Erie Railroad Obituaries - 1919



Selected Obituaries from Erie Railroad Magazine:


From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

GEORGE ADAMS
The report of the death of George Adams, employed in the Car department of the Port Jervis shops, has been received. He had been ill but one week. Deceased was 37 years of age, and resided in Matamoras. He was a member of the Carmen's union and Delaware Council, J. O. U. A. M., of Port Jervis. He is survived by his widow, two children, his father and one brother.




From the June, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM H. ALLABACK
Announcement of the death of William H. Allaback appeared in the Galion, Ohio, Inquirer, same occurring at his home in that city, at the age of 67 years. At the time of his illness Mr. Allaback was employed as watchman at the Lincoln Way crossing, but had been formerly employed as switchman and yardmaster at both Galion and Marion, and had been with the Erie many years. He is survived by his widow, a son, two daughters and seven grandchildren.




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

GEORGE O. ALLERTON
The Port Jervis Gazette announces the death of George O. Allerton, formerly employed as conductor, same occurring at Port Jervis. He is survived by his widow, one son, two sisters and one brother.




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ANDREW ANDERSON
Advices have been received of the death of Andrew Anderson, employed as janitor at the Y.M.C.A., Susquehanna, Pa., which was the result, as supposed, of having been struck by a train on the Jefferson division near Stevens Point, Pa. No definite information is given as to how the accident occurred. Mr. Anderson was a devout Christian and a religious worker of much enthusiasm. When his body was found a Bible was clasped in his hand.




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

LAVERNE ANDERSON
The Hornell Tribune reports the death of Laverne Anderson, he having been killed in an automobile accident at (unintelligible) being struck by an Erie train. The report says that Anderson had driven two persons from Elmira to Sayre, Pa., and was returning with them early the following morning when the car was struck by train 6, all three being killed and the car demolished. Anderson, at the time of his death, was operating a taxi service at Elmira, but had formerly resided at Hornell, and was employed by the Erie as a brakeman on the Susquehanna division.




From the September, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN J. ANDREWS
From the Marion, O., Star the death of John J. Andrews is learned. Decedent was 75 years old, and he passed away at his home in Marysville as the result of a stroke of paralysis. Mr. Andrews had been ill for four years. For many years he had been employed as station agent at Broadway, after having served as operator at Richwood. In additon to his railroad duties, Mr. Andrews served two terms as recorder of Union county. He is survived by his widow, two sons, a brother and sister. Fraternally he was a member of Broadway Lodge, I.O.O.F.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

NICK ARGENTERI
The Hornell Tribune reports the death from influenza of Nick Argenteri, at Saint Mercy hospital. He had been employed by the Erie for several years. He is survived by his widow, also reported very ill of the same disease, influenza, and one son.




From the June, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

AUGUST ARMSTRONG
From the Huntington, Ind., Herald it is learned that August Armstrong, who had been employed in the Erie Commissary department since 1917 as manager, died at his home in that city. He was a native of Sweden and was 47 years of age. Besides his widow, he is survived by his mother, a brother and a sister.




From the April, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM H. ARNETT
It was learned from the Port Jervis Gazette that William H. Arnett, a former resident of Port Jervis, died at Woodcliff, N.J. While in the former city he was employed in the Erie shops.




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

DANIEL W. ARWINE
From a newspaper source the news came of the death of Daniel W. Arwine of pneumonia after a brief illness. He had been an employe of the Hornell shops for a long period of years and was a highly respected citizen. His age was 72 and he is survived by his widow, one son, one daughter and a brother.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CLAUDE C. BAKER
Word has come of the death of Claude C. Baker, employed as yard brakeman, same occurring at East Columbia street, Marion, 0. He was about 35 years of age. The announcement states that Mr. Baker, who worked at the eastbound hump, was riding on an engine, fell off, the wheels crushing him to death. Brakeman Baker had been with the Erie six years. He was major of the Eagles' Drum corps, and held the same office in the Erie band. He is survived by his widow, one son, his mother, a brother and a sister, and was a member of the Eagles and the B. R. T.




From the August, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CLAUDE M. BAIRD
A notice published in the Port Jervis Gazette told of the death of Claude M. Baird, whose home was in that city, and who passed away after a prolonged illness. For the past twenty-seven years he had been employed by the Erie, and at the time of his death he was employed as chief clerk in the storekeeper's office connected with the local shops. He was in his forty-seventh year, and was affiliated with Port Jervis Lodge 328, F. & A. M., Knights of Pythias, and he was vice-president of the Orange County Building and Loan association. Surviving him are his widow, a daughter, his mother and a sister.

Also, from the Port Jervis news column:
We were saddened by the report that Claude A. Baird, former chief clerk to the storekeeper, had passed away. Mr. Baird had been on a leave of absence for several months in order to recuperate, so his co-workers were anxiously his return to the office. This, however, was denied them.




From the October, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

PETER BALMOS
Among the deaths re­corded in the Port Jervis Union is that of Peter Balmos, for many years a passenger trainman on the New York division, same occurring at Sonyea, N.Y., at the age of about 65 years. He had suffered from a long illness. His surviving relatives are his widow, a son, a daughter, two brothers and other relatives.




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN J. BANNON
A Paterson, N.J. newspaper announces the death of John J. Bannon, who for twelve years was baggagemaster at the Market street station. Pneumonia was the cause. Deceased was a well known citizen of Paterson, and was a member of St. Mary's Holy Name society, the Tribe of Ben Hur, and the Railroad Employes association. He is survived by his widow and four sons.




From the May, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

E. L. BARRETT
Another veteran of the Erie passed to his reward when E. L. Barrett died at his home in Windsor, Pa., at the ripe age of 76 years. The older employes may remember him as being the ticket agent at Susquehanna, a newspaper in which city made mention of his passing away. He was a man of kindly nature and was held in high esteem by all who knew him.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

M. B. BARTHOLOMEW
M.B. Bartholomew, employed as passenger conductor on the Oil City branch, died in Spencer (Meadville, Pa.) hospital after a brief illness, although be had been ailing for some time previous to entering the hospital. Conductor Bartholomew was known affectionately as "Jeff" by his intimates, and was widely known and respected. He had been engaged in railroad life since he was a boy of 16, and was one of the old-timers who first served with the A. & G. W., now a part of the Erie system. He was a member of the K. of P., 0. R. C., Elks and F. O. E. His age was 64, and he is survived by his widow, two sons and two daughters, also two sisters.




From the July, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CLEMENT C. BATES
A notice of the death of Clement C. Bates appeared in the Meadville Tribune. It stated that advices received by the young man's aunt from Washington told of his death in France, May 4, 1919, of pleuro pneumonia. He was in his twenty-fourth year. He was drafted, and after being assigned to Camp Lee, was sent overseas, May 17, 1918, as a member of the 319th infantry. A letter received just before his death was reported said that he was well and expected to soon sail for home. At the time of his being drafted he was employed as brakeman on a run out of Meadville.




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN K. BAXTER
Among the deaths re­ported recently was that of John K. Baxter, formerly employed as conductor on the New York division. A quarter of a century ago he resided in Port Jervis, but since that time was a resident of Pearl River, N.Y. He was 70 years of age and was a member of Utsayantha Lodge No. 143, I.0.0.F. He is survived by his widow.




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

L.W. BEA
Tbe death of L.W. Bea oc­curred as a result of an accident near Vails Gate, on the Newburgh short cut. He was in charge of the engine that caused his death. Deceased was probably 46 years of age and re­sided temporarily in Jersey City.




From the August, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JACOB BEEMER
A notice of the death of Jacob Beemer, who up to three years ago had been a member of the Erie Police department, and had rendered fourteen years' service at Huntington, Ind., appeared in the Herald of that city. He was 57 years old, and succumbed to an illness of one year's duration. He was a member of the Loyal Order of Moose of Huntington. Surviving him are his widow, two sons, a brother and three sisters.




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ALFRED W. BEMROSE
Another faithful employe of the Operating department passed away when Alfred W. Bemrose recently went to his long reward. "Al," as he was affectionately known, was almost a landmark on the New York division. He began as brakeman in the freight train service, and about 1884, after becoming freight conductor, was promoted to passenger conductor. He served the Erie well and loyally during the long term of years he was in its employ. For some time past he had not been in vigorous health, having but a year ago recovered from a violent attack of pneumonia, from which disease be finally died. For a number of years he made his home in Goshen, N.Y. He was 71 years old, and is survived by his widow, one son, one daughter, four grandchildren and one sister. He was a member of Neversink Division, No. 62, 0.R.C., and Orange Lodge, No. 506, I.0.0.F., of Goshen.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

BOYD BICKNELL
The Elmira (N.Y.) Star reports the death at Hornell of Boyd Bicknell as a result of pneumonia, following an attack of influenza. He was employed by the Erie railroad as airbrake inspector. Deceased was well and favorably known in Hornell. He is survived by three children and his father. His age was 32.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

FRANK J. BEIERSCHMIDT
A newspaper report was to the effect that Frank J. Beierschmidt, employed as machinist foreman at the Meadville shops, and who was 28 years of age, died in Spencer hospital, that city, of pneumonia, after an illness of but one week. He was one of Meadville's finest young men, and was a member of St. Agatha's R. C. church, Knights of Columbus, Elks and Taylor Hose, No. 1. He is survived by his mother, two brothers and three sisters.




Also:
Fred J. Bierschmidt, foreman of the (Meadville) wheeling and truck gangs, died Jan. 1, 1919, of pneumonia and the flu, aged 28 years. He is survived by an aged mother and several brothers and sisters. He was well liked.




From the April, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN I. BENNETT
After being employed for a period of nearly fifty years on the Susquehanna division, John I. Bennett passed to his long reward at his home in Canisteo, N.Y., at the age of 73 years. The cause was neuritis. The Hornell Tribune, in which the account of his death appeared, says he was one of the oldest residents of Canisteo. He was born in Port Jervis, and gave up active work only when his health became so impaired that he could continue no longer. This was nearly three months ago. Although Mr. Bennett was a trainman, he held the rank of conductor, and had a wide acquaintance among railroad men. He was a member of Steuben division, No. 22, 0. R. C., of Hornell, Morning Star Lodge, No. 6, F. and A. M., the Maccabees, Eastern Star, and the Grotto, a branch of Masonry.




From the April, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MEAD BLACKBURN
A Rochester, N.Y. newspaper reports the death from tuberculosis of Mead Blackburn after a year's illness. Before his disability he was employed as foreman. He was a member of the Odd Fellows and the United Brethren church. His surviving relatives are his widow and two children, also two brothers and three sisters.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOSEPH B. BLUMES
Joseph B. Blumes of the (Meadville) tool room force, died after a few days illness, aged 43 years. He was an efficient workman and a good citizen. A mother, son and daughter survive. (P. 748)




From the June, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

GEORGE L. BOLINGER
Reported dead in France of pneumonia. He was a first lieutenant in the Signal department, and was stationed in Le Mans. He was 25 years old. Before going overseas he was employed as telegrapher at the "K.X." tower, Martel, Ohio.

Also:
GEORGE L. BOLINGER—Word has been received by Mr. and Mrs. Frank Beckwith of the death on March 11 (1919) of George L. Bolinger in France, the cause being pneumonia. He was a son of Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Bolinger, who reside near Marion, Ohio. Before entering the service of his country Bolinger was a telegrapher at the Erie's "K.X." tower, Martel, Ohio, and made his home with the Beckwiths. The news of his death came after a letter had been received from him saying that he expected to sail for home in April. He left June 24, 1918, for Camp Merritt, and went overseas September 8. He was stationed at Le Mans, France, and held the rank of first lieutenant in the Signal department. His age was 24, and he leaves his widow.

Also
From the September, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
An account of the death of George Lloyd Bolinger, an American soldier, who succumbed to pneumonia in France, was reported in the Marion Star. It stated that his death occurred March 10, 1919, while in service with the American forces. The remains were brought to Marion for burial. This young hero was the son of Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Bolinger, and was a telegrapher in the employ of the Erie. He entered the army service in June, 1918, going first to Camp Sherman and then to France, where he was made a first lieutenant. His body had been buried in a cemetery at Lamdezellac, Finisterre, France. Besides his parents be leaves his widow and a sister.







From the October, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

A. BRACHER
The Marion Star reports the death of A. Bracher, station agent of the Erie at Harrods, 0. The account stated that Mr. Bracher dropped dead of heart disease while operating a telegraph key. He was in the 60's among the best-known employes on the western end of the road, being a veteran of the service.




From the June, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM BRACKEN
The news of the death of William Bracken, has been received from the Huntington, Ind., Herald. It states that he died of typhoid fever at the age of 22 years. For the past two years young Bracken had been employed by the Erie. Besides his parents he is survived by a brother.




From the June, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

EVERETT D. BRAMAN
From the Huntington, Ind., Herald news comes of the death of Everett D. Braman, employed as brakeman, which occurred at a hospital in Lima, Ohio. It was said to have been the result of an accident. Deceased was in his twenty-second year. He is survived by his father, two brothers and three sisters.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JESSE BRENNAN
The Lake County Times, in a recent issue, reported the death of Jesse Brennan, who for five years had been in the employ of the Erie railroad in the offices at Hammond, Ind. He died of influenza at his home in Denver, Col., after a brief illness. He is survived by his widow, two children, his parents, a brother and sister.




From the October, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOSEPH B. BRINTON
The Ashland, 0., Press reports the death of Joseph B. Brinton, for thirty-three years station agent at Ashland, a Civil war veteran and honored citizen of the city. Decedent was nearly 81 years of age. He was known as a man who took a great in­terest in public matters and everything that was for the uplift of his city. He enlisted in Company G, 6th Indiana infantry, and, through gallantry, rose to the rank of captain. At one time he was acting as assistant adjutant general on the staff of General Gross. After the war he learned telegraphy and became station agent at Mingo in 1867. Later he was transferred to Ashland, where remained until the time he retired ... (unintelligible text) ... Board of Education, of which be had served as treasurer, and was the first president of the Ashland Board of Trade. Fraternally, Captain Brinton was identified with the Masonic order and held membership in Mansfield Commandery, No. 21, K.T. He is survived by his widow and four daughters.




