Erie Railroad Obituaries - 1920



Selected Obituaries from Erie Railroad Magazine:


From the April, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

HERBERT F. ABBOTT
The Goshen, N.Y., Democrat reports the death of Herbert F. Abbott, ticket agent at Tuxedo, N.Y., after a few days' illness of pneumonia. After attending the Elmira Railway Training School he was appointed to the position he filled at the time he died. He was a member of the Masonic order, and served his country during the late war, becoming an adjutant overseas.




From the May, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

EDWARD BAKER
From the Rochester, N.Y., Times-Union, the death of Edward Baker is learned. He was employed as switchman, and his age was 27 years. He is survived by his widow, two sons and a sister.




From the October, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MERRITT W. BALKOM
The Suffern, N. Y., Independant printed an account of the death of Merritt W. Balkom, an Erie conductor, at the age of 40 years. The item stated that he lost his life in the Port Jervis local yard, his body having been found along the tracks by the yard crew, but he was not on duty at the time. He was employed on the Delaware division, and when he met his fate was crossing the tracks from his home to get ice from a refrigerator car. He is survived by his widow, two children and his mother.




From the May, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN M. BECKER
From the Hornell Tribune-Times the death of John M. Becker is learned. It stated that he was an old Erie employe, and succumbed after a lingering illness. Surviving are his widow and two sons.




From the September, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

D.W. Bigoney

DANIEL WEBSTER BIGONEY
Daniel Webster Bigoney, for many years treasurer of the Erie, died suddenly on August 6 (1920) at his home in Upper Montclair. Recently Mr. Bigoney had been appointed auditor of joint facilities. He had been enjoying his usual good health, and his death was a complete surprise and shock to all who knew him.

Mr. Bigoney had been with the Erie since boyhood, first as an employe of the old A. & G. W., and finally a general officer at headquarters. He was a native of Meadville, Pa., and about 62 years of age.

A special train, carrying officials and other old friends and associates, attended the funeral at Upper Montclair August 9. Interment was in Mount Hebron Cemetery. Mr. Bigoney’s surviving family consists of the widow and two daughters.




From the September, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

NICHOLAS BOURDEAUX
The Hornell Tribune reports the death of Nicholas Bourdeaux, who had been employed as brakeman on the Allegheny division. He passed away at St. James Mercy hospital as a result of a paralytic stroke, which occurred in the Erie yards the day previous. He was 65 years of age, and had been a lifelong resident of Hornell, having been employed by the Erie for forty-seven years. He was a member of the B. R. T., and is survived by his widow, one son and a sister.




From the May, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

S. A. BUCK
From the Salamanca Republican Press the death of S.A. Buck is learned. He waa a passenger conductor, and was 60 years of age. His death occurred at his home in Salamanca. Surviving are his widow and three sisters. He held membership in the Odd Fellows, Order of Railway Conductors and the Congregational church.




From the April, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JUDSON BUELL
A report from Leavittsburg, Ohio, states that Judson Buell, a veteran employe of the Erie, died in that city after a brief illness of pneumonia, at the age of 68 years. For forty years he served the Erie as baggageman. He was a member of the Methodist church, and is survived by his widow, a daughter and a stepson.




From the April, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHARLES H. BULTMAN
Charles H. Bultman, foreman of pipefitters, tinsmiths, machinists and blacksmiths at North Paterson car shops, died at his home in Paterson, Feb. 27 (1920), after an illness of two weeks, from pneumonia, age 53. He was one of the Erie veterans, having started as a wheel clerk Jan. 8, 1880, and was a mechanic of the old school, having had a thorough training under skilled workmen. The result was that he became a workman of exceptional ability. Mr. Bultman was a man of pleasing personality and sterling character, and counted among his close friends all the rank and file of the shop organization, who sincerely mourn his loss. A beautiful floral piece was sent to the home of the deceased as a tribute to his memory, and all the men who worked directly under him, as well as representatives of the several other shop departments, attended his funeral in a body. He is survived by a widow, Mrs. Teresa Bultman, a brother, F. E. Bultman, wrecking clerk on P. R. R. at Cleveland, Ohio, and two sisters, Mrs. F. E. Andrus and Miss Etta Bultman, of Cleveland, Ohio.




From the November, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

HENRY CADOGAN
The Hornell Tribune printed an account of the death of Henry Cadogan, 76 years old, and connected with the Erie for a number of years. He died at Bethesda Hospital after a lingering illness. He was among Hornell's best-known citizens. Surviving him are a brother and six nieces.




From the July, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

BERTHA and MAY CARROLL
The home of Mrs. Anna Carroll, 176 Front St. (Port Jervis), was visited twice by death during 24 hours, when her two devoted daughters, Misses Bertha and May, passed away after a long illness. The circumstances are extremely sad, and to the grief stricken mother and sister, Mrs. Michael Quinn, supervisor of car repairs, the sympathy of their many friends on their double bereavement is extended.

Both girls were born in Port Jervis and received their education in our schools. They were members of St. Mary's church and the Sodality of the Children of Mary. Bertha, before her illness, was employed as Erie telegraph central at the dispatcher's office in Port Jervis. May had been in the employ of the Erie for the past ten years. She served as Erie telegraph operator for about seven years, and for the past three years had been employed as clerk in the Mechanical Department.

J.F. Tierney, President B of R.R.C., wrote a eulogy in connection with the death of Miss May Carroll, in which he made reference to her fine qualities as a companion and loyal worker for the Erie during the many years she had been associated with the clerks at Port Jervis.




