Erie Railroad Obituaries - 1918



Selected Obituaries from Erie Railroad Magazine:

Note: obituaries for 1918 are more numerous due to the dual impacts of World War I and the Spanish Influenza pandemic.

From the January, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES J. ACKERMAN
Among the recent deaths reported in the Port Jervis Gazette was that of James J. Ackerman, who was the victim of an accident, having been, as the report stated, run over by a car. He died while being conveyed to St. Francis hospital. Deceased was employed by the Erie as hostler at the local roundhouse. He was a. member of Deerpark Lodge, No. 1, L. F. of E., and is survived by his mother, two sisters and one brother.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM F. ADAMS
The Port Jervis. N. Y., Gazette printed an account of the death of William F. Adams, night yardmaster of the Erie railroad at Port Jervis. Mr. Adams was a victim of pneumonia, and was ill but one week. He was 28 years of age, and a native of Newark, N. J. His home was in Matamoras, Pa.

Mr. Adams had been in the employ of the Erie since 1904, in the yard service at Port Jervis. He enjoyed the reputation of being a good citizen and clever railroad man. He was a member of the Knights of Columbus, Holy Name Society, Sacred Heart League and St. Joseph's Church, and is survived by his widow, a son, daughter, a brother and sister.




From the June, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

LEWIS L. ARWINE
The death notice of Lewis L. Arwine, employed as brakeman on the Erie railroad, appears in the Rochester, N.Y., Times. His death is said to have occurred as a result of falling from a car. Deceased was at one time an alderman of Hornell, N.Y. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the Maccabees.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

PAUL C. ATWELL
The Star Gazette, Elmira, N.Y., prints a notice of the death of Paul C. Atwell, a machinist employed by the Erie railroad, which occurred at the family home, 356 West Fifth street, of pneumonia. Deceased is survived by his widow. Burial took place in Binghamton, N.Y.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOSEPH BABCOCK
From the office of the master mechanic, Port Jervis, comes the announcement of the death of Joseph Babcock, tool room attendant at the Port Jervis shops, after an illness of three days of pneumonia. Deceased had been employed in the Car department for more than thirty-five years, and was highly regarded as a faithful employe and good citizen.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOSIAH BABCOCK
The Evening Gazette, Port Jervis, N.Y., reports the death in that city of Josiah Babcock, who had been employed in the Erie railroad machine shops for many years.

He died of pneumonia, after a brief illness, at the age of 68 years. He was a widower and is survived by four brothers.




From the August, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN BAUGH
John Baugh, the veteran galvanizer in the Meadville west yard since the days of the A&GW, was fatally injured recently by being caught between two cabooses while crossing the rails. He was a good citizen and faithful, honest employee. A widow and daughter survive him.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM BECKMAN
Announcement is made through the Erie railroad shops at Dunmore, Pa., of the death of William Beckman, following a week’s illness of pneumonia. Decedent had served his apprenticeship in the apprentice school at Dunmore in 1910, and was made molder foreman in 1916. He was 30 years of age. In addition to being a member of the Junior Order American Mechanics he was a member of Neptune Fire Company of Dunmore. He is survived by his widow, a daughter, his parents, a brother and two sisters.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

AMOS C. BELKNAP
An account of the death of Amos C. Belknap appeared in the Binghamton, N. Y., Herald. He succumbed after an illness of two weeks in the City hospital. He had been a resident of Binghamton for thirty-five years, and had he lived three days longer would have been 87 years old.

He was located at Deposit, N. Y., for sixty years, all the while in the employ of the Erie and United States Express companies, and retired from active service thirteen years ago.

He is survived by a brother, a son and ten grandchildren.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

J. CAMERON BENSON
The Republican Press, Salamanca, N.Y., printed an account of the death in that city of J. Cameron Benson, age twenty-five, who died of pneumonia after an illness of six days.

Young Benson was a train inspector in the employ of the Erie railroad, and resided in Salamanca three years. He was a graduate of the Falconer High school and the Jamestown Business college.

He is survived by his widow, an infant son, his father, a brother, now with the colors in France, and a sister.




JOHN H. BIEMER

John H. Biemer


From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
Information has been received that Private John H. Biemer, a member of Company B, Fifty-third Engineers, and an Erie employe, who left Meadville for Camp Dix, and was transferred to Company C, Thirty-ninth Engineers, Camp Upton, died at Base Hospital 48, about October 17 (1918) last. Early last June he was sent overseas, where he was employed in railroad construction in France.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CLAUDE E. BIER
Announcement is made in the Port Jervis Gazette of the death, in the Jefferson Street Hospital, Youngstown, OH, of Claude E. Bier, employed as machinist in the Erie Shops at Brier Hill (OH). He died of influenza after a brief illness and was 27 years of age.

Deceased had been a resident of Port Jervis for fourteen years. He is survived by his mother, two brothers, one of whom is in the U. S. navy, two half brothers and one sister. The body was brought to Port Jervis for burial.




From the March, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MARTIN BLAKE
The Delaware division has lost one of its oldest and best known passenger conductors, and when Martin Blake recently passed away there was genuine sorrow among his friends in Port Jervis, N.Y., and all along the division he had worked on so long.

Mr. Blake was born in Ireland and came to this country when a small boy. When large enough to earn an honest dollar he pledged himself to the dear old Erie, and never worked anywhere else. He was among the old-timers in the train service.

Deceased at one time was a resident of Deposit, but most of his life was spent in Port Jervis, of which he was a highly respected citizen, and a prime favorite among his railroad friends.

He was a member of Neversink Division, No. 52, O. R. C., the Catholic Benevolent Association, St Mary's church, the Holy Name Society and the Knights of Columbus. Mr. Blake is survived by his widow, two sons, two daughters and one sister.




From the March, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHARLES BOGERT
The Erie has lost another old faithful in the death of Charles Bogert, who died recently at his home in Dunmore, Pa., after a service of forty-five years with the company.

Mr. Bogert was foreman of the Dunmore car shops, and although his health had been impaired for some time past he remained at his post of duty up to within a few days of his death. He had been at the Dunmore shops for twenty-five years. Previous to his being sent there he had been twenty years at the company's shops, Port Jervis, N.Y.

Mr. Bogert was a member of the Port Jervis Odd Fellows and of the Presbyterian church, Dunmore. He is survived by his widow, two sons and a daughter.




From the April, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

BENJAMIN W. BONNELL
At the age of 81, Benjamin W. Bonnell passed away at his home in Waverly, N.Y., and another faithful Erie man has gone to his reward. Mr. Bonnell entered the service of the Erie November 1, 1882, as clerk, at Waverly, and was in continuous employment in that capacity at Waverly until June, 1912, when he resigned on account of advanced age. He was a veteran of the civil war, and as a sergeant of Company E, Tenth New York Cavalry, served throughout tlie war.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN I. BRIGHAM
A message, received by T.J. Brigham, of Youngstown, Ohio, from Houston, Tex., was to the effect that his son, John I. Brigham, who was in the aeroplane service at Ellington Field, died in hospital of pneumonia.

Deceased, who was 27 years old, had been a brakeman in the employ of the Erie railroad for several years, running on trains in and out of Youngstown. He was a member of James Harvey Lodge, No. 21, B. of R.T. Besides his parents he leaves six brothers, two of whom are on the fighting line in France, and three sisters. The body was brought to Youngstown for burial.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MAURICE BRIODY
Maurice Briody, employed by the Erie railroad at Olean, N.Y., is reported in the Hornell Tribune as having died in France on October 22 (1918), of spinal meningitis. He entered the service of his country in June, 1917, and was sent to France in June, 1918, being connected with the Medical corps. He had previously resided in Hornell, and was a member of Hornell Council No. 243, Knights of Columbus. Besides his parents he is survived by one brother in the aviation section in Arkansas, two other brothers, one sister who is a Red Cross nurse in France, and one other sister.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM C. BUCK
The death of William C. Buck, agent of the Erie railroad at Waverly, N.Y., is announced in the Binghamton Republican.

About fifteen years ago Mr. Buck was the company's division freight agent at Binghamton, and was one of the most popular and best-liked railroad men doing business along the Southern tier. Owing to an accident that befell him in being thrown from his horse while out for a ride, he asked to be relieved from the duties of his office, which request was granted. He was then appointed agent at Waverly. About two weeks ago Mr. Buck had the misfortune to meet with a fall at his home, the result being that he fractured his hip. The shock to his system was so severe that it weakened his heart and death resulted. Mr. Buck was a genial soul, and among his close friends was called "Bill," by which name he was generally known.

In March, 1917, Governor Glynn appointed him a member of the State Board of Managers of the Reformatories. He was a member of Chemung Lodge of Masons, of which he was past master, and a member of Battle Chapter, Sons of the American Revolution, of Elmira. He is survived by his widow and two sons.




From the October, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ROBERT L. BURCHFIELD
Word comes from Hornell, N.Y., of the death of Robert L. Burchfield, a resident of that city, who was killed in action in France while a private in the Canadian army. Private Burchfield was a native of Ithaca, N.Y., but came to Hornell several years ago and took up his residence with his sister. He was employed in the Erie shops.

The young soldier enlisted in the Canadian army more than two years ago, and had been in France and England for about one and a half years. He is survived by his parents, four sisters and one brother, of Ithaca.
ROBERT L. BURCHFIELD -Reported dead of shrapnel wounds at 42 Casualty Clearing Station, Dominion army, France, Aug. 29, 1918. He enlisted in the Canadian army Jan. 1, 1917, as a private, and was assigned to the Signal corps April 12, 1917; he sailed from Halifax, N.S., for England, and in March, 1918, was sent to France, later going to the front with the 116th battalion, Lewis Machine Gun section, where he received his wounds. He was 24 years old, and at the time of enlistment was employed in the Hornell shops' (unintelligible)




From the May, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM J. BURKE
William J. Burke, for thirty-five years connected with the Erie general offices, died at his home in Jersey City April 2 (1918). Death was due to pneumonia.

Mr. Burke was employed in the office of the general auditor, coal department, during the greater part of his many years of valuable service. He was highly respected by his office companions, who mourn his loss. Deceased was a member of St. Joseph's R.C. Church, Jersey City, and was also a member of the Erie Railroad Athletic Association. He was fifty-one years of age. The funeral was held from his late residence, and was followed by a solemn mass at St. Joseph's R.C. Church. The body was taken to Port Jervis for burial.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CLARENCE C. BYHAM
The Meadville Messenger announces the death from pneumonia of Clarence C. Byham, employed as brakeman on the Erie. Deceased was 22 years of age, and, after working in the local office of the Erie at Meadville station, entered the train service. He was a graduate of the Meadville High school and the Commercial college, and was a member of the Park Avenue Presbyterian church, Meadville Circle No. 44, P.H.C., and Hope Hose company No. 2. He is survived by his parents and two brothers.




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN J. CALLAHAN
He was a private in Company B, ll2th Infantry, and enlisted April 7, 1917. He was sent to Camp Hancock for training, and died there. Before entering the service of his country he was employed on the Meadville division as brakeman. He was the son of Mrs. R.H. Miller, of Meadville.

Also:
Word has been received from Mrs. R.H. Miller, Meadville, Pa., that her son, John J. Callahan, died of disease while at Camp Hancock several weeks ago. After quitting the Erie, which employed him as brakeman on the Meadville division, he enlisted in Company B, 112th Infantry, April 7, 1917, and was in training at the time of his death.




From the June, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

GEORGE CAMBISI
The Evening Transcript, Susquehanna, Pa., announces the death of George Cambisi, an Italian, employed in the Erie railroad shops of that city, the cause being pneumonia. The disease waa preceded by influenza, and the victim was removed to Barnes hospital, where he died. He had been ill but five days. He is survived by his widow and two children.




