Research by Denise Sallee (still in the process of updating with sources and new material)


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Wafer Chronology – England & Wales

THE
 BATTLE ABBEY ROLL. WITH SOME
 ACCOUNT OF THE NORMAN LINEAGES.
IN THREE VOLUMES.—VOL. III LONDON :  JOHN MURRAY,  1889.   
Wafre :

According to Eyton, "this name occurs frequently in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries;" and it is still borne by Hopton-Wafre in Shropshire, and Tedston-Wafre in Herefordshire. Robert le Wafre, in 1253, held Hopton in capite of the Earl of Hereford of the Honour of Brecknock; and Tedstone under John de Wildebouf of the same Honour; both of which were brought in marriage by his only child, Lucia, to a younger son of Lord Mortimer of Wigmore. "The obit of Alice, mother of the above-mentioned Robert, was annually celebrated in Hereford Cathedral. John le Wafre 20 Ed. I. held two virgates of land at Marston by the service of conducting the treasure of our Lord the King from Hereford to London, as often as he should be summoned by the Sheriff, with one horse and an iron helmet, at the costs of the King, to wit, twelve pence a day towards London, and returning at his own proper costs."—Duncumb's Herefordshire. Simon de Wafre held by the same serjeanty, as did Petronilla de Wafre in the time of Henry III. William de Waure represented Canterbury in the parliament held at Westminster 9 Ed. III.—Hasted's Kent. He was one of the three Crown Commissioners appointed to enquire into the case of William de Septvans 41 Ed. III.—Archaeologia Cantiana. "Robertus de Waura" held three parts of a knight's fee of Robert Fitz Odo at Wavre (now Church-Over) in Warwickshire.—Liber Niger. William de Waure occurs in the Staffordshire Pipe Roll of 1199-1200.

1103-07 - Hugh le Wafre gave tithes in "Hantune" (Hampton Wafre) to Brecon Priory. Source:  Herefordshire Place-Names. Bruce Coplestone-Crow. BAR British Series 214, 1989. pg. 96.

c.1107 - Hugh Guafra (Wafre) "rectam decimam totius terre sue de Hantune" re.  second charter by Bernard Newmarche to Brecon Priory (Breckonshire). Source: Cartularium Prioratus S. Johannis Evangelistae de Brecon. London, 1884.pg. 70-71.

c.1120 Robert le Wafre witness re. Brecon Priory and William de BurghillSource: Cartularium Prioratus S. Johannis Evangelistae de Brecon. London, 1884. pgs 117-118.

1160-70 - Robert Wafre  - Hampton Wafre. "...in possession of the manor." Also held Tedstone Wafre (same years).  "Source:  Herefordshire Place-Names. Bruce Coplestone-Crow. BAR British Series 214, 1989. pg. 96, 189.

12th and 13th C – Le Wafre family - Cleobury North - Hopton Wafre. Held lands immediately under Lords of Brecknock [Brecon].

1130 - Rogerus Wafre (Waffers) was the 1st Wafre at Hopton Wafres. Walter de Cropus (ancestor of Le Wafre?) held Cleobury North until le Wafre took over.

1180 - Ricardus filius Waifer - Wiltshire. Source: A Dictionary of English Surnames. Percy Hide Reaney. Psychology Press, 1991.  pg. 3268

c.1190 -  Robert le Wafre witness re. Brecon Priory and William de WilldeboefSource: Cartularium Prioratus S. Johannis Evangelistae de Brecon. London, 1884. pg 100.

1199 - Robert le Wafer, a Brecon tenant,  re. Bredwardine Castle. Source: Lords of the Central Marches : English Aristocracy and Frontier Society, 1087-1265. Brock Holden. Oxford University Press, Aug 7, 2008

c.1200 - Robert le Wafre in regards to Brecon Priory (Brecknock).   "The original grant of Robert, or Roger Baskerville [c.1190] was again confirmed by Robert le Wafre, who married Alice, one of his daughters, who describes it by the name of the mill of Llandevaillaue meaning Llandevailog tre'r graig, in which parish it was situated...At a later period, though not long subsequent to these grants, Alice de Baskerville gave to the prior and convent a mesuage or tenement, together with a croft...in the village of Bredwardine." Source: Monasticon Anglicanum: A History of the Abbies and Other Monasteries...in England and Wales... by William Dugdale. London, 1821.  pg. 261.

1212 - Robert le Wafer, a minor, "his three fees being held by Reginald Croc and Ranulf Hurley. Source: Lords of the Central Marches : English Aristocracy and Frontier Society, 1087-1265. Brock Holden. Oxford University Press, Aug 7, 2008.  [Note on pg. 122.]

1212 - Simon le Wafre (le Wafrer) re. fees in Herefordshire.  Source: A Dictionary of English Surnames. Percy Hide Reaney. Psychology Press, 1991.  pg. 3268

1215 - 1222 - Robert le Wafre witness re. Brecon Priory and Reginald de Braose.  Source: Cartularium Prioratus S. Johannis Evangelistae de Brecon. London, 1884.pg 86-87.