From the December, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

THOMAS A. CASEY
The death of Thomas A. Casey, an employe of the Susquehanna shop, is reported in the Susquehanna Transcript. It stated that he died of pneumonia. He was an injector expert and his services were highly valued, not only in that line of work, but as a skilled mechanic.




From the May, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

LEO CAVERLY
A notice of the death of Leo Caverly appeared in the Gallon, O., Inquirer, which stated that he died in Akron. After leaving school he joined the forces of the Western Union Telegraph Company, and later entered the service of the Erie. He served his country as a member of the 808th Field Signal battalion, with which he went overseas, serving with it for thirteen months. Fraternally he was a member of the Knights of Columbus and Galion Aerie No. 630, Fraternal Order of Eagles.




From the June, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM LEMUEL CLARKE
From the agent at Urbana, Ohio, the death of William Lemuel Clarke is learned. He stated that Mr. Clarke had been in the service of the Erie thirty-seven years. He was a brother of Charles W. Clarke, general agent of the Erie at St. Louis, Mo. He is survived by his widow and one son. Fraternally he was a member of the Masonic fraternity, and he also held membership in the Methodist church.




From the April, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN CLEARY
The death of John Cleary, for many years an employe of the (unintelligible) shops ... in the Kent ... His age was 73 years. His surviving relatives are a daughter and an adopted son.




From the April, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

W.R. COLEMAN
W.R. Coleman, foreman at Chambers street station, died March 8 (1920), at the age of 87. He was first employed as brakeman on freight trains in 1868, and was promoted to flagman on passenger trains 21 and 6, in 1864. He continued in this position until promoted to baggage master in 1866.

In July, 1866, Mr. Coleman was placed in the New York baggage room, and in June, 1868, he was transferred to Castle Garden, checking emigrant baggage. On account of the conditions at that place, he was placed in charge of the Through Baggage department at Chambers street station, which position he held until January 1, 1892, when E.C. Ensign was appointed to this position. He was then appointed foreman in the same station, which place he had filled up to the time of his death, having the title of station baggage agent. He was a man of high character and genial nature.







From the December, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

Thomas Connors

THOMAS CONNORS
Thomas Connors, who had been employed on the Erie railroad for seventy-one years, which, as far as can be ascertained, is the longest time any one employe has been on its payroll, passed away at his home, 32 Glasgow street, Rochester, N. Y., October 23 (1920), after a brief illness.

Mr. Connors was born in Ireland and came to this country at an early age, being employed first with the Erie in Jersey City, and later going to Rochester, in which city he had resided sixty years. He was for many years track supervisor on the Rochester division, having worked up to that position by integrity, a strict attention to duty, and a desire at all times to promote the welfare of his employer. When old age required his retirement he was placed on the pension list, and remained there until his death.

No man on the Rochester division had a broader knowledge of it, and no employe did more for its interests. When President Underwood and the late Vice-President Stuart traveled over the division, it was customary for Mr. Connors to accompany them in the private car, for he had always information concerning his work to impart that was of great value. He was a man of fine character and held the esteem of all his fellow employes.

Mr. Connors was among the oldest members of the Immaculate Conception Church, and a devout Christian. Funeral services were held at his late home and from the Immaculate Conception Church, where a high mass of requiem was celebrated, a large delegation of Erie employes being present.

Surviving him are four sons, four daughters and two brothers. One of his sons, the Rev. Thomas F. Connors, is rector of Blessed Sacrament Church, Rochester, and another son, John, holds a responsible position with a prominent Rochester business house, having formerly worked for the Erie.




From the June, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

THOMAS W. CONWAY
The death of Thomas W. Conway is reported by the superintendent of floating equipment, who stated that he died after an illness of several months, and had been in the employ of the Erie forty-nine years. He entered the service in 1871 as messenger in the office of Master Mechanic Brown, where he learned the trade of blacksmith under his father's direction. In 1877 he was transferred to the ferry to look after the boats. July 1, 1877, he procured his first issue of license as chief engineer of ferryboats, being then appointed assistant chief engineer and inspector of machinery in the Floating Equipment department. In 1907 he was detailed as engineer in charge of the construction of the ferryboat "Jamestown," and remained on her until November, 1919, when illness overcame him. Mr. Conway was a man of high character, kindly disposition and a faithful employe of the Erie. His loss will be deeply felt.




From the April, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES H. COOK
Readers of the ERIE RAILROAD MAGAZINE at New York terminal will regret to learn of the death of James H. Cook, one of the oldest employes of the Erie, on January 16 (1920), at the residence of his sister, Mrs. Childs, at Mexico, N.Y.

Mr. Cook entered the company's service during the Fisk regime, and was employed in the general offices, then located in the Grand Opera House, on Twenty-third street, New York, and continued in the service at 187 West street, when the general offices were moved to that address.

He was transferred to the Long Dock office, at Dock 6, Jersey City, later, and continued at that station until his retirement, about five years ago, when he went to live with Mrs. Childs, where he had a comfortable home and the loving care of a devoted sister, and the members of her family. He was an expert in figures, and pro-rated the revenue on all interline way-bills issued at New York, before the system of auditor's settlements was adopted, and worked out all the percentage tables in use at the time.

He had a well-developed sense of humor, liked a good story, and was always ready to relate some new ones. He could always hold his audience by his ready wit and the original products of his imagination. Mr. Cook was about 74 years old at the time of his death.




From the September, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES COON
From the Hornell Tribune the death of James Coon is learned. He was 68 years old and a former conductor on the Erie. He was ill two weeks. He was a member of the O. R. C., and is survived by his widow, one brother and a sister.




