91st PA: George Scott Oldmixon

George Scott Oldmixon

Before the war

He was born about 1835/1838, in Paris, France, to George Augustus Hengiston Oldmixon and Francis Margaret [unknown family name]. [sources: date: 7 (29 in 1864), 8 (42 in 1880), 22 (about 1838), 47 (1834). place: 8, 22, 47 (Saxony)]

He was baptised on 21 September 1838, at Paris, France. [source: 24]

In March 1861, he graduated from Jefferson Medical College. [sources: 21, 46]

He was living in Chester County, Pennsylvania, when he enlisted. [source: 7]

During the war

He was appointed assistant surgeon on 28 April 1864. He enlisted and was mustered into service as an assistant surgeon on 22 May 1864, in the field. On 9 June 1864, he was reported assigned to duty in the regiment. [sources: 1, 5, 7, 13, 43]

On 27 October 1864, he went on a furlough because of a disability, which was to expire on 16 November 1864. He returned by 17 November 1864. [sources: 6 (citing SO 268, 5th Army Corps, Army of Potomac), 15, 16]

He was a witness to the charge preferred against Thomas Walter on 4 January 1865. [source: 4]

In February 1865, he returned to the Surgeon in Chief, 3rd Brigade, a request for information about James Thompson. [source: 26]

He was probably the assistant surgeon the author of an anonymous contemporary account reports as helpful and successfully treating him with Tincture of Iron for exhaustion. [source: 2]

He was discharged on 27 March 1865 by special order. He was an assistant surgeon. [sources: 1, 3, 7, 17, 43]

After the war

George Oldmixon was the surgeon at Fort Yuma for many years. He experimented on Gila Monsters, concluding that they were not poisonous. [source: 14]

In October 1875, he was ordered to report to the Department of Arizona, for orders. On Thursday, 30 September 1875, he arrived in Arizona City, Yuma County, Arizona Territory, having travelled from San Francisco by Steamer. He was assigned to duty as Post Surgeon, Camp San Carlos, Arizona Territory. Some time in 1875, a picture was taken of him at Camp Apache, Arizona. [sources: 20, 32, 40, 41]

In January 1877, he was granted a leave. [source: 19]

Effective 30 June 1877, his contract as Acting Assistant Surgeon General was annulled. [source: 18]

In 1880, George S Oldmixon was an Acting Assistant Surgeon, in the US Army. He was living in Camp Bowie, Pima, Arizona, commanded by 2nd lieutenant Augustus Blockson. (His father, Captain George Oldmixon, died in April 1880. His mother and brother were living in West Caln Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania.) [sources: 8. family: 25, and 1880 US census microfilm series T9, film 1114, page 79 C = 19 handwritten]

In June 1881, he was ordered to go to San Francisco, California, and report to First Lieutenant P H Ray, for duty with the expedition to Point Barrow, Alaska. [source: 39]

Dr George Oldmixon, from the United States Army, was part of the International Polar Expedition to Point Barrow, Alaska, from October 1881 to October 1883. This expedition, sponsored by the United States Army Signal Service, and led by First Lieutenant Patrick Henry Ray, established a permanent station for various observations (including weather), and collected specimens of animals, plants, and minerals. Ray also did ethnographic studies of the Point Barrow Eskimos. This was part of the United States' contribution to the International Polar Year of 1881. Oldmixon seems not to have had much medical work to do: [sources: 9, 10, 11]

"During the whole period all the members of the expedition enjoyed excellent health, not having a single man on the sick report for two years." [source: 11, p.379]

A George S Oldmixon was a physician in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, according to a 1893 history. He was a veteran. [source: 12, 35]

On 8 April 1889, he died, in Plymouth, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania. [source: 22, 23, 47 (9 Nov 1889)]

A George Scott Oldmixon, who may be the person who served in the 91st, married Corinne Rhodes. She was born in July 1844, in Buenos Aires, Argentine Republic, and immigrated to the United States in 1849. She was probably born to William A Rhodes and Louisa [unknown family name]. They apparently had the following children:

Louise Oldmixon, daughter of 'Dr Oldmixon', became an actress because her family experienced 'one of those reverses of fortune that all families have had administered to them'. [sources: 28, 29, 36, 37, 38, 47]

In 1870, Cath [sic] Oldmixon was living with William and A Rhodes. She also apparently had three children living with her, Pauline, Daisey, and Harriet. [sources: 37]

Corinne Oldmixon continued living at 2049 Chestnut after her father (William A Rhodes) died, through about 1875. [source: 27]

In 1885, George S Oldmixon was a surgeon, living in Plymouth, Pennsylavnia. He had practiced in Pennsylvania since 1871. [source: 46]

In 1900, Corinne was living at 53 Everett Street, ward 3, Newport, Newport County, Rhode Island. She was living with her stepdaughter Sophie M Hume, and a servant. [source: 30]

On 27 May 1901, Sophie Hume, daughter of W S Oldmixon, of West Philadelphia, was divorced from Waltomar H H Hume. [sources: 33, 34]

In 1910, Corinne Oldmixon was living at 2210 Pine Street, ward 7, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She was living with her daughter Sophie Hume, and a servant. [sources: 27, 31]

She continued living at 2210 Pine Street until about 1913, when she moved to 905 South 48th Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She lived there through at least (approximately) 1916. [source: 27]

In 1920, Corinne was living at 4701 Baltimore Avenue, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, with her daughter Sophia O Henderson. [source: 44]

On 12 April 1932, Corrine Oldmixon was buried, in Woodlands Cemetery. She was buried in the 'family vault'--apparently the Rhodes family vault, and not an Oldmixon family vault. [source: 45]

Sources

1 Bates, Samuel Penniman. History of Pennsylvania volunteers, 1861-5. Harrisburg: B. Singerly, state printer, 1869-71. 5 volumes. 'Ninety-first regiment', volume 3, pages 186-233. (George S Oldmixon) (In the roster)

2 [an anonymous untitled article]. Norristown Herald and Free Press 5 July 1864.

