HMS Charybdis

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Charybdis, 1831
Type: Brigantine ; late Brig ; Armament 10, later reduced to 3.
Launched at Portsmouth : 1831 ; Disposal date or year : 1843
Displacement (BM) : 232 tons ;
Complement : 37 officers and men ; 10 boys ; 8 marines
Notes:

7 Feb 1838 a 10 gun brig altered to Brigantine with a reduced armament, and what weight of bulwarks, top-sides, and top-hamper, is taken off by such alteration is estimated at 6ľ tons. N. Symonds.

1830 Portsmouth building.

23 Jun 1831 in Portsmouth Harbour.

15 Jul 1831 departed Portsmouth to join the squadron under Sir E. Codrington.

27 Aug 1831 arrived St. Helens from the Downs, with the fleet under Sir E. Codrington and anchored at six o'clock on the evening of the 28th, and moved up to Spithead the next day.

11 Sep 1831 departed Portsmouth to the westward, on a cruise.

25 Sep 1831 arrived Cork with the squadron under the command of Sir Edward Codrington, and departed for Plymouth and Portsmouth 15th Oct.

Charybdis 16 Oct 1831 arrived Spithead from the Downs.

29 Oct 1831 the squadron under the command of R.-Adm. Warren, weighed anchor from the Downs for the Scheldt, but, on approaching the Dutch coast, the squadron met with a severe gale and thick weather, when the Admiral ordered them to disperse and make the best of their way back to the Downs.

10 Nov 1831 in the Downs.

22 Nov 1831 Charybdis and Pluto proceed in company with the Isis to the Coast of Africa.

Per a report made to Parliament in 1842, at some time during 1832 the Gun brig Charybdis, 3 guns, Complement: 52, was involved in combatting the Slave Trade and experienced 3 Deaths.

Circa 9 May 1832 reported to be in the Bights of Benin and Biafra.

10 Sep 1832 reports that she fell in with the Lander's expedition at the Isles de Los ; all well. See Cornishman Richard Lemon Lander for more detail.

Per a report made to Parliament in 1842, at some time during 1833 was involved in combatting the Slave Trade.

21 Jan 1833 with the Charybdis, moves the victualling establishment for the West Coast of Africa from Fernando Po to Sierra Leone [presumably Freetown ?].

22 Feb 1833 detained in the Bonny River the Spanish slave schooner Desengano, Francisco Loureyro, master, with 220 slaves on board, which was sent for adjudication to the British and Spanish Mixed Court of Justice, Sierra Leone, and on 11 Apr 1833 sentenced to be condemned.

26 Jun 1833 is expected at Cape of Good Hope from the West Coast of Africa.

20 Sep 1833 arrived St Helena from Simon's Bay and sails for England tomorrow.

17 Nov 1833 arrived Spithead, from the Cape of Good Hope (17 Sep), St Helena (22), Ascension (30), and Teneriffe (17 Oct).

23 Nov 1833 in Portsmouth Harbour.

1 Jan 1834 paid off at Portsmouth.

15 Jan 1834 in the Basin.

6 Mar 1834 went out to Spithead.

Per a report made to Parliament in 1842, at some time during 1834 was involved in combatting the Slave Trade and experienced the following casualties: 1 Death by Accident: Total No of Deaths: 2.

10 Mar 1834 departed Portsmouth for the West Coast of Africa, via Falmouth, Lisbon, the Cape.

6 Jun 1834 reported to be in the Bight of Benin.

14 Jun 1834 detained in lat. 5° 28' N. long. 3° 20' E., in the Bight of Benin, en route from the River Lagos, the Portuguese slave brig Tamega / Tapoeza ?, Jozé Lopez Ferreira, master, with 440 slaves on board, following a long chase from sun rise, to about 4 p.m., during which time it was found necessary to fire 14 rounds of grape and canister to stop the vessel, which was sent for adjudication to the British and Portuguese Court of Mixed Commission, Sierra Leone and on 21 Jul 1834 sentenced to be condemned ; 14 Sep 1835 Bounty on slaves and moiety of hull due for payment.