From the November, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHARLES ALBERT CORTRIGHT
A notice of the death of Charles Albert Cortright appeared in the Port Jervis Union, which stated that he died after a brief illness at the age of 31 years. For several years he had been a resident of Port Jervis and was employed in the local shops. The surviving relatives are his father, two brothers and four sisters.




From the March, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

GEORGE COY
The Marion, Ohio, Star reports the killing of George Coy, an Erie car inspector, same occurring in the local yards. He was in his 44th year and is survived by his widow and six children, five sons and a daughter. He held membership in several railroad organizations.




From the April, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHARLES COYLE
Another old faithful employe passed to his long reward when death removed Charles Coyle from the Erie family. Mr. Coyle died at the home of his daughter in Paterson, N.J., at the advanced age of 85 years. He had been in the Erie's employ upwards of forty years, and was in charge of the inspection crew that looked after the safety of Bergen tunnel, Jersey City. His record for conscientious service was known to all on the New York division. Old age alone incapacitated him from performing further duty, and he retired to the home of his daughter in Paterson, where he died. Mr. Coyle was a devout member of the Catholic church, and led an upright and consistent life. His son, Thomas L. Coyle, is chief of the Paterson Fire department. His surviving relatives are his son and four daughters.




From the March, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine (Avon Shop News):

GEORGE CRAIG
Everyone was grieved to hear of the sudden death of George Craig, an Erie conductor. Mr. Craig had been in good health, when he was suddenly prostrated with a stroke of paralysis, and death resulted the following day.




From the February, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM B. CRANE
From the Elmira Star-Gazette the death of William B. Crane is learned. He was a retired Erie conductor and a veteran of the Civil war. He passed away at his home in Cameron, N.Y. His surviving relatives are his daughter and two brothers, one of whom, Etz, is an Erie conductor.




From the January, 1921 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MICHAEL CUNNEEN
A notice of the death of Michael Cunneen appeared in the Hornell Tribune-Times. It stated that he died in New York City, where he was visiting his children. His death was sudden. Mr. Cunneen had resided in Hornell more than sixty-five years, and had been a valued employe of the Erie up to the time of his retirement.




From the May, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM CURRY
A brief account of the death of William Curry appeared in the Suffern, N.Y., Independent. It gave no facts beyond that he was an old employe of the Erie Railroad.




From the June, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

OLIVER TUTHILL DAILEY
The death of Oliver Tuthill Dailey is learned from the Port Jervis Union, which stated that he died of pleura pneumonia after a brief illness at the age of 51 years. He was a native of Narrowsburg, N. Y., and had been a resident of Port Jervis for twenty five years, during which he was employed in the Erie car shop. He was a member of the Deerpark Reformed church, Delaware Council number 9, J. O. U. A. M.. Washington Camp No. 26, P. O. S. of A. and the Brotherhood of All Railway Employes. Surviving are his widow, one daughter and six stepchildren.

Also, from the July, 1920 issue (Port Jervis Shops News):
Oliver Dailey died at his home May 19 (1920) after a short illness. Mr. Dailey spent the greater part of his life in Port Jervis and for a number of years had been an employee of the Erie shops. He was a member of the Port Jervis wrecking crew. Surviving are his wife, three daughters and five sons, all of this city.




From the July, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM DAVIS
Mention of the death of William Davis, for many years employed in the Susquehanna shops, is made in the Susquehanna Transcript. The notice stated that he was 80 years old, and that he died at his home at Oak Hill. He is survived by his widow and several children, one of which is the Rev. Father Davis.




From the March, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine (Dunmore Shop News):

HENRY DECKER
The face of Henry Decker, Conductor on the Ashley Way Freight, is missed. Henry was well known in the section of Avoca and Moosic. He died Feb. 6 (1920), leaving a wife and several children. death was caused by pneumonia.




From the December, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM DEVLIN
A report of the death of William Devlin appeared in the Huntington, Ind, Herald. He died at the ripe age of 90 years, and was Huntington county's oldest citizen. He passed away at the home of his daughter in Huntington. Decedent had resided in Huntington county eighty-seven years and had been employed at the Erie shops as carpenter for a number of years.




From the April, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

SYLVESTER DIEHL
A father passes away one day after his daughter: Sylvester Diehl, laborer in the (Stroudsburg, PA) Locomotive Department for many years, died at his home on Scott Street. Both father and daughter were laid to rest in Stroudsburg Cemetery. Worry over the serious illness and death of his daughter hastened Mr. Diehl's end. Charlotte Sofa Diehl (his daughter) died at the age of 17 years and 5 months. Much sympathy is expressed by the shop boys to the remaining members of his family in this sad hour of bereavement. Mr. Diehl was 64 years old, a highly respected citizen and loved by all who knew him. He was a member of the Shop Mutual Aid association. The pallbearers were chosen from this organization.




From the March, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ADAM DILGER
The death of Adam Dilger, a retired Erie conductor, is reported in the Port Jervis Union, same occurring suddenly at his home in Matamoras, Pa., of heart disease, from which he had been a sufferer for two years. Mr. Dilger served his country well in the Civil War. His surviving relatives are his widow, four sons and a daughter.




From the May, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

HELENE DOANE
Miss Helene Doane, chief clerk in the (Hornell) cripple yard office, died in St. James Mercy Hospital on April 2, 1920 from injuries received while on her way to work March 9. As she was crossing the tracks she was obliged to wait, as a fast freight engine blocked her way. Her attention was absorbed in watching this engine and she did not hear the pusher engine which came down the track close to which she was standing. Before the engine could be brought to a stop she was struck and dragged several feet. Besides serious internal injuries, she sustained a broken femur, a broken collarbone, and her hip was fractured. Besides her parents, she is survived by one sister. The funeral was held from St. Ann's Church on April 5, and was very largely attended, showing the high esteem in which she was held.