3 Official Army Register.

4 charge and specification against Thomas Walter, 4 January 1865 (Geo S Oldmixon)

5 Regimental descriptive book

6 undated officers' furlough list, in regimental letter, order, guard, and furlough book (George Oldmixon)

7 Civil War Veterans' Card File, available at the Pennsylvania State Archives, searched 5 May 2004 (George S Oldmixon)

8 1880 US census, Arizona, Puma County, Camp Bowie, supervisor's district 1, enumeration district 1, microfilm series T9, film 36, page 152 C = 15 handwritten (George S Oldmixon)

9 'List of Smithsonian expeditions, 1878-1917', at Smithsonian Institution Archives (searched 26 May 2004) (Dr George Oldmixon, United States Army)

10 '"To elucidate the phenomena of the weather" Point Barrow, Alaska, 1881-1883', at http://www.army.mil/cmh-pg/topics/natam/weather.htm (searched 26 May 2004)

11 Lieutenant P. Henry Ray, Eighth United States Infantry. "International polar expedition to Point Barrow, Alaska". In Compilation of narratives of explorations in Alaska, pages 365-380. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1900.

12 HC Bradsby, editor. History of Luzerne County Pennsylvania. SB Nelson & Co., 1893. Chapter XV: Medical. Available at US GenWeb (searched 28 May 2004). (George S Oldmixon)

13 consolidated morning report, 91st Pennsylvania, 9 June 1864 (Asst Surg Oldmixon)

14 '[Whe]re heat is tropic'. Washington Post, 14 September 1902, page 32.

15 consolidated morning report, 91st Pennsylvania, 30 October 1864 (Asst Surg Oldmixon)

16 consolidated morning report, 91st Pennsylvania, 17 November 1864 (Asst Surgeon Oldmixon)

17 consolidated morning report, 91st Pennsylvania, 26 April 1865 (Ast Surg Oldmixon)

18 'Late military orders', [Arizona] Weekly Journal Miner 22 June 1877, page 3 (George S Oldmixon)

19 'Army news', Daily Inter Ocean 8 January 1877, page 7 (George S Oldmixon)

20 'Telegraphic', [Arizona] Weekly Journal Miner 8 October 1875, page 2 (Geo S Oldmixon)

21 'Jefferson Medical College--commencement exercises at Musical Fund Hall', Philadelphia Inquirer 11 March 1861, page 2 (Geo S Oldmixon)

22 abstract of IGI individual record, George Scott Oldmixon (accessed on FamilySearch, 1 May 2011) (George Scott Oldmixon)

23 'Pennsylvania', The Medical Standard volume 5 number 5 (May 1889) page 163. (George Scott Oldmixon)

24 England and Wales, non-conformist record indexes (RG4-8), RG33_062 (George Scott Heyngesten Oldmixon)

25 'State notes', Patriot 16 April 1880, page 2

26 abstract of widow's pension certificate file, National Archives and Records Administration, RG 15, WC 52233, Joanna Chew Thompson widow of James L Thompson (G S Oldmixon)

27 Philadelphia city directories

28 abstract of New York marriages, 1686-1980, available on FamilySearch (no image available) (accessed 4 February 2012) (George Scott Oldmixon)

29 abstract of Rhode Island deaths and burials, 1802-1950, available on FamilySearch (no image available) (accessed 4 February 2012) (George Scott Oldmixon)

30 1900 US census, Rhode Island, Newport County, Newport, ward 3, supervisor's district Rhode Island, enumeration district 220, microfilm series T623, film 1505, page 187 = 3 B handwritten (Corinne Oldmixson)

31 1910 US census, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, ward 7, supervisor's district 1, enumeration district 110, microfilm series T624, film 1389, page 256 = 2 A handwritten (Corinne Oldmixon)

32 picture, from Records of the Office of the Chief Signal Office--Signal Corps; Photographs of American Military Activity, 1875. In Gallery of the Open Frontier (accessed 4 February 2012) (Dr Oldmixon)

33 'Mrs. Sophie Hume obtains divorce', Philadelphia Inquirer 28 May 1901, page 1 (Sophie Hume)

34 'Divorce follows after 13 weeks of matrimony', Philadelphia Inquirer, 28 April 1901, section 1, copy of page 7 (Sophie Hume)

35 'Memorial Day program'. Wilkes-Barre Times 27 May 1901, page 7, 'Plymouth Department' (G S Oldmixon)

36 'Gossip of the day', Philadelphia Inquirer, 10 December 1891, page 3 (Louise Oldmixon, Dr Oldmixon)

37 1870 US census, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, ward 9, district 27, microfilm series M593, film 1394, page 92 = 15 handwritten (Cath Oldmixon)

38 1850 US census [not transcribed], Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Lower Delaware Ward, p. 16 verso (Corina Rhodes)

39 'Army articles', National Republican [Washington DC], 27 June 1881, p.1 (George S Oldmixon)

40 'Local matters', The Arizona Sentinel (Arizona City [Yuma], Yuma County, Arizona Territory), 2 October 1875, page [3] (G S Oldmixon)

41 'Headquarters Dept. of Arizona.', The Arizona Sentinel (Arizona City [Yuma], Yuma County, Arizona Territory), 2 October 1875, page [3] (George S Oldmixon)

42 deceased physicians file (AMA), 1864-1968 (George S Oldmixon)

43 index to compiled service records of volunteer Union soldiers who served in organizations from the state of Pennsylvania (George Scott Oldmixon)

44 1920 US census, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, ward 46, enumeration district 1731, microfilm series T625, film 1646, page 115 = 11 B handwritten (Corene Oldmixon)

45 Woodlands Cemetery records, in Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Historic Pennsylvania church and town records]

46 Fourth annual report of the [Pennsylvania] State Board of Health, page 826

47 'George Scott Heynges Oldmixon', in Foote, an Ancestry family tree, owner cynthiazaeske (George Scott Heynges Oldmixon)

48 * muster-out roll, Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, record group 19, series 19.11, records of the Department of Military and Veterans' Affairs (George S Oldmixon)