From the June, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES CANFIELD
The death notice of James Canfield appeared in the Port Jervis, N. Y. Tri-States Union. He went to Huntingdon, Ind., early in life, and for many years was a passenger conductor on the Chicago & Erie division.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

LEO CAYTON
The Jersey Journal reports the death in action in France of Leo Cayton, a member of Company L, 309th Infantry, November 1 (1919) last. He was drafted April 4, 1918, and sent to Camp Dix, then to France a month later. He was a resident of Jersey City, and was employed as pipefitter by the Erie. He was 28 years of age.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

DUDLEY M. CEASE
The Salamanca Republican-Press reports the killing of Dudley M. Cease, an Erie railroad freight conductor, by a train in the Salamanca yard on the evening of November 11 (1918).

The body was found by Bert Furman, another Erie employe, and it is supposed that he stepped in front of a backing train, the wheels of which severed his body in twain.

Deceased is survived by his mother and two brothers, the former residing in Meadville.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

TONY CHAGABOPOOLOS
The Meadville, Pa., Messenger reports the death of Tony Chagabapoolos at Spencer hospital. He was employed in an Erie railroad section gang, and is survived by his widow and five children, who are in Greece. He was 37 years of age.




From the May, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOSEPH CURRAN CHAPIN
News has been received that Joseph Curran Chapin, a member of the Meadville Apprentice Association, was killed in action in France on March 24, 1918. Young Chapin was a volunteer in the Eighth Canadian Machine Gun Troop, which he joined in November last. He was the first soldier to leave Meadville and the first reported killed.

The members of the association to which he belonged passed resolutions of condolence, and presented copies to relatives of deceased and to the daily papers. The resolutions were signed by A. R. Miller, J. E. Owens, J. Hohenstein, E. H. Eastman. H. E. Gulick, H. A. Craig and F. G. De Saussure.




From the June, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

GEORGE R. CHIVERS
At his home in Hornell, N.Y., George R. Chivers, an Erie railroad engineer, passed away.

Mr. Chivers was born in England and came to this country when a child. He was a Mason. He entered the Erie's service in 1891 as fireman on the Allegheny division. In 1900 he was appointed hostler in Hornell yard, and in 1902 assigned to freight service. In the same year he was assigned to passenger service, and again in the. same year was assigned back to freight service, and later was promoted to passenger engineer.




From the April, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

GEORGE H. CLARK
After a period of twenty-five years in the service of the Erie railroad, George H. Clark, conductor, passed away recently at his home in Matamoras, Pa., at the age of forty-five years.

Mr. Clark entered the employ of the Erie railroad in 1892 as freight brakeman, and in 1905 was promoted to conductor, which position he held at the time of his death. He was a member of Neversink Division, No. 52, Order of Railway Conductors; Milford Lodge of Masons and Epworth M. E. Church of Matamoras.




JAMES COAKLEY

James Coakley


From the April and May, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
(April) James Coakley, who died February 13 (1918), at the age of 78, had been in the Erie service since 1856, giving him a record of sixty-two years in the service.

Mr. Coakley was born in Ireland in 1840, and came to America with his mother and to Waverly, NY, where at the age of 16 he took employment with the Erie as water-boy in the fence gang, but soon joined the telegraph repair force, remaining in that capacity until April, 1911, when he became a crossing watchman, where he stayed until his death.

"Mr. Coakley was always very active," says C.E. Stickels, Supervisor of Crossings, Owego, NY, "never shirking any task, and was always ready and willing any time day or night for duty. He was as honest as the day was long, and there was no better citizen to be found. He was respected by all who knew him, and as well known on the Suequehanna Division as any man that ever worked there, and had a clear record for all of his 62 years with the company. I believe that this record for continuous service will beat anything of the kind in the United States."

(May) In last month's number we printed an obituary notice of James Coakley, crossing watchman, Susquehanna division, same appearing under the caption "Sixty-two Years in the Erie Service."

As this veteran had served the company so long it was intended to print his picture with his death notice, but the photograph furnished was so dim that it could not be satisfactorily reproduced, so we were obliged to wait until a better photograph could be obtained. This explains the delay.




From the January, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

TIMOTHY W. COLLINS
Tbe death of Timothy W. Collins, who had been in the employ of the Erie for twenty-eight years, is reported in the Kane, Pa., Republican. The report says that Mr. Collins died of pneumonia, following an attack of influenza, at his home in Cattaraugus, N.Y. He had been station agent of the Erie at Bradford and Mount Jewett, Pa., and resigned from the former position recently to engage in business in Cattaraugus. His age was 47, and he is survived by his widow and three children.




From the May, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

EUGENE CONNELLY
The death of Eugene Connelly, a former Erie railroad telegrapher, was reported in the Port Jervis Gazette. Investigation elicited the information that Mr. Connelly was employed on the Delaware Division about 25 years, and the last work he performed was in the train dispatcher’s office, Jersey City. His death occurred in New York City.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

THOMAS CONNOLLY
Announcement is made in the Port Jervis Gazette of the death at Rutherford, N. J., of Thomas Connolly, a former resident of Port Jervis, and foreman in the blacksmith shop of the Erie in that city.

Mr. Connolly died of a complication of diseases at his home in Rutherford, N.J. He is survived by his widow, two sons, now in the service of their country in France, and two daughters. The burial took place in St. Mary's cemetery, Port Jervis.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES COOPER
The Port Jervis Gazette reports the death of James Cooper, an employe of the Erie railroad shops in that city, which occurred after one week's illness. He was born in Pond Eddy, Pa., and had spent most of his life there. He had come to work for the Erie a few months ago. He is survived by his widow, four daughters and two brothers.




From the April, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

AMOS S. CRANE
At his home in Weston, Mass., Amos Crane died recently at an advanced age. Mr. Crane for eight years had been freight traffic manager of the Boston & Maine railroad, and had once served as export agent. He entered railroad life in 1877 as contracting freight agent of the Erie railroad at Chicago, and later was transferred to Boston as New England agent.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN CROWLEY
A notice of the death of John Crowley, the seventeen-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. D.J. Crowley, who was employed by the Erie railroad as operator at Susquehanna, appeared in the Sullivan County Democrat, Callicoon, N.Y. One week before he died young Crowley became ill of pneumonia. John Crowley was one of the cleanest, most honorable and ambitious boys in Callicoon, and his early taking away is mourned by a wide circle of friends.




From the May, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES C. CURLEY
After serving the Erie railroad well and faithfully for fifty-six years, James C. Curley, called "Uncle Jim" by his friends, has passed to his long reward, at the age of 84 years. Mr. Curley worked up to within three weeks of his death. He died at the home of his daughter at Glen Rock, N.J.

In 1863 he was appointed foreman of plumbers and tinsmiths over the New York division, maintenance of way forces. He continued in this position until 1914, when, as a result of injuries, he was appointed inspector of engine water stations on the New York division, and performed duty faithfully in all sorts of weather.

Mr. Curley's fund of anecdote was remarkable, and his recitals of happenings on the Erie were intensely interesting. On account of his long service with the Erie, he was selected to hoist the American flag on the high pole erected last fall by the company's employes at Paterson, N.J.

Mr. Curley was one of the oldest employes on the roster of the Erie railroad. His loss is felt by a large circle of men who for years served beside him.




From the January, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

GEORGE DAILEY
George Dailey, aged fifty, thirteen years ago a valued employe of the Hornell shops, is reported in the Hornell Tribune as having died at Breckenridge, Minn., following a brief illness. Mrs. Dailey had previously died at Breckenridge. He was a member of Evening Star Lodge, No. 44, F. and A. M., and is survived by one son, who is in the service of his country in the army.




From the April, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHARLES DANNHAUER
After a continuous service of fifty-one years with the Erie railroad, in whose Mechanical department he was employed, Charles Dannhauer has passed away.

Deceased was born in Alsace, France; came to this country in 1863, and entered the employ of the Erie in 1865 as machinist in the Port Jervis shops. In 1884 he was transferred to Huntington shops, and employed as machinist there up to the time he was pensioned, which was in 1915.

The body was brought to Port Jervis for burial. Mr. Dannhauer was a member of Port Jervis Lodge No. 328, F. and A. M.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CLARENCE DECKER
The Port Jervis Gazette announces the death of Clarence Decker in that city after a brief illness. He was a trainman in the service of the Erie railroad, and had resided in Port Jervis but a short period. He is survived by his mother, several brothers and sisters.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

HARRY DECKER
The Port Jervis Gazette announces the death of Harry Decker, which occurred at his home, Matamoras, Pa. He was 28 years of age, and employed as trainman by the Erie railroad. The burial was at Lackawaxen, Pa. He was a member of the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen. The surviving relatives are his widow, a son, his mother, two brothers and a sister.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

LAFAYETTE DERBY
Lafayette Derby, a retired accountant who had been in the Erie's Meadville Freight Office for thirty years, has passed away. He was a veteran of the Civil War in one of the famous Bucktail regiments, a good citizen, and was respected by all who knew him.




From the January, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ADRIAN DeWILTON
A report of the death of Adrian DeWilton appeared in the Hornell Times, and the cause was given as pneumonia, following an attack of influenza. Mr. DeWilton, at the time he died, was employed in the Ordinance department, Washington, D.C. He was 35 years of age. For many years previous to his entering the government service he had been employed in the freight office of the Erie at Hornell, and later was station agent at Canisteo. He was a member of the Evening Star Lodge, No. 44, F. & A. M. Besides his mother he is survived by three brothers and two sisters.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

J.J. DONOVAN
The death of J. J. Donovan, chief clerk in the office of the agent, Long Dock, Jersey City, is announced by that department as having occurred at the City Hospital, that city.

Deceased had been in the employ of the Erie railroad for about thirty years, always in the agent's office, Long Dock, and rose to be chief clerk, which position he held for a long time. After being taken ill he was transferred from his home to the hospital, and died in two day thereafter of double pneumonia. He is survived by his widow and three daughters. The funeral took place at his late home, thence to St. Patrick's Church, where a requiem high mass was held. It was attended by a delegation of employes from the agent's office, who contributed a large floral piece. The burial took place in Holy Cross cemetery.

Mr. Donovan's long association with his office brought him in touch with many shippers, with whom, as well as his associates, he was held in high esteem.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM W. DORR
The columns of the Port Jervis, N.Y., Union contained the announcement of the death of William W. Dorr, which occurred at Danbury, Conn. Mr. Dorr was for many years a telegraph operator on the Erie railroad at Port Jervis, Middletown and other points. He had also been in the employ of the Central New England railroad at Danbury.

Deceased was born in Port Jervis, and came of a family long identified with the Erie railroad. He was held in high esteem by his associates all along the line.




From the May, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

EMMILLIIOUS R. DUNN
An account of the death of Emmillious R. Dunn, one of the oldest freight conductors on the New York division of the Erie, appears in the Port Jervis Gazette. He had been in the train service since 1857, first as brakeman on the Delaware division, and then conductor on the New York division.




From the March, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN P. ECKERT
Another veteran of the Erie service passed away recently when John P. Eckert, passenger conductor, went to his long reward. He died at St. Bernard's hospital, Chicago, after undergoing an operation for a growth on his neck.

Mr. Eckert had passed his sixty-eighth birthday, and had spent most of his life in Meadville. Last August he celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of his connection with the Erie and the old Atlantic & Great Western, now a part of the Erie. After filling many minor positions he was promoted to passenger conductor in 1875, and served as such until his death. His was a generous nature and he never refused aid to those he knew to be in distress.

He was a member of St. Agatha's R.C. Church, and a member of the Order of Railway Conductors. He is survived by two sons, four daughters and several relatives.