12 Oct 1834 Cruising off Lagos for slave vessels.

Per a report made to Parliament in 1842, at some time during 1835 was involved in combatting the Slave Trade and experienced 2 Deaths.

24 Jul 1835 departed from St. Helena for the Coast of Africa.

13 Aug 1835 per a note in her papers, boarded the Spanish slave schooner Amalia, José Ramon Manenee, master, in the Congo, which subsequently detained off the west coast of the Island of Grenada, when en route from the Rio Congo to Cuba, by the Vestal, Captain Wm. Jones.

27 Aug 1835 arrived at Fernando Po.

Per a report made to Parliament in 1842, at some time during 1836 was involved in combatting the Slave Trade and experienced 1 Death.

5 Feb 1836 detained off Saint Thomas Island the Spanish slave schooner Matilda / Matilde, José Maria de Arrarte, master, which was sent for adjudication to the British and Spanish Mixed Court of Justice, Sierra Leone and on 29 Jul 1836 sentenced to be condemned.

19 Feb 1836 detained in lat. 4° 39' 0" S. long. 11° 42' 0" E., in Loango Bay, the Spanish slave brig Tridente, Juan Julian Paque, master, which was sent for adjudication to the British and Spanish Mixed Court of Justice, Sierra Leone, and on 23 Aug 1836 sentenced to be condemned.

4 Mar 1836 detained in lat. 7° 52' N. long. 18° 3' E., at Ambriz, the Spanish slave brig El Mismo, alias Centinella, José Pereyra, master, which was sent for adjudication to the British and Spanish Mixed Court of Justice, Sierra Leone, and on 11 Oct 1836 sentenced to be condemned.

21 Oct 1836 detained in lat. 5° 50' 0" N. long. 9° 57' 0" W., off Grand Bassa, the Spanish slave schooner Cantabra, Pedro Miguel Delesquest, master, which was sent for adjudication to the British and Spanish Mixed Court of Justice, Sierra Leone and on 7 Nov 1836 sentenced to be condemned.

Per a report made to Parliament in 1842, at some time during 1837 was involved in combatting the Slave Trade and experienced the following casualties: 2 Deaths by Accident: Total No of Deaths: 5.

11 May 1837, whilst cruising off Lagos, in the Bight of Benin, lat. 6° 8' N., long. 4° 13' E., detained the Portuguese slave schooner La Fayette / Lafayette, Manoel Antonio Rodrigues Nogueira, master, armed with 2 guns, with a cargo of 448 Africans, shipped the previous day at Lagos, and bound for either Bahia or Havana, both places having been given as destinations by the Master when examined. The vessel was sent to Sierra Leone, arriving 6 June, for condemnation and emancipation of the surviving 441 slaves, which took place on the 16th inst.

26 Jun 1837 detained in lat. 5° 19' 0" N. long. 0° 5' 0" W., not far from British Accra, the armed 238 ton Spanish slave brig General Ricaforte [aka Rienforte], Carlos Martinez, master, being unlawfully equipped for the Slave Trade, and was sent for adjudication to the British and Spanish Mixed Court of Justice, Sierra Leone, and on 25 Aug 1837 sentenced to be condemned.

24 Apr 1838, Portsmouth, departed for Quebec with the Hastings and Dee.

16 May 1840 Clerk-in-Charge Charles Thorne, appointed to the Charybdis.

3 Jun 1840 Jamaica departed for Nassau.

28 Jul 1840 Jamaica arrived from Carthagena, with 150,000 dollars .

22 Aug 1840, Nassau, New Providence, arrived from Jamaica with officers to form a court martial to try Lieutenant Findlay, of the 2d West India Regiment.