From the September, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

M.G. DONALDSON
Morrel Gay Donaldson, who held first place on the operators' roster of the Mahoning division, died a few weeks ago at the age of 71 years, after fifty-four years of continuous service, the result of hardening of the arteries. Mr. Donaldson entered the service of the Erie railroad as a pumper on August 1, 1844, his duty being attending to pumps at various points on the Mahoning division. He entered the telegraph service at Mahoning, Ohio station, on September 1, 1867, and was appointed agent at Mahoning on December 1, 1871, which position he held until the time of his death.

His record with the Erie railroad is exceptionally good—no mark ever having been entered against it, and there is no one now connected with the Mahoning division that recalls any complaint having been entered against him. He was held in high esteem by his fellow employes as well as all who resided in the community in which he lived so long. Mr. Donaldson's health was exceptionally good until a few months prior to his death, when, although he did not request it, it was considered advisable to give him some assistance in handling the business at his station. His condition became gradually worse until finally he reluctantly was compelled to remain at home for several days at a time. During the latter part of April, 1920, his condition was such that he was unable to leave his room, and he was therefore informed that in view of his long and merited service, a leave of absence was granted him to continue in effect as long as he desired. His condition fluctuated for a time, and eventually began to grow gradually worse until the time of his death.

Mrs. Donaldson preceded her husband a little over a year ago. He is survived by an elder brother, Henry N. Donaldson, who is also an old, faithful employe on the Mahoning division, now holding the position of assistant to the division superintendent at Youngstown, and a younger brother, Sherl Donaldson, who lives on a farm near Mahoning.




From the February, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

EDWARD DONLIN
The death of Edward Donlin is learned from the Jamestown Post, same occurring at his home in Salamanca, N. Y., at the age of 81 years, fifty-seven of which he was a resident of that city. He was among the first employes of the Atlantic & Great Western Railroad, now Erie. He is survived by three sons.




From the March, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

FRANK J. DREHER
The Youngstown, Ohio, Vindicator published a notice of the death of Frank J. Dreher, a former Erie conductor, which occurred in that city after an illness of several months. He was 47 years old. He is survived by his widow and three children, one son and two daughters.




From the April, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

EDWARD J. DUBOIS
From the Port Jervis Union the death of Edward J. Dubois is learned. The report stated that he was a fireman in the employ of the Erie, and that his age was 23 years. Blood poisoning was the cause. He was a member of Deerpark Lodge, No. 1, B. of L. F. and E. Surviving are his widow, a daughter, and his mother.




From the March, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MARTIN E. DULANSKI
The death of Martin E. Dulanski is reported in the Salamanca Republican Press, same occurring at the City hospital, of pneumonia. He was a native of Salamanca and was employed by the Erie. His surviving relatives are his father and six sisters.




From the January, 1921 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CARL E. EASTMAN
The Binghamton Press reported the death of Carl E. Eastman, employed as engineer on the Susquehanna Division, at the age of 55 years. He was taken ill while on duty, and died in an ambulance while he was being conveyed to the city hospital, Hornell, the cause being diagnosed as cerebral apoplexy. He was a member of T.D. Walsh Division 641, BLE.




From the March, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine (Dunmore Shop News):

HALL EDEN
The death of Hall Eden, machinist, was very sudden. He made many friends both at Dunmore shops and Avon, NY, where he worked for the Erie. He died Feb. 2 (1920).




From the October, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM EDWARDS
An account of the death of William Edwards appeared in the Susquehanna, Pa., Transcript. It stated that he died in Barnes hospital from a complication that developed from injuries sustained in the local yards, where he was employed as galvaniser.




From the April, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM R. EMERY
Among the deaths reported in the Kent Courier was that of William R. Emery, who had been employed by the Erie and its predecessors (Lines West) for fifty years. Mr. Emery came with the old A. & G. W. as yardmaster, and remained loyal to his employers until the day of his death. He was a native of Newark, N. J., and was 79 years old. A stroke of apoplexy last March resulted in his death. Surviving are a son and two daughters.




From the October, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

EDGAR EVANS
The news of the death of Edgar Evans was learned from the Goshen Independent Republican, which stated that he was 78 years old, and died after an illness of five months. He was a trainman and resided at Otisville, N. Y. He was a member of Hoffman Lodge No. 412, F. and A. M., of Middletown, N. Y. Surviving are two sons and three daughters.




From the March, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine (Dunmore Shop News):

WILLIAM EVANS
The death of William Evans, former safety committeeman, Dunmore Car Shop, is also mourned by many of his fellow workmen.




From the September, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MISS HELEN LOUISE FITZPATRICK
This young woman, who had been a faithful and efficient employe in the Erie freight office, Elmira, N.Y., since May, 1917, died of heart failure, July 4 (1920), following an operation. She was 22 years of age. Decedent, during the period she had been employed, was a bright and conscientious worker, and was familiar with the routine work of the office. At the time death called her she was a comptometer operator. Suitable resolutions were drafted by her fellow employes, a copy of which was sent to her bereaved parents.




From the October, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHARLES FLINT
An account of the death of Charles Flint appeared in the Mount Morris, N.Y., Enterprise. It stated that he was a motorman on the Erie and was instantly killed when he came in contact with a heavily charged wire as he was adjusting the telegraph outfit at Seven Nations station. He was 62 years old.