1215 - 1222 - Robert le Wafre confirms grant of Reginald de Braose. re. Brecon Priory [(Breckonshire] and the Trosdref MillSource: Cartularium Prioratus S. Johannis Evangelistae de Brecon. London, 1884. pgs 93-94.

c. 1215 - Robert le Wafre witness re. Brecon Priory and convent [Breckonshire]. Source: Cartularium Prioratus S. Johannis Evangelistae de Brecon. London, 1884.pgs 42-43.


1205-1206 Robert le Wafre witness re. Brecon Priory [Breckonshire] and Stephen de Surdeval.  Source: Cartularium Prioratus S. Johannis Evangelistae de Brecon. London, 1884. pgs 120-121.

c.1220 - Robert le Wafre married Alice, the eldest daughter of Roger de Baskerville. [Note: this is the same Robert listed as a minor in 1212]  Source: Antiquities of Shropshire. R. W. Eyton. Vol XI.  London: John Bussell Smith,1860.

1216-1222 - Robert Wafre (le Wafre) signature on the Charters of Brecknock. Source:  Shropshire Parish Registers, Diocese of Hereford, Vol. IX. 1909.

1219 - Symond le Waffre versus Roger le Bygod in Wynedole (Norfolk). Source: A Short Calendar of the Feet of Fines for Norfolk: Comprising the fines of the reigns of Edward II., Edward III., Richard II., Henry IV., Henry V., Henry VI., Edward IV., and Richard III. A. H. Goose, 1886. pg. 114.

c.1227 – Ralph Le Waverer re. fees in Yorkshire. Source: A Dictionary of English Surnames. Percy Hide Reaney. Psychology Press, 1991.  pg. 3268

1241 - Robert Wafre as claimant on the Honour of Montgomeryshire (claiming to be heir of Robert de Bollers; claim never proved). Source:  Antiquities of Shropshire. R. W. Eyton. Vol XI.  London: John Bussell Smith, 1860.

1242 - Richard Waifer re. fees in Wiltshire. Source: A Dictionary of English Surnames. Percy Hide Reaney. Psychology Press, 1991.  pg. 3268

1249 - Symon le Wafre versus John le Wafre in Wynedole (Norfolk).  Source: A Short Calendar of the Feet of Fines for Norfolk: Comprising the fines of the reigns of Edward II., Edward III., Richard II., Henry IV., Henry V., Henry VI., Edward IV., and Richard III. A. H. Goose, 1886. pg 78

1234 - 1247 - Robert le Wafre [Domino] witness to grant by Herbert fitz Peter to Brecon Priory (Breckonshire). Source: Cartularium Prioratus S. Johannis Evangelistae de Brecon. London, 1884. pgs. 26-27.

1250 – Symon le Wafre v John le Wafre in Wynedole [Norfolk].  Source: A Short Calendar of the Feet of Fines for Norfolk: In the reigns of Richard I, John, Henry III, & Edward I.  Great Britain. Court of Common Pleas. A.H. Goose, 1885. pg. 78.

c.1250 - William Waffre in Sudbury (north of London).

1255 - Robert le Wafre - Lord of Hopton (Wafre)

1257, July 30th, Lichfield - Robert le Wafer - in a list of eight men "These have gone with Humphrey de Bohun and have protection with clause so long as they shall be in Wales in the king's service." Also mentioned in this list:  Philip le Brette, Henry de Monemuth, Richard de Hortel, Payn Wake, Walter de Avenbiry, John de Waldebof, Walter de Muucegros. Before the list is the name William de Munrivell.   Source: Patent Rolls of the Reign of Henry III Preserved in the Public Record Office. Volume 4. Great Britain. Public Record Office, 1908.

1258-1301 - Thomas Le Wauffre - Witness to charter by Bishop of Worcester granting land in Mawene (now Marden), Herefordshire.  Source:  Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica. Vol. IV. London, 1837. pg. 248.

1263 - Robert le Wafre  - of Talelond [Talyllyn near Brecon?].  "The Welsh tenants of Humphrey de Bohun, lord of Brecon...[other Brecknock mesne lords named including Robert le Wafre] had revolted and gone over to Llywelyn." Sources: Calendar of Ancient Correspondence Concerning Wales. Sir John Goronwy Edwards, University Press Board, 1935. pg. 17.  The Baronial Plan of Reform, 1258-1263, Volume 1. Reginald Francis Treharne.  Manchester University Press, Jan 1, 1971. pg. 292.

c1265 - Lucia le Wafre married Roger de Mortimer of Chirk. Her father was “Lord of Hopton”,  Robert le Wafre. [Note: her mother was Alice de Baskerville].