Sources checked unsuccessfully

American Medical Directory for 1906, and for 1909
pension index by name
Ancestery index (accessed June 2005)
1850 US census
FamilySearch index (accessed 1 May 2011)
1860 US census
HeritageQuest index (accessed 1 May 2011), Footnote index (accessed 1 May 2011), FamilySearch index (accessed 1 May 2011)
1880 US census
note that Wm A Rhoads (the apparent father of the Corinne who may have married my George S Oldmixon) died on 1 March 1873, (9th ward, 2049 Chestnut St, Philadelphia), and was buried in Woodlands Cemetery (Philadelphia death certificates 1803-1915 (Wm A Rhoads, 1 March 1873)
Louisa (Corinne's apparent mother, 70, b. NJ)) is living at 2015 St Martin's Squire, with her daughter Caroline M Booth (40,, b. NY), and a servant Margaret Dundas (Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, enumeration district 573, microfilm series T9, film 1186, page 94 = 33 A handwritten (FamilySearch)
Caroline is presumably the Caroline Booth living with Wm A, Louisa, Corina Rhodes (and Rosita Rob) in 1850 (FamilySearch)--it's natural to see her as Corinne's older sister
1890 veterans' census
Ancestry index (accessed October 2005)
1930 US census
Footnote index (accessed 1 May 2011)
Ancestry index (accessed 15 February 2015)
Find a grave
no entries for George S Oldmixon (note memorial 25766941 for Cpt George Oldmixon, in Saint Johns Episcopal Church Cemetery) or Corinne Oldmixon (accessed 4 February 2012)
Pennsylvania Church and Town Records
from the PA Historical Society, on Ancestry (accessed 6 February 2012)
Pennsylvania, veterans burial cards, 1777-1999
Ancestry index (accessed 15 February 2015)
records of headstones of deceased Union veterans, 1879-1903
FamilySearch index (accessed 15 February 2015)
headstone applications for US military veterans, 1925-1949
FamilySearch index (accessed 15 February 2015)
Pennsylvania death certificates (1906-1963)
no Oldmixon entries in Ancestry's index (accessed 15 February 2015)

Note on identification

I am not at all confident that all these records are of the same person.

The meager facts I know from Civil War records are that he was a surgeon, was 29 when he enrolled in 1864, and was living in Chester County, Pennsylvania. [source: entry 7 in the sources above]

A George A Oldmixon (Captain, born 1796/97, in England) was living in West Caln Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania in 1870 and 1880, with his wife Francis Margaret (born ca 1821/22, England) and son Chester (born 1856/57, Pennsylvania). According to an entry in the LDS International Genealogical Index, George A and Francis had a child George Scott, born about 1838, in Paris. [sources: entry 22 in the sources above; see also 1870 US census, Pennsylvania Chester County, West Caln Township, microfilm series M593, film 1325, page 124 = 31 handwritten, and 1880 US census, Pennsylvania Chester County, West Caln Township, enumeration district 73, microfilm series T9, film 1114, page 79 = 19 C handwritten]

The fact that that George S Oldmixon, son of George A and Francis, was born in France links him to the George S Oldmixon living in Arizona in 1880. [source: 8]

Further, a George S Oldmixon seems to have died in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania. The IGI record links him to the son of George A and Francis, and a late newspaper report indicates that he was a veteran ('MD USA'). [sources: 22, 23, 35, 37, 42]

Further, a George Scott Oldmixon married Corinne Rhodes. They had four children, including Francis Pauline Scott Oldmixon, who died on 27 September 1877, in Providence, Rhode Island. One fact suggests that this George Scott Oldmixon is the one who served in the US Army after the Civil War--the 1874 Philadelphia directory lists George S Oldmixion [sic], "u.s.a.", as living with Corinne's mother Louisa, at the address Corinne lived at before and after 1874. [sources: 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 34, 35]

The George Scott Heynges Oldmixon in the Ancestry family tree (source 47 above) was married to Corina, with the above-listed children, but according to the tree lived in the Channel Islands in 1871, and died on 9 November 1889 in the US. (They cite the National Probate Calendar of England and Wales as evidence for his death; I have not seen it. But they also cite a Plymouth city directory, which lists '8 April 1889' as his death date.) I don't know what to make of that evidence.

In my summary above, I have assumed that all these George Scott Oldmixon's are the same person, but that is very uncertain. I have not found any evidence that shows they are different, but I would not be at all surprised to find that they are.

Display


George Oldmixon in the 91st PA gedcom on RootsWeb WorldConnect

George Oldmixon in the 91st PA database

1880 census

[1880 US census, Arizona, Puma County, Camp Bowie, supervisor's district 1, enumeration district 1, microfilm series T9, film 36, page 152 C = 15 handwritten]
[identification is speculative; see the 'note on identification' above]
[I did not transcribe the other soldiers listed in this residence]
line13
street name 
house number 
dwelling visit #[53]
family visit #[56]
nameOldmixon Geo S.
colorW
sexM
age42
month born if born in year 
relationship 
single 
married 
widowed/divorced 
married during year 
occupationA A Surg USA
months unemployed 
currently ill? 
blind 
deaf/dumb 
idiotic 
insane 
disabled 
school this year 
can't read 
can't write 
birthplaceFrance
father's birthplaceEngland
mother's birthplaceEngland

Newspaper article

[Washington Post, 14 September 1902, page 32]
'[WHE]RE HEAT IS TROPIC
'Yuma Desert on Par with the Equatorial Regions.
'HOME OF THE GILA MONSTER
'Famous Lizard of the Southwest Has the Jaws of a Bulldog and Is Regarded as Poisonous--Warfare Between Apaches and Peacefully Inclined Indians--Injustice Regarding the Water Supply.

'Only two sections of the United States enjoy what might in the strictest sense be termed a tropical climate; namely, the southernmost extremity of Florida and that part of Arizona that lies for a distance of 100 miles on either side of the Colorado and Gila rivers. The first is a rather mild tropical climate, but the second is all and more than one could expect in the sultriest region under the equator.

'Among those now resident in this city who formerly lived in this region is Mr. Rodney Vedder, of 11 Fourth Street southeast, a clerk in the War Department, and for many years an army paymaster stationed at Fort Yuma. In conversation recently with a Post reporter he said:

'"Like most places that are far removed from the centers of civilization, the valley of the Gila and the Colorado is but little known. For instance, we have in that region around the mouth of the Gila River a very peculiar reptile that for some reason has received the grotesque name of the Gila monster. Up until quite recent years this reptile was comparatively unknown, and I remember seeing along about 1874 a picture in a magazine that one would not suspect of such things, of an Indian in moral combat with one of these Gila monsters, the 'monster' being as large as a full grown buffalo.