From the July, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILBUR F. BROADSWORD
The obituary of Wilbur F. Broadsword appeared in the columns of the Marion, O., Star. The account stated that he was an Erie freight conductor, and that while attempting to make a coupling at the rear of his engine at Galion, was crushed between the bumpers. Deceased was 51 years old and was affiliated with the B. of R.T., O.R.C., and Order of Moose. His surviving relatives are his widow, two children, his mother, a brother and sister.




From the April, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHARLES H. BROOKS
The death of Charles H. Brooks, employed as switchman, is announced by the Salamanca Republican Press. He died at Olean, N.Y., at the age of 38, after an illness of two weeks. He is survived by his widow, a step-son and one sister, and held membership in the B.R.T., I.T. Fosdick Lodge, No. 137, and the Protected Home Circle.




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

DAVID BRYFOGLE
David Bryfogle, em­ployed as engineer, died of heart trouble at his home in Galion, 0. He was 71 years of age, and earlier in life was employed as conductor on the Big Four. After joining the Erie he became an engineer, then engine dispatcher, which position he held until the terminal was removed to Marion. He is survived by his widow, a daughter and a niece.




From the October, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN J. BURKE
From the Port Jervis Union the death of John J. Burke is learned. He had been for many years a yard conductor at that point. His death was due to a compli­cation of diseases. He was a member of the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen, the Sacred Heart church and the Sacred Heart league. His surviving relatives are two sons, a daughter, one brother and a sister.




From the July, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

FRED L. CASE
The Hornell Tribune reports the death of Fred L. Case, age 17, who had been employed by the Erie. It occurred at St. James hospital after a brief illness. He is survived by his mother, a brother and a sister.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

NORMAN W. CASE
Advices from Port Jervis are to the effect that Norman W. Case, an employe, died at his home in that city of pneumonia at the age of 38 years. He is survived by a brother and one sister.




From the May, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM G. CASTLE
News of the death of William G. Castle was printed in a Huntington, Ind., newspaper. The report said that deceased, who was 39 years of age, was preparing to open his new grocery business when he was suddenly stricken with heart disease, which proved fatal. He was well known in Huntington, and before quitting railroad life had been for five years an Erie conductor on the Marion division, and had a run out of Huntington. His surviving relatives are his widow, a daughter and two sisters.




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

THEODORE D. CHAMBERLAIN
In the February issue we announced the passing of T.D. Chamberlain, Clerk (Chicago, 14th Street Station). It is with deep regret we now announce his death.

Also:
It is with the deepest regret that we announce the death of Theodore D. Chamberlain, who entered the Erie service at Chicago on September 28, 1896, and held various clerical positions at the local freight office. Captain Chamberlain, as he was generally known by those closely associated with him, was one of the most popular Erie employes, and at all times faithfull to his duties. He was kind, congenial, with always a smile for everyone, and he will be greatly missed by all who knew him. (A small photo was also included)




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

HARRY CHART
From the Elmira Gazette it is learned that Harry Chart, night station agent at Addison, N.Y., died in that place at the age of 84 years, after a brief illness, of pneumonia. He had been employed by the road about one year. He held membership in Addi­son Union Lodge No. 18, F. and A. M., and is survived by his widow and two children, be­sides several relatives.




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHANDLER W. CHASE
Among the deaths recently reported in the Canisteo, N.Y., Times was that of Chandler W. Chase, employed on the Susquehanna division as conductor. He was a victim of pneumonia, and succumbed after a ten-days' illness. He had resided in Canisteo during the greater part of his life, and was well and favorably known by a wide circle of friends. His age was 68 years. He began service with the Erie at the age of 15 as brakeman, and, after a brief period, was promoted to conductor, being at that time the youngest conductor on the division. He retired from active duty about twenty years ago. his surviving relations are a daughter and a brother.




From the April, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

DENNIS E. COLLINS
The Hornell Tribune reports the death of Dennis E. Collins, a former chief train dispatcher of the Allegheny division, which occurred in St. James hospital, Hornell, after an attack of influenza. He had been a resident of Hornell from 1887 until fifteen years ago, when the Allegheny division offices were removed to Salamanca. He was chief dispatcher of that division when the change was made. He was a highly respected citizen of Hornell. His surviving relatives are his widow and two sons, both of whom are doing military duty in France.




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

E.S. CONKLIN
After thirty-three years of faithful service, the death is announced by the Hornell Tribune of E.S. Conklin, a train­man in the passenger service. He had been ill for several months. His age was 66 years. He had been an employe since 1885, and was a member of Joseph Bailey Lodge No. 186, B.R.T., Loyal Order of Moose. His surviving rela­tives are his widow, one son and one daughter and three brothers.




From the May, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

OLIVER C. COREY
Announcement is made in the Port Jervis Union of the death of Oliver G. Corey in Matamoras, Pa., at the age of 47 years. He had suffered a long illness. Deceased was a decorator by trade and had been for some time employed in the Port Jervis roundhouse. His surviving relatives are one daughter, two sons, one brother and one sister.




From the August, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

BARTLEY CORLISS
An account of the death of Bartley Corliss, a Jersey City patrolman, appeared in The Jersey Journal, same occurring at his home in that city. He had been a member of the force for twenty years. Previous to becoming identified with the Police department of Jersey City he had been a special officer on the Erie, and was located at the foot of Pavonia avenue in the terminal, from which point he did duty on the New York division.




From the August, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MICHAEL CRONIN
The Susquehanna shops lost a good man and capable machinist when Michael Cronin passed away. The account of his death was published in the Susquehanna Transcript, and it stated that he had been employed for several years as machinist, and had been a resident of the city all his life. He was 43 years old, and the cause of his death was liver trouble. No citizen of the city was held in higher esteem. His surviving relatives are his father and two sisters.




From the August, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN CROSS
He Saw Lincoln Assassinated
In a long article the Kent Tribune records the death of John Cross, at the ripe age of 84 years. He was a native of England, and came here in time to offer his services in defense of the North, and served with distinction in the memorable War of the Rebellion. Also he had been employed in the Kent car shops for a period of forty-two years. Mr. Cross was a man with an honorable history, and was a sterling citizen of the city of Kent, in which he was a prominent and respected resident for fifty-four years.

In addition to being a loyal and faithful employe of the Erie railroad, he was likewise loyal and faithful to the city of his adoption, and filled several city offices with credit and integrity. Not only did Mr. Cross serve the country of his adoption with honor, but his good wife, who survives him at an advanced age, served also as an army nurse. Through nursing the sick Mr. Cross acquired smallpox, which confined him in the Lincoln General hospital, Washington, and when he asked to go back with the boys on recovering, he was told that his services were needed more at the hospital, to which command he acquiesced, like the good soldier he was.

He happened to be in Ford's theatre, Washington, with a friend on the memorable night that President Lincoln was assassinated by J. Wilkes Booth, and he not only saw the great Lincoln slain, but saw his cowardly assassin flee in haste from the stage. Mr. Cross rode at the head of a division when the president's body was borne from the capitol on its way to the tomb.

The Erie's predecessor, the Atlantic & Great Western, ran the Kent shops when he first signed on and continued when the road in succession became the New York, Pennsylvania & Ohio, New York, Lake Erie & Western, and then Erie. He was foreman of the Saw shop for forty years, or until failing health compelled his retirement.

Mr. Cross held membership in the Universalist church, G. A. R., W. R. C., Masons, having been raised in Naval Lodge No. 4, F. & A. M., Washington, D. C, but received his transfer to Rockton Lodge, Kent. He had been commander of A. H. Day Post, and was its chaplain for a number of years.

Mrs. Cross is a member of all the organizations with which her late husband was identified, except the Masons, but she holds membership in the Order of the Eastern Star. Besides his widow, decedent is survived by a daughter.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM BURT CRUMB
An article appearing in the Marion (0.) Star, states that William Burt Crumb, employed as freight conductor by the Erie, and in the service thirteen years, died of pneumonia at his home in Galion, at the age of 42 years. Previous to entering the Erie's employ, Conductor Crumb was a reporter on a Galion newspaper. He is survived by his widow, his mother and a brother. He was a member of the Methodist church, the Elks and Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen.




From the July, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN W. DAWSON
From the Corning, N.Y., Leader the death of John W. Dawson is learned. The report stated that he died of a lingering illness at the age of 58 years. He had been a resident of Elmira, N.Y., thirty-three years, and had been employed by the Erie during all of that period. He is survived by his widow and a sister.

Also:
JOHN W. DAWSON—The death of John W. Dawson is reported in the Hornell Tribune, same occurring at his home in that city at the age of 58 years. Mr. Dawson was one of the most widely known citizens of the city. For the past thirty-three years he had been employed as machinist in the local shops. Besides his widow he is survived by a sister.

Also, from the August, 1919 issue (Hornell Shops news):
Machinist Jack Dawson, who has been employed for about thirty-four years in the back shops, died at his home on Howard St. He underwent an operation for appendicitis about six weeks before his death. He was a valued employe, and well liked by all who knew him. We extend our deepest sympathy to Mrs. Dawson.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ROY D. DECKER
A notice of the death of Roy D. Decker, appeared in the Port Jervis Gazette. He died in the Deerpark sanitarium. For several months he had been a trainman in the employ of the New York division. He was a member of Maghogomock Fire company of Port Jervis, and Delaware Council, No. 9. J. O. U. A. M., and is survived by his parents and two brothers, all of Port Jervis.




From the May, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

PRIVATE BENJAMIN L. DEVORE
Reported as dying in France of pulmonary tuberculosis, March 25 (1919), as the result of being gassed while serving his country in battle; also he was wounded twice. He was a member of the Machine Gun battalion, and sailed overseas in May, 1918. His home was in Matamoras, Pa., and before enlisting was employed as brakeman on the New York division.

Also:
BENJAMIN L. DEVORE—The Port Jervis Union announces the death of Benjamin L. Devore, who succumbed to tuberculosis as a result of having been gassed while fighting in the service of his country in France. His death occurred March 25, and was diagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis, the report havin been received from Adjutant-General Harris at Washington. Deceased was a private in the Machine Gun battalion and enlisted in July 1917, at Honesdale, and was sent to Camp Hancock, Ga. He went overseas in May, 1918 and was badly wounded in battle on September 6, receiving a machine-gun bullet in one leg besides internal wounds. For nearly five years Devore was employed as brakeman on the New York division, and his home was in Matamoras, Pa. He is survived by his parents, three brothers and three sisters.




From the July, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHARLES DORAN
A report published in the Susquehanna Transcript states that Charles Doran, employed by the Erie at Susquehanna, died at his home in Binghamton, NY. He was well known and liked by the people of Susquehanna, among whom he had lived for thirty years while yardmaster of the Erie. He is survived by his widow, three sons and seven daughters.




From the October, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM DOUGHERTY
A notice of the death of William Dougherty appeared in the Susquehanna Transcript. The account stated that deceased had been a resident of that city for many years previous to his removing to New York City, and that he had been employed in the Erie shops, where he was held in high esteem. Surviving him are three sons, two daughters and his father.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN HENRY DWYER
It is reported by the superintendent of the Kent division as having died of pneumonia while attached to a United States battleship. He was employed as fireman by the Erie railroad, and at the time of his demise was stationed at the naval operating base, Hampton Roads, Va.




From the July, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

EDWARD BERNARD EAGEN
The death of Edward Bernard Eagen is reported in the Port Jervis Gazette, as occurring at his home in that city, after a long illness. He was employed as machinist in the local shops, and was a member of the Machinists Union, and Sacred Heart church. His surviving relatives are two brothers and four sisters.




From the June, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES HENRY EAGAN
The Port Jervis Union reports the death of James Henry Eagan. He was a native of England, and on coming to this country was employed as machinist in the rail shop at Port Jervis, having served forty years. He was a member of the Sacred Heart League, Sacred Heart church and Lodge No. 1,079, United Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employes and Railway Shop Laborers. His surviving relatives are three sons and four daughters, all of Port Jervis.

Also:
From the July, 1919 issue:
A gloom was cast over the shop when it was reported that our fellow workman James Eagan, familiarly known as "Eddie," had passed into the Great Beyond. He had been failing for some time, but continued at his trade as machinist until about a month ago, when he was forced to give up on account of ill health. The sympathy of the (Port Jervis) employees is extended to the bereaved family.




From the June, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM JOSEPH EARLEY
He is reported killed in an accident at St. Sulpice, France, March 27, 1919, while attached to the railroad transportation service, to which he had been transferred from the 118th Engineers. He was trained at Camps Meade and Fort Benjamin Harrison, and finally was sent overseas from Camp Upton. Before going abroad he was employed as trainman on the New York division.

Also:
WILLIAM JOSEPH EARLEY—It is reported in the Port Jervis Union that Mrs. John Earley, of that city, received from the War department notice of the death of her son, William Joseph Earley, in France, same being the result of a railroad accident at St. Sulpice, March 27, 1919. He was attached to the Railroad Transportation corp. He was 27 years of age, a native of Port Jervis and a son of John Earley, Erie conductor. Before going overseas he was employed as trainman on the New York division. He was called in the draft of July, 1918, and, after being sent to Camp Meade, was transferred to Fort Benjamin Harrison, and assigned to the 118th Engineers, which departed from Camp Upton for overseas last September. After being further trained in England, they were sent to France, and were on the way to the front when the armistice was signed. Mr. Earley's railroad experience caused him to be transferred to the railroad transportation service, where he was engaged in handling trains for the movement of troops and supplies. He was an estimable young man and held in high esteem by his many friends in his home city. He was a member of Neversink Lodge No. 263, B R.T.; Port Jervis Council No. 473, K. of C.; Holy Name society, and St. Mary's church. His surviving relatives are his parents and two brothers.