1267 - Robert le Wafre.  "Commission to Adam de Grainvill and Richard de Crumpton, Westminster, justices appointed to hear like pleas in the county of Hereford, to enquire whether Ralph de Baskerville, whose lands the king gave by reason of like trespasses to Robert le Wafre, and who has frequently offered to stand his trial touching such trespasses and still is ready to stand to the award of Kenilworth, was guilty of the said trespasses or not. They are to proceed without delay at their next coming to these parts, without waiting for R. bishop of St. Davids, their fellow, if he should be absent, as the king desires that the execution of the award of Kenilworth should not be further postponed to the prejudice of the said Ralph."  Source: Patent Rolls. Patent Rolls of the Reign of Henry III Preserved in the Public Record Office. Volume 6. Great Britain. Public Record Office, 1908.

c.1270 - Robert le Wafre - witness to confirmation of grant to Brecon Abbey [Breckonshire] by Humphrey de Bohun, son of Humphrrey de Bohun and Eleanor de Braoise. Source: Cartularium Prioratus S. Johannis Evangelistae de Brecon. London, 1884. pgs 26-27.

[By 1286 le Wafre lands passed to Mortimer.]

1272 - John Waffre listed on Inquisition made at Albedeston, co. Wiltshire. Source: Wiltshire, England, Extracted Parish Records
 on Ancestry.com

1278 – Robert Le Wafre and Nicholas Comyn are nominated by the wife of John Comyn (Amabila) to be her attorneys in Ireland. Source: Calendar of documents, relating to Ireland preserved in Her Majesty's Public Record Office, London, 1171-1307. London: Longman, 1875.

1282 -  Robert le Wafre re. land in Ravenyngham (Norfolk). Source: The Forty-Sixth Annual Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records. London, 1886

c.1300 – Mabel Wafre. Abbess of Godstow, endowed land for Trinity College, Oxford University.

1301 - Hugh le Waffre versus Roger Norman in Bunewell (Norfolk). Source: A Short Calendar of the Feet of Fines for Norfolk: Comprising the fines of the reigns of Edward II., Edward III., Richard II., Henry IV., Henry V., Henry VI., Edward IV., and Richard III. A. H. Goose, 1886. pg. 155

1303 – Robert and Geoffrey Le Wafre in Sturmer, Essex

1334 - Nicholas Wafre, king's clerk and rector of Old Radnor. Source:  “Medieval Radnorshire clergy.”  by  E.J.L. Cole.  
Radnorshire Society Transactions. Vol. 19 (1949) p. 17-28. 

1341 -  Robert le Wafre, of Raveningham [Clavering Hundred, Norfolk], debtor. Creditor: John de Hevingham, taverner, and citizen of Norwich [Norfolk]. Amount: £30.

Before whom: William, the son of William Butt, of Norwich; John de Bumpstead, Clerk. Writ to: Sheriff of Norfolk Source: The National Archives, Kew. C 241/115/211

c.1350 – Thomas le Waffre – Hereford (Welsh Borders) at Tedstone Wafre [11 miles east of Leominster] and Hampton Wafre.

c1350 -  Walter le Wafre (his daughter Catherine married William Ruse) seated at Dinnington in Hoxon Hundred, Suffolk.  Source:  Proceedings of the Suffolk institute of Archaeology and Natural History. Volume 8. 1894.   pg. 207:

1386 – William Wafre of Toft Monachorum (Norfolk).   Source: A Short Calendar of the Feet of Fines for Norfolk: Comprising the fines of the reigns of Edward II., Edward III., Richard II., Henry IV., Henry V., Henry VI., Edward IV., and Richard III. A. H. Goose, 1886

n.d. Robert de Wafre in Thorp (Norfolk)

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Wafer Chronology – Ireland

1194 -  Walter Wafre - grantor  - Killegland, Ashbourne, Meath
A final charter in the name of Walter Wafre (ancestor of the reputed builder of Killegland Castle, one Walter Wafre, after 1400), dating from between 1194 and 1224, grants 'all my water (works) at Kilegelan, with the site of the mill, and a messuage at which Hugo the miller is tenant, with appurtenances and (rights of) common pasture (and/for) six cows (vacarum) in the aforesaid village of Kilegelan' to the Abbey of St Thomas of Dublin and 'its canons in service to God' (Gilbert 1889, 50). A note in the margin of this document, in another hand, identifies the charter as pertaining to 'the mill and mill water(work)s of Killegland donated by Walter de W'. Again the reference to the mill and what is likely to be its (engineered) waterworks separately would seem to imply that the latter were extensive and/or elaborate. The listing of the miller's residence separately implies a separate household structure/plot, that may nevertheless have stood near to the mill site. Source: Meath 2003:1346 Killegland, Ashbourne Medieval millrace and rural landscape O525063
SMR 45:5 02E1728; 02E0708 ext. http://www.excavations.ie/Pages/Details.php?Year=&County=Meath&id=10174

c.1200 – Walter le Waffre- Witness to charter [X] of Walter de Scotot. Land in Donaghmore (co. Meath) near Navan. Source: Register of the Abbey of St Thomas. Dublin. John Thomas Gilbert, 1889.