From the March, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WALTER ELLIS
The Port Jervis Union printed a report of the death of Walter Ellis, employed as freight conductor by the Erie, the cause of which was believed to have been acute indigestion. It occurred at a time when he was on duty, and as his train was entering the tunnel at Otisville, N.Y. He was 62 years of age and was of English birth. He came to Port Jervis when a young man, and had since been in the service of the Erie. He was a member of the Reformed church, the Dutch Arms, Port Jervis Lodge No. 828, F. & A. M.; Division 62, 0.R.C. of Port Jervis, and the Railroad Square club of Jersey City. He is survived by his widow, five daughters, one sister and one brother.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

HARRY H. EMERSON
The Galion, Ohio, Inquirer makes mention of the death of Harry Harrison Emerson, who was a victim of influenza, after an illness of about one week. Deceased was 38 years of age. He came to Galion nine years ago, and entered the employ of the Erie railroad. When the headquarters of the Kent division were removed to Marion he moved to that city, where he afterwards lived and died. He is survived by his widow, a son and mother.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHARLES ERICKSON
Charles Erickson, a native of Susquehanna, Pa., and a blacksmith employed in the shops of the Erie railroad at Hornell, N.Y., is reported in the Evening Transcript, Susquehanna, as having died in Hornell in the early part of last month of Spanish influenza, after an illness of but a few days.

Mr. Erickson was thirty-two years old, and had visited his father in Susquehanna just before being prostrated.




From the June, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

SAMUEL B. ERMY
Reported dead in France. He was 26 years old and a native of Italy. He entered the Erie's employ in 1913, and was a boilermaker in Hornell shops when he entered the service of the United States. On Feb. 26, 1918, he entrained for Camp Upton, and went overseas about March 20 of the same year. His command was the 307th infantry, 77th division, and he was a private in Company R.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHARLES FIELDER
The Port Jervis Union reports the death of Charles Fielder, employed by the Erie railroad as crossing watchman at Ramapo, N.Y. The cause given was that he was struck and killed by a westbound passenger train on the night of November 1 (1918). He was 60 years of age.




From the January, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

FREDERICK L. FITZGERALD
Recorded in the Ravena, 0., Democrat is the death of Frederick L. Fitzgerald, an employee of the Erie in the Kent, 0., upper yard. Mr. Fitzgerald was a victim of pneumonia which was preceded by an attack of influenza. He was unmarried. Delegates from several orders in which deceased held membership attended the funeral. Burial was in Standing Rock cemetery.




From the March, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MICHAEL FLANNERY
Another death that has taken from the Erie an old faithful, was that of Michael Flannery, passenger conductor on the Allegheny division, who passed away recently at Salamanca, N.Y.

Mr. Flannery was born in 1864, and entered the service of the Erie in 1882, in the freight train service. He was promoted to conductor in 1885, and to passenger conductor in 1892. During his entire service of over thirty-five years his record was entirely clear.

He ran trains 3 and 4 between Salamanca and Jersey City, and was about to report for the conductorship of trains 13 and 14, when he was stricken with the illness that proved fatal.




From the June, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ALEXANDER FORBES
The Corning, N.Y., Leader, published an account of the death of Alexander Forbes, who for many years had been an engineer in the employ of the Erie railroad.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN H. FORTNER
The Evening Transcript, Susquehanna, Pa, reports the death of John H. Fortner, an Erie railroad police officer, which occurred at Susquehanna. Officer Fortner, who was the successor of the late Anthony Griffin, was the victim of an attack of pneumonia which carried him away after a few days' illness. Deceased was the son of John Fortner, of Windsor, N.Y., to which place the body was sent.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

BYRON FRISBIE
The Tribune Times, Homell, N.Y., announces the death of Byron Frisbie at his summer home, Conesus Lake. Mr. Frisbie died of gangrene poisoning after a lingering illness. He had been in business in Hornell for years, and about one year ago entered the employ of the Erie railroad, and remained until his health became so impaired that he was obliged to quit. He was among the best known of Hornell's citizens, and at one time had been an ardent worker in the Salvation Army. He is survived by his widow and three step-children.




From the June, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

BENJAMIN D. GASKILL
The Corning, N. Y., Leader, announces the death of Benjamin D. Gaskill, an Erie railroad freight conductor, same taking place at the Corning hospital as a result of apoplexy.




From the January, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

AUGUSTUS GERHART
An account of the death of Augustus Gerhart appeared in the Marion, 0., Star. It is said he died of hardening of the arteries, after an illness of several months. Previous to ten years ago Mr. Gerhart was an engine dispatcher employed by the Erie railroad at Galion, 0., and quit the company's service when be was elected sheriff of Crawford county, which office he held for two terms. He was about 62 years of age, and leaves his widow and two daughters. Click here for more information.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

HARRY GINSBERG
Before entering the service of his country as an enlisted man, Harry Ginsberg was employed as special claim agent of the Erie railroad at Buffalo, N.Y. He entered the service in August, 1918, and died of pneumonia at a camp in Syracuse, N.Y., one month after he had been sent there.



Also:

HARRY GINSBERG—W. S. Throop, claims attorney for the Erie railroad, reports the death of Harry Ginsberg, who, previous to entering the service of his country, was employed by the Erie as special claim agent, Buffalo, N. Y.

Mr. Ginsberg died in camp. His home was in Elmira, N.Y., and he was a graduate of Elmira Free Academy and the law school of Cornell University. He had been engaged in the practice of law in Buffalo before entering the service of the Erie. He is survived by his mother, four brothers and a sister, three of the former being in the military service of this country. He enlisted in August, 1918, and was sent to a camp at Syracuse, N. Y., where he died a month later of pneumonia.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

FRANK GLEASON
The Goshen, N.Y. Independent Republican reports the death of Frank Gleason, employed by the Erie railroad as machinist's helper in the Port Jervis shops. The report says the boy was 16 years of age, and he was the victim of an accident at the Pike street crossing, Port Jervis, where he was struck and instantly killed by a motor car, in front of which he stepped from behind a locomotive.



Also:
Friday, December 13 (1918), was surely an unlucky day. A general gloom was cast over the (Port Jervis) shop when Machinist Apprentice Frank Gleason was struck by inspection motor car No. 51. Young Gleason, who was a very promising apprentice, was on his way from lunch, but in some unaccountable manner he was on the main track when the accident occurred. The ties were icy, and, crossing behind a switch engine on a lead, he failed to notice the motor car until it was too late to avoid being struck. The car knocked him down and dragged him beneath, killing him instantly. The sympathy of Gleason's fellow workers is extended to his relatives and friends.




From the May, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

THOMAS GOFF
A report of the death of Thomas Goff, an Erie railroad conductor, appeared in the Elmira (N.Y.) Herald. Conductor Goff was a former resident of Elmira, and died in Scranton, Pa.




From the August, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JACOB LOWMAN GREATSINGER
Railroad life lost one of its best-known representatives when Jacob Lowman Greatsinger passed away last month at his home in Elmira, N.Y., from arterio-sclerosis at the age of 67.

Mr. Greatsinger began his career on the Erie railroad. After graduating from the Elmira Free Academy he sought a position as fireman, and was assigned to a switch engine. After a period of service with the Erie he resigned and went elsewhere, although he always kept closely in touch with the old Erie and its officials. Like many others he returned to the Erie, and became president of the Elmira, Corning & Waverly electric railroad. Mr. Greatsinger was also president of the Duluth & Iron Range railroad, and later became president of the Brooklyn Rapid Transit railroad when Clinton L. Rossiter resigned. He made an enviable record for himself as president of the latter corporation, and. resigned in 1903 when ill health compelled it. Then he returned to his home in Elmira.

Mr. Greatsinger was a frequent visitor at Erie headquarters, 50 Church street. He had many friends among the officials. While in Brooklyn Mr. Greatsinger made his home on Columbia Heights, and was a member of the Metropolitan, Brooklyn, Crescent, Athletic, Hamilton and Riding and Driving clubs.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MAX A. GREENE
The Susquehanna Transcript reports the death of Max A. Greene, he having been killed in action the day before the war ended. He was about 28 years of age, and had reached the rank of sergeant. He was employed as yard brakeman by the Erie in the Susquehanna yard since August, 1917.




From the May, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM H. GRIFFITH
The Rochester Democrat contained an account of the death of William H. Griffith, who was over seventy years old. Mr. Griffith learned telegraphy on the Erie, and for a number of years was train dispatcher at Avon, N.Y., and was later station agent at Avon for a quarter of a century.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM GROSSMAN
The Susquehanna Transcript reports the death in action at the front of William Grossman, who was, previous to his entering the service of his country, employed as trainman on the Erie, and resided at Susquehanna. The killing of this young soldier occurred shortly before the war ended.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CORPORAL ROBERT S. GRUNDEN
Word has been received from the superintendent of the Marion division to the effect that Robert S. Grunden, a corporal in the 166th U. S. Infantry (Rainbow Division), died on Oct. 8, 1618, of wounds received in battle October 1. He was a student clerk at Ohio City, under Erie Agent Harriman at the time of his enlistment during the Mexican trouble, and was with General Pershing. After the demobilization he was again called to the colors at the outbreak of the late war, and was in France since September, 1917. He had been gassed and wounded, and had been over the top several times. He was 21 years old at the time of his death.




CHARLES HACKAMEYER

Charles Hackameyer


From the May, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
There is sorrow among the employes of the Erie's Northside machine shop, Jersey City, on account of the death of Charles Hackameyer, a real veteran of the Mechanical dcpartment. He was among the eldest employe, and though ill worked loyally almost to the day when he passed away. He was one of the hale and hearty type of men who never flinched, and his good-natured smile was of the kind that offered encouragement to his fellow workers when the sun shone brightest or when skies were darkest.

During the half century that he labored for the Erie he counted all as his friends and no one his enemy. He was a faithful worker and as steady as a clock.

He was a skillful mechanic and operated two planers simultaneously thereby showing others what a man can do if willing and has the ability.

Mr. Hackameyer left his widow, one daughter and two sons, one of whom is a machinist employed in the same shop where his father served so long and energetically. The funeral was conducted at his late home, Paterson, N.J., and was attended by his shopmates in a body. They contributed a beautiful floral offering. The burial was in Cedar Lawn Cemetery.

Mr. Hackameyer began his service with the Erie in 1869.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

EDWARD HAMSLER
The Tribune Times, Hornell, N.Y., announces the death of Edward Hamsler, who died in that city of pneumonia following an attack of influenza. He was an employe of the Erie railroad machine shops; is survived by his widow, two daughters, one son, his parents and a sister.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

GEORGE HARGET
Information has been received from Meadville, Pa., to the effect that George Harget, an electrician in the employ of the Erie railroad, and attached to the U. S. Ambulance corps, was killed while in the performance of duty at the battle of Chateau-Thierry. He was a member of Company B, 112th Regiment.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

GUY HARRIS
Announcement is made in the Evening Tribune-Times, Hornell, N.Y., of the death of Guy Harris, an engineer on the Erie's Allegheny division, who succumbed to pneumonia, the result of an attack of Spanish influenza. Engineer Harris died in the St. James Mercy hospital.

Deceased came to Hornell about nine years ago, and had been in the employ of the Erie elsewhere. He was found on the floor of his bathroom in an unconscious condition and was quickly hurried to the hospital. He leaves his widow and a brother, now in the service of his country in France. He was thirty-nine years old.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN B. HASSETT
The Binghamton Republican reports the death of John B. Hassett, a foreman of the Erie shops at Susquehanna, Pa. Deceased was a brother-in-law of Corporation Counsel John J. Irving, of Binghamton.