From the August, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WALTER D. EARNEST
The sad death by drowning of Walter D. Earnest, electrical welder (Meadville shops), is deplored by his shopmates He was an estimable man and a good citizen. The sympathy of all the shop employees has been expressed for his widow and 7 year-old daughter.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WALTER W. EDDY
Walter W. Eddy, aged 24 years, an employe of the Erie at Hornell, N.Y., died in St. James Mercy hospital from pneumonia. He is survived by his widow, his parents and one brother.




From the April, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM S. EDWARDS
While working on the hump in the Erie yard at Port Jervis, where he was employed as night switchman, says the Gazette, William S. Edwards fell between moving cars, and received injuries which resulted fatally after being removed to St. Francis hospital. Deceased was 28 years of age. He is survived by his parents, three brothers and seven sisters.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

GEORGE W. ELLIOTT
George W. Elliott, employed as flagman at the Market street crossing, Paterson, N. J., was found dead alongside the tracks, at Waldwick, one hour after a westbound express train had passed. No one witnessed the accident, although the train referred to was the only one that passed after Elliott was seen to cross the tracks. The body was found within 160 feet of his home. He was on his way to Paterson to go on duty. He is survived by two sons and one daughter.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

AXEL ERNST
As a result of heart trouble, Axel Ernst, for twenty-eight years employed in the office of auditor of passenger receipts as head clerk in the local ticket department (New York), is dead. Mr. Ernst was one of the old faithfuls in the office, and his presence is sadly missed. He was 68 years old, and leaves bis widow and three children, two of whom, a boy and girl, are employed in the Erie's office of auditor of freight receipts.




PAUL EUBANKS

Paul Eubanks


From the December, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
Paul Eubanks, conductor, working out of Fifty-first street yard (Chicago), died Sunday morning, October 19, 1919, from acute indigestion. He had taken his run into Fifty-first street yard, walked home, and died about one hour after arriving there.

Mr. Eubanks entered service ... (unintelligible) ... one of our most loyal employes, and everyone had a kind word for him. He is survived by his daughter. Conductors Goodman and Duggan and Engineers Landgraf and Rutsay accompanied his body to Rice Lake, Wisconsin, where burial took place.




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES A. FARNSWORTH
From a Marion, 0., newspaper source the news of the death of James A. Farnsworth is received. He was an old-time railroad man and at one time had been a train dispatcher on the Erie. He was 72 years of age and died of paralysis. He is survived by his widow, two sons, one daughter and a sister.




From the June, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

EDWARD FLEMING
It is learned from the Stroudsburg Times-Democrat that Edward Fleming, an employe of the car shops, died at Hamburg sanitarium of tuberculosis, at the age of 32 years. He is survived by his widow, one child and his father.




From the April, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ALLISON C. FLETCHER
The Marion Star reports the death of Allison C. Fletcher, at the age of 24 years. He was a member of the B.A.R.E. and the O.R.C. His surviving relatives are his widow, both parents, two brothers and four sisters.




From the August, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM D. FLORENCE
In a report of the death of William D. Florence appearing in the Port Jervis Union, it was stated that he was 70 years old, and had been a resident of Middletown since removing from Matamoras, Pa. He had been for many years an engineer on the New York division. His surviving relatives are his widow, a son and a daughter.

From the April, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ROBERT C. FLYNN
In a Kent, O. newspaper the death is reported of Robert C. Flynn, who was a victim of pneumonia. He was 27 years old, and had been employed in the local roundhouse. His native city was Scranton, Pa., where his parents reside. Besides his parents he is survived by his widow, two brothers and two sisters.




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

HENRY FORSTER
A report of the death of Henry Forster has been received from Salamanca. He died in the family home in that city from the effects of a paralytic stroke, at the age of 70 years. For twenty-one years he had been in the employ of the Erie, and for the past six years was janitor of a school. He was a member of Chapter 190, P. H. C., and is survived by three sons, two daughters and several grandchildren and great-grandchildren.




From the August, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHARLES W. FOX
From the Galion. O. Inquirer, the death of Charles W. Fox if learned. It stated that he was employed in the Telegraph department for thirty years, and passed away at his home in Marion, the cause assigned being leakage of the heart, following a brief illness. He was a member of the Order of Railroad Telegraphers, and is survived by his widow and two children.




From the January, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JEREMIAH W. FULLER
It is learned from the Port Jervis, N.Y., Union that Jeremiah W. Fuller died at his home in Matamoras, Pa., at the age of 42 years. His illness covered a prolonged period. He had been in the Erie's employ for twenty-three years in the capacity of trainman and conductor on the New York division. Fraternally he was a member of the Port Jervis Hive, Knights of the Maccabees. His surviving relatives are his widow, a son, stepdaughter and a stepson.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

EDWARD GALLAGHER
The Paterson, N.J., Morning Call reports the death of Edward Gallagher, employed as gateman by the Erie at Nutley, N. J. His dead body was found beside the tracks near that place early in the morning, and it is believed that he was struck and killed by a passing train.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

PHILIP GEIB
The Port Jervis Union reports the death of Philip Geib, at his home in Callicoon, N.Y., at the age of 70 years. He had suffered for a long time with a nervous breakdown. He was employed as section man at Hankins, on the Delaware division, and later was transferred to Callicoon for several years. He is survived by his widow, one son, three daughters, one brother and three sisters.




From the August, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

FRED. GETTYS
From the Kent, O., Courier the death of Fred Gettys is learned. It occurred suddenly at his cottage, Brady's Lake, O. On the evening previous he finished his trick in the upper yards, and then mowed his lawn, at which time he appeared to be in good health. Mr. Gettys was a life-long resident of Kent, in which city he had a large number of friends. He had been in the Erie's employ as operator for thirty-five years. His surviving relatives are one daughter and two sisters.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES F. GILMARTIN
The death of this veteran Erie employe was reported in a Scranton daily. For many years be was chief coal inspector, although he had retired from work a few years ago. He had been a resident of Dunmore borough for thirty years. He is survived by his widow, four sons and one daughter.




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

HARRY GOLDSTEIN
This young man, whose age was 37, was killed in a train accident near Vails Gate, N.Y., on the Newburgh short cut, which was the same accident in which Engineer L.W. Bea also lost his life. He was employed as brakeman and his home was at Bath Beach, L.I.




From the September, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

GEORGE GOTTSCHALK
A notice printed in the Port Jervis Union told of the death of George Gottschalk, for several years employed as train dispatcher in the J. Y. office, Jersey City. He passed away at Craigville, N.Y., after a long illness. He was well and favorably known among the employes of the Erie an the New York and Delaware divisions.




From the May, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JACOB A. GOUGHLER
The Kent Courier printed an account of the death of Jacob A. Goughler, an employe of the Erie and well and favorably known about the city. He succumbed to Bright's disease after a prolonged illness. He was 61 years old. and is survived by his widow, one son and a daughter.




From the December, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

HENRY B. GRAY
Henry B. Gray, who for 50 years was in the service of the Erie Railroad as station agent at Perrysburg, NY, died at Dunkirk, NY, November 28, 1919, at the age of 76 years.

At the age of 14 he entered the railroad service as a telegrapher's apprentice, and from that time until about nine years ago, when ill health forced his retirement, he was located at Perrysburg as station agent. His term of service was continuous except for a period during the Civil War, when he joined the Union forces from Dunkirk, NY, with men from his town. At the time of his death he was the only surviving veteran from this group and town. During the war period his station was on the Western division, Dunkirk being the western terminus, and before the construction of the Buffalo & South Western, Perrysburg was the railhead for the adjacent country that has since given way to other points.

He is survived by one son, Clayton W., of Pittsburgh. He was a member of Dayton Post ... (illegible) ...




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

SALVATORE GREGOLI
A letter received from Ridgewood Junction advises of the death of Salvatore Gregoli, who succumbed to an attack of pneumonia at the General hospital, Paterson, N.J. He was 26 years of age, and came to this country from Italy when 16. His position on the Erie was that of trackman, and later track foreman. He was a faithful, loyal and capable employe. His surviving relatives are his widow and (text garbled) children.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

LAWRENCE D. GRIFFIN
After a prolonged illness, Lawrence D. Griffin, employed as a brakeman, and a resident of Jersey City, died at his home. He was a well-known citizen in his native city, and excelled as a handball player. He is survived by his parents and one brother, who is in the United States army. His father is employed as conductor by the Erie.




From the August, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

FRANKLIN P. HALL
A report published in the Hornell Tribune told of the death of Franklin P. Hall, a pioneer railroad man of the southern tier section, same occurring at his home in Mount Pleasant, Pa. He had been employed as conductor by the Erie for the past forty-eight years. He was 68 years old. Besides his widow he is survived by two daughters, one son and two sisters.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES A. HALSEY
James A. Halsey, employed as conductor, 64 years of age, is reported as having died at his home in Hornell, N.Y., of Bright's disease, after an extended illness. He entered the service when a boy, and attention to duty won him promotion. His residence in Hornell covered a period of thirty-one years. He was a member of the 0. R. C. and B. R. T., and is survived by one sister and other distant relatives.




From the August, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

BURT HAMM
The death of Burt Hamm is recorded in the Elmira Star. The notice stated that he died at the Arnot-Ogden hospital at the age of 50 years, as the result of an operation for appendicitis, followed by complications after he had resumed duty. He was employed as gatetender at an Elmira crossing, and passed the greater part of his life in Elmira. He is survived by his widow.




JOHN HANIFIN

John Hanifin


From the July, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
Erie's Heavyweight Bridgetender Dead -- JOHN HANIFIN, for many years bridgetender at the Erie's Newark N. J., draw spanning the Passaic river, died June 11 (1919) at his home in Paterson, N.J., at the age of 50 years.

He is said to have been one of the heaviest men in New Jersey, and weighed 458 pounds. Notwithstanding his great weight he often engaged in "fat men's'' races, and was often a winner. He was known as "Big Jack."



JOHN C. HARING

John C. Haring


From the October, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
John C. Haring, of Piermont, N.Y., an Erie conductor in the 60's, died at his home at the ripe age of 85 years. He was a native of Piermont and belonged to that class of railroad men who helped to make Erie history in the early days when Piermont was its eastern terminus. Not only did he run trains between Piermont and Port Jervis, but between Jersey City and Port Jervis after the terminus was changed. He was a sterling citizen in his home town, and took interest in all matters that were for the public good. He had been for many years village trustee ... (unintelligible text) ... was a devout Christian and a member of the Piermont Reformed church. His surviving relatives are two daughters, two grandsons, a nephew, William P. Haring, who is employed as train dispatcher on the Erie at Jersey City, and two granddaughters.




From the May, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

EDMUND B. HARDENBURGH
The Port Jervis Gazette received word of the death of Edmund B. Hardenburgh, which occurred at his home in Honesdale, Pa. He was at one time employed as conductor on the Delaware division. He had been a senator from Wayne county, Pa., and was elected auditor-general of the state. At the time of his death he was president of the Citizen Publishing Company, of Honesdale.




EDMOND M. HART

Edmond M. Hart


From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
Edmond M. Hart, one of the most valued contributors to the ERIE RAILROAD MAGAZINE, died on January 11 (1919) at his home in Hornell. Mr. Hart was an old and faithful Erie employe, having been with the company in various capacities almost continuously since 1865. His death was wholly unexpected in this office, and the announcement followed close upon the receipt of a contribution from him. "Autumn Scenes," a poem, written by Mr. Hart, appeared in the November number.

The Hornell Evening Tribune-Times, in recording Mr. Hart's death, says in part:
"He was employed first as a fireman and extra engineer, and later for eighteen years was stationary engineer at the Erie shops. For the past six years he has been engaged in the Painting department, dispensing stock.

"While always thus engaged in railroad work, Mr. Hart was a man of distinct literary tastes, and displayed marked ability as a writer and critic. He was the correspondent for the ERIE RAILROAD MAGAZINE for several years, and was for many years a correspondent for the Hornell Times, and acting editor of that paper for one year. He has also been a frequent contributor to the columns of the Evening Tribune.

"In addition to this, Mr. Hart found time to write a large number of poems of real merit, some of them having been published in local papers from time to time, covering a period of many years. He was a great lover of art in all forms and a good judge of pictures.

"Home was everything to him, and he was never happier than when he had some time at home surrounded by his books. His home and community has sustained a great loss in his passing.

"Edmond M. Hart was born at Groton, Tompkins county, June 13, 1840. He was married on September 2, 1872, to Miss Anna Merrell, who survives him, as do also two sons, Edmond Percival, of this city, and Dr. Stanley Matthew, of Port Chester, and a sister, Helen Hart, of Canisteo."
NOTE: Photo was from the March, 1919 issue.




From the July, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

PHILIP HARTMAN
It is learned from the Galion, O., Inquirer that Philip Hartman, an octogenarian, and for many years a resident of Galion, died at his home in that city following a paralytic stroke from which he never recovered. For many years he had been employed by the Erie in the local shops and about the yards. He is survived by his aged widow, two sons, a daughter and four stepchildren.




From the June, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM L. HAYDEN
The death of William L Hayden is reported in the Kent Tribune. He died at his home of pneumonia, after an illness of nine days. He was employed in the Kent shops, and was in his forty-ninth year. His surviving relatives are his widow, his parents, a brother and four sisters.