c.1250 - Richard le Wafre ("Domino Ricardo le Wafre, milite) - Witness to charter [LXII] of Philip, son of William [Coci]. Land in Ratoath (co. Meath) near Ashbourne. Source: Register of the Abbey of St Thomas. Dublin. John Thomas Gilbert, 1889.

c.1265 -  Richard le Wafre  - Witness to charter [LXXVI] of Henry de Straton. Land in Donaghmore (co. Meath) near Navan. Source: Register of the Abbey of St Thomas. Dublin. John Thomas Gilbert, 1889.

1225-1250 – Radulfus [Ralph] la Wafre – a free citizen of Dublin. Source: Dublin Municipal Archives. 4

1278 – Robert Le Wafre and Nicholas Comyn are nominated by the wife of John Comyn (Amabila) to be her attorneys in Ireland. Source: Calendar of documents, relating to Ireland preserved in Her Majesty's Public Record Office, London, 1171-1307. London: Longman, 1875.

* John Comyn was the 1st Anglo-Norman Archbishop of Dublin @1191. Built St. Patrick's (Dublin).

1286 - Richard le Wafre. Dublin. "for agreeing without license."
Source: Calendar of documents, relating to Ireland
preserved in Her Majesty's Public Record Office, London, 1285-1292. London: Longman, 1879

1288 - Nesta, "who was the wife of Richard Wafre" roll of receipt. Meath.  "for a false action." Source: Calendar of documents, relating to Ireland
preserved in Her Majesty's Public Record Office, London, 1285-1292.
London: Longman, 1879

1291 - Henry le Wafre on roll of receipt, Michaelmas Term, for pledge of Roger de Portes.  Source: Calendar of documents, relating to Ireland
preserved in Her Majesty's Public Record Office, London,
1285-1292. London: Longman, 1879

1292 – William Wafre (le Wafere) tenant of 1 messuage and 59 acres in Corbally, Meath (currently Westmeath, near Fore). King's writ also mentions (1) Ralph le Wafere, grandfather of William, deceased, and (2) Alice le Wafere, mother of Simon de Campeleye. Ralph gave Alice and her husband, Thomas,  9 acres in Killegelan, Meath. Ralph died before Alice died. Source: Calendar of documents, relating to Ireland preserved in Her Majesty's Public Record Office, London, 1285-1292. London: Longman, 1879

1293 -   Henry le Waffre and William de Keppoe - of farm of the city of Dublin.    Source: Roll of Receipt.  Calendar of documents, relating to Ireland
preserved in Her Majesty's Public Record Office, London, 1171-1307. Published by Longman in London

1303-1427 - Wafer shows up on Patent Rolls in Leinster. Source: The Surnames of Ireland. Edward MacLysaght, 1985.

1324 - William Wafre of Reccouth in Ireland acknowledges that he owes to Hugh le Despenser, Earl of Winchester, 10,000 marks; to be levied, in default of payment, of ... Source: Close Rolls, Edward II - July 1324. Calendar of Close Rolls, Edward II: volume 4 (1898)

1337-1351 – Philip Wafre, Abbot of St. Mary’s – Dublin.

1354 -  Philip Waufre, formerly Cistercian abbot of St. Mary's by Dublin. Signification that he, being of noble birth, has resigned the office on account of age and weakness, and that his successor Richard and the convent have assigned to him some possessions, tenths, and rents, with yearly portions of two monks, and other distributions of victuals, and a room and adjacent garden within the limits of the monastery, with certain privileges and immunities for his life, and that Hugh, abbot of St. Mary's Build was, and his convent, have confirmed the same. He therefore prays for papal confirmation and approval of what has been done.
Let all relative papers be exhibited in the chancery, and, if reasonable, be confirmed. Avignon, 11 Kal. Jan. 1354 Source: Volume XXV: 2 Innocent VI, Petitions to the Pope: 1342-1419 (1896), pp. 256-269:

Chartularies of St. Mary's Abbey, Dublin: with the Register of its house at ... By St. Mary's Abbey (Dublin, Ireland),
Philip Wafre, Abbot, A.D. 1337-1351. 
Dunbrody.
Contest for precedency 
between Armagh and Dublin:
… made preparations for his attendance in St. Mary's Abbey, but that he was obstructed by the Archbishop of Dublin, who would not permit him to have his cross borne before him, as he had intended, in assertion of the right of precedency of the See of Armagh over that of Dublin.1 This matter formed the subject of documents addressed by Edward III. to the Archbishop of Dublin and officials in Ireland.2   Philip Wafre, who became Abbot of St. Mary's in 1337, is stated to have been a monk of  that Abbey.3 He was probably a member of the family of Wafre, or Le Wafre, which was of much importance in Shropshire.1
Edward III., in 1346, on representations addressed to him by Philip Wafre, directed the officers of his See Annals, A.D. 1337, In second volume. • " 
Feedern, Couventiories," etc., 
vol. ii. 2, p. 1007. London : 1821. 
3 Sec pp. 378, 381; also, at p. 
345, reference to Nicholas Waffre, 
appointed vicar of church at Serine 
by Abbot of St. Mary's.
Antiquities of Shropshire. Eyton, vol. ??., pp. 25-27. London : 1856. [1 Sec p. 326. 6 See p. 307.]