From the January, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES E. HATHEWAY
While engaged in his work away from home James E. Hatheway, employed as a conductor by the Erie railroad, and whose home was in Meadville, Pa., was stricken with illness which finally developed pneumonia, resulting fatally. He was 28 years of age, and for a long time had been in charge of a work train at Kent, 0., in which city be died. He is survived by his widow and two children. He was a member of the Loyal Order of Moose in Albion, also of the Eagles, and Dunbar Lodge No. 142, B. of R. T. Burial was in Meadville. The report of his death appeared in the Meadville Messenger.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES FRANCIS HEFFERMAN
James F. Hefferman, who previous to entering the naval service was employed as extra station agent on the Greenwood Lake division of the Erie railroad, died September 30 at St. Mary's hospital, Brooklyn, N.Y., after an illness of ten days, a victim of influenza.

Young Hefferman resided at West Orange, N.J., with his widowed mother. The funeral took place from St. John's R.C. Church, Orange, and was attended by a detachment from the Brooklyn navy yard, at which place deceased was stationed.

Master Hefferman was a son of James J. Hefferman, who had been in the employ of the Erie for twenty-eight years, and who was a conductor on the Greenwood Lake division at the time of his death. At that time the Erie began placing women on the ferries as ticket sellers, and Mrs. Hefferman was the first one chosen.

About a year and a half ago the son enlisted in the navy, and was gunner on a transport, having made one trip to France.

John Hefferman, an Erie conductor and an uncle of the dead boy, asked to have the following printed in appreciation of the service rendered by the escort from the Brooklyn navy yard:

"On behalf of his family we desire to express our thanks to Chief Yeoman Bascomb for his kindness in providing a military escort and honors for the ceremonies of burial."




From the January, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ROBERT L. HICKOK
A brief account of the death of Robert L. Hickok, employed by the Erie as conductor and running on the Delaware division, was reported in the Goshen, N.Y., Independent. Deceased was in his 80th year, and before joining the Erie family was employed on the D. & H canal. He had been a conductor on the Erie for twenty-four years, and was retired twenty-five years ago.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MICHAEL HIPP
The Port Jervis, N.Y. Gazette published a notice of the death of Michael Hipp, who succumbed to an attack of pneumonia at his home in that city. He was 34 years of age and had been a resident of Port Jervis for thirteen years.

Since arriving in this country from Austria he had been employed in the Erie's Port Jervis shops, and was held in high esteem by his fellow employes. A pathetic incident in connection with Mr. Hipp's death was that his wife died at about the same time. A double funeral was the result. The couple are survived by three small children.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

FRANK HISTED
Announcement was made in the Susquehanna. Pa., Transcript of the death of Frank Histed, an engineer in the employ of the Erie railroad. Engineer Histed died at his home near Susquehanna of pneumonia.




From the August, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHARLES H. HODGES
Charles H. Hodges, for four years employed in the Freight Claim department of the Erie railroad and seven years in the office of auditor of freight accounts, died recently at his home, Hawthorne, N.J. at the age of 51 years.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MISS MARY HOGAN
The Rochester, N.Y., Democrat announces the death of Miss Mary Hogan, ticket agent of the Erie railroad at Avon, N.Y., after a short illness of pneumonia, which had been preceded by an attack of Spanish influenza.

Miss Hogan who was 25 years of age, was a graduate of the Rochester Business Institute, and had been employed in the office of the Avon Electric Company previous to entering the employ of the Erie railroad. She is survived by her mother, a brother and sister.




From the September, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

R. M. HOOPER
The Paterson (N. J.) Press-Guardian published a death notice of Renaldo M. Hooper, who died at his home in Hawthorne, N.J. Mr. Hooper entered the service of the Erie railroad in 1888 in the capacity of painter, and was later made assistant foreman. He was at Marion, N. J., when the shops were located there.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHARLES D. HOWES
News of the death of Charles D. Howes, for more than forty years an employe of the Freight department of the Erie railroad at Rochester, N.Y., has been received. Mr. Howes was an old resident of Rochester's Thirteenth ward, and a well known and respected citizen of that city. He leaves his widow, a niece and three nephews. He was a life member of Rochester Lodge, No. 660, F. and A. M.




From the January, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHRISTIAN S. HULSHIZER
A death reported in the Port Jervis Gazette was that of Christian S. Hulshizer, who had been a resident of that city for over fifty years, and was 82 years of age. For many years he was employed as locomotive engineer by the Erie, and relinquished duty only when compelled to do so on account of ill health. He was a veteran of the civil war, and returned to his work as engineer at its conclusion. He had always been attached to the Delaware division. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity, and is survived by his widow, a sister and several nephews and nieces.




From the April, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES A. HUTCHINGS
Word has been received from an officer of the 414th Telegraph & Signal Battalion in France, of the death from bronchial pneumonia of James A. Hutchings. The end came September 8, 1918, at the American hospital, Briey. Hutchings held the rank of sergeant. Before enlistment he was employed as signal foreman on the Meadville division. He leaves his mother, who resides in Binghamton, N.Y.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

STEPHEN INGRAM
Stephen Ingram, a former locomotive engineer in the employ of the Erie, is reported in the Goshen, N.Y., Democrat as having died in Albany, but no facts are included beyond that he was a former resident of Port Jervis, N.Y.




From the June, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILBUR IRICK
Reported killed in action at Le Catlet, France, Sept. 28, 1919 (sic), while a private with Company K, 108th Regiment, 27th division. He was 20 years old, and entered the Erie service as machinist apprentice in Hornell shops, and continued as such until the time of his enlistment.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

FREDERICK JACKSON
When an Erie railroad train reached Elmira on a recent date Frederick Jackson, Pullman car porter, was removed on account of illness and taken to St. James Mercy hospital. It developed that the patient was suffering from pneumonia, which resulted fatally. Deceased was a resident of Jersey City, to which city his remains were taken.




From the March, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

DANIEL KEEFE
Pneumonia claimed another Erie veteran when Daniel Keefc died recently at the age of 70, after rendering the Erie and the old Atlantic & Great Western loyal service for half a century. Mr. Keefe, who was an old resident of Meadville, passed away at Spencer hospital, that city.

He was an Irishman, and at the age of 20 entered the employ of the Atlantic & Great Western, for a long period filling the position of storekeeper and later was a foreman. He was affectionately known as "Uncle Dan" on account of his sunny nature and had a host of friends.

Deceased was a member of St. Bridgid's R.C. Church and the C.M.B.A. He is survived by two sons.




From the September, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHARLES JOSEPH KERR
While sitting at his desk in the Erie's Buffalo Lake office on a recent morning, Charles Joseph Kerr, who had been employed as accountant for twenty-five years, died suddenly of apoplexy.

Mr. Kerr was apparently in good health when he left home, and stopped to attend to other business before going to the office. Deceased was a native of Fredericton, N.B., and was graduated from the New Brunswick University. He was a member of the First Christian church and the Masonic fraternity. He was 73 years of age.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

EDWARD E. KERWIN
A recent death that will recall to the minds of the older employes of the New York division the days of long ago is that of Edward E. Kerwin, who was employed as water boy on a track gang that worked in the vicinity of Turner (Harriman), N. Y., and later in life rose to be one of this country's well-known railroad officials.

Reference is made to Edward E. Kerwin, who at the time of his demise was vice-president of the Virginia railway, with headquarters at Norfolk, Va. Mr. Kerwin entered the service of the Erie, then New York, Lake Erie & Western, at Turner, first as water boy and later track laborer in a section gang. He held these positions for twelve years, and then learned telegraphy at Highland Mills on the Newburgh short-cut, and also became station agent.

From the Erie he went to the West Shore road, and held similar positions. In 1885 he went to the Union Pacific as operator, and later joined the forces of the CM & St. P., also as operator and station agent, on the Council Bluffs division. He was next found on the Chicago Great Western, as operator, Station agent and train dispatcher. From March, 1890, to June, 1892, he was in the employ of the Iowa Central, first as train dispatcher for two years and then chief dispatcher for two years, later becoming trainmaster for eight years. In June, 1902, he was appointed trainmaster of the Central Railroad of New Jersey, and in the following October was promoted to be superintendent of that company's Central and Lehigh & Susquehanna divisions. In February, 1914, he quit the service of the Central and went with the Minneapolis & St. Louis, as general superintendent at Minneapolis, Minn., later being made superintendent at Watertown, S. D. Since March, 1917, he served as vice-president of the Virginia railway at Norfolk, Va.

Mr. Kerwin's death occurred in a New York hotel while in that city on business.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WYMAN F. KNAPP
Announcement is made of the death of Wyman F. Knapp, for many years an engineer on the Delaware and Wyoming divisions of the Erie railroad, which occurred at Port Jervis, N.Y.

Engineer Knapp entered the service as fireman, and later was promoted to engineer. He was a member of W.C. Hayes Division, No. 732 B. of L. E., also of the board of deacons of the First Baptist church, and for many years a member of the board of directors of the Port Jervis Y.M.C.A. He was a man of high ideals and respected in the community in which he resided so long.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

LEONARD LA BEUR
The Daily News, Passaic, N. J., reported the death of Leonard La Beur, a night yardmaster of the Erie railroad in Jersey City, at his home, Garfield, N.J. He was the victim of pneumonia, an attack of which confined him to his home for two weeks.

Mr. La Beur was 26 years of age and a life resident of Garfield, where he was well and favorably known. He is survived by his widow, three small children and his father. The burial was at Lodi.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

EUGENE LARRABEE
The Scranton Republican reports the death by drowning of Eugene Larrabee, employed nights at the Erie railroad terminal, Susquehanna, Pa. He was 50 years old.

The report states that Larrabee was one of a party of three who went fishing in Comfort's pond. His companions left the boat to prepare dinner at a nearby house, he remaining behind. On their return they found the boat upturned and his hat floating on the surface of the pond. Later they found his body near where the accident happened. He is survived by his widow, one son and two daughters.




From the January, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

GLENN A. LLOYD
A report of the death of Glenn A. Lloyd, who, before entering the service of his country was employed as brakeman by the Erie railroad, appeared in the Scranton Republican, and it was stated that he was killed in action on September 28 (1918). He was a member of Company B, 316th Infantry, and left Wayne county with the draft contingent of May 28 after receiving his military training at Camp Meade. He departed on July 8 for France. He was a resident of Preston Centre, and was 22 years of age. He is survived by his widow, mother, two brothers and two sisters.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

VICTOR LOTH
The Jersey Journal, Jersey City, N. J., printed an announcement of the death of Victor Loth, who was a resident of that city. He was drafted into the army service September 4, 1918, and was stationed at Camp Humphreys, Va.

While on furlough visiting his home he was taken ill and pneumonia developed, which resulted in his death. He was buried in Flower Hill cemetery, North Hudson, N.J.

Private Loth was 22 years old and was born in the Hudson City section of Jersey City. He was a graduate of public school Number 26 and was employed as clerk by the Erie railroad in Jersey City.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

GEORGE HAMILTON LUCKEY
An account of the death of George Hamilton Luckey, employed as switchman by the Erie railroad, was printed in the Port Jervis, N.Y., Gazette.

Switchman Luckey died of bronchial pneumonia after an illness of ten days. He was 28 years old. Deceased was born in Port Jervis and had always resided there. He had been for several years a switchman in the Port Jervis yard, and had recently filled the position of tower gateman at Pike street crossing. He was a member of Neversink Lodge, number 235, Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen and the Brotherhood of All Railway Employes. He is survived by his mother, one brother and one sister.




From the June, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES E. MARCH
Among the deaths of prominent persons who were identified in a way with the Erie railroad was that of James E. March, who in his early youth became an usher in the Erie's employ when that position was still in existence.