'"Nowadays, however, the Gila monster, which some kind-hearted naturalist should take in hand and rechristen with a better and kindlier name, is fairly well known, although the question of whether or not this lizard is poisonous is still an open one. The popular notion is that this reptile is as dangerous as a rattlesnake, but the proof thus far gathered seems to indicate that it is as harmless as an eel. Dr. Oldmixon, who for a long time was the surgeon at Fort Yuma, and who afterward accompanied the Point Barrow Expedition, made a number of experiments with the Gila monster during the years from 1870 to 1890, with the result that he became convinced that it was not poisonous.

'Worse Than a Bulldog.

'"The reptile has a wonderfully powerful pair of jaws, and when it come to biting, he can beat the worst bulldog that ever lived. What is more, when he clamps his jaws on anything or anybody, he holds on with a determination and tenacity that is little short of astonishing. To be bitten by one of these reptiles is, of course, very excruciating, and doubtless those who know something of the reptile's qualities have jumped at the conclusion that because the Gila monster was a most ferocious biter, he was also extremely poisonous.

'"While I was in the Southwest, I did not pay very close attention to the habits and beliefs of the Indians, and am not able to say what view the Papagoes, Pimas, Yumas, and Maricopas take of the Gila monster, or what their views and beliefs are on the question of whether the reptile is poisonous, but I do know that the Mexicans look upon it with horror, and will go out of their way to avoid localities where they happen to be numerous. I was stationed at Fort Yuma from 1865 to 1880, and in all that time I did not see any one die of the bite of a Gila monster. I have, of course, heard a great deal about such things, and the soldiers, cowboys, and greasers about Fort Yuma have told me stories without end of persons whom they knew and had seen die of the bite of these lizards, but in every case the party telling such stories had either himself received it second hand or else had seen some one die from what was alleged to have been the bite of a Gila monster.

'"During the years that I served at Fort Yuma it was a common thing for the government to send troops to Yuma from San Francisco on board a steamer, around by way of the Gulf of California and up the Gila and Colorado rivers to their destination. This was especially the case before the building of the great transcontinental lines of railroad, and even in the early day the fame of the Seris, that ferocious and little-known tribe of Indians living on Tiburon Island, in the Gulf of California, had gone abroad in the land. On our way south from San Francisco to Mazatlan, Mexico, the steamer made a number of stops, but after we left that point until we reached the mouth of the Gila River we steered clear of land, and especially of Tiburon Island.

'Regarded as Cannibals.

'"You see, in that day every one had an idea that the Seris were cannibals, and if it so happened that for any cause whatever, either through stress of weather or breakage of machinery, the vessel carrying troops had to come to anchor anywhere near Tiburon Island, an extra guard was put out, and every precaution taken to prevent any of the soldiers from leaving the ship in its boats. Nor were these precautions unnecessary, for the Seris are continually prowling about the Gulf of California in their light grass boats or balsas, in search of something to kill or eat. Reaching the mouth of the Colorado River, the troops brought around from San Francisco were transferred from the steamer to a river packet, that did not draw over 28 inches of water, and from there they made the rest of the trip up to Yuma.

'"Although Fort Yuma had its draw backs, it had one great advantage. Scattered up and down the Valley of the Colorado and the Gila are the Maricopas, Pimas, Papagoes, and Yumas, Indians who are self-supporting and peaceful and who are all agriculturists. Being of this character, they were, of course, the natural enemies of the Apaches and the Seris, tribes that have long been the scourge of the Southwestern country, and while it is true that the first-mentioned tribes are peacefully inclined, they have, nevertheless, been able for centuries to more than hold their own against the Apaches. As a result of this the Apache has always entertained a wholesome fear of the Gila Valley tribes, and in their raids the Apaches have always taken good care to give the region occupied by the Maricopas, Papagoes, &c., a wide berth.

'"While New Mexico and the country to the east of what is known as Maricopa Wells has from its earliest settlement suffered continually from the depredations and raids of the Apaches, all the region west of Maricopa Wells to the Pacific coast has enjoyed peace and immunity from the horrors and turmoil of Indian warfare.

'Robbed of Water Supply.

'"The peaceful tribes that I have mentioned were able to carry on agriculture by means of a very primitive system of irrigation, obtaining their water supplies from the Colorado and Gila rivers. Recently, however, since this country has begun to fill up with settlers and the government has undertaken to supply them with water, these peaceful tribes that have so long remained the friends and protectors of the white men have been robbed of their water supply. When you rob a man of his means of irrigation in the Southwest it simply means starvation for the party thus treated. Consequently they are in rather sore straits, but the government, recognizing their value as a protecting element, has come to their rescue and is now supplying them with provisions until other arrangements can be made whereby they will again be self-supporting.

'"Another remarkable feature of the country which one does not encounter in any other section of the United States is the rivers that flow for some distance until they strike the desert, where they disappear, to again reappear at a considerable distance from where the waters sank into the sand. The most remarkable example of this sort is that of the Santa Cruz River, which, rising in the Mexican state of Sonorra, flows north to a point not far fromTucson, where it disappears, to again rise to the surface at a point eight miles distant, from which latter spot it continues on its course, finally emptying into the Gila. The locality where it sinks into the sand resembles a broad expanse of marsh and is one vast quagmire of quicksand.

'"One other locality concerning which a great deal of nonsense has been written is the famous Death Valley of Southern California, not far from the border of Arizona. I remember reading once a story about this place in which it was stated that the bed of this valley was far below the surface of the sea; that it was the hottest place on the earth's surface, and that it was filled with venemous serpents of the most repulsive and disgusting character; in short, a regular Dante's Inferno.

'"As a matter of face [sic], the bed of this valley, while very low, is not below sea level, and as for the heat, the temperature of this depression is about the same the year around as at Fort Yuma and other places that I might mention in the Southwest. As for serpents, Death Valley is as barren and destitute of life as the inside of a copper boiler. What, then, you ask, makes it so dangerous? Simply this: Death Valley is situated in the middle of the Colorado Desert and is about sixty miles broad. In no part of the depression is there a drop of water, and it is simply this lack of the life-giving fluid that makes any attempt at crossing the valley extremely dangerous."'

