HMS Albion

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Albion, 1802
Type: 3rd rate ; Armament 74
Launched : 1802 ; Disposal date or year : 1836
BM : 1743 tons.
Net war complement : 594 men and boys, including 32 of the latter
Notes:

15 Nov 1802 the Albion has been commissioned at Sheerness by Capt Ferrier.

6 Jan 1803 the Albion, R.-Adm., Sir J Saumarez, Capt John Ferrier, lying at Sheerness.

17 Mar 1803 the Albion has departed Sheerness for the Nore, although regrettably, one doesn't get the regular reports regarding how ships are coming forward for service and the accompanying hustle and bustle of ships being rigged &c., in Sheerness dockyard that one seems to get at Portsmouth and Plymouth - far more sedate ;-).

29 Mar 1803 departed Sheerness harbour for the Nore.

6 Apr 1803 arrived Cawsand Bay this morning.

11 Apr 1803 are reported to be under orders to depart Cawsand Bay for Torbay, the Culloden, R-Adm Campbell, Capt Otway ; Neptune ; and Albion, and will sail this evening, wind permitting.

12 Apr 1803 the Neptune, and Albion, departed Cawsand Bay for Torbay.

29 Apr 1803 as a result of the expected forthcoming collapse of the Treaty of Amiens, aka, Peace of Amiens, the following squadron was arriving from Cawsand Bay and slowly forming up off Brixham Quay, at Torbay, the Culloden, Neptune, Ardent, Albion, Courageux, Venerable, and Thunderer.

16 May 1803 Adm Cornwallis sailed on Monday from Torbay, with a squadron consisting of the following ships : Dreadnought, 98, Hon Adm Cornwallis, First Capt Murray, Second Capt Brace ; Neptune, 98, Capt Drury ; Albion, 74, Capt Ferrier ; Minotaur, 74, Capt Louis ; Ardent, 64, Capt Winthorp ; Culloden, 74, R.-Adm Campbell, Capt Lane ; Venerable, 74, Capt Searle ; Sceptre, 74, Capt Dickson ; Thunderer, 74, Capt Bedford ; and Russel, 74, Capt Williams. The Tonant, Malta, Spartiate, Plantagenet, Mars and Conqueror, lying in Cawsand Bay are nearly ready for sea, and want but few men to complete their complement.

28 Jun 1803 arrived Plymouth from the Channel Fleet.

17 Jul 1803 the Albion, and Russell departed Plymouth with the Ann, Glory, Northampton, Anna, and General Stewart, under convoy to the East Indies.

21 Dec 1803 Albion and Sceptre captured the French privateer Clarisse on the East Indies station.

9 Jan 1804 the Albion and Sceptre arrived Madras from England.

Circa 23 Jun 1804 the Albion is reported at Portsmouth to have arrived with the Sceptre at Bombay, along with the French privateer Clarisse, of 12 guns and 150 men, that they'd captured.

May 1805 East Indies

5 Oct 1808 departed Madras for England with a convoy.

17 - 22 Nov 1808 extracts from a log detailing a period passing through a hurricane with a convoy of 9 East India Company ships, during which 3 of them, the Glory, Lord Nelson and Experiment, are thought to have foundered. Judging from the damage received in the storm I would guess that she probably needed quite a long refit : and I note that she was in refit from 1810-1813 at a cost of £71,000 (Warships in the Age of Sail by Rif Winfield).

Jun 6 1813 Appeared off Falmouth with a convoy of over 500 vessels bound for Spain, Portugal, the Mediterranean, the Brazils, North America, and the West Indies, which were joined from here by a number of merchantmen that had been awaiting its passing.

Portsmouth Jul 11 1813 departed this morning with a convoy bound to Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, Halifax, and Quebec, now working into St. Helen's.

Portsmouth Jul 12 1813 departed with a convoy for Newfoundland, Quebec, &c.

Weymouth Jul 14 1813 Put into Portland Roads with a convoy for North America.

Falmouth, Jul 22 1813 arrived with the convoy for Newfoundland and Halifax, put in due to contrary winds.

Falmouth 6 Aug 1813 put back the North American convoy under the command of the Albion, 74, Captain Devonshire. As a result of the weather conditions a number of the convoy came into contact with each other and some damage resulted.

The Acadian Recorder reports that Albion departed Falmouth 9 Aug 1813, in company with the Talbot, Primrose, and Mutine, and convoy for N. America, who were seen on the Banks on 15 Sep., and all well.