Mr. March was of Italian birth, and his real name was Antonio Maggio, but for reasons of his own he had it changed to March.

He was promoted from one position to another until he finally became labor contractor for the entire Erie railroad system. As Italians were rapidly emigrating to the United States, he was able to employ hundreds of thousands of them, and furnished the Erie with all that were required to carry on laboring work. He wielded great influence with his fellow-countrymen, and, through his fair treatment of them, obtained faithful service.

The aforesaid influence carried Mr. March high into Republican political circles, until be became the recognized leader of his people. As he became associated with the most prominent political lights in this country, his influence grew stronger. He is credited with being to a large extent responsible for the establishment of the Columbus Day holiday. He was in possession of the pen with which Governor Odell signed the bill making that holiday legal.

Mr. March died of pneumonia, and is survived by three sons and three daughters.





From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOSEPH MASCANZ
He was a member of Company A, 309th Infantry, and after enlisting was sent to Camp Dix, after which he went overseas, and died in France of disease on October 21, 1918. He was buried in the American cemetery at Chaumont, Haut Marne. He was 28 years old, a native of Italy, and was a citizen of that country. He was employed at Port Jervis, N.Y.

Also:
The death of Joseph Mascanz, an employee of Port Jervis, was reported in the Port Jervis Gazette. Although an alien, he enlisted to satisfy his desire to fight for Uncle Sam. He was sent to Camp Dix, and later went overseas with the 309th In­fantry, and was a member of Company A. He died of disease October 21, 1918, and was buried in the American cemetery at Chaumont, Haut-Marne, France. He was a native of Italy and came of a family of distinguished musicians, he having inherited the gift from his father, and was regarded as a musical genius. He had no living relatives as far as is known. He was 28 years of age.




From the June, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHARLES J. MATSON
Another veteran Erie railroad man is dead. Charles J. Matson died suddenly at his home in Meadville. Deceased was for many years a conductor on the Meadville division, and gained his first experience on the old Atlantic & Great Western. In 1875, he was a passenger conductor. In 1901 he was changed to freight conductor and extra passenger conductor. He ran on the Franklin branch. In March, 1905, he was retired from active service on account of old age and given a pension.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

GUSTAV MAUERMAN
A report in the Youngstown Vindicator is to the effect that Gustav Mauerman, employed by the Erie as target man at the roundhouse, died of pneumonia after a brief illness at the age of 65 years.

Since coming from Germany thirty-eight years ago Mr. Mauerman resided in Youngstown. He is survived by his widow, eight sons, three of whom are in Uncle Sam's army, and one daughter.




From the January, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MATTHEW J. MAY
Among the Erie employes who have passed to the Great Beyond was Matthew J. May, who was one of the oldest clerks employed in the office of H. C. Barlow, freight claim adjuster of the Erie railroad. He was known among the faithfuls as "Matt" and was one of the reliable men in the busy office where he worked. Of a quiet and unassuming nature, Mr. May was a typical New Yorker, and resided in the old Ninth ward, where he was born and raised. His loyalty to duty was one of his strong traits, and when taken ill he remained on duty until the day before he died.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN B. McCALL
An account of the death of John B. Mc-Call, a former telegraph operator on the Erie railroad, and later a train dispatcher on the old Midland railroad, now the Greenwood Lake division of the Erie, has been received. Mr. McCall died recently in Buffalo, and his remains were brought to Oxford, N. Y., for burial.

Deceased was a telegrapher in the Jersey City office of the Erie in 1870, and up to 1872. He resigned to accept the position of dispatcher on the New Jersey Midland, of which the late C. W. Douglas was superintendent. Later he became identified with the New York & Oswego Midland at Norwich, N.Y., and again was train dispatcher. From that road he went to the Lehigh Valley at Tonawanda as train dispatcher.

When that road was extended to Buffalo he was made chief train dispatcher. He had been in the service of the Lehigh Valley for upward of forty years, or up to the time of his death.

Mr. McCall was a worker in the Y. M. C. A. and treasurer of All Saints Episcopal Church, Buffalo, for twenty years. He is survived by his widow, a son and daughter.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

GEORGE W. McALLISTER
The Port Jervis Gazette announces the death of George W. McAllister in that city after one week's illness of pneumonia. He was 66 years of age. He had lived the greater part of his life in Port Jervis, and was in the employ of the Erie railroad. He is survived by his widow, a daughter, a sister and three brothers.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

DAVID McCLINTOCK
The Meadville Messenger reports the death of David A. McClintock as having occurred through accident. Mr. McClintock, who was 36 years of age, and was employed as trainman on the Meadville division, was run down by a switch engine on the Mead avenue crossing, Meadville, and so badly crushed that he died two and a half hours later in Spencer hospital.

The report states that Mr. McClintock was riding to the station on the engine of his train after it had placed its cars, and when it neared the Mead avenue crossing he dismounted and threw the switch. Then he unconsciously stepped onto another track directly in front of a switch engine that was placing a freight car. He is survived by his widow, a son, his father, four brothers and three sisters.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES McCOY
The Port Jervis, N.Y., Union announces the death of James McCoy, a conductor on the Erie railroad. Conductor McCoy rose through the various grades in the train service. He was a member of the Order of Railway Conductors.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ROSS McDANIELS
Ross McDaniels, formerly employed hy the Erie railroad as baggageman at Bath, N.Y., station; was killed in action on September 28, 1918, while engaged in battle with the American forces in France. He was twenty-seven years of age and joined the colors in April, 1918.




Also:

ROSS McDANIELS—The Corning, N.Y., Evening Leader prints a death notice of Ross McDaniels, who died a hero while serving with the American forces in France. It occurred on September 28, 1918. Before entering the service of his country Ross was employed as baggageman by the Erie railroad at Bath station, on the Rochester division. He became a soldier last April at the age of 27. He is survived by his widow, father and two brothers, all of Hammondsport, N.Y.




From the May, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES J. McGOLRICK
James J. McGolrick, for thirty-one years a faithful employe in the office of H. C. Barlow, freight claim adjuster of the Erie railroad, passed away at the age of 64 on May 15 (1918).

Mr. McGolrick was born in Ireland, where his earlier life was spent. His occupation before coming to America was that of a schoolmaster. He entered the service of the Freight Claim department of the Erie Despatch, Fast Freight Line, March, 1887. His mathematical knowledge, accounting ability and expressive and correct dictational writings, rendered his service of more than ordinary value. His labors closed when in charge of the Statistical bureau of the freight claim office.

His was a kind and genial nature that endeared him, not alone to his office associates, but to all others with whom he came in contact. His ready wit and keen appreciation of humor was characteristic of his race. On the birthday of an office associate he penned the following tribute:

"Our genial, whole-souled friend has reached another milestone on the journey of life. The snows of forty-six winters have whitened his intellectual brow, and the fierce heat of forty-six summers have seared the foliage that crowns his classic dome and reveals vistas that open the way to the gentle autumn. But the snow of winter could not cool the ardor of his enthusiasm in doing good, nor the heat of summer dry up the fount of human kindness that wells up spontaneously from the depths of his capacious heart. May he glide imperceptibly into the autumn of life, and when the chill winter arrives almost unheralded, wrap the mantle of his all-embracing charity around him, and lie down to pleasant dreams."

He possessed a lively interest in the publication of the ERIE RAILROAD MAGAZINE, and his contributions frequently appeared in its issues; also, he was deeply concerned in all matters that benefited Erie men. He was a charter member of the Erie Mutual Benefit Association, holding office as its secretary for a number of years, and was also one of its trustees. He held membership in the Royal Arcanum.

A commendable phase of a life well lived was the success attending his efforts in the care of a large family, consisting of five sons and three daughters, by whom he is survived, together with his widow.




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

HARRY A. MILLENER
A Rochester, N.Y., newspaper printed an account of the death of Harry A. Millener, a resident of that city, and who was a private in Headquarters Com­pany, 147th Field Artillery. The report says that he was killed in action abroad September 26 (1918). It is believed that he met his fate while repairing telegraph lines under fire. He had been a billing clerk employed by the Erie at the Exchange street office. Nine years ago he left Rochester, and when he joined the colors was in the employ of a large rubber company.




From the May, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

HERMAN MILLER
The death of Herman Miller has removed a good citizen of Essex Fells, N.J., and a faithful employe of the Erie railroad. Mr. Miller was station agent at Essex Fells. His untimely death while still a young man was caused by pneumonia, which has taken from among us so many good Erie employees of both sexes.

Mr. Miller was a public-spirited citzen and was interested in all matters affecting his village. He had been borough clerk, recorder, clerk of the Board of Education and secretary of the local Fire department. He was the Erie's station agent, operator and express agent.

Mr. Miller was assistant agent at Bloomfield in 1900, and the same year was transferred to Orange as assistant agent. In 1901 he resigned, and was reemployed the same year and made clerk at North Newark. In 1902 he was appointed agent at Montclair Heights, and in the same year was appointed acting agent at Little Falls. In 1905 he was appointed agent at Essex Fells. Mr. Miller was a member of the Masonic fraternity and the Essex Fells Home Guard.




From the April, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

HUGH LEONARD MILLER
The news of the death of Hugh Leonard Miller is received. He died at Willard Parker hospital, New York, of pneumonia, after an illness of ten days. He was in his nineteenth year. He resided in Port Jervis, and for a time was employed as machinist apprentice. In April, 1918, he enlisted in the navy, and was trained at Newport, R. I. He was assigned to the U. S. cruiser San Diego, and was aboard it at the time it was sunk. After escaping he was transferred to the Leviathan, where as fireman he made eight trips across the Atlantic. When he was taken ill he was awaiting embarkation for his ninth trip across the ocean, after which he was to be honorably discharged. Miller was a young man of fine character, and was a member of the Port Jervis Y. M. C. A. and the Drew M. E. church and Sunday school. He is survived by his parents, a brother and a sister.




From the January, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

VICTOR MONCZKOWSKI
Among the casualties reported in The Jersey Journal, Jersey City, N.J., is one announcing that Victor Monczkowski, a resident of Jersey City and a private in the U.S. Army, was killed in action while a member of Company I, 827th Infantry. The young soldier, whose age was 25 years, was a native of Russian Poland, and came to this country in 1911. He was employed as boilermaker by the Erie. His surviving relatives are three brothers and two sisters in Europe and one married sister residing in Bayonne, N.J.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

DONALD MOORE
Donald Moore, a former employe of the Erie, who was a foreman at the ice house in Port Jervis, is reported by the Port Jervis Gazette as having died at Youngstown, Ohio, of influenza. He was buried from the home of his parents, Deposit, N.Y.




Also, from the January, 1919 issue:
DONALD A. MOORE—The news of the death of Donald A. Moore, of Youngstown, 0., is reported in Crown Point, Ind. Mr. Moore was employed in the Signal department of the Erie, and was well known in the Crown Point section because he was employed there for nearly one year. He was later transferred back to Ohio. His personality is spoken of highly in the newspaper report of his death.




From the September, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

AUGUSTUS MORDECAI
Augustus Mordecai, once a civil engineer in the employ of the Erie railroad, is dead at his home in Cleveland, Ohio, at the age of 70. He was born in Philadelphia, and was graduated from the Polytechnic College of Pennsylvania. In 1872, after having had experience on several other railroads, Mr. Mordecai went to Cleveland, and became division engineer in charge of maintenance on the Atlantic & Great Western, now the Erie, and for twenty years remained in Cleveland, filling various positions. He was with the Erie most of the time until 1906. Since that year he was identified with other railroad systems, and was a consulting engineer with the city. Mr. Mordecai was a member of the board of directors of the American Society of Civil Engineers in 1895-1897.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

EDDIE MORGANHAND
He was reported from Youngstown as having been killed in action in France. He was employed by the Erie as yard clerk at Youngstown.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM A. MOYLAN
William A. Moylan was killed while in the service of his country and fighting with the American forces in France. He had previously been a member of the 71st N. G. N. Y., and while with this command was employed as brakeman on the N. Y. S. & W. Division in the Undercliff yard.