Military orders annulling contract

['Late military orders', [Arizona] Weekly Journal Miner 22 June 1877, page 3]
[transcribed 1 May 2011, from GenealogyBank]

Late Military Orders.

The following are late military orders from Headquarters Department of Arizona:

...

III. The contracts of the following named Acting Assistant Surgeons serving in this Department are annulled, to take effect June 30, 1877: ... George S. Oldmixon ....

leave in 1877

['Army news', Daily Inter Ocean 8 January 1877, page 7]
[transcribed 1 May 2011, from GenealogyBank]

ARMY NEWS.
Abstract of Orders from the Departments.
...
MISCELLANEOUS.

Leaves of absence have been granted: ... Acting Assistant Surgeon George S. Oldmixon United States army; ....

orders to report in 1875

['Telegraphic', [Arizona] Weekly Journal Miner 8 October 1875, page 2]
[transcribed 1 May 2011, from GenealogyBank]

TELEGRAPHIC.
[Special to the Miner by U. S. Military and W. U. Lines]
...

San Diego, Oct. 6.--... A. A. Surgeons Geo. S. Oldmixon and Henry Sanders are ordered to report to the Department of Arizona for orders. ...

Graduation

['Jefferson Medical College--commencement exercises at Musical Fund Hall', Philadelphia Inquirer 11 March 1861, page 2]
[transcribed 1 May 2011, from GenealogyBank]

LOCAL INTELLIGENCE.
Miscellaneous.

JEFFERSON MEDICAL COLLEGE--COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES AT MUSICAL FUND HALL--On Saturday morning, the Annual Commencement of Jefferson Medical College took place at Musical Fund Hall. The Graduating Class was very large. This class occupied the front seats in the saloon near the platform, while the latter was occupied by the Faculty, officers of the College, &c. After a prayer by REV. JOHN CHAMBERS, and the performance of several airs by the Band, the degree of Doctor of Medicine was conferred upon the following named gentleman, by Hon. EDWARD KING, L.L.D., President of the Institution:--

...
Oldmixon, Geo. S. Pa.
...

IGI record

[abstract of IGI individual record, George Scott Oldmixon (accessed on FamilySearch, 1 May 2011)]
George Scott Oldmixon, born about 1838, Paris, Seine, France, to George Augustus Hengiston Oldmixon and Francis Margaret [unknown family name], died 1889 in Plymouth, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania
Chester Augustus Oldmixon was born to the same parents about 1856 in West Caln Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania

death notice


[The Medical Standard volume 5 number 5 (May 1889) page 163.]
[transcribed 1 May 2011, from Google Books]

PENNSYLVANIA--...--Dr. George Scott Oldmixon died at Plymouth on April 8.-- ...

baptism

[England and Wales, non-conformist record indexes (RG4-8), RG33_062]
[accessed 1 May 2011, on FamilySearch; note that only the abstract is available there]

George Scott Heyngesten Oldmixon, baptised 21 September 1838, at Paris, France; parents George Oldmixon and Harriet [unknown family name]

father's death notice

['State notes', Patriot 16 April 1880, page 2]
[transcribed 1 May 2011, from GenealogyBank]

CAPTAIN George Oldmixon, who died last Thursday, at his residence at Super Valley, Chester county, was the youngest son of the four sons of the late Sir John Oldmixon, all of whom obtained rank in the Royal navy.

Philadelphia city directories

[transcribed 3 February 2012, from Fold3]
I transcribed all Oldmixon's in the six entries found in their OCR index, and selected others]
1816 Robinson's Philadelphia directory, page 334
Oldmixon Mary, 70 S. Eighth
1830 Desilver's Philadelphia directory, page 144
Oldmixon Mrs M, Washington square W
1833 Desilver's Philadelphia directory, page 159
Oldmixon Mrs M, 7 S 9th
1859 Biddle's Philadelphia directory, page 543
Oldmixon George S., seedsman, 241 S 18th
1860 Biddle's Philadelphia directory, page 704
[no Oldmixon entries]
1861 Sherman's Philadelphia directory, page 753
[no Oldmixon entries]
1862 Biddle's/McElroy's Philadelphia directory, page 508
[no Oldmixon entries]
1863 Biddle's/McElroy's Philadelphia directory, page 579
[no Oldmixon entries]
1864 Biddle's/McElroy's Philadelphia directory, page 565
[no Oldmixon entries]
1865 Sherman's Philadelphia directory, page 519
[no Oldmixon entries]
1866 McElroy's Philadelphia directory, page 558
[no Oldmixon entries]
1867 Gospill's Philadelphia directory, page 986
[no Oldmixon entries]
1868 Gopsill's Philadelphia directory, page 1228
[no Oldmixon entries]
1869 Gopsill's Philadelphia directory, page 1145
[no Oldmixon entries]
1870 Gopsill's Philadelphia directory, page 1180
[no Oldmixon entries]
1871 Gopsill's Philadelphia directory, page 1101
[no Oldmixon entries]
1872 Gopsill's Philadelphia directory, page 1034
[no Oldmixon entries]
1873 Gopsill's Philadelphia directory, page 1011
Oldmixon Corinne, h 2049 Chestnut
[note p.1094:] Rhodes William A., h 2049 Chestnut
1874 Gopsill's Philadelphia directory, page 1021
Oldmixion [sic] George S., u.s.a., h 2049 Chestnut
[note p.1106:] Rhoades [sic] Louisa, wid William, h 2049 Chestnut
1875 Gopsill's Philadelphia directory, page 1154
Oldmixon Corina [sic], h 2049 Chestnut
[note page 1255:] Rhodes Louisa C., wid William A., h 2049 Chestnut
1876 Gopsill's Philadelphia directory, page 1158
[no Oldmixon entries]
[note p.1258:] Rhodes Louisa C., widow, h 2049 Chestnut
1877 Gopsill's Philadelphia directory, page 1115
[no Oldmixon entries]
[note on p.1212 no Louisa Rhodes or Rhoads, or Rhodes or Rhoads on 2049 Chestnut]
1878 Costa's Philadelphia directory, page 1203
[no Oldmixon entries]
[note on p.1308 no Louisa Rhodes/Rhoads, or Rhodes/Rhoads on 2049 Chestnut]
1879 Philadelphia directory, page 1243
[no Oldmixon entries]
[note on p.1351:] Rhodes Louisa C., widow, h 4023 Locust
[p.1351] Rhodes Mary A., wid William, h 3825 Baring
1880 Gopsill's Philadelphia directory, page 1301
[no Oldmixon entries]
1881 Gopsill's Philadelphia directory, page 1262
[no Oldmixon entries]
1884 Gospill's Philadelphia directory, page 1227
Oldmixon Chester A., real estate, 1215 Filbert h Chester
1901 Gopsill's Philadelphia directory, page 1848
[no Oldmixon entries]
1908 Howe's Philadelphia directory, page 1480
[no Oldmixon entries]
1909 Howe's Philadelphia directory, page 1499
[no Oldmixon entries]
1910 Howe's Philadelphia directory, page 1522
Oldmixon Coriene [sic] wid h 2210 Pine
1911 Howe's Philadelphia directory, page 1431
Oldmixon Corinne wid Geo h 2210 Pine
1912 Howe's Philadelphia directory, page 1455
Oldmixon Corinne h 2210 Pine
1913 Howe's Philadelphia directory, page 1505
Oldmixon Corrine [sic] wid Geo h 905 S 48th
1914 Howe's Philadelphia directory, page 1280
[no Oldmixon entries]
1915 Howe's Philadelphia directory, page 1282
Oldmixon Corinne h 905 S 48th
1916 Howe's Philadelphia directory, page 1277
Oldmixon Corinne h 905 S 48th
1917 Howe's Philadelphia directory, page 1292
[no Oldmixon entries]
1918 Howe's Philadelphia directory, page 1355
[no Oldmixon entries]
1921 Howe's Philadelphia directory, page 881
[no Oldmixon entries]