From the February, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

FRANK GERAGHTY
The death of Frank Geraghty is learned from the Port Jervis Union, which stated that he died at the home of his daughter in Bradford, Pa., at the advanced age of 94 years. At the time of his death he was said to be the oldest of the living Erie railroad conductors who were on the retired list. Conductor Geraghty was the first to run a train on the Port Jervis & Monticello railroad, and he conducted trains on other branches of the road. His service dated back to 1871. He is survived by a son, Frank, Jr, with whom he resided at Monticello in summer, and his daughter, with whom he resided in winter.




From the March, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHARLES L. GILBERT
New of the death of Charles L. Gilbert has been received from the Erie agent's office at Cleveland. Mr. Gilbert was a veteran clerk in the Erie's employ. He died at his post while performing his duties as chief clerk to the local agent. He started in a minor position with the old N.Y., P. & 0. in 1889, and by diligence and perseverance rose to the position he occupied when death claimed him. "Chip" was the familiar name by which he was known by his intimates, and he enjoyed the acquaintance of a larger number of railroad men than any other railroad man in Cleveland. To all of these his death came as a great shock. He is survived by his widow and a daughter.




From the February, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

HARRY CARPENTER GOODRICH
At the age of 21 years. Harry Carpenter Goodrich died at his home in Port Jervis, N.Y., after an illness of two weeks. He was not regularly employed by the Erie, but worked in the local shop after high school hours. He entered the service of his country during the late war and was a member of the Medical corps. After being assigned to two encampments here he was sent first to England and then to France. He saw service at the front for nine months with the 44th artillery and was once gassed and sustained an injury from shell shock. On being honorably discharged here he reentered the high school and, had he lived, would have graduated next June. He was a member of James C. Bilz Post, American Legion of Honor, and the Brotherhood of Railway Carmen. He is survived by his parents and one sister.




From the February, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM R. GORDON
Heart disease was the cause of the death of William R. Gordon, a notice of which appeared in the Port Jervis, N.Y., Union. He was employed by the Erie and had been in the service several years. He was 55 years old and was a member of Port Jervis Tent, Knights of the Maccabees. His surviving relatives are his widow, two sons, two daughters, a brother and a sister.




From the March, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

FRANK GRAHAM
The death of Frank Graham, more than fifty years ago an expert machinist in the Erie's Galion shops, is reported in the Galion Inquirer. The notice stated that he died at Portland, Ore., where he was general manager of the Oregon-Washington Railway & Navigation Company. His age was 65. He was a victim of influenza one year ago, which left him in a partly paralyzed condition. His widow survives him.




From the May, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

FLOYD H. GREER
The death of Floyd H. Greer is learned from the Port Jervis Union, which stated that he died from a sudden attack of heart disease, and was 70 years of age. He had been employed aa conductor by the Erie for thirty-five years, and for a short time conducted a market at Howells, N.Y. He held membership in the O. R. C. Surviving are his widow, two sons and two daughters.




From the March, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine (Dunmore Shop News):

BERNARD HAGERTY
Bernard Hagerty, laborer in the Shipping Gang, was operated on for apendicitis, and while in the hospital developed influenza and died Feb. 9 (1920).




From the September, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

GUY HALL
The death of Guy Hall is reported in the Marion Star, which stated that he was 34 years of age, and had been an Erie switchman at Galion. He lost his life while swimming in a pond. He was a member of the Eagles.




From the November, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

J. C. HAMILTON, SR.
From the Buffalo Courier information is received of the death of J. C. Hamilton, Sr., for the past fifty years a locomotive engineer on the Erie and Pennsylvania railroads. He was 73 years old, and died at his home in Allegany, N. Y. Surviving him are a son and a daughter.




From the October, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine (Dunmore Shop News):

EDWARD FRANCIS HARRIGAN
The death of Edward Francis Harrigan is reported in the Port Jervis Gazette. The account stated that ... (illegible) ...coming a special officer in the Erie's employ he served for twenty-three years in the Jersey City Police department. Decedent was a member of the Elks, Sacred Heart church and the Holy Name society. Surviving are his widow and three sons.




From the May, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

C.E. Harriman

CHARLES E. HARRIMAN
Charles E. Harriman, commercial agent of the Erie Railroad at Philadelphia, while performing the duties of freight conductor for the company during the recent emergency, was accidentally killed at Rosas, Pa., on April 23, 1920. He was standing on the westbound track with his back toward the east checking the billing of his train and was struck by westbound passenger train No. 27. His position was obscured by a sharp curve.

Mr. Harriman had volunteered his service to help move the traffic he and others had solicited. He was seeking no man's job, but doing his full duty as an official of the company, as did many others.

What greater heritage for his only son! And is there not some consolation for Mrs. Harriman in the knowledge that her husband left such a fine record ? And that he died like a true soldier?

Mr. Harriman entered the employ of the Erie Railroad Company, March 6, 1908, as telegraph operator. He was promoted to the agency at Boone Grove, Ind., March 29, 1910. Close attention to his duties and studious application to the processes of that station marked him for further advancement.

In June, 1915, he was assigned to that busy junction office, Ohio City, and from there he was promoted to the important agency at Kenton, Ohio, Feb. 16, 1917, in recognition of his meritorious service. Sometime subsequent to this Mr. Harriman's ambition directed his view toward the Traffic department, but the advent of Federal control halted more than mere contemplation. Early in 1918 the then director general of railroads closed all "off-line" agencies as a measure of economy. The absence of competition for business through the operation of all railroads as a single unit appeared to justify this course, and the shipping public set aside its discontent with the whole program pending the conclusion of the war.