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

BERNARD EDMUND HEALY
The Marion Star reports the death of Bernard Edmund Healy, who had been connected with the Erie in various capacities for about three years, and at the time of his death was employed elsewhere. He was 21 years of age and died of enlargement of the heart. His surviving relatives are his mother, a sister and a brother. He was a member of the Knights of Columbus.




From the April, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM JOSEPH HEALY
On the night of March 3 (1919), William Joseph Healy, for forty-seven years a faithful employe and tireless worker in the ranks of the Erie railroad, died at his home on Jersey City Heights. Mr. Healy, or "Billy," as he was affectionately called by his friends of many years, was a man who performed duty willingly and untiringly, for he loved the old Erie, and gave it the best he had in him. He died of acute indigestion, after an illness of but a few days. He was 60 years old.

On July 1, 1872, he entered the Erie's employ as messenger in the New York Terminal office. On November 1, 1872, he was promoted to clerk, progressing on November 3, 1883, to assistant chief clerk, and on October 1, 1895, to chief clerk. On August 1, 1900, he was appointed special agent. On September 8, 1906, he was again made chief clerk. On July 1, 1914, the title of special agent was again given him, and he held it until the day of his death.

He had been located in Jersey City for many years, and when he died was the right-hand man of Terminal Superintendent Condon, whose praise of him was unbounded. He had served as chief clerk to J.F. Maher, agent, westbound, and was agent in charge of westbound until the east and westbound offices were consolidated and placed in charge of W.R. Conwell. Then he became special agent to the terminal superintendent. When J.M. Barrett became terminal superintendent he again became chief clerk, and served consecutively as such under Terminal Superintendents J.G. June, E.R. Allen, F.B. Lincoln and F.J. Mosher. When J.J. Mantell became terminal superintendent he again became special agent.

No greater sorrow has been expressed for a deceased employe of the Erie than that which has been given spontaneously for Mr. Healy. He leaves his widow, three sons and three daughters.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLARD W. HESS
After a lingering illness Willard W. Hess, who had been in the service for a number of years, died at his home in Marion, O., at the age of 29 years. He was a member of Emmanuel Lutheran church at Mifflin, and of the Odd Fellows.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

HARRY E. HILL
Harry E. Hill, an Erie brakeman, died in the City hospital, Warren, O., as a result of injuries received in an accident at Leavittsburg. The report says that at the time of the accident Hill was working with his crew in the yard. He was a resident of Meadville.




From the May, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

SERGEANT FARMER J. HILLS
Died at Commercy, Department of Meuse, France, February 11 (1919). He was a member of Company E, 414th Telegraph Battalion Signal Corps, and employed in the telegraph construction gang before going overseas. His death was caused by bronchial pneumonia.

Also:
FARMER J. HILLS— Official notice has been received from France stating that Farmer J. Hills, sergeant in Company E, 414th Telegraph Battalion Signal Corps, U. S. army, died February 11 of bronchial pneumonia, at Commercy, Department of Meuse. Sergeant Hills was in charge of a gang locating lines, and later in charge of a wire-stringing detachment. He received the assignment when the battalion was split up. First reports stated that he had been stricken with pneumonia, but was getting along finely. Later he suffered a relapse and passed away. Before going overseas. Sergeant Hills was a member of Erie General Foreman Monahan's construction gang and one of it most promising men. He was out of one of the Western Union Erie telegraph construction gangs.




From the May, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

PATRICK HINES
A brief announcemen of the death of Patrick Hines appeared in the Susquehanna Transcript. It merely stated that he was one of the oldest Erie employes located in that city. He died at Barnes hospital.




From the July, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ALBERT C. HOFFMAN
As a result of being injured some time ago at Hornell, reports the Corning Leader, Albert C. Hoffman, employed at Hornell, died in the St. James Mercy hospital. He was 62 years old.




From the October, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MATHIAS HOLDERMAN
The death of Mathias Holderman is reported in the Hornell Times, the account of which states that he was 73 years of age, and died following an illness of about two weeks. He was a valued employe of the Erie and had been a resident of Hornell for upward of thirty-six years. His surviving relatives are his widow, two sons and three daughters.




From the June, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

GILSON HOMAN
After serving the Erie well and faithfully for a long term of years in the Marine department, Jersey City, Gilson Homan was killed by a train at the Gregory street crossing, Passaic, when he attempted to cross the tracks to board it. Deceased was 64 years old and was well and favorably known. As floatmaster at the piers he was a capable and painstaking employe. He leaves his widow and three children.

Also:
Gilson Homan, floatmaster at Jersey City, was killed by train 137 at Gregory Ave., Passaic, NJ. "Gil," as he was familiarly known by all his associates, had been a faithful employe of the Erie for the past 32 years. His death was a great shock to all who knew him, and employees of the entire division extend their sincere sympathy to his widow and children.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

HARVEY R. HOOSE
Harvey R. Hoose, formerly a police officer, and later a trainman on the New York division, died in Port Jervis, where he resided, after one week's illness, at the age of 39 years. Before entering the train service he had been for several years a member of the Erie police department. He is survived by his parents, three brothers and one sister.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM EDWIN HOSKING
The news of the death of William Edwin Hosking was received from a newspaper source, and occurred at his home in Port Jervis, N.Y., after an illness of five days. He was 28 years of age. For the past five years he was employed as trainman on the New York division. He is survived by his widow, his mother and four brothers, and was a member of Neversink Lodge, No. 253, D. K. T., and Delaware Council, No. 9, J. O. U. A. M.




From the May, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

J.E. HOTALING
Official announcement is made of the death of J.E. Hotaling in St. Joseph's hospital, Paterson, N.J. Mr. Hotaling had been employed in the office of the auditor of disbursements since September, 1907. In October, 1916, he was granted a leave of absence on account of failing health, and did not resume his duties until February, 1918. His sudden demise came as a great shock to his many friends in and out of railroad service. Up to the time of his illness Mr. Hotaling was an active participant in all kinds of sports and entertainments connected with the Erie, and was a popular favorite by reason of his cheerful nature and pleasing personality. He will be missed by all whose good fortune it was to be well acquainted with him.




From the August, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MARGARET HOWELLS
We regret to note the death of Miss Margaret Howells, one of our stenographers (Youngstown, OH Gen. Supt's office), which occurred at her home in Niles, OH, following an illness of several weeks. Miss Howells was formerly with the traffic department, and about a year ago was transferred to this office. Her presence will be greatly missed by her many business associates, as she had endeared herself to all.




From the May, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

HARRY H. HUFFMAN
The Evening Leader, Corning, N.Y., reports the death of Harry E. Huffman, for twenty years employed as trainman by the Erie and New York Central. Two weeks previous to his death he suffered a stroke of paralysis, which finally proved fatal. He was a member of Corning Tent, Knights of Maccabees. His surviving relatives are his widow, one son and a brother.




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

TIMOTHY HURLEY
One of the best-liked citizens of Susquehanna, Pa., passed away when Timothy Hurley died. He was a victim of kidney trouble, and the end came at Barnes hospital. Mr. Hurley was employed as switch-man in the local yard and was a popular fa­vorite with the railroad boys. He is survived by his parents and four brothers.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CORRELL C. INGALLS
From a Hornell newspaper is gleaned the news of the death of Correll C. Ingalls, employed as hostler at the local shops, that city. He was 47 years of age and had worked for the Erie about three years. Six children survive him. He was a member of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ISAIAH JACKSON
Isaiah Jackson of the (Meadville) car shop force, died on the fiftieth anniversary of his marriage, aged 82 years. He was the first colored employee of the A&GW Railway, fifty-six years ago. A widow and two sons survive. Mr. Jackson was a faithful employe, a good citizen and respected by all who knew him. (P. 748)




From the April, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

DAVID JOSEPH JENKINS
The Daily Star, Marion, O., announces the death of David Joseph Jenkins, who was employed as car repairer at that point. The report says he was crushed by a falling box car, and later died in the Orchard hospital. Mr. Jenkins had worked at the local roundhouse for about seven years. He is survived by his widow, one son and five brothers. He was a member of St. Mary's church, Holy Name society and the Knights of Columbus.




From the July, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

HENRY KASE
The (Huntington, IN) employees all extend to William Kase, Paint Shop Foreman, our sympathy in the death of his father, Henry Kase, who was accidentally killed by a C&NW passenger train at Arlington Heights, IL, near the Old Peoples' Home, where he had been staying the last few years. Mr. Kase had reached the age of 81 years and has been in feeble health for some time. He was one of the oldest employes of the Erie, having been with the company for about thirty years. He helped to build the present car shop building and worked in the planing mill. In recent years he worked at bench work. His body was brought to this city (Huntington, IN) for burial, the funeral sermon being preached by the Rev. Mr. Russman of St. Peters Lutheran church of this city.




From the April, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JEREMIAH KELLEHER
Jeremiah Kelleher, Receiving Clerk and Weighmaster at Weehawken Docks for the past 35 years, died at his home, 613 Sunnyside Ave., Weehawken Heights, recently, after an illness of two weeks. "Jerry," as he was familiarly called by all who knew him, was one of the most conscientious, trustworthy and reliable clerks around Weehawken. His loss as a citizen and employe will be keenly felt by all. He is survived by a widow, two sons, and five daughters.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WALTER KELLY
The Jersey Journall, Jersey City, reports the death of Walter Kelly, who was employed as clerk by the Erie, same occurring at his home in Jersey City, of pneumonia. The illness that carried him off was of but a few days' duration. He was 20 years of age, and is survived by his mother and a twin brother.




From the August, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOSEPH W. KEMPTON
A death notice of Joseph W. Kempton appeared in The Jersey Journal. It stated that he was 62 years of age, and had been for years an employe of the Erie car shop. He was a member of Local No. 1052, Brotherhood of Railway Carmen of America. His surviving relatives are his widow, two sons and two daughters.




From the August, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MICHAEL KENT
Sincere regret is expressed at the passing of Michael Kent, assistant foreman to G. Goldsmith (Buffalo Car Dept. Foreman). Mr. Kent was one of the real old employees, having begun as apprentice in the trade of carpenter, and has thirty years of service to his credit. The employees held him in high esteem. His bereaved family has been extended the sympathy of his fellow workers.




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

THOMAS KILLORAN
The Susquehanna Transcript announces the death of Thomas Killoran, an employe of the Erie shops for many years, after an illness of two weeks. Mr. Killoran was an old and highly respected resident of Susquehanna, and is survived by his widow, a brother and sister, the latter two residents of Troy, N.Y.




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

KARL L. KINGSLEY
Karl R. Kingsley, ticket agent at Cleveland, 0., died suddenly in his office. He had been identified with the road for thirty-one years, having been stationed at the Cleveland office during the past twenty-one years. He had previously been ticket agent at Sharon, Pa. He was one of the Erie's finest employes and had made hosts of friends among travelers who used the road to and from Cleveland. He is survived by his widow and two daughters.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

HARRY FREDERICK KOENIG
News of the death of Harry Frederick Koenig came from a newspaper source, and occurred at his home in Port Jervis, N.Y., of pneumonia, at the age of 27 years. Deceased was a native of Port Jervis, and was a mechanic employed in the local shops. He is survived by his widow, his father, three brothers and one sister. He was affiliated with the Order of. Owls and the Machinists' union.




From the July, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ADAM KRAUS
A report of the death of Adam Kraus appeared in the Hornell Times. It stated that he was 64 years old, and passed away at his home in that city. He had been an employe of the local shops for many years. His surviving relatives are three daughters, two brothers and four grandchildren.




From the July, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOSEPH LAGONEGRO
From the Elmira, N.Y., Star, news of the death of Joseph Lagonegro is learned, same occurring after a brief illness. He was employed as signal repairman. His surviving relatives are his parents, four brothers and three sisters.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

EDWARD C. LANDON
The din of noise incident to ushering in the new year is said to have been responsible for the death of Edward C. Landon, employed in the signal corps, who was struck and fatally injured by a westbound freight train at the Kenton avenue crossing, Kenton. Mr. Landon is reported as having arrived at Kent on train 7, intending to go to his home. An eastbound freight was standing at the crossing ready to move, and its crew, seeing the danger of an oncoming westbound freight, attempted to stop it, but the crew failing to hear the warning on account of the noise made in ushering in the new year, continued, and did not know that it had struck Landon until told of it. He was removed to the Orchard hospital, where he died the next morning. He is survived by his father, with whom he resided, a brother and three sisters.




From the August, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOSHUA A. LEACH
An account of the death of Joshua A. Leach, who forty-six years ago founded the Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen and Engineers at Port Jervis, N.Y., appeared in the Port Jervis Gazette. He died at his home in Sedalia, Mo., at the age of 70 years. He was born in Port Jervis, and his early life was spent there. As an Erie fireman he was employed on the Eastern, now New York division. The establishment of brotherhood lodges was his favorite diversion, and he was the first grand master of the Grand Lodge. He was a member of Ustayantha Lodge of Odd Fellows. His only surviving relative is a daughter, with whom he resided.




From the September, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

THOMAS LEAHY
It is learned from a report published in The Jersey Journal that Thomas Leahy, formerly employed in the (Jersey City) Freight department of the Erie, died at hie home in that city of pneumonia.




From the May, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM LEITZ
A notice of the death of William Leitz appeared in the Meadville Messenger, which stated that it occurred in San Bernadino, Cal., to which resort he had gone in the hope of restoring ill health. For a number of years he had been a foreman in the Meadville shops, and enjoyed the friendship of a wide circle of friends. He is survived by his widow, mother, a brother and two sisters.




From the September, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

EUGENE F. LOBDELL
News of the death of Eugene F. Lobdell is learned from the Deposit Courier, which stated that the cause was convulsions, and his age 54 years. Mr. Lobdell was employed in one of the signal gangs, and was taken suddenly ill. Several months ago he had undergone an operation and had been ill ever since. His surviving relatives are his widow, a son and two daughters.