possible daughter's marriage

[abstract of New York marriages, 1686-1980, available on FamilySearch (no image available) (accessed 4 February 2012)]
[for identification, see the note on identification above]

Corinne S Oldmixon (daughter of George Scott Oldmixon and Corrine Rhoder [sic]) and Emerson G Foote (son of Edward Y Foote and Lucy A Manson) married on 5 June 1888 in Manhatten, New York

death record for possible daughter

[abstract of Rhode Island deaths and burials, 1802-1950, available on FamilySearch (no image available) (accessed 4 February 2012)]
Francis Pauline Scott Oldmixon (daughter of George Scott Oldmixon and Corinne Rhodes Oldmixon) died 27 September 1877, 10 years old, in Providence, Providence, Rhode Island

1870 census

[1870 US census, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, ward 9, district 27, microfilm series M593, film 1394, page 92 = 15 handwritten]
[identification is speculative; see the note on identification above]
[this is pretty clearly this William Rhoads in the 1871 Gopsill's Philadelphia directory (p.1189): 'Rhodes William A., pres, 424 Walnut, h 2049 Chestnut'
[see for example house 89 family 98 headed by Joseph Shaw 'Hotel Keep', which nicely matched 'Shaw Joseph, hotel, 2101 Chestnut' (p.1275 of the 1871 Gopsill's Philadelphia directory)\
[see also house 86 family 95, which matches: 'Beam Christian, boarding, 2043 Chestnut' (p.197)]
[searching Fold3's index search for 424 Walnut yields the following entries:]
Catawissa Railroad Co., 424 Walnut [p.333]
Catawissa Railroad Co., 424 Walnut. Incorporated 1860. Capital $3,350,000. Par value, $50. M. P. Hutchinson, President. Edward Johnson, Secretary. W. L. Gilroy, Treasurer. [p.1577]
Lancaster Fire Insurance Co., 424 Walnut [p.848]
South Mountain Iron Co., 424 Walnut [p.1329]
Union Land Co., 424 Walnut [p.1419]
Diament George H., clk, 424 Walnut, h 30 N 9th [p.444]
Gilroy Washington L., treas, 424 Walnut, h 932 Pine [.600]
Johnston Edward, sec., 424 Walnut, h N J [p.778]
Keeling William F., janitor, h 424 walnut [p.797]
Myer Isaac, lawyer, 424 Walnut h 214 S 9th [p.1069]
Rex Abraham, real estate, 424 Walnut, h 1033 Walnut [p.1186]
Riter Gilbert, clerk, 424 Walnut, h 661 N 12th [p.1200]
Sandgran Mitchell, sec, 424 Walnut, h 1632 S 5th [p.1236]
MACDONALD CHARLES (Burton & Macdonald), civil engineer, 424 Walnut st & 80 Broadway, NY, h NJ
line14151617181920212223
Dwelling-house number88         
Family number97         
NameRhodes Wm" Mrs ABooth CarollOldmixon Cath" Pauline" Daisey" HarriettDonnelly SarahKelly RosaMontagne Hanna
Age69594125322/12282540
SexMFMFFFFFFF
ColorWWWWWWWWWW
OccupationGentlemanHou KeepMerchantHou Keep   Domestic  
Real estate value110 000         
Personal estate value30 000 50004000      
BirthplaceRhode IslandNew JerseyNew YorkEnglandPennsylvaniaPennaPennaIrelandIrelandIreland
Father foreign born   1   111
Mother foreign born   1   111
Birth month if born within year      Apl   
Marriage month if married within year          
Attended school past year          
Can't read1111   111
Can't write1111   111
Deaf, dumb, blind, etc.          
Male US citizen at least 21 years old1 1       
Male US citizen at least 21 years old who can't vote ...          