30 Sep 1813, arrived Halifax, with 7 merchant vessels from her convoy for this place.

22 Oct 1813, departed Halifax on a cruise.

5 Dec 1813 Orpheus observed the US frigate President sail from Providence, Rhode-Island and hastened with the information to her consort, the 74-gun ship Albion.

latter end of May 1814 Rear-admiral Cockburn in the 74-gun ship Albion (into which he had shifted his flag from the Sceptre), Captain Charles Bayne Hodgson Ross, arrived in the bay and relieved Captain Barrie, Dragon.

1 Jun 1814 St.-Lawrence and ships' boats of the Albion and Dragon in action with a US flotilla of gun boats in Chesapeake bay.

6 Jun 1814 the Loire and Jasseur join the St.-Lawrence and ships' boats of the Albion and Dragon, but having retreated in to shallow water US flotilla remained safe.

15 Jun 1814 Narcissus joined the squadron in Chesapeake bay and various boats expeditions were carried out.

4 Jul 1814 the Severn arrived in Chesapeake bay. 19 Jul-12 Aug the arrival of a battalion of marines, and a detachment of marine artillery enabled the squadron to mount further expeditions ashore using the ships' boats of the Albion, Dragon, Loire, Jasseur, Narcissus, Severn and St.-Lawrence.

14 Aug 1814 Albion off the mouth of the Potomac.

Aug 1814 a portion of the prize money resulting from the various actions in the Chesapeake became due for payment on 1 May 1835 : namely a dividend from the estate of the bankrupt agent Henry Abbott : no doubt one of the many fraudsters who ripped off matelots in those days : both officers and ratings being fair game.

19 Sep 1814 Albion departed for Bermuda.

Dec 1814 Albion and Orlando arrived in the Chesapeake, from Bermuda, and departed on the 14th for Amelia Island, in East Florida, leaving left orders for the Dragon, Hebrus, and Regulus to follow.

18 Mar 1815, wind and weather etc. permitting, was supposed to be departing Charleston, at the end of the war, with the Ceylon, Terror, and Devastation, if the latter three could cross the bar. Flag ship to Adm. Cockburn.

Portsmouth Aug 6 1815 departed for the Downs with transports containing troops for Ostend.

1 Sep 1815 (Capt. J Walker), based at Sheerness, for the present.

16 Jul 1816 (Captain Coode), along with other ships of the fleet, is preparing at Portsmouth for the forthcoming expedition to Algiers.

25 Jul 1816 At Portsmouth, preparing to sail for Algiers.

28 Jul 1816 departed as a part of a fleet of 19 vessels from Plymouth Sound, for Gibraltar and the bay of Algiers.

9 Aug 1816 the fleet arrived at Gibraltar, where it joined the Dutch squadron, which had arrived the previous evening, and which, it was agreed, would join the expedition. Whilst at Gibraltar the fleet was victualled and preparations made for the forthcoming battle, with gunnery practice &c. taking place.

27 Aug 1816 circa 1400 hours, no reply having been received to Lord Exmouth's demands, the ships of the fleet took up their stations and the Battle of Algiers commenced, ceasing about 2200 hours. Account of casualties. Account of powder and shot expended. Conferences &c. held with the Dey following the battle regards the demands of the allies and settlements made : honours and awards. See also p. 226 at www.archive.org/details/royalnavyhistory06clow.

3 Sep the fleet departed from Algiers for Gibraltar and England, although the Albion would appear to have remained in the Mediterranean.

1 Oct 1816 Promoted for his services at Algiers, Lieutenant R. Hay, to the rank of Commander

Medals granted to surviving officers, seamen and marines (and soldiers who served as marines) per order of 7th June, 1848

22 Oct 1816 has departed for Malta.

7 Nov 1816 at Malta.

1817 arming of the Albion.

11 Feb 1817 Reports from Malta advise that the Albion is the only ship there.

11 Aug 1818 To be one of the guard-ships at Portsmouth for the next three years.

27 Nov 1821 In commission and based on Portsmouth

7 Jan 1822 Surgeon J. E. Anderson appointed

3 Oct 1822 Captain Sir William Hoste appointed

21 Oct 1824 At Portsmouth.

5 Dec 1825 At the Tagus (Captain Ommaney).

8 Jan 1827 At Lisbon.

Portsmouth, July 14 1827 At Lisbon.

20 Aug 1827 A part of the British squadron in the Mediterranean.

Portsmouth Sep 29 1827 Is reported to have departed from Malta on the 20th ult for the Arhipelago.

1827 the diplomatic and political situation which led the Battle of Navarin.

14 Oct 1827 state of the Allied Fleet off the Bay of Navarin and the numbers of Turkish vessels present. See also p. 256-> at www.archive.org/details/royalnavyhistory06clow.