1355 - John le Wafre acknowledges that he owes 25m to Geoffrey le Wafre, [to be levied] from lands in co. Dublin unless [it is paid].  15 Aug. 1355. Source:  Close Roll  29-   Edward III (Trinity College, Dublin)

1358-1361 - George, son of Edmund Wafre, staying in England, has letter nominating James de la Hide and Richard Wafer as his attorneys in Ireland for two years.  Source: Calendar of Patent Rolls Preserved (1358-1361) in the Public Record Office, London.

1363 - Roger Wafre - Fined 10s - Culduff (?), Dublin area. Source: Delafield: The Family History  by John Ross Delafield. Vol. I, 1945.

1374 – Nicholas Waffre with Thomas Burley [Chancellor of Ireland] - Carbury, Co. Meath [East of Edenderry, current Co. Kildare]. Source: Carbury and the Berminghams' Country. By the Rev. M. Devitt.  In The Journal of the County Kildare Archaeological Society, Vol. 2., 1896-1899.

1388 - Thomas Waffre - barony of Dunboyne (co. Meath) - to collect levies. Source: Patent Roll 12 Richard II RCH (142/220 221 7 Oct. 1388) on A Calendar of Irish Chancery Letters c. 1244 - 1509, Trinity College, Dublin. http:/chancery.tcd.ie/roll/12-Richard-II/patent

1388 - Thomas Wafer, a Canon [of St. Patrick's, Dublin]. "...was joined with William Chambre, the Archdeacon,  as Guardian of the Spiritualities of the archbishopric...He was still a Canon in 1406, and one of the Vicars-Generals."  Source: Fasti Ecclesiae Hibernicae: The Province of Leinster. Henry Cotton. Hodges and Smith, 1848. pg. 194.

1389  - Thomas Waferton - regarding the vicarage of Callan, Diocese of Ossory. Source: Delafield: The Family History  by John Ross Delafield. Vol. I, 1945.

1391 – Thomas Wafre – canon of Dublin – St. Patrick’s. Also mentioned, Johannis Wafre. Source: Calendar of Entries in the Papal Registers Relating to Great Britain and ... edited by William Henry Bliss, Jessie Alfred Twemlow, 1902. See also: Calendar of Papal Registers Relating to Great Britain and Ireland, Volume 4 - 1362-1404:
4 Id. Jan.
St. Peter's, Rome.
(f. 191.) To Landulph, cardinal deacon of St. Nicholas's in carcere. Reservation, motu proprio, of the deanery of Dublin, an elective major dignity with cure, value 100 marks, which is to be resigned by Master Henry Bowet, papal chaplain and auditor of causes in the court of the camera, upon his obtaining possession of the archdeaconry of Lincoln, a dignity, under the terms of the provision thereof, then void, made to him by Urban VI. Concurrent mandate to the archbishop of Bari, the bishop of Leighlin, and Thomas Wafre, canon of Dublin.  See also: 
Calendar of Papal Registers Relating to Great Britain and Ireland, Volume 5: 1398-1404

1397 – Petitions: 9 Kal. Nov.
St. Peter's, Rome.
(f. 207d.) To the bishop of Meath, and the abbots of St. Thomas the Martyr and St. Mary's without the walls, Dublin. Mandate to collate and assign to James Redenesse, Augustinian canon of Dublin, papal chaplain, the priory of Dublin, a major dignity with cure, value not exceeding 300 marks, to which on its voidance by the death of Robert Lokington, he was elected by the chapter, confirmation of which election he obtained from Thomas Wafre, then official of Dublin, and vicar general of the chapter in the voidance of the see. James now doubts whether the election and confirmation hold good. Grata devocionis.