4 Mar 1841 at Jamaica.

3 Apr 1841 Lieutenant Michael De Courcy, appointed to Charybdis (late Racer), vice Tinling, to Magnificent

26 Apr 1841 was at Jamaica.

30 Jun 1841 departed Jamaica for Carthagena.

14 Aug 1841 left Jamaica for the Bahamas and Halifax.

18 Oct 1841 was at Halifax on the departure of the Seringapatam for England.

6 Feb 1842 at Cartagena, (now Columbia), then little better than a piratical oligarchy, the British brig Jane and Sarah, and sloop Little William, at anchor in the Cartagenan harbour of Sapote, were seized and plundered by five Cartagenan vessels of war under the orders of one General Cannons, and their crews and passengers, including a Colonel Gregg, who were thrown into prison. The British consul at Cartagena endeavoured, in vain, to obtain their release, so requested assistance from the brig Charybdis, 3, Lieutenant Michael de Courcy, stationed off the coast. De Courcy arrived off the port of Cartagena, where the Cartagenan war vessels then lay, and sent on board the commodore's corvette a demand for the liberation of the British subjects. The commodore was insulting and contemptuous, and refused to receive de Courcy's letter. The Cartagernans, moreover, had by that time shot Colonel Gregg. Upon the return of his officer, de Courcy entered the port. In spite of her nominal rating, his brig had on board only one long gun and two carronades, with a complement of 55. The Cartagenan flotilla, on the other hand, included, besides the commodore's corvette, a brig and three schooners. As the Charybdis passed up to an anchorage, she was fired into by the corvette. De Courcy replied with the greatest steadiness and spirit; and, in a short time, the corvette struck, having lost her commodore and 25 men killed. Scarcely had the prize been taken possession of when the brig and schooners came down and attacked the Charybdis ; but the British gunnery quickly sank the brig, whereupon the schooners surrendered. The whole action occupied less than an hour; and, at its conclusion, anchored in the enemy's port to await the decision of his Commander-in-Chief concerning his captures. Lieutenant de Courcy was promoted. See p. 306-8 at www.archive.org/details/royalnavyhistory06clow.

15 Dec 1841, the packet Alert brings the following news : papers confirm the taking of General Carmona's fleet at Zapata on 15 Dec 1841, and a proclamation by Senor Taro, commander of the government squadron states that the Charybdis, with the object of avenging the private wrongs of her nations, happily found herself with us at the time that….we attacked the federal fleet at Zapata. Her intrepid commander, DeCourcy, engaged and captured the enemy's brig Marcelina, with the gallantry worthy of an Englishman : and I have in the name of the government ceded to him the said vessel as his prize, since it is no more than just.

1 Jan 1842, was at Carthagena, when the Pickle departed for Jamaica, and carried reports of Charybdis' action with General Carmona's vessels, but states that her rigging and bulwarks suffered some damage and that Carmona's party was still firing on the town, so much so that some 35 British and American merchants had been embarked on board the Charybdis.

10 Jan 1842 arrived Surinam, from Jamaica.

21 Jan 1842 arrived Jamaica, from Carthagena.

1 Mar 1842 at Jamaica.

23 May 1842 the Hampshire Telegraph reports that Second Master James George Hobbs Thain of the Charybdis was court martialled and found guilty of drawing his sword and striking and wounding Marine William Avery, but taking into account the circumstances was fully acquitted and the Marine was found guilty of drunkenness and mutinous conduct and was sentenced to 50 lashes.

30 Jun 1842 the Hydra arrived Port Royal, Jamaica, reporting that she had departed Honduras with the Illustrious, Spitfire, Fair Rosamond, Charybdis, which were bound for Bermuda.

C 9 Aug 1842 reported to be at Jamaica.

24 Aug 1842 at Jamaica she is reported as blockading St. Juan, Nicaragua with the Fair Rosamond.

17 Nov 1842 departed Bermuda for England with the crew of the Spitfire.