20 Oct the Allied Fleet entered the Bay of Navarin and anchored opposite their Turkish equivalents, and shortly afterwards, following some sporadic firing, the battle became general. Numbers of allied personnel killed and wounded at the Battle of Navarin (a.k.a. Navarino), and the names of British Officers killed and wounded. Medals granted to all surviving Officers, seamen and marines (and soldiers who served as marines) per order of 7th June, 1848. † Prize Money see Sep 1834.

Portsmouth, February 2 1828 Has returned to England, having taken part in the Battle of Navarino : she departed from Malta on 29 Dec. and has now come into the harbour to be paid off.

27 Mar 1828 It is reported that on the 20th Oct., at Navarino, she expended the following: Powder, 7 tons ; Round Shot, 52 tons ; Grape and Canister, 54 cases ; Musket ball, 5,000 ; Pistol ball, 2,000 ; Iron crow bars, 6.

† 30 Sep 1834 prize money for Navarin due for payment from 1 Oct 1834 - see London Gazette of 30 Sep for for details www.gazettes-online.co.uk.

Portsmouth 6 Jun 1835 it is reported that the Albion, used as a lazarette at Leith during the cholera epidemic, is to be moved to the River Thames where she is to be sold and broken up.


Extract from the log of HMS Albion, Captain John Ferrier (in Civil Time).