3 Kal. April.
St. Peter's, Rome.
(f. 233d.) To Clement, bishop of Telese, dwelling in the Roman court. Mandate, if he find the facts to be as stated in the recent petition of Thomas, Augustinian prior of Molynger, in the diocese of Meath—namely, that although the prior and convent have from time immemorial held to their own uses the parish church of Dounboyng, in the said diocese, nevertheless lately, namely in 1399, John, archbishop of Armagh, during a metropolitical visitation, at the instance of one Thomas Wafre, layman of the same diocese, cited prior Thomas in a cause about the institution of a priest in the chapel of Kylbride, within the bounds of the said parish, to which chapel the archbishop (disregarding the plea that the cause was pending in his own court by the prior's appeal from the court of Meath, and that he ought not therefore to proceed or act), after finishing his visitation and leaving the diocese and again returning, instituted a perpetual chaplain, deputed to him an excessive portion from the fruits of Dounboyng, and promulgated sentences of excommunication etc., from all which the prior appealed to the pope—to annul the archbishop's undue proceedings, all causes and suits which have arisen out of the above circumstances, whether pending in the Roman court or elsewhere, being hereby called up to the pope. Pastoralis officii.

4 Non. May.
St. Peter's, Rome.
(f. 86.) To the bishop of Tuy, and the chancellor and Thomas Wafre, canon, of Dublin. Mandate as below. The petition of Richard Caran, who asserts that he is archdeacon of Dublin, contained that a cause arose lately between him and William Chamber, clerk, of the diocese of London, about the said archdeaconry, which he obtained by papal authority and held peaceably for some time on its voidance by the resignation, made to the pope, of Landulph cardinal deacon of St. Nicholas's in Carcere Tulliano, and that Chamber has prevented his peaceable possession; that the pope at the instance of Chamber, who was then in the Roman court, committed the cause, notwithstanding that it did not by its nature lawfully devolve to the said court, to James, [now] bishop of Aquila, then papal chaplain and auditor, before whom appeared Master James de Subinago as Caran's proctor, and who, upon Chamber's absenting himself from the said court and not appearing upon citation, pronounced him contumacious and removed him, in so far as he could, from the archdeaconry and restored Caran, condemning Chamber in fruits received and costs, which latter he afterwards taxed at 25 gold florins of the camera. The pope therefore orders the above three to execute the aforesaid, restoring Caran to possession and removing Chamber, causing satisfaction to be made to Caran for the said fruits and costs, proceeding against present or future intruders as if the above sentence had been delivered against them, and invoking, if necessary, the aid of the secular arm. Exhibita nobis.

c.1398 - William Waffre - Rathconrath (co. Mead) -  Keeper of the Peace with Simon Burford. Source: Medieval Trim: History and Archaeology. Michael Potterton. Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2005. pg. 379.

1402 – Rev. Nicholas Wafre, vicar of Church of St. Columb, Skryne, Meath.  Source: The diocese of Meath, ancient and modern.
Pub. 1862

1405 - Robert Waffre - defendant in a lawsuit.  Culduff (?), Dublin area. Source: Delafield: The Family History  by John Ross Delafield. Vol. I, 1945.

n.d. Nicholas Waffre appointed Vicar of church at Serine. Appointed by Philip Wafre.

1438 – John Wafre – in a Dublin will. Source: Proceedings of the Royal Irish AcademyThe Royal Irish Academy, 1905

1445 – William Wafre – Killegian. Co. Meath

c. 1450 (Reign of Henry VI)-  John Wafre  nominated for power of attorney for Agnes Netterville in regards to the manor of Douth and land in Welham.  Source:  Calendar of the Patent and Close Rolls of Chancery in Ireland. pg. 127.

1462 – Margery Waffre [Weafer?] – widow granted lands in Parsontoun, Co. Kildare. Source:
Calendar to Christchurch Deeds, cited in Appendix to 24th Report of the Deputy Keeper of Public Records in Ireland

Margery Waffre, [Weafer? ] widow, granted to her cousin, Wm Typpyr, [Tipper; see 1597] lands in Parsonestoun, Co Kildare, at the services due the chief lord. Dated 16/12/1462. [Deed no.970] .

1472 - Katherine Waffure listed in an inventory for John Sherreff in Howth (north of Dublin). Source - Register of Wills and Inventories of Diocese of Dublin, 1457-1483. Dublin, 1898.

1473 – Edmund Wafyr (and Ann Petyte his wife) ordained executors in will of Alice Whyte. Garristown (near Fingal, Co. Dublin). Source - Register of Wills and Inventories of Diocese of Dublin, 1457-1483. Dublin, 1898.

1518 - Lucas Wayfare, nephew of Robert Bowen. Mary Bowen, wife of Lucas Wafer. Regarding the murder of Robert Stanton. Source:  Calendar of documents, relating to Ireland preserved in Her Majesty's Public Record Office, London, 1171-1307. Published by Longman in London

1534 – Wafer – a captain for Thomas Fitz-Gerald near Fingal.  Source:ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND, BY THE FOUR MASTERS, FROM THE EARLIEST PERIOD TO THE YEAR 1616. EDITED FROM MSS. IN THE LIBRARY OF THE ROYAL IRISH ACADEMY AND OF TRINITY COLLEGE, DUBLIN, WITH  A TRANSLATION, AND COPIOUS NOTES, BY JOHN O'DONOVAN.