From the June, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOSIAH C. LONG
Announcement is made of the death of Josiah C. Long, which occurred in New York City after a long illness, at the age of 84. He was a native of Nantucket, Mass., and moved to Ravenna, Ohio, when a young man. For a long term of years he was station agent of the Erie, then the A. & G. W., until 1876, when he removed to Philadelphia, from which city he came to New York. He is survived by a son.




From the May, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

THOMAS LOONEY
The Elmira, N.Y., Star contained a notice of the death of Thomas Looney, who was employed as switchman at Elmira for more than thirty-eight years. The account stated that while conducting a switch-engine crew near the switch leading to the Elmira Foundry plant he stepped onto the main track and was struck and killed by train 18. Deceased was among the best-known railroad men in Elmira, and had been employed in the yard since 1881. He was a member of the Switchmen's Brotherhood and St. Peter and Paul church. He was 60 years old, and is survived by his widow, four daughters and a sister.




From the June, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

C. O. LOWERY
C.O. Lowery, employed as detective at Marion, Ohio, was shot and instantly killed by car robbers while doing duty at Youngstown. He and a brother officer were searching for thieves who had been looting cars, and as they approached two negroes to question them regarding their business, both drew revolvers and opened fire, Lowery being hit twice. Deceased was 24 years old.




From the May, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

J. F. LYNCH
It is learned from the Passaic, N.J., Herald that J.F. Lynch, for a number of years officer at the Erie passenger station and later an Erie officer, died at his home in that city, after an illness of six months, at the age of 62 years. Besides his widow, he leaves three sons and two daughters.




From the June, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES P. MACK
Announcement of the death of James P. Mack is made in the Meadville Messenger, same having occurred at Spencer hospital, that city, at the age of 38 years. He had been employed at the Erie shops for a number of years, and was generally respected by his fellow employes. He was a member of St. Brigid's church and Holy Name society. Also he held membership in the Machinists' union and Taylor Hose company. His surviving relatives are three brothers and one sister.

Also:
James P. Mack, an Erie machinist, died recently at the age of 34. He was a faithful apprentice in his younger days, and made good at his trade when he mastered it. He was a lifelong resident of Meadville. His surviving relatives are a brother and sister.




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES W. MAHON
The death of James W. Mahon is announced. He was employed as conductor on the New York, Susquehanna & Western division. His age was 60, and he was employed on the NYS&W for upward of thirty years. He is survived by his widow and four daughters.




From the June, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

DENNIS JOHN MAHONEY
The report of the death of Dennis John Mahoney appeared in the Galion Inquirer, which stated it was caused by typhoid pneumonia, after a brief illness. Deceased was in his twenty-third year. He began as messenger, then learned the trade of machinist, and remained in the Erie's employ up to the time the illness that resulted in his death overtook him. He was a devout member of St. Patrick's church, and held the respect of a wide circle of friends. His surviving relatives are his parents, two sisters and other more distant relatives.




From the June, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN C. MALONEY
Announcement is made in the Elmira advertiser of the death of John C. Maloney, which occurred at his home in that city, of which he had been a resident for thirty years. He was employed as inspector at the cripple yard. He was a member of the C. M. B. A., and is survived by his widow, three sons and one daughter. He was 67 years of age.




From the July, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM MALONEY
William Maloney, a trainman employed on the Allegheny division, fell from the top of a car in the yards at Cuba and sustained injuries that resulted in his death a few minutes later. He had been employed on the road for thirty-eight years, and his age was 58. He was a member of the B. R. T. His surviving relatives are his widow, a son, a brother and a sister, all of Hornell.




From the May, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILBRAHM MANNERING
It is learned from the Journal, Deposit, N.Y., that Wilbrahm Mannering died recently at his home in Bridgeburgh, Ontario, Canada. He had been previously employed as machinist by the Erie.




From the May, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

THOMAS C. MANWARING
The announcement of the death of Thomas C. Manwaring appeared in the Port Jervis Union, which stated that he had suffered a short illness. He was 70 years old. In early life he became an engineer on the Pennsylvania railroad, and later entered the Erie's employ as engineer on the New York division. His home was in Matamoras, Pa., where he once served as constable. He was a member of Deerpark Lodge No. 1, B. L. F. & E., of Port Jervis, Farnsworth Lodge, I. 0. 0. F., and Mount Sinai Encampment of Jersey City. His surviving relatives are two sons and four grandchildren.




From the April, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ANSEL K. MARTIN
Announcement is made by the Republican, Binghamton, N.Y., of the death of Ansel K. Martin, who was employed as foreman of the local freight house. He was 44 years of age, and had been employed by the Erie since last November. The cause of his death was heart failure, and it attacked him suddenly while he was conversing with his family at his home. His surviving relatives are his widow, his mother and a sister.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

HAROLD R. MARTLING
It is learned through the Engineering department that Harold R. Martling, employed as draughtsman, died of pneumonia at his home, Belleville, N.J., after one week's illness. Mr. Martling was 33 years of age, and had been in the Erie's employ thirteen years. He had lived all his life in Belleville, and was very popular there, as well as with his associates in railroad life. He is survived by his widow and three little children, two girls and a boy. His body was cremated.




From the July, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES WILMOT MASON
The death of James Wilmot Mason is reported in the Elmira Advertiser. The account says that he dropped dead while on duty at the Hudson street crossing, where he was employed as gate tender. The cause was dilation of the heart. Deceased was a cripple, having lost an arm in an accident. He is survived by nine children, four sons and five daughters.




From the July, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES H. MATHER
It is learned from the Paterson Morning Call that James H. Mather, for many years employed as flagman at the Main street crossing, died at his home in that city as the result of a nervous breakdown. He is survived by two sons, both of whom were in the United States service.




From the July, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN McBRIDE
An account of the death of John McBride, retired police sergeant in the employ of the city of Paterson, appeared in the Paterson, N.J., Morning Call. It stated that he died after a lingering illness at his home in that city, of which he was an old resident. He was 80 years of age. He had been employed in the Erie shops, after which he joined the local police department and became a sergeant. He is survived by a brother, a sister, three sons and a daughter.




From the April, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

EDWARD McCARTNEY
Among the recent deaths reported in the Galion Inquirer was that of Edward McCartney, who had been employed as carpenter in the Erie service. He suffered with dropsy for several years, and was crippled through an injury. He had been a resident of Galion for about 30 years. His surviving relatives are his widow, five sons and three daughters, a brother and twenty-four grandchildren.




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MARTIN McCAY
Advices have been received through a Meadville newspaper that Martin McCay, formerly employed as supervisor of track construction at that point, died at his home at Evans City. He was about (unintelligible) years of age, and had been a resident of Meadville for a number of years previous to removing to Evans City, where he was employed in a similar capacity. He is survived by four sons




LIEUT. JOHN R. McDERMOTT

John R. McDermott


From the May, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
Died in France, March 5 (1919), from injuries received in an automobile accident while serving his country. He enlisted as a private in the American army, and by gallantry rose to the rank of lieutenant. His home was in Allendale, N. J., and he was employed in the office of the general superintendent, New York City.

Also:
The many friends of Lieut. John R. McDermott, a faithful employe of the Erie, have learned with deep regret of his untimely death, which occurred March 5 in Tours, France, four days after an automobile accident in which he was fatally injured while in the service of his country.

Lieut. McDermott received his early military training in the Bergen Guards of Allendale, N.J., in which village he made his home. He was popular with everyone in the community, and was beloved by the young people, because he was an active participant in all athletic events, and they were certain that "Jack" would make good. He was especially fond of baseball, being a most capable player, and was a clean-cut sportsman at all times. He gave up these pleasures to answer the call of his country.

Going to France early in the year 1918 as a private, he rose to the rank of lieutenant His success in athletics was duplicated by his record in the army, and he was popular among the officers and men, testimony of which was borne out in a letter sent to the dead soldier's parents by Dewell V. Wall, another Erie soldier in France.

Lieut. McDermott had received assurance that a responsible position awaited him with the Erie railroad upon his discharge from the army, and while anticipating that this was not far distant, news was received of the unfortunate accident.

He was a member of Ridgewood Council, Knights of Columbus; Holy Name Society of St Luke's Church, Hohokus, and of the Erie Railroad Athletic Association. It is said that his body will be brought home in the near future for burial.

Also, from the December, 1920 issue:
JOHN J. McDERMOTT—The Susquehanna Transcript printed an account of the funeral of Lieutenant John J. McDermott, who died in the defence of his country in France, having fallen in Tours. This young soldier was attached to the Quartermaster's division of Salvage Regulating department of the A. E. F., and met his fate in a collision between the motorcycle which he was riding and a motor truck, being thrown against the curb and his skull fractured. The home of young McDermott was in Allendale, N. J., and funeral service over his body, recently brought home, was conducted at St. Luke's church, Hohokus, and attended by a large assemblage of friends and residents of the community. The Knights of Columbus and Legion of Honor paraded in his honor. Decedent was 23 years of age, and before entering the service was a valued employe of the Erie in the Jersey City offices.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES J. McFARLAND
As a result of being scalded when his engine was smashed by being side-swiped by a cut of cars at the Marion, O., hump, James J. McFarland, employed by the Erie as fireman, died at Orchard hospital. He was a widower, and is survived by two sons and two sisters. He was 34 years of age. His death was reported in the Marion Star.




From the August, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN F. McINERNEY
The Susquehanna Transcript printed a report of the death of John F. McInerney, who, previous to twelve years ago, when he removed to New York City, held the position of foreman in the Erie shops. He was a well respected resident of Susquehanna, where he had many friends. The cause of death was not stated. His surviving relatives are his widow, three sons, two of whom served their country in France, and four daughters. The remains were brought to Susquehanna for burial.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM D. McGOWAN
The death of William D. McGowan, a passenger conductor in the employ of the Erie, running between Marion, O., and Salamanca, N.Y., is reported in the Daily Star, Marion, the cause given being a stroke of paralysis. Conductor McGowan was 64 years of age, and was one of the best known employes on the road. He was a member of the O. R. C., Elks and Knights of Columbus.




From the July, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN McNAMARA
The death of John McNamara, another veteran of the Erie and the Atlantic & Great Western, is reported in the Gallon, O., Inquirer. He passed away at his home in Galion at the advanced age of 83 years. He came here from Ireland when a young man, and located in Galion, in which city he was a respected resident for half a century. Previous to entering another pursuit he worked as section man on the A&G.W. He reentered the employ of the railroad, then the Erie, and became a sweeper in the shops. His flower garden was one of Galion's beauty spots. He is survived by his widow, a son and a daughter.




From the September, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MATTHEW McNAMARA
From the Elmira Star-Gazette the death of Matthew McNamara is learned. The report stated that he died suddenly in front of the passenger station. He was 62 years old, and had been employed as car repairer for a period of thirty years. Heart disease is supposed to have been the cause. He is survived by two sons, a daughter and two brothers. As a veteran railroad man Mr. McNamara was well known and had a wide circle of friends.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

DANIEL W. McWILLIAMS
Among the employes of the old New York & Erie railroad was Daniel W. McWilliams, who at the age of 18 years joined the forces. He was a native of Orange county, and later won distinction in the world of commerce. He died in Brooklyn, N.Y., Jan. 8 (1919). He was a banker in Elmira, N.Y., and in 1861 was elected treasurer of the Peoria & Warsaw railroad. He was also a member of the banking house of Henry Q. Marquard, during which he was treasurer of the St. Louis & Iron Mountain railroad. He had been treasurer of Manhattan Railway Company, and in 1904 was made treasurer of the Interborough. He was one of the founders of the Y. M. C. A.




From the September, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

GIDEON MERCHANT
The Wellsville, N.Y., Reporter printed an account of the death of Gideon Merchant, who was injured at River Junction last May by a ditcher. His death occurred in St. James Mercy hospital, Hornell. He is survived by a daughter, with whom he made his home, and a sister. He was 61 years old, and a member of the Masonic fraternity.




From the July, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CARL H. MESSINGER
From the Republican Press, Salamanca, N.Y., news of the death of Carl H. Messinger is learned. He died at Higgins Memorial hospital, Olean, N.Y., at the age of 61 years. The cause was abscess of the ear. He had been employed by the Erie since 1880, and from 1882 until 1891 had charge of the local baggage room. Later he was placed in the ticket office, and two years ago was appointed ticket agent tor Salamanca, that office being separated from the office of freight agent, held by F. H. Hicks, who was then designated as freight agent, and Mr. Messinger as ticket agent. He retired from active work last summer on account of illness. Deceased was a prominent citizen, and was affiliated with Masonry, holding membership in Cattaraugus Lodge 239, F. & A. M.; Salamanca Chapter 266, R. A. M.; Salamanca Commandery 62, K. T. and Ismalia Temple, Order of the Mystic Shrine, Buffalo. He had been master of Cattaraugus Lodge and commander of Salamanca Commandery. He was also a member of the Buzzard club. Surviving him are his widow, two daughters and two sisters.




From the July, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ALEXANDER MILLENER
Another old-time Erie employe has passed to his long reward, the report of whose death appeared in the Elmira, N.Y., Advertiser. It stated that Alexander Millener, one of the first trainmen to run out of Elmira, died at his home in Rochester, N.Y. at the advanced age of 79 years. He entered the Erie's employ in 1855, and up to ten years ago, when he was retired, worked on trains running between Elmira and Buffalo and Rochester. He had served faithfully for fifty years, when old age compelled his retirement. He is survived by two sons and a daughter, making his home with the latter since becoming a widower.




From the June, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES M. MITCHELL
James M. Mitchell, employed as chief clerk in the Statistical Department of the office of auditor of freight accounts, died at his home in New York City of a complication of diseases, after serving the Erie faithfully and loyally for a period of thirty-three years. He was 64 years of age, and is survived by his widow.