Hour K. F. Courses Winds Remarks
Thurs 17 Nov 1808
A.M. - - - - -
1 - - SSW W by N A.M. Fresh breezes and squally.
2 - - - - -
3 - - - - -
4 - - - - Moderate breezes and cloudy ; convoy in company.
5 - - - - -
6 - - - - -
7 - - S by W W by S -
8 - - - - -
9 - - - - -
10 - - - - -
11 - - - - -
12 - - - - Lat 5° 47’ S, long 89° 40’ E.
P.M. - - - - -
1 - - - W by S P.M. Fresh breezes and cloudy.
2 - - - - -
3 - - - - Set the mainsail and jib.
4 - - - - -
5 - - S by E - -
6 - - - - -
7 - - S by W - Moderate breeze and cloudy.
8 - - - - -
9 - - - - Fresh breezes and squally, with rain.
10 - - - - -
11 - - - - Squally ; down jib.
12 - - - - -
Fri 18 Nov 1808
A.M. - - - - -
1 - - S by W W by S A.M. Eleven sail in sight.
2 - - - - Squally, with rain ; up mainsail.
3 - - - - Cloudy ; squally, with rain
4 - - - - -
5 - - - - Fresh breeze, and cloudy
6 - - - - -
7 - - - - -
8 - - - - -
9 - - - - -
10 - - - - -
11 - - - - -
12 - - S - Lat 7° 33’ S, long 89° 50’ E.
P.M. - - - - -
1 - - S by W W by S -
2 - - - - -
3 - - S by E WSW -
4 - - S - -
5 - - S ½ W - -
6 - - - - -
7 - - S ½ E - -
8 - - - - -
9 - - S by E Variable Moderate breeze and cloudy.
10 - - S ½ W - -
11 - - S ½ E - -
12 - - S - -
Sat 19 Nov 1808
A.M. - - - - -
1 2 0 S ½ W W by S ½ S A.M. Squally.
2 3 2 - - At daylight, convoy in close order.
3 3 4 SSE - -
4 2 6 - - -
5 2 4 - - -
6 2 0 - - -
7 2 0 - - -
8 1 4 - - -
9 2 0 - - -
10 1 4 - - -
11 2 0 - - -
12 2 0 - - Course, S 20° E, distance 53 miles.
Lat 8° 23’ S, long 90° 18’ E.
P.M. - - - - -
1 3 4 S ½ W W b S ½ S -
2 3 4 S by W W by S -
3 3 0 - - -
4 3 0 - - -
5 3 5 - - -
6 3 6 S ½ E Variable -
7 3 0 S - -
8 5 0 - - -
9 4 6 S ½ W W b S ½ S -
10 4 4 - - -
11 3 4 S by W W by S Moderate breezes and cloudy ; double-reefed topsails.
12 3 6 S - -
Sun 20 Nov 1808
A.M. - - - - -
1 4 0 S by W W by S -
2 4 4 - - -
3 4 4 S b W ½ W - -
4 4 4 - - -
5 4 0 S W A.M. Fresh breezes and squally ; in third reef in the topsails.
6 4 0 - - -
7 4 0 S by W - -
8 3 0 - - -
9 2 0 - - -
10 2 2 S - -
11 2 4 - - -
12 2 0 - - Lat 9° 41’ S, long 90° 52’ E.
P.M. - - - - -
1 2 0 - W -
2 2 4 - - -
3 2 4 - - -
4 2 4 - - -
5 2 4 - W by S Fresh gales and squally, with rain and a heavy swell ; split the fore-staysail.
6 3 0 - - -
7
8
0
0
head fr. S to SSE - -
9
10
11
12
0 0 up SW off SSE - Course, S 23° E, distance 85 miles.
Mon 21 Nov 1808
A.M. - - - -  
1
2
3
4
0 0 head fr. S to SSW WNW A.M. Hard gales and squally, with rain ; one sail in sight ; a very hard squall ; hauled down the storm-staysail ; the ship making much water.
4. Strong gales, with hard squalls and rain ; all the pumps going.
5
6
7
8
0 0 up SSW off S - Very heavy squalls with rain ; the fore-topmast blew over the side by the cap ; the mast in falling carried away the larboard side of the top.
Very heavy gales, with rain and hard gusts of wind.
7.30 The main-topmast blew over the side.
9 - - up SSW - 9.30 The mizenmast went by the board..
10
11
12
0 0 head fr. ENE to E NW
N
The ship payed-off ; set the fore-staysail and wore.
Began to throw overboard the main-deck guns ; the ship labouring very much, the mainsail blew from the yard, and a great part of the foresail ; the fore-staysail blew to pieces from the netting in the bowsprit.
Course, S 58° E, distance 40 miles.
Lat 10° 6’ S, long 91° 23’ E.
P.M. - - - - -
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
0 0 head fr. E to S NE
E
SE
SSE
S
S by W
SW by S
P.M Thick weather and heavy gales, accompanied with hard gusts of wind and rain, and a great sea, the latter blowing over the ship ; employed at the pumps and throwing overboard the main-deck guns.
At 3, left off the latter duty, after having thrown overboard 19.
At 3.30, an extreme hard gust of wind.
At 4, a heavy sea running ; ship labouring very much.
At 5, the gale began to moderate.
At 8, fresh gales and thick weather.
9 - - head N by E SW by S -
10 - - W -
11
12
0 0 head NNE WNW Midnight. Moderate breeze and thick swell.
Tues 22 Nov 1808
A.M. - - - - -
1
2
3
4
0 0 ship’s hd from NE to ENE variable from W to N and NE A.M. Moderate breeze at times, with great swell.
At daylight saw the [HEIC ship] Ceylon.
5
6
7
8
0 0 head fr NE to NE by N - Fresh breezes and cloudy weather, with a great swell ; found the third main-chain plate on the starboard side, and the eighth fore one on the larboard side, drawn ; the barge stove, by the fall of the main-top-gallants ; the ship working much on the upper, lower, and orlop decks ; the hooping butts, over the ports, opened one inch ; the seam, next the waterways, on the lower deck, three quarters of an inch ; the fastenings on the butt-ends of the deck planks, transom, and breast hooks drawn ; the black steak on the starboard side and several bolts broke ; threw overboard twelve of the lower-deck guns and frapped the ship with an 8-inch hawser
Noon. Fresh breezes and cloudy weather.
Course, S 79° W, distance 8 miles.
Lat 10° 31’ S, long 91° 12’ E.
9
10
11
12
0 0 head fr. NNE to NE Variable fr. W to N and NE
P.M. - - - - -
1
2
3
4
0 0 ship’s hd from N to NE ditto -
5
6
0 0 ship’s hd. fr. N by W to N by E - -
7 0 0 head S - P.M. Moderate breezes ; Ceylon in company ; employed in clearing the wreck ; towards midnight light breezes.
8 1 4 S WSW
9 1 6 - -
10 1 4 - - -
11 1 4 S ½ W W by S -
12 1 4 - - -
Wed 22 Nov 1808
A.M. - - - - -
1 1 0 S ½ W W by S -
2 1 0 - - -
3 1 0 - - -
4 1 0 - - -
5 1 4 S - -
6 1 4 - - -
7 1 4 - - -
8 1 4 - - -
9 2 4 - - -
10 2 2 - - -
11 2 4 - - Course, S 22° E, distance 22 miles.
Lat 10° 31’ S, long 91° 12’ E.
12 1 6 - -
P.M - - - - -
1 1 2 S ½ E W by S -
2 1 0 S by E - -
3 1 0 S b. E ½ E - -
4 1 0 - - -
5 1 4 SSE - -
6 1 4 S by E - -
7 1 0 SSE - -
8 1 0 - - -
9 1 0 - - -
10 1 0 - - -
11 1 0 - - -
12 1 0 - - -