A. D. 1534. Thomas Fitz-Gerald, eldest son to the earl of Kildare, being left lord deputy in his father's absence, a rumour was spread abroad that his father was imprisoned and beheaded in London; upon which he surrendered the sword to the council, and flew out into open rebellion. The council sent secretly to the mayor and citizens to apprehend FitzGerald and his accomplices. But either the favour of the citizens to that house, or the strength of the confederacy, or the weakness of the city, which was much dispeopled by a plague then reigning in town and country, prevented any attempt at that time however, the citizens afterwards behaved themselves with zeal and resolution against him. Fingal was the granary which usually supplied the city with corn but was now exposed to the depredations of the O'Tools, and other Irish of the mountains, assisted by John Burnell of Balgriffen, a gentlemen of a good estate in Fingal, who favoured the rebellion. The citizens having received advice that the O'Tools were busied in conducting a prey from Fingal to the mountains, sallied out to intercept them at Kilmainham-bridge. They met the enemy near the wood of Salcock, but being over-powered with numbers, they were routed and four score of them slain.
This misfortune threw the city into a consternation, which Fitz-Gerald laying hold of; demanded liberty to march his army through it, and lay siege to the castle, promising that no citizen should be injured in his property by his soldiers. The citizens took time to advise on this matter before they gave their consent; and immediately dispatched one of their aldermen, Francis Herbert, to the king to know his pleasure, who, for his discreet demeanor upon the occasion, received the honour of knighthood, and was made a member of the privy-council. They also consulted the constable of the castle, who regarding the security of the city, gave his consent to the demand, provided he were sufficiently furnished with men and provisions to withstand a siege. The citizens sent by night into the cattle a good store of provisions, and alderman John Fitzsimons, upon his own account, furnished the constable with 20 tun of wine, and 24 tun of beer, 2,000 dried ling, 16 hogsheads of powdered beef, 20 chambers for mines, and an iron chain for the draw-bridge that he had procured to be forged in his own house to avoid suspicion.
The castle being abundantly supplied, the citizens consented to Fitz-Gerald's demands, and he accordingly sent in 600 men under the command of six captains, viz. Field, Teeling, Wafer, Broad, Rouks and Purcell, who planted two or three pieces of artillery near Preston's inn, opposite to the castle-gate, and intrenched their party with strong ramparts sufficient to defend them from the shot of the castle; and to frighten the constable from annoying them with his ordinance, they threatened to place the youth of the city on the tops of their trenches, as marks at which they would be loth to aim.

1536 – Peter Waffre listed as the king’s enemey -  [Wexford?]. Source: The Surnames of Ireland. Edward MacLysaght, 1985 and "Analecta Hibernica", Irish Manuscripts Commission.

1539 – (The Reign of Henry VIII) Thomas Wafre. Abbot, Navan Abbey, Co. Meath. "Surrender by Thomas Wafre, Abbot, with the consent of the convent, of the abbey of Blessed Virgin Mary, of Navan, in Meath County, with all its possessions in the county of Meath, Louth, Dublin, Kildare, and Carlow, and elsewhere in Ireland."  Source:  Calendar of the Patent and Close Rolls of Chancery in Ireland. pg. 56.

1540 - Matthew Wafer - "of Monketon." Juror re. Friary of Skreen (co. Meath).  Source: Extents of Irish Monastic Possessions, 1540-41. Newport B. White, ed. Dublin: Stationery Office, 1943. pg.306

1540-41 - Nicholas Wafre - Newcastell (co. Meath). Listed as holding a "castle or tenement...to farm from the late abbot p.t.a..." Source: Extents of Irish Monastic Possessions, 1540-41. Newport B. White, ed. Dublin: Stationery Office, 1943. pg. 251.

1540-41 - Nicholas Wafre - Little Moieton (co. Meath). Listed as paying to "the baron of Tryme."  Source: Extents of Irish Monastic Possessions, 1540-41. Newport B. White, ed. Dublin: Stationery Office, 1943. pg. 301.

1541  - Peter Waffer - co. Wexford. Juror re. Dominican House of Arklow. Source: Extents of Irish Monastic Possessions, 1540-41. Newport B. White, ed. Dublin: Stationery Office, 1943. pg.373.

1544 – Nicholas Wafer – Meath. Source: The Surnames of Ireland. Edward MacLysaght, 1985.

1546 – Thomas Wafre and John Wogan. [Pat. Roll Edward VI] re. church at Donoghmore, co. Meath. Prebendaries of St. Patrick's at the Suppression.  Source: Fasti Ecclesiae Hibernicae: The Province of Leinster. Henry Cotton. Hodges and Smith, 1848. pg 183.

1592 - Richard Waffer - signer in document regarding the Hill of Lacke-M'Keghoe. Source: Calendar of documents, relating to Ireland
preserved in Her Majesty's Public Record Office, London, 1171-1307. London: Longman, 1875.