1900 census

[1900 US census, Rhode Island, Newport County, Newport, ward 3, supervisor's district Rhode Island, enumeration district 220, microfilm series T623, film 1505, page 187 = 3 B handwritten (Corinne Oldmixson)
[identification is speculative; see the note on identification above]
line757677
streetEverett Street
house number53  
dwelling number54  
family number54  
nameOldmixson CorinneHuhm Hume Sophie MBohlin Alma
relationshipHeadS. DaughterServant
colorWWW
sexFFF
birth dateJuly 1844Nov 1874Sept 1873
age552526
married?WdMS
# years married25 [crossed out]2 
mother of how many children?4 [?]  
# of children living3  
birthplaceArgentine RepublicEnglandSweden
father's birthplaceRhode IslandFranceSweden
mother's birthplaceFranceArgentine RepublicSweden
immigration year184918761893
# years in USA 247
naturalized citizen?   
occupation  General Housework
# months not employed  9
# months in school   
can readYesYesYes
can writeYesYesYes
speaks EnglishYesYesYes
owned/rentedR  
free or mortgaged   
farm/houseH  
# of farm schedule   

1910 census

[1910 US census, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, ward 7, supervisor's district 1, enumeration district 110, microfilm series T624, film 1389, page 256 = 2 A handwritten]
[identification is speculative; see the note on identification above]
line131415
streetPine St
house nr2210  
dwelling nr24  
family nr24  
nameOldmixon, CorinneHume, SophieGaines, Delia
relationshipHeadDaughterServant
sexFFF
colorWWB
age653619
marital statusWdWdS
#years present marriage   
mother of # children40 
mother of # living children30 
birthplaceArgentina [?]England [?]Virginia
father's birthplaceRhode IslandEnglandVirginia
mother's birthplaceNew JerseyArgentinaVirginia
immigrated 1874 
naturalized/alien   
speaks EnglishEnglishEnglishEnglish
occupationNoneNoneServant
nature of industry etc.  Private facility
employer etc.  W
out of work 15 Apr 1910?  No
# weeks out of work 1909  26
can readYesYesYes
can writeYesYesYes
school since 1 Sep 09  No
owned/rentedR  
owned free or mortagaged   
farm/houseH  
nr on farm schedule   
civil war vet   
blind   
deaf & dumb   

1920 census

[1920 US census, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, ward 46, enumeration district 1731, microfilm series T625, film 1646, page 115 = 11 B handwritten (FamilySearch (indexed under 'Careme Oldm*On')]
[identification is speculative; see the note on identification above]
line6566
streetBaltimore Ave
house number4701 
dwelling visit number219 
family visit number219 
nameHenderson Sophia O [?]Oldmixon Corene
relationshipHeadMother
own/rentO 
free/mortgaged (if owned)F 
sexFF
raceWW
age at last birthday4675
marital statusWdWd
year of immigration1900 [?] 
naturalized/alienAl 
year of naturalization  
attended school since Sept 1919NoNo
can readYesYes
can writeYesYes
birth placeEnglandSA Brazil [?]
native languageEnglishSpanish [?]
father's birthplaceFranceRhode Island
father's native languageFrenchEnglish
mother's birthplaceBrazilNew Jersey
mother's native languageSpanishEnglish
can speak EnglishYesYes
occupationNoneNone
industry, business  
employment status  
number of farm schedule  

index to compiled service records

[index to compiled service records of volunteer Union soldiers who served in organizations from the state of Pennsylvania]
[transcribed 13 February 2015, from Fold3]


Oldmixon George Scott
     or George S
Co. F+S, 91 Pennsylvania Inf.
Asst Surg | Asst Surg
See also [blank]

GENERAL INDEX CARD.

muster-out roll

[muster-out roll, Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, record group 19, series 19.11, records of the Department of Military and Veterans' Affairs]
[transcribed from Pennsylvania, Civil War Muster Rolls, 1860-1869, on Ancestry, 31 July 2015]



Discharged
NUMBER OF EACH GRADE.1
NAMES. PRESENT AND ABSENT.George S Oldmixon
RANK.Asst Surg
AGE. 
JOINED FOR SERVICE AND ENROLLED AT GENERAL RENDEZVOUS--COMMENCEMENT OF FIRST PAYMENT BY TIME.WHEN.May 22 /64
WHERE.In the Field
BY WHOM.Cap Bernard
PERIOD.3 yrs
MUSTERED INTO SERVICE.WHEN.May 22 /64
WHERE.In the Field
BY WHOM.Cap Bernard
LAST PAID.BY PAYMASTER. 
TO WHAT TIME. 
TRAVELING.To place of rendezvous, No. of miles. 
From place of discharge home, No. of miles. 
Clothing ActDue U.S 
Due Soldier 
AMOUNT for clothing in kind, or in money advanced. 
VALUE OF equipments, arms &c., received from the United States, to be paid for if lost or destroyed. 
BountyPaid 
Due 
 
REMARKS
Discharged by SO No 78 Hd Qrs A of P Mar 27 /65

divorce, Sophie Hume

['Mrs. Sophie Hume obtains divorce', Philadelphia Inquirer 28 May 1901, page 1]
[transcribed 4 February 2012, from GenealogyBank]

MRS. SOPHIE HUME OBTAINS DIVORCE
Daughter of W. S. Oldmixon, of Philadelphia, Given Decree at Newport
Special to The Inquirer.

NEWPORT, R.I., May 27.--Sitting in the Appellate Division of the Supreme Court to-day, Judge William H. Douglas granted decrees of absolute divorce to Mrs. Sallie Hargous Elliott, Mrs. Augusta Floyd Bowen and Mrs. Sophie M. F. Hume. No one of the cases occupied more than fifteen minutes of the time of the court.

Mrs. Hume is the daughter of the late W. S. Oldmixon, of Philadelphia.

'Divorce follows after 13 weeks of matrimony'

['Divorce follows after 13 weeks of matrimony', Philadelphia Inquirer, 28 April 1901, section 1, copy of page 7]
[transcribed 4 February 2012, from GenealogyBank]

DIVORCE FOLLOWS AFTER 13 WEEKS OF MATRIMONY
Mrs. Hume, Formerly of This City, Suing Her Husband
Special to The Inquirer.

NEWPORT, R.I., April 27.--Another interesting society divorce is on order for trial at the May term of the Supreme Court, the petitioner being Mrs. Sophie M. Hume, a woman of rare personal charms, and the respondent being Waltomar H. H. Hume, a prominent insurance man of New York, who represented the Mutual Life Insurance Company at the Paris Exposition.

Mrs. Hume is the youngest society woman who ever sought divorce in Newport, being only 23. Mr. and Mrs. Hume were married in New York in September, 1898, and lived together only thirteen weeks. Since then she has lived here and obtained a legal residence. She is the daughter of the late W. Scott Oldmixon, a Philadelphia merchant, who left Mrs. Hume a million. Michael W. Callahan, Mrs. Hume's attorney, filed papers to-day alleging desertion and non-support. Mrs. Hume is well known in Philadelphia society.