Mr. Harriman continued his devotion to duty at Kenton, abiding return to normal conditions. He realized that the public at large must be served and believed his chance would come. The railroads, under pressure from the public and by presidential decree, were returned to their owners on March 1.

Mr. Harriman’s patience was about to be rewarded, and his ambition attained. Early in March he was offered, and as promptly accepted, a position in the Traffic Department, as a commercial agent at Philadelphia, but it was not convenient to check in his successor until April 6. His title to the new position at Philadelphia became effective the next day, April 7.

During the week following Mr. Harriman's arrival there, announcement was made from headquarters at New York to the Traffic department men at all points informing them of the serious problem confronting the management in the movement of food and other necessary supplies, due to the strike of trainmen and others. All volunteered their services, Mr. Harriman among the first. The need of this service did not actually appear until April 19. On that date Mr. Harriman and others of the Philadelphia office joined with the men of the New York squad and were assigned to duty.

A number of the most experienced men, including Mr. Harriman, were appointed conductors of freight trains. Others served as brakemen, flagmen and switchmen.

Freight Traffic Manager E.T. Campbell, in a letter to Mrs. Harriman, said in part:

Your husband bravely and unselfishly volunteered to do his part. He did this in the spirit of the soldier who offers his life to his country. We revere his memory as such. Mr. Harriman has won an honored name in the annals of the Erie Railroad Company. I trust you may find some consolation in this thought, and that your great bereavement may be somewhat assuaged. Please accept from myself and his other associates assurances of our deep sorrow and sincere sympathy.




From the May, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILBUR F. HARTWELL
In the death of Wilbur F. Hartwell, the Erie lost one of its most efficient passenger conductors on the New York division. The Port Jervis Union, in printing an account of his death, stated that he died of a complication of diseases at the age of 68 years. He had been once a member of the crew of one of the milk trains, and later rose to be a passenger conductor, which position he held for twenty-five years, running a train between Jersey City and Suffern. He held membership in Jersey City Division No. 490, B. of R. C. Besides his widow he leaves a son and a daughter.




From the November, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JACOB HARTZ
From the Port Jervis Union the death of Jacob Hartz is learned. It stated that he died at the home of his grandson, Matamoras, Pa., at the age of 82 years. At the age of 14 years he entered the employ of the Erie, and continued in different branches until twelve years ago. His surviving relatives are two brothers, a sister and other distant relatives.




From the April, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN HARVEY
The Hornell Tribune reports the death of John Harvey, employed as trainman, at the age of 53 years. He was prominent in the B. of R. T. Surviving are five children, four brothers and four sisters.




From the November, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN HAVENS
From the Owego Times the death of John Havens is learned. The notice stated that he died in the Binghamton City hospital following an operation. He was 52 years of age. The Erie employed him in the bridge carpenter's gang, and more recently as gatetender at Main Street Crossing. Besides his widow, he is survived by a son, two daughters and two sisters. He was a member of Regal Lodge No. 863. I.O.O.F.




From the April, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

GUSTAVE ERNEST HEINRICHS
At his home, 22 Dale avenue, Paterson, N. J., Monday, Feb. 2 (1920), Gustave Ernest Heinrichs was called by death at the age of 29 years. He fell a victim of influenza-pneumonia, after a brief illness of twelve days. He was employed in the Car Record office, New York, for the past twelve years, during which period he not only rendered very satisfactory services, but succeeded in acquiring the affection and friendship of all his associate employes, due to his kind nature and quiet and agreeable disposition. The sudden announcement of death came as a shock to the many employes of the Car Record office, who extended their condolences through personal expressions and by a very handsome floral tribute. He is survived by his wife and daughter, his parents, (unintelligible) sister ... brother...




From the April, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

EDWARD HENDERSON
A report of the death of Edward Henderson appeared in the Jersey Journal, Jersey City. It stated that he died at his home in that city at the age of 59 years. He was a marine engineer, and had been employed by the Erie for about thirty-eight years. He was a member of the Marine Engineers Benevolent Association, No. 33. His surviving relatives are his widow, a son and four brothers.




From the February, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

T. B. HEWlTT
From the Republican Press, Salamanca, N.Y., the death of T. B. Hewitt, an Erie passenger conductor, is learned. The cause was diabetes. He was 69 years old and had been a resident of Salamanca for forty-five years, during which he ran passenger trains, being very popular and efficient. His surviving relatives are his widow, mother, a son and a daughter.




From the January, 1921 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MARY HELEN BRANYON HIGLEY
Mrs. Mary Helen Branyon Higley died at the Huntington (IN) County Hospital Nov. 29 (1920) following an operation for peritonitis. She was the wife of G.H. Higley, Supervisor of Airbrakes, Ohio and Chicago Regions. For several years prior to her marriage she was employed as stenographer in the Master Mechanic's office, and at numerous time since her marriage she assisted at division headquarters in the capacity of extra monitor and stenographer.

The following Mechanical officers were in Huntington to attend the funeral of Mrs. Higley: G.T. Depue, Mechanical Superintendent, Chicago; T.W. Dow, General Airbrake Inspector, Meadville; G.A. Allen, Supervisor of Airbrakes, Hornell; and J.A. Cooper, General Supervisor of Locomotive Operation, Marion, OH.




From the February, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MICHAEL HOPE
A notice of the death of Michael Hope, an employe of the shops at Jersey City and elsewhere, occurred at his home in Rutherford. N. J. The Hoboken Observer stated that he had been a resident of Rutherford since boyhood, when he went to work for the Erie, and retired a few years ago. His surviving relatives are his widow, four sons and three daughters.