Also:
WILLIAM A. MOYLAN—Terminal Trainmaster Glazier, of the New York, Susquehanna and Western division at Undercliff, N.J., reports the death of William A. Moylan, while in action with the American forces in France.

Moylan, previous to being mustered into the National army, was a member of the 71st Regiment, N. Y. N. G. He had been employed by the Erie railroad as brakeman in the Undercliff yard. He bore an excellent reputation as an Erie man, and died the death of a hero.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES T. MURPHY
The Republican Press of Salamanca, N.Y., published the facts concerning the death of James T. Murphy, which occurred at Olean, N.Y., after an illness of more than one year. Mr. Murphy had been an employe of the Erie railroad for more than forty-two years.




CORPORAL STEWARD K. NEVIL

Steward K. Nevil


From the April, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
Corp. Steward K. Nevil, who before entering the service of his country was an apprentice in the Locomotive department of the Stroudsburg shops of the N. Y. S. & W. division, having served two years as mechanic, and then enlisted in the cause of liberty and justice, made the supreme sacrifice August 12, 1918.

He was but 18 years old when he joined Company G, 13th Infantry, on May 3, 1917, at Stroudsburg. He served on bridge guard duty until September, 1917, when he was transferred to Camp Hancock, Augusta, Ga., for further training; transferred from the 13th Infantry to the 108th M.G. battalion, and sailed overseas May 3, 1918, and landed at Liverpool May 20. During his trip overseas he was promoted to corporal. He trained again at Haniavo, France, until July 1.

Corporal Nevil's first battle was July 4, 1918, in the Marne, where he was cited for bravery and for his able command of his squad. His wounds were received in his second battle of the Marne, one of the most daring battles of the war. He was seriously wounded August 10, 1918, in this battle. He was removed to Base hospital No. 20, living only two days after reaching there. He died August 12, 1918.

Corporal Nevil was a clean-cut fellow, never ashamed to stand for right, no matter how great the odds against him. This, with his strong character, courage and kindness, won the love and respect of all. Much sympathy is expressed by the shop employes for his bereaved father and mother. Mr. and Mrs. George Nevil.




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WALTER T. NIGHTINGALE
Reported to have died in a hospital in France, November 1 last (1918), of pneumonia. His army record dates from February 23, 1918, when he was sent to Camp Dix as a member of Company C, 303d Field Signal Battalion, going overseas after six weeks' training. He was formerly station agent at Waldwick, N. J.

Also:
Word of the death of Walter T. Nightingale was re­ceived from the superintendent of the New York division, same having occurred in a hospital in France, of pneumonia, November 1 (1918). He had been called for government service Feb­ruary 23, 1918, and was sent to Camp Dix, thence to France after six weeks' training. He was a member of the 303d Field Signal Bat­talion Company C. Previous to entering the service of his country deceased was station agent at Waldwick, N.J.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES J. O'BRIEN
Among the news items from the war zone in France appearing in The Jersey Journal, Jersey City, is an account of the death of James J. O'Brien, who succumbed to an attack of pneumonia in October (1918). He was attached to the U. S. Infantry, and before being stricken had seen strenuous fighting in the trenches. He was about 25 years of age, and had been in France eight months. His home was in Jersey City, and he was employed by the Erie previous to going overseas. His surving relatives are his parents and (garbled text).|




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM F. O'NEIL
The Daily Vindicator, Youngstown, Ohio, announces the death of William F. O'Neil, an Erie railroad conductor, who, after suffering for a long period with rheumatism, became the victim of an attack of pneumonia, which resulted fatally. He died at Girard, Ohio. Deceased was a native of Youngstown, and a member of the B of RT. He leaves his wife and several children.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES O'ROURKE
The Erie railroad has lost another old and faithful employe, and one who was well known and loyal. He died Sunday, October 20 (1918).

James O'Rourke was freight agent of the Erie at Weehawken, N.J., and had filled that position for more than twenty years. His death was the result of pneumonia, which was preceded by an attack of influenza. Deceased was as well known in public life as a railroad man, and took great interest in the welfare and progress of the city of Hoboken, which adjoins Weehawken, and where he resided. He was particularly interested in educational matters, and at the time of his death was vice-president of the Board of Education of Hoboken. He had been councilman of the Fifth ward and served two terms.

Mr. O'Rourke was 54 years old, a man of commanding appearance, strong personality and genial nature. He was a favorite with his subordinates, who mourn his sudden death.




GEORGE HENRY PALMER

George Henry Palmer


From the May, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
George Henry Palmer, assistant land and tax agent, died at his home, 269 Dodd street. East Orange, N. J., April 9 (1918), after an illness of less than two weeks. He had not been in robust health since his daughter's illness and death about one year ago, but that his condition was serious was not realized by any one. He left his office March 28 at the request of his physician to take a few days rest, and expected to return at the end of a week or ten days at most. On the following Monday the heart trouble and hardening of the arteries from which he had been suffering became more pronounced, and he had not the vitality or strength to resist the malady. He is survived by his widow, a grandson, Paul, and a brother, Frederick T. Palmer, of Springfield, Mass.

Mr. Palmer was born in Worcester, Mass., August 16, 1853, his father, Paul T. Palmer, and his mother, Ann Baughn, being members of the Society of Friends. He studied civil engineering in Worcester Polytechnic Institute, from which he graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Science July 21, 1872. The first years of his professional work were spent in the service of his native city, and in 1881 be was draftsman in the department of the city engineer of Worcester. July l of that year he entered the service of the New York, Lake Erie & Western Railroad Company as draftsman in the office of John M. Finch, real estate agent at Hornell, N.Y. From that date he was continuously in the Erie service, and was successively chief clerk, assistant real estate agent and assistant general land and tax agent, which position he held at the time of his death.

In 1878 he married Fannie E. Shaw, of Worcester, Mass., who survives him. They had three children, Philip, Ralph and Mildred. The two former, boys of promise, died just as they approached manhood, and Mr. Palmer's affections centered in his daughter. Her illness and death about one year ago was a great sorrow to him and her loss undoubtedly hastened his death.

Mr. Palmer will be greatly missed. He had a wide acquaintance among Erie officials and employes, and all who knew him were his friends. He made and kept them so by his uniform courtesy, cheerfulness and readiness to give aid. He had an intimate knowledge concerning the company's lands and property, which had been gained by personal contact, observation and painstaking research. He had walked over nearly all of its lands, and much he had surveyed. He was generous with the wealth of information and facts he had stored up, and none who called upon him was refused.. He was a man of exemplary habits and the highest character. The example of unselfish devotion to duty and the high standard he set up of accuracy and faithfulness will remain an inspiration to those who were privileged to associate with him.

Funeral services were held at his late home April 11. Interment was at Worcester.

Also from the June, 1918 issue (Hornell Shops news):
The late George Palmer, whose picture appeared in the May number of Erie Magazine, is pleasantly remembered by a few remaining friends as a lovable Christian gentleman. He resided when here with his delightful young family on the south side of Union Park.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES C. PAYE
The Susquehanna Evening Transcript reports the death by accident of James C. Paye. The young man, who was but 18 years of age, had been employed in the new Erie terminal for about eighteen months, and was a member of the "night shift."

The report says that Paye finished work at 6 o'clock and started for the depot to board a train that would take him to his home in Uniondale. Two companions were with him, and they found a parted train, which they passed through, Paye following, but he was caught and killed as the cars came together.




CAPTAIN OLIVER H. PEARSALL

Oliver H. Pearsall


From the August, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
A death that will be felt by the Marine department was that of Captain Oliver Horton Pearsall, who entered the employ of the Erie railroad in 1873. Captain Pearsall was in command of a tug, and when towing cattle from Oak Cliff to the hog dock, Jersey City, in the early days, doing duty days and nights when work was heavy, it was often days at a time before he went home to his family. For fifteen years he towed floats between Duane street, New York, and Jersey City, and held the record for never having had one collision. It was his boast in foggy weather that he could take a car float at Duane street and land it safely at Jersey City, and in the opposite direction as well.

During the past five years he was incapacitated. The Erie employed no more loyal or efficient person than this veteran, who served the company well and faithfully for more than forty-five years.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MISS AGNES PETTY
Miss Agnes Petty, employed as ticket agent at Niles, Ohio, by the Erie railroad, is reported in the Warren Tribune as having died of pneumonia, following an attack of influenza. She had been ill one week. Miss Petty had been in the employ of the Erie about one year. She is survived by her parents, two brothers and three sisters.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

LEONARD J. PRESTON
It is reported that Leonard J. Preston, a corporal in Company G, 327th Infantry, died at the base hospital, New Mexico, of pneumonia.

He was one of the first young men of Dunmore, Pa., to leave for Camp Meade. Having served his time at the Erie's Dunmore shops he went to Hornell, N.Y., and held the position of foreman until he joined the colors. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. John Preston, of Dunmore, and was 23 years old. Besides his parents he is survived by two brothers, both in the service of their country, and six sisters. His remains were brought to Dunmore for burial.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN A. PURCELL
John A. Purcell died at his home, 972 East Eighteenth street, Paterson. The young man was exceedingly active in many local charitable affairs, and was tenor soloist at the Paterson Knights of Columbus Lodge, having made numerous visits to Camp Merritt to entertain the soldiers there.

He was born in Maryhill, Glasgow, Scotland, and was educated at St. Mungo's Academy, Glasgow. He is survived by his mother, Mrs. Rose A. Purcell, and four sisters. He was employed as a clerk by the NYS&W R.R.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ALTON EMERSON QUICK
The Port Jervis Gazette announces the death of Alton Emerson Quick, who died of pneumonia at his home in Matamoras, Pa., after a brief illness. Decedent was 16 years of age, and a son of Mr. and Mrs. J. K. Quick. He was employed in the Erie railroad shops, Port Jervis, as a machinist apprentice.




From the March, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS QUICK
The death of an Erie old-timer took place recently when Christopher Columbus Quick passed away at the ripe age of eighty-four years at his home in Port Jervis, N.Y.

Mr. Quick was among the most widely known employes on the Erie division. For sixty years he was a resident of Port Jervis, and for a long time had conducted passenger trains over the Delaware division.

Deceased had been a Free Mason for fifty-five years, and was the oldest member of Port Jervis Lodge No. 328, F. & A. M. He is survived by two sons, a daughter and one sister.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

EDWARD ROACH
Edward Roach, reported by War department as having died in France, October 1 (1918), of pneumonia. He enlisted as a private in the 113th U. S. Infantry, and was sent to France last June from Camp McClellan. He was employed as conductor by the Erie railroad.




Also:

EDWARD ROACH—Edward Roach, a private in the 113th United States Infantry, is reported in the casualty list of November 8 (1918). He was a private, and succumbed to pneumonia in France on October 1. Information concerning his death is said to have come from the War department. The home of the deceased was in Jersey City, and he was 21 years of age. He was a member of the old Fourth Regiment, N. G. N. J., and was sent to France last June from Camp McClellan, Anniston, Ala. Previous to his enlistment he was employed as conductor by the Erie railroad.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MR. AND MRS. AUSTIN ROBBINS
The Port Jervis Union announces the death of Mr. and Mrs. Austin Robbins, of Ninevah, Pa. The former was employed aa fireman on the Delaware & Hudson railroad, and Mrs. Robbins, before her marriage, had been employed by the Erie railroad in the office of the trainmaster at Susquehanna.