Memorial Day program

['Memorial Day program'. Wilkes-Barre Times 27 May 1901, page 7, 'Plymouth Department']
[transcribed 4 February 2012, from GenealogyBank]

MEMORIAL DAY PROGRAM,
How the Day Will be Observed in This Town.

The following order is ussed by the marshal of Memorial Day exercises.

...
PARADE AND EXERCISES.
...

The following is a list of the dead veterans who are interred in various cemeteries in this place and whose graves will be decorated by their comrades on Memorial day.

...
G S Oldmixon M D, U.S.A.
...

Gossip of the day

['Gossip of the day', Philadelphia Inquirer, 10 December 1891, page 3]
[transcribed 4 February 2012, from GenealogyBank]

Gossip of the DAY

WEST PHILADELPHIA society will be interested in learning that Miss Louise Bampfield, now with Mme. Janauschek's "Harvest Moon" Company, at the Arch, is a star from their own firmament, being no other than Miss Louise Oldmixon, daughter of Dr. Oldmixon, formerly prominent in that section of the city. Miss Bampfield, to call her by her professional name, has adopted the theatrical profession from the highest motives that can overcome a young lady's natural reluctance to come before the public. Her family experiencing one of those reverses of fortune that all families have had administered to them, she availed herself of her acknowledged histrionic ability in the hope of giving a more favorable turn to fortune's wheel. With Tennyson she has learned to say: "Thy wheel and thee, I neither love nor hate." Her friends, of whom she has many in the home of her girlhood, will be glad to find that her success has fully justified her choice of a profession. Her reception in this city has been deservedly kind, the critics all admitting that of her very inadequate part she develops all the capabilities. In such a role, requiring her to personate a young, lovely and accomplished lady, she at least has reality in her favor to start with.

Army articles

['Army articles', National Republican [Washington DC], 27 June 1881, p.1]
[transcribed 4 February 2012, from Chronicling America]

--Acting Assistant Surgeon George S. Oldmixon, U.S.A., has been ordered to proceed from this city to San Francisco, Cal., and report in person to First Lieutenant P. H. Ray, Eighth Infantry, acting signal officer, for duty with the expedition to Point Barrow, Alaska.

Local matters

['Local matters', The Arizona Sentinel (Arizona City [Yuma], Yuma County, Arizona Territory), 2 October 1875, page [3]]
[transcribed 4 Feb 2012, from Chronicling America]

THE following named passengers arrived last Tuesday evening by steamer from San Francisco, beside Dr. Semig, whose arrival is announced elsewhere: Capt. Simpson and family, for Prescott; Dr. Henry Sanders, for Camp Verde; Dr. O. J. Eddy, for Camp Lowell, and Dr. G. S. Oldmixon, for San Carlos.

Headquarters Dept of Arizona

['Headquarters Dept. of Arizona.', The Arizona Sentinel (Arizona City [Yuma], Yuma County, Arizona Territory), 2 October 1875, page [3]]
[transcribed 4 Feb 2012, from Chronicling of America]
Headquarters Dept. of Arizona.
Prescott, A.T., Sept. 16, 1875.
Special Orders, No. 71.
...

II On the recommendation of the Medical Director of the Department, the following named Acting Assistant SUrgeons, now en route to this Department, are assigned to duty as follows:--

...

Acting Assist.-Surgeon George S. Oldmixon, to Camp San Carlos, A. T.

III. Acting Assistant-Surgeon George S. Oldmixon upon his arrival at Camp San Carlos, A.T., will relieve Acting Assistant-Surgeonb L. Sanderson of his duties as Post Surgeon at that Post, and Acting Assistant-Surgeon Sanderson upon being so relieved, will proceed without delay, to Camp Apache, A.T., reporting upon arrival to the commanding Officer for duty.

...

deceased physicians file (AMA), 1864-1968

[accessed on FamilySearch (21 September 2012)]
(NAME IN FULL.) Oldmixon George S.
(COLLEGE AND YEAR OF GRADUATION) Jefferson Phila 1861
Registered in Prothonotary's Office in Luzerne County, Pa
(DATE OF LICENSE.) --

Woodlands Cemetery records (Corrine Oldmixon)

[Woodlands Cemetery records, in Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Historic Pennsylvania church and town records]
[transcribed 15 February 2015, from Ancestry (image 944 of 2714)]

[what appears to be a name index, in image 2207, has only Corrine as an entry under 'Oldmixon' ("Corrine 87 4/12/1932 162 G")]
[images 343 to 345 include 'O' entries from 1845 to 1880; image 346 begins with 'P'; I did not see any 'Oldmixon' entries]
[images 555-557 have 'O' entries from 1881 through 1893--they have no entries from 1889, and no 'Oldmixon' entries]

[image 762, page 176, begins with 'O' entries from 1894; the previous image, page 170, is 'N' entries; I looked at images 750 through 770]

[note that a reference to a burial record for Sophie Oldmixon Henderson, 22 March 1948, is present on image 1749 (162 G again)]

[also image 141 refers to Capt George D. Oldmixon, 4-8 1880]

[and image 122 has: 1873, 'Rhodes Wm A 74 " [sc. yrs] M[arch] 4" 162 G in family vault': so the family vault is the RHODES family vault, and not Oldmixon]


[page] 372
REGISTER OF INTERMENTS, WOODLANDS CEMETERY

1932

NAME Oldmixon Corrine
AGE 87
DATE OF BURIAL Apl 12
LOT 162
SEC. G [?]
DEPTH -
LOCATION Family Vault
UNDERTAKER O. H. Bair Co
NO. OF PERMIT 24810
REMARKS Easton Maryland

State Board of Health, 1888 annual report

[Fourth annual report of the [Pennsylvania] State Board of Health, page 826]
[transcribed 15 February 2015, from Google Books]

Date of registration. May 5, 1885.
FULL NAME. George S. Oldmixon
Sex. " [sc. M]
Place of birth. New York.
Residence. Plymouth.
Color. " [sc W]
[the corresponding entries on page 827 are hard to align, but I believe this is correct:]
Medical degrees, institutions and dates. Jefferson Med. Co., 1861.
Other degrees, institutions and dates. [blank]
Place or places of continuous practice in Pa. since 1871. [blank]
Removal or death. [blank]

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revised 31 July 15
contact Harry Ide at hide1@unl.edu with comments or questions