From the March, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

EDWARD HOREY
From the Elmira Star-Gazette the death of Edward Horey is learned. He was gate tender on the Elmira, Corning & Waverly Electric road. Having reached the age limit several years ago, he was placed on the retired list. Formerly he had been section foreman at Cameron Mills. His widow and four sons survive him.




From the April, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

HAROLD L. HORTH
A recent death at Meadville of a promising young Erie mechanic was that of Harold Livingston Horth, whose age was 23 years. He passed away at the home of his parents. The trade of patternmaker was learned by him at the Meadville shops during the war period of 1917-18. In the spring of 1918 he developed tuberculosis and was obliged to quit. His surviving relatives are his parents, three sisters and four brothers.




From the April, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

LE GRAND HORTON
The death of Le Grand Horton, employed in the Mechanical department at 50 Church street, New York City, occurred at his home in Brooklyn of pneumonia. He was 28 years old.




From the August, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MICHAEL HURLEY
The death of Michael Hurley is recorded in the Susquehanna Transcript. It stated that he was among the oldest and best-known citizens of the city, and died at his home of a complication of diseases, after a long illness. He was employed as switchman in the local yards for fifty-one years, being one of the oldest employes of the Erie at Susquehanna, and performed his duty loyally and conscientiously. Besides his widow, he is survived by four sons.




From the December, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES P. KELLY
The Port Jervis Union reports the death of James P. Kelly, an employe of the Erie for more than fifty years. Decedent was 66 years old, and passed away at his home in Honesdale, Pa., of a complication of diseases. At the age of 14 he became an Erie employe and worked his way up through the various grades until he became a conductor of coal, freight and passenger trains. On account of an accident in which he lost a leg he ceased running trains, and three years ago became baggagemaster on the Honesdale train.




From the April, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

T. S. KELLY
The death of T. S. Kelly, former agent at Piermont, N. Y., has caused a feeling of deep sorrow to prevail among his associates and friends on the Erie. Mr. Kelly was a faithful employe, and performed his duties well and conscientiously. The Erie Railroad Side Line association passed resolutions of condolence on the death of their old associate, who had been employed by the company since 1906.




From the September, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CURTIS KIGHTLINGER
The death of Curtis Kightlinger is learned from the Meadville Tribune, which stated that it was the probable result of an injury received in the Kent, Ohio, yard. He died in an Akron hospital. He was a trainman and veteran of the recent war in Europe. He went abroad with Company B of Meadville, serving throughout the conflict, and was a brave soldier. Surviving him are his parents, four brothers and a sister. He was a member of the B. R. T.




From the February, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

PETER KNISKERN
A report of the death of Peter Kniskern appeared in the Susquehanna Evening Transcript, same occurring at his home in Riverside. He had been formerly a resident of Susquehanna for a number of years. For many years he was employed in the Creamery department of the Erie and had supervision over the milk stations. Mr. Kniskern was a conspicuous figure along the road, for he was a giant in stature and was said to weigh 300 pounds.




From the April, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES LEMON
From the Passaic, N.J., Herald the death of James Lemon is learned. He had been in the employ of the Erie for forty years, and was 72 years of age. He had been employed in the freight train service, and held other positions as well. Mr. Lemon was a veteran of the Civil war, enlisting from New York. He was a member of the Odd Fellows and the J.O.U.A.M. His surviving relatives are his widow, two daughters, five grandchildren and one brother. He resided in Garfield, and was a faithful member of the Presbyterian church.




From the March, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

A. J. LOFTUS
The death of A. J. Loftus, a retired Erie conductor, is reported in the Hornell Tribune, which stated that his retirement occurred in 1888, after which he entered the grocery business. When a conductor he ran some of the Erie's fastest trains. Ten years ago he suffered a stroke of paralysis, which compelled him to retire from active business life. He was one of the best known citizens of Hornell. He was a veteran of the Civil War, received a wound at Malvern Hill, and carried the bullet with him to his grave. Mr. Loftus was an Irishman and was 78 years old. He held membership in Doty Post, G. A. R., was a member of Branch No. 83, C. M. B. A., of which he was financial secretary, and the order of Railway Conductors, of which he had been chief conductor. His surviving relatives are two sons and three daughters.




From the February, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

FREDERICK LONG, SR.
The death of Frederick Long, Sr., was announced in the Port Jervis Union It stated that he died in St. Francis hospital, that city, from injuries received at Sparrowbush. His age was 81 years. He was among the Erie's oldest employes at Port Jervis, having been in the service since 1863. For many years he had been a freight trainman and conductor on the Delaware division. During the last ten years of his life he filled the position of baggageman at Sparrowbush. His surviving relatives are his widow, one son, three daughters, a brother, two sisters and nine grandchildren.




From the September, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

F.E. LOOMIS
When the news flashed over the wire that F.E. Loomis had died suddenly at Passaic, NJ, there was sadness in the office at (Chicago) Fourteenth Street Local Freight Station, where Mr. Loomis had labored so long and faithfully, and by his genial disposition endeared himself in the hearts of all.

Mr. Loomis had been in the employ of the Erie railroad for a period of 30 years. He came to Fourteenth Street Local Station as agent in the spring of 1890, and served the company faithfully in that position until the year 1911, when he received the title of commercial agent, acting in that capacity until his death. Deceased had a host of friends in the business world, and the record of his life, actions and work fills a page of loyal, true and earnest labor in the interest of the Erie railroad. He was a thirty-second degree Mason, was past commander of Englewood Commandery, under whose auspices the funeral services were held in the Englewood Masonic temple. A large floral piece was sent from the employees of the local office.