Both Mr. and Mrs. Robbins had been stricken with influenza, Mrs. Robbins succumbing first, and a few days later her husband. They are survived by one child. Mrs. Robbins also is survived by her parents and one sister.




JOHN H. ROBERTS

John H. Roberts


From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
John H. Roberts, foreman blacksmith of Hornell shop, passed suddenly to the "farther aide of silence" October 29 (1918) at his home, 7 Bennett Parkway, Hornell, N. Y.

Mr. Roberts entered the service of the Erie as a blacksmith February 8, 1870, at the age of 26. He worked nine years at the forge, and upon the resignation of Foreman Charles Green he was promoted to the foremanship, which position he held continuously till his death, a period of thirty-nine years.

Mr. Roberts was born in South Wales, and after serving his apprenticeship he worked in France for some time before coming to America. Upon arriving in this country be worked at his trade in several cities before locating in Hornell.

Mr. Roberts was a mechanic of remarkable ability, and many of the tools which have served to materially increase the output of Hornell shop are due to his inventive talents. He was also a musician of rare accomplishments, and always has been active in local musical affairs. During his residence in Hornell he was the efficient director of various church choirs. He was a member of Hornellsville Lodge 331, F. and A. M., which body conducted the funeral. Mr. Roberts is survived by his widow, three daughters, three sons and five sisters.




Also:
J.H. Roberts, foreman of the Blacksmith Shop for nearly forty years, died suddenly in his home in this city.

A letter received from C.W. Hansen, a machinist employed here in 1871, and later, and for many years since, a resident of Erie, PA, where he is connected with a large engine works, speaking of the late John H. Roberts, says:

"Roberts was a very bright man and a fine workman; and not alone that, he was a good friend and companion. I went to Hornellsville in 1871 and found Roberts, Bright and Jones working in the Shop, and from that day Roberts was one of my close friends."

The older men here will remember the gentlemen referred to above as among the finest mechanics ever employed in Hornell Shops.



From the June, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

R.B. ROCKWELL
The death of R. B. Rockwell, an Erie railroad conductor, is announced as having occurred at Kent, Ohio, same being announced by the Meadville Republican. Death was the result of neuralgia of the heart. Mr. Rockwell had been in the employ of the Erie for twenty-nine yearn, and had been a conductor for twenty-five years. He was a member of the O. R. C. and Odd Fellows.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JACOB M. ROSS
The Evening Gazette, Port Jervis, N.Y., reports the death of Jacob M. Ross, who succumbed to pneumonia in that city after a week's illness, at the age of 26 years. Deceased was a native of Port Jervis, and was the son of Herbert C. Ross, an Erie railroad conductor. He was employed as blacksmith in the local Erie shops and was a member of Washington Camp, Number 26, Patriotic Order, Sons of America, and was its president. Also he was a member of the Blacksmiths' Union and Delaware Council, Number 9, Junior Order American Mechanics. Besides his parents, he leaves his widow, one daughter, a brother and sister.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

LAWRENCE F. RYAN
Spanish influenza claimed Lawrence F. Ryan, of Hornell, after a brief illness, a report of his death having been published in the Elmira Advertiser. He was employed as brakeman on the Erie railroad. Deceased is survived by his widow, both parents, two brothers and a sister.




From the May, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MISS ETHEL A. SAGER
Another death that shocked the employes of the office of H. C. Barlow, freight claim adjuster, was that of Miss Ethel L. Sagar, who had held a clerkship for more than seven months. Pneumonia was the cause of her death.

Miss Sagar was a girl of sweet temperament, witty and bright, and was a general favorite among those with whom she worked. A delegation of employes from her office attended the funeral, which took place from her home in Passaic, N.J.




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

EDGAR SAVACOOL
Reported by the Maintenance of Way department as dying of disease while in the United States Army. Before entering the service he was employed as a (New York Division) trackman.

Also:
The report of the death of this employe was received from the Maintenance of Way department. He was a resident of Swartswood, N.J., and in the United States army, where he died of disease. Before entering the service he was a trackman.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHARLES H. SAYER
Announcement is made in the Sussex Independent of the death of Charles H. Sayer, station agent of the Erie at Pearl River, N.Y., which was the result of pneumonia. Deceased had been employed in railroad industry the greater part of his life, and for several years was in the service of the Lehigh & Hudson River railroad at Greycourt, N.Y. He is survived by his widow, six children, his mother, two brothers and two sisters.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIS C. SCHUYLER
A notice of the death of Willis C. Schuyler, a brakeman in the employ of the Erie railroad, which took place in the Meadville, Pa., City hospital, is announced in the Tribune Republican.

Mr. Schuyler had just reached his majority. His death was the result of an operation for appendicitis. He was a member of the B. of R.T. He was one of Meadville's most exemplary young men.




MISS MARION A. SCOTT

Marion A. Scott


From the May, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
A death in the Erie family that has brought deep sorrow to the hearts of many of her associates was that of Miss Marion A. Scott, which occurred a short time ago. Miss Scott was the sister of R. M. Scott, chief clerk in the office of Vice-President A.J. Stone. She had been employed in the office of H.C. Barlow, freight claim adjuster for several months.

A few days before her demise Miss Scott was taken ill, and pneumonia developed which proved fatal within five days.

The death of this most estimable young woman removes one whose sweet, sunny nature and loyalty to duty and her friends were characteristics that defined her nature most strongly. That her death, which took place at the home of her brother, Nutley, N. J., should have come so suddenly added more sorrow to the blow.

Miss Scott had a bright, discerning mind, and she was of the type that find their most gracious acts bound in silence. She was patriotic in an unusual degree and was engrossed in Red Cross work, having taken a first-aid course. Much of her time was spent in work to aid the cause of the allied armies, and she loved it. A real American girl she was. She was born in Bordentown, N.J., and the burial took place in the family plot in that city.

Also from the June, 1918 issue:
Kind Words Appreciated
The death of Miss Marion A. Scott. sister of R. M. Scott, assistant superintendent of terminals, an obituary notice of which appeared in the May number of this MAGAZINE, called forth many letters of sympathy and floral contributions from officials of the Erie railroad and others.

Mr. Scott, his mother and other members of the family asked that suitable recognition and sincere thanks for their kindly remembrances be extended these friends through this MAGAZINE. It is a pleasant duty to comply with their wishes.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

THOMAS SCOTT
Thomas Scott, employed by the Erie as fireman on the Allegheny division, died of pneumonia at Camp Upton.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ANDREW J. SEXTON
The Port Jervis Gazette publishes an account of the death of Andrew J. Sexton, an Erie railroad freight conductor, who met his fate in an accident at Campbell Hall, N.Y.

Conductor Sexton was 42 years old, was born in Port Jervis, N.Y., and had lived the greater part of his life in that city. He had been employed as trainman and conductor on the New York division of the Erie for twenty-church, Matamoras, Pa., the Holy Name Society of St Mary's church, and was a member of Neversink Lodge, number 2S5, Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen. He is survived by his widow, one daughter, two sons, his mother, three brothers and three sisters.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

SAMUEL P. SHANE
Officials of the Erie railroad were grieved to learn of the death of Samuel P. Shane, several years ago traffic manager of the road for a long while.

Mr. Shane was well known in transportation circles in the Central West. In addition to his identification with the Erie he had been manager of the Gilchrist Transportation Company and then receiver. At the time of his death he was president of the Great Lakes Towing Company.

Deceased was 61 years old, and the illness which carried him off was of short duration. He died in Cleveland, in which city he made his home.




From the January, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ALFRED J. SHINE
The report of his death while in action serving his country in France is among those appearing in The Jersey Journal, Jersey City. Private Shine was 28 years of age, and was killed on October 22 (1918) while attached to the Second Battalion, Intelligence Section of the 310th Infantry. After being drafted he was sent to Camp Dix February 25, and to France May 19. He had been in action but one month when he fell before the enemy's fire. A New Yorker by birth, Private Shine came to Jersey City when a boy, and was graduated from St. John's Parochial school and St. Peter's college. Prior to going to the front Shine was employed by the Erie. He is survived by his mother and three brothers.




From the April, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WALTER S. SKINNER
After a service of forty-three years with the Erie railroad in the car and blacksmith departments, Walter S. Skinner died recently at his home in Middletown, N.Y., at the age of 63.

Mr. Skinner entered the Erie's employ at the age of 19 as car repairer at Newburgh, N.Y. In 1876 he was promoted to foreman of car oilers. In 1877 he was transferred to blacksmith helper, and in 1880 was promoted to clerk in the Mechanical department. In 1881 he was transferred back to blacksmith helper, and in November of that year he was promoted to car foreman at Middletown, N.Y., which position he held until he died. He had always been a faithful employe of the company. He is survived by his widow and two sons.




From the January, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

FOREST SMAIL
News of the death of First Sergeant Forest Smail, of the 414th Telegraph Battalion, is reported in the Kane, Pa., Republican, as having occurred from disease while in the service of his country in France. Mrs. Smail, mother of Sergeant Smail, was apprised of her son's death in letters received from two members of the same battalion to which he was attached. The dead soldier first entered railroad service with the Pennsylvania railroad, and later was in the employ of the Erie, filling the position of supervisor of signals, with headquarters at Meadville, Pa. His home was in Kane, and he is survived by his mother and one sister. The report says that he was buried in the American cemetery at Tours.




From the May, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM R. SMITH
Another hero of the war, who was an Erie employe, has passed to his long reward. William R. Smith succumbed to an attack of diabetes while confined in the Brooklyn, N.Y., Navy Hospital.

Deceased was a petty officer on the U. S. ship Waconda. He was twenty-seven years old, and about five years ago came from the South and entered the employ of the Erie railroad as brakeman on the New York division.

In June, 1917, he enlisted in the navy, and was stationed at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. He was a member of the Port Jervis Y.M.C.A., where he made his home while with the company. A wide circle of friends which he made in Port Jervis deeply regret that he should have passed away at so early an age.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ZENNIE HAYES SMITH
He is reported by the superintendent of the Kent division as having died of disease in the training camp at Camp McArthur while in the Aviation section of the government service, in which he had enlisted. He was an Erie engineer in fine standing.




From the May, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHARLES SPAULDING
Another veteran has passed to his long reward after a service of fifty-six years with the Erie. Charles Spaulding was baggage master at Belmont station, Allegheny division. Shortly before he died he was attending to business, and leaning against a baggage truck complained of being ill. A moment later he collapsed and died.

Deceased was 74 years old, and a familiar figure with the patrons of the road with whom he came in daily contact. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity and treasurer of his lodge.




From the May, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JESSE J. SPEAR
The death of Jesse J. Spear, a trainman on the New York division of the Erie, is reported in the Port Jervis Tri-States Union. The report states that Mr. Spear died in the Good Samaritan hospital, Suffern, N.Y., as the result of an accident.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ANDREW D. SPENCER
The Owego, N.Y., Gazette reported the death of Andrew D. Spencer, a retired locomotive engineer, who had been in the employ of the Erie railroad. He died at the home of his daughter in Binghamton at the age of 68 years. He formerly resided in Tioga Center, where the burial took place. After being retired by the Erie he was employed in Tioga Center. He leaves his widow and two daughters.




From the June, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHARLES STAFFORD
Killed in the Argonne Forest battle. Before going overseas he was employed as clerk in the Mechanical department, Meadville. He was a member of Company B, 112th Regiment, 28th division.

Also:
Charles Stafford, who was employed as clerk here (Meadville) before going abroad in defense of his country, is among the heroes who made the supreme sacrifice in the great Argonne Forest conflict. He was a member of Company B, 112th Regiment, 28th Division. A memorial tree has been planted in his honor on the grounds of the Episcopal church, Meadville.