From the April, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHARLES R. MONROE
It was learned from the Susquehanna Transcript that Charles R. Monroe, for the past twelve years employed as machinist in the local shops, died recently in Oakland at the age of 64 years. He was a member of the International Association of Machinists, and is survived by two brothers who reside in Brooklyn, N.Y.




From the August, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM P. MOORE
The second oldest passenger conductor in point of service on the Kent division passed out when William P. Moore died at his home in Dayton, O., in his 62nd year. Conductor Moore's record and the account of his death appeared in the Marion Star. He was very well and favorably known along the line, and had many friends. He began as engine wiper at Kent, and in 1876 became a trainman. Later he was promoted to freight conductor in 1888 (unintelligible).




From the May, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN MORLEY
It is learned from a Corry, Pa., newspaper that John Morley, for a number of years an employe of the Erie, died at Corry hospital, the result of fracturing his hip by falling on an icy sidewalk. He had been in the hospital twelve days. At the time of his death he was in charge of the Sixth avenue crossing. He was 74 years of age and was a member of St. Thomas church.




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ROSS MORRIS
A report of the death of Ross Morris appears in the Youngstown Vindicator, as having occurred at Washingtonville, 0., where he was killed by an engine. Deceased was 21 years of age, and was employed as brakeman on a mixed train on the Niles and Lisbon branch. He is survived by his widow, an infant child, two brothers and three sisters.




From the June, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WALTER MOSAKOWSKI
The Kent, Ohio, Courier reports the death of Walter Mosakowski, which occurred at Ravenna hospital at the age of (unintelligible), the cause being pneumonia. Deceased was a member of the Erie car repair force, and is survived by his widow and two children.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ROBERT MURPHY
The local yard at Susquehanna, Pa., has lost one of its switchmen, Robert Murphy, who was 20 years of age. Pneumonia seized him, and his death occurred after a few days' illness. Murphy was one of thirteen children, and he resided at Oakland. His was the first death in the family. He was a member of the B. R. T.




From the September, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

THOMAS C. MURPHY
A notice of the death of Thomas C. Murphy appeared in the Port Jervis Union. He was 40 years old, and died in St. Luke's hospital, Newburgh, N.Y., after a long illness. For many years he was a locomotive engineer out of Port Jervis and conducted a haberdashery. He was affiliated with the Elks, Hibernians. Lodge No. 186, Knights of Columbus, Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Adopted Daughter Lodge, Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen and Engineers, all of Jersey City. His surviving relatives are his widow, mother, a brother and two sisters.




From the January, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

THOMAS MYLOTT
After thirty-seven years of faithful service as engineer of the Erie's pumping station east of Decatur, Ind., Thomas Mylott died at his home of acute bronchitis, following a severe cold contracted while on a visit to Chicago.

Mr. Mylott was a native of Ireland and came to this country at the age of 17 years and settled in Youngstown, Ohio, at first entering a mercantile pursuit. Later he took charge of the pumping station mentioned and retained charge until his death. He was in his 70th year. His surviving relatives are his widow, two sons and six daughters.




From the April, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

PATRICK NOONAN
The Youngstown Vindicator reports the death of Patrick Noonan, who succumbed to blood poisoning at the age of 85 years. Deceased was a native of Ireland, and came to Youngstown in 1854. For fifty seven years he was in the employ of the Erie, retiring a few years ago. He was a devout member of St. Columba's church. His surviving relatives are a daughter, three grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

Photo of Patrick Noonan.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

LEROY NORTON
Leroy Norton, who died at his home in Hornell following a lingering illness, had lived in Hornell for forty-three years and had been employed in the train service for forty-seven years. He was a member of the B. R. T., and is survived by three sons, two daughters, three brothers and five sisters.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

GEORGE OAKLEY
The Port Jervis Gazette reports the death of George Oakley, a toolroom attendant in the employ of the Erie at Susquehanna, Pa. The report says that Mr. Oakley was burned severely when the engineer's toolroom took fire, and died shortly after being taken to the hospital. He is survived by his widow.




From the April, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

PATRICK O'CONNOR
From a Port Jervis newspaper source came the news of the death of Patrick O'Connor, who succumbed to an attack of pneumonia. He was 47 years of age. For about thirty years he had been employed, first as fireman and then engineer on the New York division. He held membership in Division 64, B. of L. E., St. Mary's church, Holy Name society and the Knights of Columbus, all of Port Jervis. His surviving relatives are his widow, four sons, one daughter, his mother, a brother and two sisters.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES FRANCIS O'HARA
A report says that Mr. O'Hara died at his home, Sparrowbush, N.Y., at the age of 82 years. He was a resident of Port Jervis during the greater part of his life, and was employed as machinist at the Port Jervis shops. His surviving relatives are his widow, five children, a brother and three sisters.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES O'NEIL, Meadville Shops
The number of influenza cases has been somewhat reduced. James O'Neil, expert boilermaker, aged 34 years, is among the victims. He is survived by his parents and three sisters and brothers.




From the September, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ENOCH W. OLIVER
From the Hoboken Observer news of the death of Enoch W. Oliver is learned. The report states that he died at the age of 72 years, of paralysis, at his home on Jersey City Heights. For more than fifty-one years Mr. Oliver had been in the Erie's employ, and served in the capacity of checker. His surviving relatives are his widow, two sons, four daughters and seven grandchildren.




From the September, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

EDWARD ONDERDONK
A brief notice of the death of Edward Onderdonk appeared in the Port Jervis Union. It stated that he had been employed as dispatcher in the J.Y. office, Jersey City. He is survived by his widow and a daughter.




From the April, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

EDWARD PANGBORNE
It is learned from the Daily Chronicle, Warren, 0., that Edward Pangborne, who was a well known citizen of Leavittsburg, and who had been employed by the Erie at the Leavittsburg station for forty years, was killed at St. Petersburg, Fla., by being struck by an automobile driven by a young woman, said to be a resident of Gloverdale, Ind. He had been in the habit of spending recent winters in Florida, where he owned a home. He is survived by his widow, three sons and three daughters.




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

A.A. PATTENGILL
From an Elmira, N.Y., newspaper the death of A.A. Pattengill is learned, same having occurred at Montclair, N.J. He had been for many years in the Erie train service, and later became identified with the West Shore railroad as passenger conductor. He was retired about eight years ago. Familiarly known among his associates as "Pat," he was among the most congenial railroad men in this country, and carried the smile and kindly manners that won friends and held them. He is survived by two sons and one daughter. He had been a member of Ivy Lodge No. 897, F. and A. M., of Elmira, since 1872, and of Elmira Chapter No. 42, R.A.M., since 1878; also St. Omer's Commandery, No. 19, K.T.




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHARLES A. PATTISON
A Passaic, N.J., newspaper report tells of the death of Charles A. Pattison, at one time chief clerk in the Auditing department, who quit the service to engage in a private enterprise. He is sur­vived by his widow and one son. He was 49 years of age and a victim of influenza followed by pneumonia.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

FREDERICK PENDINGTON
Among the employes reported as having died was Frederick Pendington of Bath, N.Y., who succumbed to pneumonia at the age of 32. He was employed as brakeman. His surviving relatives are his widow, two children and his parents, who are residents of Detroit, Mich.




From the June, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES B. PENNAL
James B. Pennal, employed in a clerical capacity in the office of auditor of freight accounts, died suddenly of heart failure, at his home in Ramsey, N. J., at the age of 60 years. He had been employed in the same office for a period of eighteen years, and was very popular with his fellow-employes. He was a member of Fortitude lodge, F. and A. M., and had arranged to visit Trenton, N.J., the day following the one on which he passed away. He is survived by his widow, one son and two daughters.




From the May, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ELMER PERKINS
A report in the Elmira, N.Y. Advertiser announced the death of Elmer Perkins at his home in Hornell, at the age of 53 years, after an illness of several months. He had been for several years a faithful employe in the Hornell shops. He was a member of the Loyal Order of Moose and the Eagles. Besides his widow, he is survived by a brother.




From the April, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

SALVATOR PETRUSO
It was learned from the Meadville Daily Messenger that Salvator Petruso, 60 years of age, and an employe of the Erie, died at his home in Meadville. He is survived by his widow, two sons, a daughter and three brothers.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

LEROY A. POLING
From a reliable source news has been received of the death by accident of Leroy A. Poling, employed as brakeman in the Huntington, Ind., yards. The account said that the supposition was that he was attempting to get off the front end of a switch engine, and fell beneath it. No one witnessed the accident, and his body was found after the engine had passed over it. At the time Poling was on his way to go east with his train. He is survived by his widow, a son, his mother, three brothers and a sister. He was a member of the Moose and the B. of R. T.




From the July, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHARLES POTTS
From the Marion, O., Star is learned the death of Charles Potts, a section hand at Marion, who died at the Orchard hospital from injuries received in the yard, when he was said to have been struck by an engine. He was 35 years old, and is survived by his widow, five small children, his parents, two brothers and a sister.




From the May, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHARLES POWERS
On the night of March 29 (1919), Charles Powers, for twenty-seven years a faithful employee and tireless worker in the ranks of the Erie Railroad, died at his home, 781 Harvard street, Akron.

Mr. Powers, or "Charlie," as he was affectionately called by his friends of many years, was a man who performed his duties, working untiringly. He loved the old Erie, and gave it the best he had in him. He died of Spanish influenza, after an illness of but a few days. He was 45 years of age. He entered the service of the Erie as brakeman, and from that time on served in the capacity of brakeman and conductor until seven years ago, when he was made assistant yard master. After serving one year in that position, he was appointed assistant general yard master, with the territory of Akron yard, Kenmore yard, and Akron belt.

He had been a resident of Akron for the past thirty-five years. He was the right-hand man of General Yard Master Zimmerman, whose praise of him was unbounded. He leaves a wife and two children, and one brother, who is a conductor on the Kent Division.

The Akron lodge of the Eagles was in charge of the funeral arrangements, and the attendance at the funeral showed his popularity among fellow-workmen and lodge members. No greater sorrow has been expressed for a deceased employe of the Erie than that which has been given Mr. Powers.




From the August, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WALTER PUGH
The Kent Tribune records the death of Walter Pugh, colored, who was a victim of dropsy, of which disease he died after several months' suffering. He was employed in the Kent shops. His surviving relatives are his widow and a daughter.




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES E. PURCELL
The death of another veteran employe, James E. Purcell, is reported in a Goshen, N.Y., newspaper. Mr. Purcell, who died in that village, had been confined to his home for more than a year with the illness that proved fatal. He had been employed for a great many years on milk trains 17 and 18 as flagman. He was a member of the Goshen Presbyterian church and is survived by his widow and four daughters.

Also:
When James E. Purcell, flagman on milk trains 17 and 18, passed away, one of the best known trainmen on the New York Division went to his long reward. He was a first-class railroad man and performed duty faithfully and loyally.




From the August, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MICHAEL QUANE
It is learned from the Hornell Tribune that Michael Quane, employed as a trackhand, was run over and killed by a switch engine in the fast freight yard near the ice plant, Hornell. Mr. Quane had quit work and was on his way home walking on the track when the accident happened. Decedent had been a resident of Hornell for about fifty years, and had been an Erie employe for thirty years. He was a highly respected citizen and a devout member of St. Ann's church. His surviving relatives are two sons and four daughters.




From the May, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

HAROLD REED
It is officially announced from Port Jervis that Harold Reed died in a railroad accident in France on the eve of his departure for the United States. He was in the provost guard of the A. E. F. Before going to France Mr. Reed was an assistant caller at Port Jervis.




From the May, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN REILLY
Announcement is made in a Hoboken, N. J., newspaper of the death of John Reilly, a brakeman employed at Weehawken. The account says that Reilly was found dead in the hallway of his home in Weehawken. He had quit work early in the morning and was seen going toward his home shortly before his body was found in a sitting posture on the second-floor landing. He was 29 years old. It is believed that Reilly died from natural causes. He is survived by his widow and three children.




WILLIAM H. RICHARDSON

Captain William H. Richardson


From the December, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
After a serious illness lasting about five months, Captain William H. Richardson died at the home of his sister-in-law, Mrs. Sarah E. Timson, No. 180 Stuyvesant avenue, Arlington, N. J., Nov. 3 (1919).

Captain Richardson was born in Wilmington, Del., in 1856, and came from a seafaring family. He went to the Pacific coast with his parents in the early 70's and steered boats on the coast, running a ferryboat between San Francisco and Oakland.

Leaving there is 1886 he entered the employ of the Philadelphia & Reading, steering ferryboats on their ferry between Philadelphia and Camden. In 1887 he took charge of one of the Sandy Hook boats operated by the Central Railroad of New Jersey, being a shipmate of Capt. T.A. Egbert, who was afterwards marine superintendent of the Erie railroad.

On Nov. 11, 1889, Captain Richardson entered the Erie employ. He was a careful, conservative man, always ready and willing to assist his fellow man, loyal and kindly to a fault.

During his thirty years on the ferry he never had a serious collision or accident of any kind. Funeral services were conducted by the Rev. Henry R. Rose, D. D., of the Church of the Redeemer, Newark, and also by the Hancock Lodge No. 87, Knights of Pythias.




FRED E. RITTMAN

Fred E. Rittman


From the October, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
Fred E. Rittman died September 3 (1919) at the Emergency hospital, Washington, D. C., after a long and painful illness.

Mr. Rittman was treasurer of the Atlantic & Great Western, later the New York, Pennsylvania & Ohio railroad, when the general offices were at Meadville, in 1870, under the administration of Gen. J. H. Devereaux, as president, and later receiver. Upon the reorganization of the Atlantic & Great Western into the New York, Pennsylvania & Ohio, in 1880, Mr. Rittman left Meadville for Cleveland, Ohio, when the general offices of the railroad were removed from Meadville to that city.