1598 - Lucas Wafer. Pardoned for a murder indictment.  Source:  Calendar of the Patent and Close Rolls of Chancery in Ireland. pg. 377.

1598 – John Wafer, Dublin merchant.

1598 – Wafer (various) – Meath.  Source: The Surnames of Ireland. Edward MacLysaght, 1985.

1598 – Waffer – Ballemoy, Ballighkeen, Wexford. Source: The Surnames of Ireland. Edward MacLysaght, 1985.

1603 - John Wafer in Navan, Co. Meath. Calendar of documents, relating to Ireland
preserved in Her Majesty's Public Record Office, London, 1171-1307.
London: Longman, 1875.

1628/1631 – Elizabeth Wafer alias Plunkett, widow, Dublin listed in prerogative grant.  Source:  Index to Prerogative Grants - Eire. 1595-1810 (1536-1810).  London: Public Record Office.

1634 – Roger Wafer, gentleman, Guyanstown, Co. Meath listed in prerogative grant. Source:  Index to Prerogative Grants - Eire. 1595-1810 (1536-1810).  London: Public Record Office.

1640 – Thomas and Francis Wafer, Gory, Wexford. Source: Civil Survey. County Wexford  for 1640

1641 – Maraget, daughter of William Wafer, buried. Dublin.  Source: The Register of St. John the Evangelist, Dublin, 1619-1699. Dublin, 1906.

1650 – Felix, son of William Wafer, buried. Dublin. Source: The Register of St. John the Evangelist, Dublin, 1619-1699. Dublin, 1906.

1653 – Rose Wafer buried. Dublin. Source: The Register of St. John the Evangelist, Dublin, 1619-1699. Dublin, 1906.

1656 - Francis Waffer of Gainestown Co. Meath (64 acres) transplanted to Connaught. Source:  The Manuscripts of the Marquis of Ormonde, Preserved at the Castle, Kilkenny, Volume 2. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, 1899. pg. 176. 

1656 - Richard Waffer of  Co. Meath (37 acres) transplanted to Connaught. Source:  The Manuscripts of the Marquis of Ormonde, Preserved at the Castle, Kilkenny, Volume 2. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, 1899. pg. 176.

1656 - Francis Waffer of  Co. Wexford (110 acres) transplanted to Connaught. Source:  The Manuscripts of the Marquis of Ormonde, Preserved at the Castle, Kilkenny, Volume 2. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts, 1899. pg. 176.

1657 - Thomas and Frances Wafer - on list of "Papist Proprietors" from Gorey, co. Wexford who forfeited under the Cromwellian Settlement.  Source: The Irish and Anglo-Irish Landed Gentry, When Cromwell Came to Ireland... John O' Hart. Heritage Books, 2007 (facsimile from the 1884 edition).

1673 - Francis Waffre - Will. Ballinmoney, Co. Wexford. Source:  Index to Prerogative Grants - Eire. 1595-1810 (1536-1810).  London: Public Record Office.

1689 - Thomas Wafer - listed as a Lieutenant under Capt. Michael Roth, The King's Regiment. Source:  Illustrations, Historical and Genealogical, of King James's Irish Army List (1689). John D'Alton. Vol. I.

1740 – Elizabeth Waffer buried. Dublin. Source: The Register of the Parish of St. Peter and St. Kevin, Dublin. 1669-1761. Dublin, 1911.

1742 - Mary Wafar, Gorey, co. Wexford. Mentioned in deed and referred to as the widow of Wm. Murphy and the wife of Miles Kavenagh. Land is 12 acres in Killbegnett.  Source:  Registry of Deeds Project. http://members.pcug.org.au/~nickred/deeds/memorial_extract.cgi?my_memorial=75820&my_indexer=SW

1745 – James Whafre, Dublin linendraper, listed in prerogative grant.

1765  - James Wafer, age 31, in Killinagh (Killena ) and Fairs (Gorey, co. Wexford). re. return of the rental of the forfeited lands in the hands of the Crown from the rebellion of 1798. Source: The Third  Report of the Commissioners, 1806. pg. 128.

1767 – George Wafer and Marks Wafer named in will of R. Burkitt of Cookstown, Co. Wexford. Source: Registry of Deeds, Dublin. Abstracts of Wills, Vol. II, 1746-85. Dublin,   1954.

1793 - Elizabeth Waffer (Wafter), marriage to William Parker. Source: Index to the Act of Grant Books and to Original Wills. Diocese of Dublin to 1800. pg. 348.

1797 - Mary, daughter of Francis Wafer and Mary Bryan, of Killincooley,  - Baptized. Source:  Litter (Kilmuckridge) Parish Registers. Co. Wexford

1848-64 – Wafer name appears mainly in Co. Wexford.

- Weafer name appears x4 in Co. Wexford and x1 in Dublin.