From the June, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

U.H. STEINHARDT
The Rochester, N. Y., Times, printed an account of the death of U. H. Steinhardt, a lifelong resident of Wayland, N.Y. Mr. Steinhardt had been employed as ticket agent and operator at the Erie's Wayland station for over thirty-five years. This veteran's death came very sudden. After the evening meal he sat down to read his paper when suddenly he was stricken and fell from his chair, death being instantaneous.




From the April, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

SAMUEL CROSBY STICKNEY
The death of Samuel Crosby Stickney, assistant to the vice-president of the Erie, was briefly noted in a postscript in the March number of the MAGAZINE, owing to the fact that Mr. Stickney died after the press had started. He was greatly admired wherever known, especially among railroad officials and employes.

The following memorial was issued by President Underwood:

OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
Samuel Crosby Stickney, assistant to the vice-president, died at his residence in Englewood, N. J., February 20, 1918. Coming to the East a comparative stranger, he won for himself an exceptionally high place in the esteem and affection of his fellows. He rendered intelligent and valuable service to the Erie company. His fortitude and patience throughout his painful illness was an index of his fine fiber. Long after he should have laid off his official load, by reason of his health, he insisted on carrying it, with his habitual ability, fidelity and zeal.

His passing deserves the eulogy:
"There was a man."

F. D. Underwood, President New York, Feb. 21, 1918.

The following letter to Gen. George J. Schoeffel, written from Englewood, N.J., on December 22 last, more truly represents the sterling character of Mr. Stickney than anything that might be written by any one of his many friends:

Dear Gen. Schoeffel:
The season's greetings to you, too, my friend. I am sorry you haven't been able to get out here. I enjoy seeing the friends I knew when I was alive. It is not often you hear from one who has already cashed in, but don't let it disturb you. I am still wearing pajamas, and it may be months before I get my white robes and a harp, but if it goes over sixty days I will surely be disappointed, not that I care for the robes and harp but I am getting tired of lying in bed. Yours very sincerely, (Signed) S.C. Stickey.


As Mr. Stickney died on February 20 it will be noted that he lived just sixty days from the time he wrote the above letter.




From the June, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MICHAEL TAFFNEY
The Deposit, N. Y., Courier, announces the death of Michael Taffney, who had been employed by the Erie railroad for fifty years. He is survived by his widow and two daughters.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES J. TESKEY
James J. Teskey, Corporal, died in a base hospital in France, October 11 (1918), as a result of wounds received in battle. He had been employed as chief clerk to Shop Superintendent George T. Depue at the Erie's Susquehanna shop.




Also:

JAMES J. TESKEY—The people of Susquehanna. Pa., were surprised and filled with regret when they read in the Transcript of the death in France, as a result of wounds received in battle, of Corporal James J. Teskey, a resident of that city, and employed by the Erie railroad in the capacity of chief clerk to Shop Superintendent George T. Dcpue, of the Susquehanna shops.

The report says that Corporal Teskey received his fatal wounds while fighting with the American army, and died in a base hospital in France on October 11. He was the second Susquehanna boy to give his life that the liberty of the world might be continued. He was a graduate of Laurel Hill Academy, a member of Susquehanna Council, No. 323, Knights of Columbus, and was beloved by his shopmates and a wide circle of friends in his home city. He is survived by his father and five brothers, one of whom is a sergeant at Camp Meade, and another a sailor boy in Uncle Sam's navy.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHARLES L. THOMAS
Word has been received from Cincinnati that Charles L. Thomas, general freight agent of the Baltimore & Ohio railroad, died of heart trouble in that city, October 15 (1918), after a few hours' illness.

Mr. Thomas arrived in Cincinnati the night previous, and on retiring at his hotel complained of feeling ill. His secretary was summoned, and after a consultation with a physician it was deemed expedient to send him to a hospital, where he died.

The older officials of the Erie railroad will remember Charles L. Thomas as having been several years ago the company's general freight agent in Chicago. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity.




From the June, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

HENRY H. THOMPSON
Henry H. Thompson, of 123 Lexington avenue, Passaic, N. J., died at his home April 25 (1918) at the age of 94 years. Since 1899 he had been employed as secretary of the People's Bank & Trust Company of Passaic, but owing to ill health was compelled to give up active work for that organization about three years ago.

Mr. Thompson was born in Pompey, Onondaga county, N.Y. In 1861 he went to Washington, where he was employed as chief paying teller of the United States Treasury. At the close of the civil war he went to Berne, N. C, where he organized a national bank. In 1873 he became assistant cashier of the Erie Railroad, and later was made assistant treasurer under Brig. Gen. Bird W. Spencer. In 1899 with Brig. Gen. Spencer, he moved to Passaic, where the People's Bank & Trust Company was organized.

Among the interesting memories in Mr. Thompson's life was that he was in the Ford Theater in Washington the night President Lincoln was assassinated. He saw Booth go to the presidential box, following the shot, saw him run across the stage. Mr. Thompson cast his first presidential ballot for Zachary Taylor in 1848.

The payroll register of the Erie Treasury department,, from 1870 to date, is in the treasury safe, Mr. Thompson's name appearing therein from March, 1873, to January, 1885. General Spencer is a valued friend of the present Erie treasurer, and a welcome visitor at the Erie office, where he greets B. A. Van Tassell, John Turner, Sylvester Earle and A. B. Campbell, all of whom were in the service of the treasury under General Spencer's administration.

Peter Donahue, at one time office boy for Col. James Fisk. Jr. at the Erie Grand Opera House offices, and later, for many years, paymaster of the company, is now located at Dunmore, Pa., as paymaster of the Erie Coal companies.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

VICTOR TOBIN
The Tribune Times, Hornell, N. Y., announces the death of Victor Tobin, an Erie railroad engineer, who died at Saint James' Mercy hospital, that city, but does not state the cause.

Mr. Tobin was at one time interpreter of the Salamanca, N.Y., Police department. He was born and lived near the Mexican border, and spoke Spanish fluently. He was a member of Salamanca Lodge of Elks.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

GEORGE BAILEY TORRENCE
The master mechanic at the Erie's Port Jervis shops reports the death of George Bailey Torrence of pneumonia after a few days' illness. Mr. Torrence held the position of gang foreman, and had been in the employ of the Erie railroad for thirteen years, both at Port Jervis and Hornell, coming to Port Jervis about one year ago. Burial was at Laurel Grove Cemetery. He is survived by his widow.




From the June, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

FRANK TRACY
The Rochester, N.Y., Democrat announces the death of Frank Tracy, a widely known railroad man of Hornell, N.Y., who died at the home of his daughter, in Johnson City. Mr. Tracy was a conductor on the Erie railroad for many years.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

TONY TRUHAM, JR
Word has been received of the death of Tony Truham, Jr., of pneumonia while with the American Expeditionary Forces in France. He resided with his parents in Passaic, N.J. Private Truham was 29 years of age, and enlisted about fifteen months ago. He was sent to Camp Dix for two months, and was then transferred to Camp Merritt, from where he was sent overseas. He had been on duty constantly with the 602d Engineers, Company D, for more than one year. He was taken ill with the disease that proved fatal, in October last, and died on the 31st. He has a brother in France with the A. E. F. Before enlisting, Tony Truham was employed in the freight house on Central avenue, Passaic.




From the January, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

FRANCIS B. TULLEY
Among the deaths of soldiers reported in The Jersey Journal, Jersey City, is that of Private Francis B. Tulley, a resident of Jersey City, and before entering the service of his country was employed as machinist helper at the Jersey City shops. Tulley was 18 years of age and died of wounds received in battle. At the time of enlistig in the 4th Regiment he was but 16 years of age, and received his initial military training at camp in Somerville, N.J., and Camp McClellan, Anniston, Ala. He was a member of the 113th Machine Gun. Battalion, formerly the old Fourth Regiment. A brother is serving with the colors in France. He is survived by his mother, two brothers and two sisters.




From the May, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ISAAC UTTER
Suffern, N.Y., has lost its station agent, and the Erie has lost an employe who had served it faithfully for nearly thirty years.

Isaac Utter entered the service in 1888 at the age of 19 as extra operator, working at various points on the New York division until about 1893, when he was assigned as telegrapher at Arden station. In 1896 he was transferred to Arden tower, and in 1898 was appointed agent at Arden. In 1901 he was transferred to Ramsey station, and about the year 1908 was sent to Suffern, where he was agent until the time of his death last month from pneumonia.

Mr. Utter was a member of the Junior Order of American Mechanics, Odd Fellows and Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen.




From the March, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

L. S. WAKEMAN
News of the recent death of L. S. Wakeman, trainman on the Middletown and Crawford branch of the Erie, has been received.

While on a recent run from Middletown to Pine Bush he was taken ill and pneumonia developed, death resulting within five days. His home was at Pine Bush. Deceased was fifty years old. He leaves his widow, one young son, his mother and a sister.




From the July, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM WENTWORTH
It is learned through the columns of the Hornell Tribune that William Wentworth was killed September 1, 1918, on the Vesle front in France, while in action. The report says that a shell burst in the midst of a party of the 307th infantry. He had worked for the Erie at Hornell previous to his departure for abroad, and was attached to the 77th division. His death is said to be confirmed by a comrade who kept a diary of the happening. While he enlisted from Hornell, his home was on the Buffalo division, between Canaseraga and Burns.




From the August, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

SAMUEL E. WHEELER
The death of Samuel E. Wheeler, employed by the Erie railroad as station agent at North Newark, N.J., has been received from a company source. Mr. Wheeler was a victim of an attack of influenza, after a brief illness at his home in Midvale, N.J. His education in handling the business of station agent was learned at North Newark in 1900, and he worked as a telegrapher at many stations on the Greenwood Lake division before being appointed station agent. He had been at North Newark since 1917. He is survived by his mother, two brothers and a sister. His popularity extended all over the line on which he worked, and the Erie in his death has lost one of its most faithful employes.




From the August, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MUNSON G. WICKHAM
An account of the death of Munson G. Wickham appeared in the Port Jervis Gazette. He died of a complication of diseases after a long illness at the age of 73. For many years Mr. Munson was employed by the Erie railroad as plumber. He was a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellows orders.




From the August, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

E.A. WIGGINS
E.A. Wiggins, who entered the employ of the Erie in 1887 in the capacity of clerk, and who was promoted to traveling auditor in 1895, died July 14 (1918) at his home in Paterson.

Mr. Wiggins is survived by two brothers and three sisters, as follows: John L. Wiggins, Middletown, N.Y.; George A. Wiggins, New York city; Lillian A. Wiggins and Ella A. Wiggins, Middletown. N.Y., and Catharine Pyatt, of Green, La.

Mr. Wiggins was a native of Mount Hope, Orange county, N.Y., and was a bachelor. He was one of the best known employes of the company and leaves a record of duty well performed.




From the November, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

GILMORE A. WILKINSON
The Corry, Pa., Evening Journal published an account of the death of Gilmore A. Wilkinson, employed as trainman by the Erie railroad, which occurred at Spencer hpspital, Meadville. His remains were taken to Corry for burial.




From the May, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

EDWARD WOOD
The Port Jervis Tri-States Union announces the death of Edward Wood, one of the well-known telegraphers on the New York division, which occurred at Goshen, N.Y. He had been employed by the Erie for more than twenty years.




From the December, 1918 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CARL WYANT
The Post Express, Rochester, N.Y., printed an account of the death of Carl Wyant, who had been the Erie's station agent at Mount Morris, Mount Morris branch, for some time. Mr. Wyant was stricken with influenza, a relapse of which developed pneumonia, and resulted fatally. Deceased was 35 years of age, and is survived by his widow and four sisters.




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