Mr. Rittman was born in 1847 at Cleveland, and while living at Meadville married Miss Georgiana Derickson (who survives him), a daughter of Major David V. Derickson. On Jan. 1, 1885, during the time the New York, Pennsylvania & Ohio railroad was under lease to the Erie, Mr. Rittman resigned his position as treasurer to accept that of cashier of the National Bank of Commerce, Cleveland, which responsible position he held for an extended period of years. After severing his connection with the Cleveland banking institution, Mr. Rittman engaged in other business activities, and from 1901 to 1905, under President McKinley's administration, was auditor for the War department at Washington, and during the European war his duties were with the Council of National Defense, Washington, where he lived latterly with his youngest daughter, Mrs. Georgiana Butts.

Mr. Rittman was a man of marked ability, showing it in every position held by him, of dignified and pleasing personality, and during his service with the railroad was well and favorably known by the railroad employes of the western end of the Erie. The present Erie station at Rittman, Ohio, west of Akron, was named after him.

Mr. Rittman is survived by a son, David Derickson Rittman, of Akron, Ohio; two daughters, Mrs. Josephine Grace Cerri, wife of the Italian vice-consul of Italy, located at Cleveland, Ohio, and Mrs. Georgiana Butts, of Washington, D. C; and one grandchild, the son of Mrs. Cerri. Funeral services were held Friday, Sept. 5, and interment made at Washington, D. C.




From the May, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN L. ROSS
It is learned from the Port Jervis Gazette that John L. Ross died at his home of acute indigestion, after a short illness, at the age of 60 years. In 1876 he entered the service of the Erie as trainman, and rose to be conductor. He was a Delaware division man. He held membership in the J. O. U. A. M., Owls, Patriotic Order Sons of America, Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen and Patriotic Order of Americans, all of Port Jervis. Besides his widow, he is survived by a son, a brother and two sisters.




From the September, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHARLES F. RUSBOULT
Both the Dunkirk Observer and Olean Herald published notices of the death of Charles F. Rusboult, a former telegrapher at Dunkirk in the Erie's employ. He came to Hinsdale twenty-five years ago, and resided there until the time of his death. His age was 60 years. He was a member of the Odd Fellows. His surviving relatives are his widow, a brother, nephew and niece.




From the January, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

BENJAMIN SAUL
From the Evening News, Paterson, N.J., the death of Benjamin Saul is learned. Mr. Saul, who was an Erie detective, died in the Hackensack hospital as the result of a bullet wound in the stomach, same having been inflicted by one of two chicken thieves whom he attempted to place under arrest at Passaic Junction, and who escaped after firing the shot. Mr. Saul was a hero of the late war in France, and was severely wounded in the great Argonne Forest battle. He was 27 years old.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN SAVAE
The Portage County Democrat announces the death of John Savae, employed as section hand by the Erie railroad, same being the result of having been killed by falling between cars at Windham, 0. The report says that Savae was standing on a car in order to signal to his fellow workman to be careful when the train moved; and when it did move the jar caused him to fall between two cars, which crushed him to death. His age was twenty years, and he made his abode in the company's bunk house at Leavittsburg. He was unmarried.




From the May, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM C. SCALES
A notice of the death of William G. Scales appeared in the Port Jervis Gazette, which stated that he died of influenza, after having the disease twice since last January. He was 19 years of age and was employed as machinist helper in the Port Jervis shops. He was a member of St. Peter's Lutheran church and the American Association of Machinists. His surviving relatives are his parents, two brothers and three sisters.

Also:
Engine Dispatcher William Scales, Jr., has the sympathy of the entire organization on account of the death of his son, William G. Scales, on March 23 (1919), from an attack of influenza last January. He was 19 years old, a machinist helper in the (Port Jervis) shop, and a friend highly esteemed among his associates.




From the January, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

LOUIS A. SCHEB
Louis A. Scheb died at his home, 191 W. Main St. (Port Jervis) after a short illness. He was 49 years old. He learned the trade of blacksmith, and for nearly ten years has been foreman of the Erie Rail Shop, this city (Port Jervis). He was an excellent citizen, skillful workman, and was held in high esteem by his fellow-employes, associates and friends. He is survived by his widow, two brothers and two sisters.




From the May, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ISAAC K. SCHULTZ
The Port Jervis Gazette announces the death of Isaac K. Schultz, in the town of Greenville, N. Y., of apoplexy, after a short illness, at the age of 73 years. He was a veteran of the Civil War and was in the artillery service. For many years he was baggagemaster at the Port Jervis station, and was well and favorably known. He was a member of the J. O. U. A. M.. and is survived by one son, two sisters and four grandchildren.




FRANK R. SEELY

Frank R. Seely.


From the January, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
The Erie railroad lost an old and faithful employe and Hornell a good citizen when Frank R. Seely passed away. Mr. Seely was a trainman in the passenger service, and had been in the employ of the Erie since he was a boy of 14, when he went to work on trains 32 and 39 "greasing" and flagging for his uncle, "Mart" Marean, and later with "Gurd" Van Tuyl, who ran trains 4 and 6 between Owego and Buffalo, and later when this run was changed he ran with Conductor G. M. Writer on trains 1 and 2 between Binghamton and Buffalo, serving as flagman. He was a member of the crew of trains 1 and 2 nearly thirty-five years, and when the run was changed to Jersey City and Buffalo he removed to the latter city. When these trains were abandoned he took up his abode at Hornell and became one of the crew that ran trains 48 and 9. He remained on these runs until the time of his death.

He was enthusiastic over fire matters, and at different times held membership in engine company No. 2, Owego, and later Susquehanna Hose company No. 1.

The Erie men along the line greatly miss this kind soul, as he was a prime favorite among them. He is also missed by the patrons who rode on his trains, for he was one of the employes who best defined Erie courtesy, and never failed to look after the safety and comfort of passengers.

He leaves his widow, who was before her marriage Miss Georgia Hemstrought.




From the April, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

PAUL J. SETHMAN
The Kent, O. Tribune announces the death of Paul J. Sethman, who met his fate in an accident. He had been in the Erie's employ since he was a boy of 14, and had worked well and faithfully for seven years. He was 21 years old, and he was a native of Bradford, Pa. He is survived by his father, a sister and his grandmother. At the time of his death he was engaged to be married to Miss Maude Bowers, daughter of Fred W. Bowers, foreman painter at the Erie shops.




From the August, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

J.M. SEWELL
The death of J.M. Sewell, one of the Erie's oldest conductors on the western end of the road, is reported in the Huntington Herald as having died at his home in Chicago. The report does not state cause of death, although he had been recently the victim of an attack of acute indigestion. He was 68 years old, and was a member of the Masonic fraternity, Odd Fellows and the O.R.C. His surviving relatives are his widow, a sister and two cousins.




From the April, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

THOMAS SEYMOUR
The people of Bath, N.Y., mourn the death of Thomas Seymour, who, says the Hornell Times, had been employed in the freight office of the Erie at Bath. Mr. Seymour was a son of the late Orange Seymour, a former member of assembly and sheriff of Steuben county, in which Bath is situated. He had been a resident of the county seat since childhood, and was 77 years old when he died. After quitting the Erie he became an employe in the Steuben county clerk's office. He left no relatives.




JOHN J. SHANLEY

John J. Shanley Sr.


From the June, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
John J. Shanley, for forty years a faithful and loyal employe of the Erie, passed to his long reward at his home in Kent, Ohio, after a long period of illness.

Mr. Shanley also was a friend to humanity, and in addition to the faithful labor he performed for the Erie, was a public servant in his adopted state, and filled two high positions of trust with a fidelity and zeal that won for him the praise and endorsement of his fellow-citizens that come to those who are honest and upright in the performance of duty.

By birth Mr. Shanley was a Scotchman, and was born May 19, 1860. He came to this county at the age of 9 years, and attended school at Oak Hill, Jackson, Ohio. Moving to Akron, he attended the parochial schools, and later was a student at a Louisville, Ohio, college. Early in life he entered railroad life on the old A. & G. W., now Erie railroad. While performing night duty he met with an accident that cost him an arm. He then became a watchman at a crossing, but his ambition caused him to aspire higher, and he learned telegraphy, when he was assigned regular work. For twelve years be was station agent at Freedom, Ohio. Twenty-seven years ago he moved to Kent.

As a public servant he was recorder of Portage county, and served four years in the Ohio legislature, he was a writer of unusual force and a talented speaker. As a citizen of Kent he was generally loved, and he was always deeply interested in and worked for everything that was for the best interests of the community. He was a member of the C. M. B. A., K. of C., Father Mathew Temperance Society of Ohio, the Order of Railway Telegraphers and the Kent Board of Trade, having held office in several of these organizations. His surviving relatives are his widow, four sons, one of whom served his country in the late war; six daughters and a sister.




From the June, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

TIMOTHY SHEA
Timothy Shea, of Hornell, N.Y., who entered the service in 1864, and rendered faithful service until June, 1918, is dead. He retired a year ago. He is survived by one son, six daughters and seven grandchildren.




CORNELIUS SHINN

Cornelius Shinn


From the June, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
This is a picture of the late Cornelius Shinn, of Binghamton, crossing watchman, who had a fine record with the Erie railroad. Mr. Shinn was born in 1843, coming to this country when a young man, and began railroading on the D. & H. In 1868 he was employed by the Erie as a car inspector, and in 1889 became a crossing watchman, had been on the same crossing for thirty-three years, and never laid off a day except to attend the funeral of a friend or some one of his own family.

A more faithful employe could not be found, or a man who had more friends. He was every day alike, always full of jokes and laughter and a good word for everybody. He never had an accident during all the long years of his service as a crossing watchman.

He was taken sick at his post and had to go home, where he soon passed away in his 76th year. Nothing but words of praise can be said of him for his honesty, integrity and faithfulness.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILBER SHIRK
The Marion Star reports the death of Wilber Shirk, who recently became an employe of the Erie at Marion. He died in the Emergency hospital of influenza, after one week's illness. He is survived by his widow, his parents, three brothers and three sisters.




From the December, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MATTHEW SHIRLEY
Matthew Shirley, aged 25 years, of the (Hornell) pipe shop, died Nov. 20 (1919) after a long illness of pneumonia. He was a young man of good character and well liked by all fellow employees. Our heartfelt sympathy is extended to his sister, with whom he made his home. He had returned recently after serving with the A.E.F.




From the June, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

HENRY L. SIDMAN
Henry L. Sidman died, after one week's illness, at his home in Jersey City, at the advanced age of 90 years. He was born in Ramapo, N.Y., and had been a resident of Jersey City for fifty-eight years. Twelve years ago he was retired from the service of the Erie after he had rendered faithful duty for forty-two years. He is survived by two daughters and four grandchildren.




ANGUS SINCLAIR

Angus Sinclair


From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
At his home in Millburn, N.J., on January 1, 1919, Angus Sinclair, D.E., passed away after a long life of usefulness in railroad service and as an editor and author. Mr. Sinclair died of acute rheumatism complicated with gastritis. He was in his 78th year, and at the time of his death was proprietor and editor of Railway and Locomotive Engineering, a technical journal published in New York, and more than thirty-two years in the field.

He was a native of Forfar, Scotland, and was reared in Laurencekirk, where he began railroad life as telegraph operator, and later, studied engineering in the shops of the Scottish Northeastern Railway at Arbroath, and ran a locomotive. He was employed for several years in the Customs department at Montrose and in London.

Arriving in America he took up railroading,, first on the Erie, then on the Burlington, Cedar, Rapids & Northern. He attended chemistry classes at the Iowa State University, and became a chemist in addition to roundhouse foreman. This experience, coupled with that which he gained later, led him to write and publish a number of books on combustion, which became text-books in the mechanical departments of railroads. He was a contributor to many technical publications, and after being on the staff of the American Machinist became proprietor and editor of Railway and Locomotive Engineering.

. In 1908 the president of Purdue University, Lafayette, Ind., conferred upon Mr. Sinclair the honorary degree of doctor of engineering. About this time he was appointed special technical instructor in the Mechanical department of the Erie railroad, and he devoted much time in addressing the pupils of the apprentice schools. He was a ready and convincing speaker, and his services were in great demand.

He was of great assistance to George Westinghouse in demonstrating the efficiency of his air brake. No more prominent figure was recognized than he in the many associations identified with the mechanical branches of railroading.

His delightful home in Millburn, N.J., was the mecca of distinguished visitors, who shared in its generous hospitality.




From the August, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MARTIN E. SKELLENGER
The death of Martin E. Skellenger is reported in the Owego, N.Y., Times. It is stated that he died at his home in Owego at the age of 81 years. Mr. Skellenger was among the oldest retired conductors, and quit the service a number of years ago. He was a first-class railroad man, and rendered good and faithful service while actively engaged on the road. He was a member of the B.R.C. His surviving relatives are a son, a daughter and two sisters.




From the May, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

GEORGE SMITH
The Port Jervis Evening Gazette printed an account of the death of George Smith, which occurred at his home in Middletown, N.Y., after a long and painful illness. At the age of 17 he entered the employ of the Erie as chainboy in the Engineering corps, and soon became foreman of a gang located at Howells. On marrying, Mr. Smith removed to Jersey City, and was placed in charge of track-laying in Bergen tunnel. In 1873 he went to reside in Middletown, N.Y. He remained with the Erie as supervisor and later became assistant roadmaster to the late Jacob Keene. After thirty-two years with the Erie he accepted the position of roadmaster with the NYS&W, then an independent corporation, which he held until he resigned, eighteen years ago, thus completing fifty years in railroad service. He is survived by his widow, three sons, two daughters and nine grandchildren.




