HMS Cornelia

Naval Database

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Cornelia, 1808
Type: 5th rate ; Armament 32
Launched : 1808 ; Disposal date or year : 1814
Notes:

21 Nov 1810 off the island of Rodriquez preparing for a joint naval and military expedition to take the Isle of France, where they arrived on 28th, and the capitulation was signed on the 3 Dec.

3 Aug 1811 a part of the fleet involved in the invasion of Java, which terminated with the surrender of Dutch and French forces on 16 Sep.


Cornelia, 1828
Type: tender to the Eden ; Armament ?
Acquired : 1828 ? ; Disposal date or year : ?
Notes:

22 Nov 1828 departed for off Calabar, in the Bight of Biafra, with a view to arresting the French slave brig Neirsée, alias Estafette, her captain, according to Captain Owen of the Eden, apparently offering a thousand guineas to let the vessel pass.

24 Nov 1828 arrived back at Clarence Cove with the French slave brig Neirsée.

6 Jan 1829 with the boats of the Eden detained the Dutch slave Brig Jules, André Ferraud, master, on the bar of River Calabar ; when bound from Old Calabar to St. Thomas. 144 men and 76 women, were emancipated, 13 having died en route for Sierra Leone where the British and Netherlands Mixed Court of Justice sat to adjudicate the capture and on 24 Jun 1829 sentenced to be condemned.

6 Jan 1829 with the boats of the Eden detained the Dutch the slave schooner La Jeune Eugenie, Neils Williams, master, on the bar of River Calabar ; bound from Old Calabar to Martinique. 18 men, and 32 women were emancipated, 4 having died en route for Sierra Leone where the British and Netherlands Mixed Court of Justice sat to adjudicate the capture and on 24 Jun 1829 sentenced her to be condemned.

15 Feb 1829 detained the Brazilian slave schooner Mensageira, Ignacio Alvez Martha, master, on the bar of the River Bonny, when bound from the River Bonny to Rio de Janeiro, with 353 negroes on board, of whom only 244 were emancipated, 43 dying en route to Sierra Leone, to attend the British and Brazilian Court of Mixed Commission, for adjudicating the capture, and 66 whilst awaiting the adjudication.

8 Mar 1829 was hailed by a large French vessel which claimed to be the French Naval vessel Amphitrite, but things didn't feel right and Lieutenant Kellet remained with the vessel for a couple of days and watched her send her boats up the River Bonny when he came to the conclusion that she was a slaver.

11 Mar 1829 rejoined his mother ship, the Eden, in Clarence Cove and advised Captain Owen of his suspicions regarding the supposedly French vessel.

13 Mar 1829 departed for the Bar of the Bonny with a view to intercepting the strange slaver, whilst the Eden made ready for sea and and followed on later.

16 Mar 1829 arrived on the Bar of the Bonny and maintained observation of the strange vessel.

18 Mar 1829 following the arrival of the Eden the strange sail attempted to escape her attention, but with superior sailing brought her to to await the Eden. The vessel, now known to be the Diana, alias La Fama, was taken possession of and brought to Clarence Cove for examination. Whilst she was equipped for slaving she couldn't be arrested at this time as she didn't have any slaves on board, and so, after a thorough inspection she was released, but a serious point had been made.

23 Nov 1829 detained off Calabar, in the Bight of Biafra, the French slave vessel Neirsée, alias Estafette, with 280 slaves on board which was sent for adjudication but did not make it to court, being restored to her original crew, presumably because, like the Americans, France wouldn't allow a clause in their Treaty with Great Britain allowing anti-slavery cruisers to search each other's vessels.