that Henry was Frederica's only support, that before enlisting Henry 'took charge of a Grocery Store for his mother, which through his exertions and superintendence supported his mother', that she would have had to pay someone $5 to $8 per week to do his job, and couldnot have afforded it, that she had to close the store when Henry enlisted, that he (Budd) was in the same company as Henry and saw him send almost all his pay to his mother, 'one occasion in particular deponent recollects of the soldier having sent Twenty Dollars home to his mother shortly after his enlistment in the 91st Pa vols through Alderman Lentz of Philadelphia a brother to John D. Lentz the Captain of Company "E" 91st Penna vols', that Frederica owned only the property in which she lived, 621 S 9th st, which is worth no more than $2800 and has a $1500 mortgage on it, that she will owe $54 this year in taxes on it, plus $11 water tax, that she could rent a house for the same rate, that her other children don't support her (five girls, three less than 16, and the other 2 earning only enough to support themselves), and one boy (12), that she can scarcely provide necessities, that giving her a pension would be an act of justice (pp.51-53)
20 Jan 1865
the Adjutant General's office sent the above-summarized information (p.8; see p.13 for the request)
27 Jan [?] 1865
the Pension Office noted that 'soldier has middle name [illegible word] initial not on rolls[;] mother had real estate worth $3000 mortgage on it of $1500.00' (p.14)
9 June 1865
the Pension Office sent circular 5 to the Adjutant General (p.14)
25 July 1865
the Pension Office received circular 5 from the Adjutant General with evidence, and also sent a letter to the attorney requesting 'better testimony than of identifying witnesses as to value of client's real estate, + nature + extent of incumbrances thereon' (p.14)
the Adjutant General's office reported that no other Henry G Mathers or Henry Mathers was borne on the rolls of company A 90th Pennsylvania than the one reported earlier (p.15)
see page 16 for the letter requesting better evidence (p.16)
23 August 1865
William Patton (resident of Philadelphia) swore that he had a mortgage on the house at 621 South 9th St, owned by Fredericka Mathers, that the property was worth $2000 and the mortgage was for $1500 (p.26)
25 August 1865
taxes for 621 South 9th st for 1865: valued at 1400, city tax $35.00 + $1.40, state tax $4.20 + $0.21, penalty $38.01 + $0.02 for stamp (p.59)
29 August 1865
the Pension Office received some response to their letter of 25 July (p.14)
31 August 1865
the Pension Office sent a letter informing the attorney [?] that the offered proof of dependency wasn't satisfactory, and that the evidence about the mortgage didn't show that it hadn't been discharged, or wasn't about to be discharged, giving her real estate worth enough to support her (p.14)
7 Sep 1865
William Patton (resident of Philadelphia) swore that he had a mortgage on 621 S 9th St, and had for 6 years, with interest of $90 payable every 6 months, that Fredericka Mathers hasn't been able to pay the interest for 6 months because of her poverty, that no part of the mortgage has been satisfied or discharged and it isn't likelyl ever to be settled by her (pp.57)
9 September 1865
the Pension Office received some response to their letter of 31 August (p.14)
29 November 1865
the Pension Office sent a letter asking for 'prop. proof incumbrance' (p.14)
12 Feb 1866
the Recorder said that he did not find any unsatisfied mortgage of Frederica's property since 1 April 1860 (pp.61-61)
2 March 1866
the Pension Office received some response to their letter of 29 November 1865 (p.14)
25 Apr 1866
William M Burns and Lewis Kuntz (both residents of Philadelphia) swore that they knew Fredericka Mathers and Henry, that he was her sole support for five years before enlisting, that he was a grocer, and gave his mother the money he earned, and sent her all the money he received as a soldier except what he owed the Sutler and other small amounts (pp.54-55)
26 October 1866
the Pension Office received some additional evidence (p.14)
7 January 1867
the Pension Office sent a letter to the attorney (p.14)
28 February 1867
Lewis Kuntz and William W Burns (residents of Philadelphia) swore that they had known Frederica and Henry Mathers for more than 7 years, that he was employed in a grocery store for more than two years before enlisting, which his mother 'had the superintendence of and [was] considered the proprietor thereof although really the grocery store was not her own', since she had borrowed $300 from Godfrey Goeckler to purchase the goods, and Henry Mathers 'was employed in said store only through consent of said Mr Goeckler', and Frederica retained the $5 per week Henry's emplyment was worth with Henry's consent, that Frederica had to give up the business when Henry Left 'claimant tried a stranger to attend the store at the rate of over Five Dollars per week, but owing to this circumstance the fact of paying said amount she was unable to make anything and obliged to close business' (p.18)
they also testified that 'the witnesses Mrs Annarst [?] and Mary L Goekler in their evidence supposed the store was Mr Goecklers' because of 'the money transaction between claimant and Mr Goeckler' (p.18)
27 July 1867
Elizabeth Steppler and WIlliam M Burns (both residents of Philadelphia) swore that they had known Fredericka Mathers for seven years, that she had owned property at 621 S 9th St, assessed at $1400, with a mortgage of $1500, sold in June 1866 for $4000, and that she no longer owned it, that she had to sell it to prevent the Sheriff from selling it to pay for debt (since she couldn't keep up with the taxes and interest on the mortgage), that she kept only $700 of that $4000, since she had to pay $1500 on the mortgage and $1800 in debts including interest on the mortgage and store bills, and $100 that she owed Wm W Burns (deponent), that she owed Jacob Mather (her brother-in-law) $150, and other debts totalling $1800 (p.19)
4 Dec 1875
the Pension Office instructed the Pension Agent to suspend payment of the pension (p.12)
25 January 1876
the Pension Office instructed the Pension Agent to resume payment of the pension (p.12)
29 January 1904
Frederica Mathers died (p.9)
last paid at $12 to 4 November 1903; dropped 17 February 1904 (pp.9, 12)

pension index, by name

[pension index, by name]
[transcribed 21 December 2014, from Ancestry]
NAME OF SOLDIERMathers, Henry G
 
NAME OF DEPENDENTWidow 
Minor 
MotherMathers, Fridreca [sic]
SERVICE
A. 90 Pa. Inf.
 
DATE OF FILINGCLASS APPLICATION NO CERTIFICATE NO STATE FROM WHICH FILED
  Invalid      
  Widow      
  Minor      
1864 Oct. 4 Mother 67461 98917  
ATTORNEY  
REMARKS  

pension index, by unit

[pension index, by unit]
[transcribed 22 December 2014, from Fold3]
DEAD
NAME OF SOLDIER
Mathers, Henry G.
 
SERVICELate rank PCo. A. 90 Reg't Pa. Inf.
TERM OF SERVICEEnlisted Discharged
DATE OF FILINGCLASS APPLICATION NO LAW CERTIFICATE NO.
  Invalid      
  Widow      
  Minor      
1864 Oct 4 Mother 67461   98917
ADDITIONAL SERVICES  
 
 
REMARKS  
Died at

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revised 3 Jan 15
contact Harry Ide at hide1@unl.edu with comments or questions