From the April, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN SMITH
The Daily Star, Marion, O., announces the death of John Smith, who had been employed by the Erie for about six years. He had been ill of dropsy for some time. His age was 55. His surviving relatives are three sons.




From the June, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN SMITH
Announcement is made by the Kent, Ohio, Tribune of the death of John Smitli, employed as carpenter, who succumbed to tuberculosis at his home in that city. He is survived by his widow and six children.




From the May, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MARSHALL SNOVER
From a Sussex, N.J., newspaper it was learned that Marshall Snover, who had been employed as engineer by the Erie for a long period, died at his home in Ogdensburg, N.J., of heart failure. He was familiarly known by residents along the line of the NYS&W division as being in charge of the engine that hauled the milk train between Deaver Lake and Stroudsburg, and at one time ran the morning train between Sussex and Beaver Lake. He was 57 years old.




From the May, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

LEROY STAUFFER
An account of the death of Leroy Stauffer appeared in the Marion Star. It stated that he was seized with an attack of heart trouble and died suddenly, after being taken to the home of his parents. He was 16 years of age and was employed as night clerk in the Erie yards. He was president of the D. A. E. High School fraternity and a member of the D. A. M. club and United Brethren church. His surviving relatives are his parents and a brother. His father is an Erie engineer.




From the March, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN H. STEIN
The Meadville, Pa., Tribune prints an account of the death of John H. Stein, who passed away at the age of 67 years, after a lingering illness of more than one year. He had been an employe of the blacksmith shop at Meadville for twenty-nine years. He is survived by two sons and two daughters, besides his aged mother and a sister.




From the May, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN M. SULLIVAN
In the columns of the Elmira, N.Y., Advertiser appeared a notice of the death of John M. Sullivan, night yard-master at Elmira and one of the best-known railroad men on the Susquehanna division. He died at the Robert A. Packer hospital, Sayre, Pa., and had been in failing health for a long time. He began railroad life as switchman, had resided in Elmira all his life, and was among its best-known residents. He was one of the organizers of Telegram Lodge of the Switchmen's union, and was a member of Chemung Lodge No. 229, B. R. T. Also he was prominent in politics and was an enthusiastic baseball fan. His surviving relatives are his widow, a son, a daughter, two brothers and three sisters.




From the June, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MICHAEL SULLIVAN
Michael Sullivan, who died last month, had been in the employ of the Erie for forty years as freight conductor. He died at his home on Jersey City Heights. His age was 65. For twenty years he had been treasurer of Hudson lodge No. 146, B. K. T., and a member of the Cobweb club, of Hobokcn. He is survived by his widow, four sons and two daughters.




From the July, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

GEORGE SUMAILE
A report published in the Corning, N.Y. Journal tells of the death of George Sumaile, who, it is alleged, was struck by a car of the E. C. & W. electric line, near East Corning. Deceased had been employed as water tender for a section gang, and resided in a car near the scene of the accident. He is survived by a daughter.




GILBERT E. SUTCLIFFE

Gilbert E. Sutcliffe


From the December, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
Gilbert E. Sutcliffe, of the Erie's Marine department, who died at his home in Rutherford, New Jersey, on October 13 (1919), was born on February 14, 1850, in county Tipperary, Ireland, being educated in the P. E. School, and graduating in 1866 from the University of Edinburgh, Scotland.

At the close of the Civil war he came to the United States, migrating to Schenectady, N.Y., in 1867, where he had a brother in the employ of the McQueen Locomotive works. He learned the machinist trade at this place, and after serving his time went to Vermont, remaining but a short time. He came to the Erie shops, Jersey City, in March, 1872, and worked there until the shops were burned in July, 1872. He was transferred to Susquehanna, where he worked about six months, going from there to Water Valley, Miss., where he worked until the panic of 1874. He returned to Jersey City shops in 1876, remaining with the Erie until the time of his death. He was connected with the Marine department since 1870, and for several years was general foreman of machinists at the Erie marine yard, Weehawken.

Mr. Sutcliffe was an active member of the Odd Fellows and Knights of Pythias. He is survived by two sons and three daughters.




From the October, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

PATRICK SWEENEY
From the Marion Star the death of Patrick Sweeney is learned. He was a car inspector, and his age about 66 years. He had been ill but one week. Decedent leaves his widow and three daughters.




From the October, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

STEVE SWIDERSKI
The Hornell Tribune printed notice of the death of Steve Swiderski, employed in the local shops. He was stricken while on his way to work, and died shortly afterward. He is survived by his widow and three children.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

J.S. TERWILLIGER
It is learned from the office of superintendent, New York division, that J. S. Terwilliger, employed as conductor, died at his home in Jersey City. He was employed first as brakeman in 1874, promoted to freight conductor in 1887 and passenger conductor in 1891. In 1917 he was disqualified from service on account of physical disability. He is survived by his widow, three sons and two daughters. His age was 87.




From the June, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHARLES E. TURK
Announcement is made in the Kent, Ohio, Tribune of the death of Charles E. Turk. Previous to 1891 he had been employed by the Erie at Kent for twenty-five years. After purchasing a farm near Kent, where he resided for twelve years, he removed to Akron, and resided there until his death. The account says that Mr. Turk met his fate by falling down a cellar stairs, death resulting instantly. He was 64 years old and is survived by his widow, three sons, one daughter and fourteen grandchildren.




From the July, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

O.B. TYLER
The death of O.B. Tyler, who had been employed as carpenter at the local shops, is reported in the Meadville Tribune, and occurred at Warren, Pa. He was 59 years old, and is survived by his widow, two sons and a brother. He held membership in Cussewago Lodge No. 108, I.O.O.F. and Olympus Encampment No. 82, P.H.C. and L.O.O.M.




From the August, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

SAMUEL L. VAN AKIN
The death of Samuel L. Van Akin was published in the Port Jervis Union. It stated that he died at his home in Lackawaxen of heart trouble, after a short illness, at the age of 72 years. In early life he became a telegrapher on the Delaware division, and remained in that department twenty-five years. Later in life he was engaged in a mercantile pursuit, and for several years had been a member of the Board of Education of Lackawaxen township. He was a member of the Christdelphian church. Besides his widow he is survived by three sons and a brother.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

EARL LESTER VAN SICKLE
The death of this employe occurred at the home of his mother-in-law, in Passaic, N. J., the result of pneumonia, after a brief illness. He was 22 years of age. He was a trainman on the New York division, and resided in Port Jervis, N.Y. He was taken ill while visiting his mother-in-law in Passaic, and was unable to return to his home. His surviving relatives are his widow, an infant son and his parents.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ELMER ELLSWORTH WAINWRIGHT
The city of Port Jervis lost another good citizen when Elmer Ellsworth Wainwrigbt passed away. The report says he was ill but a short time. Mr. Ellsworth was employed in the Port Jervis shops, and had but recently entered the service. He was a member of Delaware Council, No. 9, J. O. U. A. M., and of the Willing Workers of the Montague Reformed church. He is survived by his mother, three brothers and two sisters.




From the August, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CLARENCE WALLACE
A report published in the Hornell Tribune tells of the death of Clarence Wallace, which occurred at St. James Mercy Hospital as a result of injuries received on the road. He was 28 years old, and was employed as brakeman. After holding a clerkship in the Hornell shops and later assistant storekeeper at Cleveland and Bradford, he went on the road. He is survived by his widow, a daughter and six brothers. Being in the train service, he held membership in the B. of R. T.




From the August, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN WALLACE
The death of John Wallace, aged about 55 years, is reported in the Susquehanna Transcript. It is stated that he fell out of a window at his home, Oakland, Pa. His neck was broken in falling, death being instantaneous. He was an employe of the Erie.




From the April, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHARLES WALLM
The Hornell Times prints an account of the death of Charles Wallm, whose end came while confined in Bethesda hospital, after four years of illness. Mr. Wallm was 67 years old, and had been a resident of Hornell for about forty years, during most of which time he had been an employe of the Erie. Besides his widow he is survived by two sons, four daughters and twelve grandchildren.




From the September, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

PATRICK WATSON
The Kent Tribune reports the death of Patrick Watson, whose passing away occurred at Meadville, and of which a Meadville paper published a notice. He had formerly resided at Kent, where many years ago he was a train dispatcher on the Kent division.




From the August, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHARLES H. WELCH
The Binghamton Republican reports the death of Charles H. Welch, employed in the signal service on the Susquehanna division, which resulted suddenly from heart disease at his home in Binghamton. He was a well known and liked citizen, and was an active member of the First Methodist Episcopal church and its choir. Also he was a member of Tioga Lodge, number 836, I.O.O.F., C.M. Haywood Encampment, I.O.O.F., Sa-Sa, na Lost Tribe, I.O.R.M., and the Signalmen's brotherhood. His surviving relatives are his widow, one son, two daughters and two brothers.




From the August, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

LOUIS WENG
A notice appearing in the Rochester, N.Y., Democrat told of the death of Louis Weng, a member of the gang handling ballast, which was the result of being struck by a passenger train at Darien Center. His home was said to be at Gowanus Creek, near Brooklyn, N.Y.




From the May, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

GEORGE W. WESTFALL
It is learned from the Port Jervis Union that George W. Westfall, for thirty-seven years an employe of the Erie at Port Jervis, died after an illness of several months, at the age of 68 years. He was a member of the Knights of Pythias, Junior Order United American Mechanics, and the Deerpark Reformed church. Besides his widow he is survived by two brothers and one sister.




From the May, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

THOMAS JAMES WHALEN
A Salamanca, N.Y., newspaper printed an account of the death of Thomas James Whalen, a resident of that city, and for the past nine years employed by the Erie. At the time of his death he held a clerical position in the Maintenance of Way department. He was 24 years old, and is survived by his parents, two brothers and a sister.




From the July, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM GAYLORD WHITMAN
The announcement of the death of William Gaylord Whitman appeared in the Newark, N.J. Evening News. It stated that Mr. Whitman died from a stroke of apoplexy at his home in Montclair, N.J., at the age of 53 years. He entered the service of the Erie in 1903 as dining car steward, leaving the railroad in May, 1909. He was reemploycd in August, 1909, again quitting the service in 1913. He was reemployed as camp steward in April, 1917, and was so engaged at the time of his death.




From the July, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

GEORGE L. WHITNEY
The death of George L. Whitney is reported in the Susquehanna Transcript, same having occurred at his home in Oakland, Pa., at the age of 48 years. He had been stricken with influenza, which developed congestion of the lungs. He had been employed at the Susquehanna shops. Hia surviving relatives are his widow and a brother.




From the July, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

W. J. WINANS
The death of W. J. Winans, a conductor on the Kent division, is reported in the Kent Courier. The Courier says that Mr. Winans had been visiting in Pittsburgh and was on his way to Akron when he was hit by a train at the Union station and instantly killed. His body was buried in Marion, and a delegation of the B. of R. C. attended. Deceased is survived by a son and daughter.




From the February, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN H. WINTERS
After a period of twenty-five years of usefulness as a signal tower-man, advices have been received of the death from a complication of diseases of John H. Winters, at the age of 41 years, same having occurred at the home of his sister, in Port Jervis, N.Y. He was a member of the Westbrookville M. E. church, and a man of fine character. He is survived by his widow, a daughter, his mother, three brothers, two of whom are ministers, having churches in Susquehanna and Jermyn, Pa., and five sisters.




From the August, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CAPTAIN WILLIAM HENRY WRIGHT
The death notice of this veteran river and harbor pilot was printed in several newspapers. They stated that he was 68 years old and died from a complication of diseases. Captain Wright had been for years a pilot on the Hudson river, and in addition had been employed on the Greenpoint ferry, and had been a master of boats owned by the Erie and Pennsylvania railroads. He died at Brooklyn, and at one time was a well-known resident of Jersey City. He was a charter member of Garfield Lodge of Odd Fellows, Dickinson Council, R. A., of Jersey City, and the American Association of Masters, Mates and Pilots, Harbor No. 1.




From the June, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

DANIEL D. WRITER
Daniel D. Writer died at his home in Paterson, N.J., of lung trouble. He had been employed by the Erie for upwards of twenty years, more recently at Jersey City. He is survived by his widow, five sons and a daughter, as well as other relatives.




From the August, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

J. YEAGER
Sorrow is felt in all departments on account of the death of J. Yeager, passenger car carpenter, and who had more than fifty years service with the Erie to his credit. He was one of the men who helped to construct these shops (Buffalo Car Shops), and during the long term he was employed, had alwsys been a popular favorite with everyone. He came to Buffalo from Washington, DC, after he had been mustered out of the Army when the Civil War closed. The companions of this good man sent a floral wreath to be placed on his bier, and a delegation attended his funeral. The American flag was half-masted at the shops out of respect for his memory.




De WITT CLINTON YOST

De Witt Clinton Yost


From the October, 1919 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
After several weeks' illness, De Witt Clinton Yost, a veteran telegrapher, died in a hospital at Reading, Pa., at the age of 62 years.

Mr. Yost was affectionately known as "Dan" by his associate telegraphers in the YA office, New York City. He was a man of considerable versatility, and his abilities were well known to the men along the line who answered his calls and received Morse from him.

An illness overtook him in June, 1917, which incapacitated him from duty, although he kept in touch with his comrades once each month when he came to the city.

He entered the service of the Erie as messenger at Owego, NY ... (unintelligible text) ... and became an operator on the Susquehanna Division in 1876, during which year and until 1886 he worked in the V office as operator, and later became dispatcher at D. X. office, Hornell. In 1887 he went to Buffalo, and in 1888 was assigned to the dispatcher's office, Jersey City. In 1890 he was sent to the Y. A. office, New York, and continued there until incapacitated from work. He is survived by a daughter.




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