From the June, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

THOMAS LOWRY
The death of Thomas Lowry, employed as switchman in the yard at Niles, Ohio, is reported in the Warren, Ohio, Tribune. The report stated that while he was conversing with persons in the yard he was taken ill and died suddenly. Surviving are his widow and four step-children. He was 40 years old.




From the April, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES MACKEY
The Sullivan County Democrat reports the death of James Mackey, employed in the Maintenance of Way department, same occurring at his home of pneumonia. He was 33 years old, and had been a foreman for the Erie at Skinners Falls and Binghamton. His surviving relatives are his widow, a son, his mother, and two sisters.




From the May, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CLARENCE O. MADISON
A notice of the death of Clarence O. Madison appeared in the Kent, O., Courier. It stated that he had been employed in the machine shop of the Kent roundhouse, and anemia following an attack of influenza, was the cause. He was 20 years of age and is survived by his parents.




From the February, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

M. W. MAGUIRE
From the Goshen N.Y., Independent Republican the death of M.W. Maguire is learned. Mr. Maguire will be remembered as being superintendent of the New York Division of the Erie Railroad (unintelligible) with offices at Jersey City. The nature of the illness that resulted in his death was not given. His age was 62 years. Mr. Maguire had been identified with railroad work for forty-five years, and was a man of exceptional ability, he made his home in Freeport, Long Island, at which place he died. His brother, J. F. Maguire, now general manager of the Lehigh Valley railroad, was also superintendent of the Erie's New York division, having been raised on the Erie, beginning first in the Telegraph department.




From the December, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

PAUL MANTELL
Paul Mantell died at his home in Elmira, Oct. 21 (1920). He had been in charge of track construction for the E. D., L. & Railway company since 1879. The decedent first entered the employ of the former Elmira & Horseheads Railway company when the little cars were drawn by horses. He supervised the construction of the Elmira Traction company's tracks on Maple avenue, the West Water street line and rebuilt the entire system to Horseheads, Elmira Heights and the West Clinton street lines. Mr. Mantell was a practical railroad construction foreman. He had no college or technical education in that line, but had acquired a valuable practical experience and possessed natural ability. Many stories are related of his work and his ability to handle men in his quiet manner. His superiors in the company work could always count on "Paul" to do the correct thing at the proper time, says the Elmira Telegram. Mr. Mantell had been engaged in some general supervision work for the Elmira Water, Light & Railway company early in the year, but for several months past he had suffered a severe physical breakdown and remained at his home, on upper College avenue, the greater part of the time. He was a man of kindly disposition, loyal and true, always ready to assist a friend or benefit those unfortunate in life.




From the February, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES MAREAN
It is learned from an Owego, N.Y., source that James Marean, a retired Erie engineer, died at North Owego at the advanced age of 83. He began his railroad career on the Erie in the early 60's and was retired several years ago. His surviving relatives are two sons, one of whom is an Erie fireman on the Susquehanna division, and the other an engineer on a southwestern road; also a daughter.




From the September, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM G. MARION
The death of William G. Marion is reported in the Port Jervis Union. It stated that deceased succumbed to an attack of paralysis after a brief illness. He had been a trainman for upwards of twenty years, running out of Port Jervis, later entering private business. Surviving are his widow, three daughters and one son, besides other distant relatives.




From the February, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

EDWARD MARONEY
The Port Jervis Union reports the death of Edward Maroney, employed as conductor, at the age of 33 years. He was a victim of pneumonia, which carried him off after a short illness. He had been a resident of Port Jervis for upwards of twelve years. His surviving relatives are his father and two sisters.




From the April, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN C. MCCARTHY
The Hornell Tribune-Times reports the death of John C. McCarthy, a former Erie employe. His surviving relatives' are his widow, three sons, a daughter and a sister.




From the July, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES McGUANE
From the Susquehanna Transcript the death of James McGuane is learned. The notice stated that he suffered an attack of pneumonia, and later a relapse, which resulted in his death. For many years he was employed in the Susquehanna office as train dispatcher, and was widely known in railroad circles. Surviving are his widow, two sons and two daughters.




From the May, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

PAUL MILEY
The Marion Star reports the death of Paul Miley at the age of about 28 years, same being caused by accident He was taken to the People's hospital, Akron, where he died. Surviving are his widow, three children and his parents.




From the March, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

EARL JAMES MILLER
From the Marion, Ohio, Star the death of Earl James Miller is learned. The cause was pneumonia, following a week's illness. He was 37 years old, and had been a fireman on the Erie. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity and the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Firemen. His surviving relatives are his widow, two sons and his aged parents.




From the June, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

GEORGE C. MILLER
The death of George C. Miller was reported in the Marion, Ohio, Star. It stated that he was among the oldest Erie employes in point of service on the Chicago & Erie division and was 63 years old. The cause of death was kidney trouble. For many years he ran as baggageman on trains between Marion and Chicago. He was a member of Marion Lodge No. 402, K. of P. and Buckeye Lodge No. 35 B. of R. T. Surviving are his widow, one son, and other relatives.




From the January, 1921 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CON MONAHAN
Con Monahan, for over 51 years a faithful employe of the Jersey City shop, passed away at his home in Jersey City on Nov. 30 (1920). Mr. Monahan had for a long period been employed as watchman.




From the August, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOSEPH F. MOONEY
The death of Joseph F. Mooney is learned from the Susquehanna Transcript, which stated that he died at the family home after a long illness, at the age of 35 years. He had resided in Susquehanna all his life. Learning the trade of machinist, he became an expert, and last October was elected general chairman of the Machinists' unions of the Erie system. He held membership in the Knights of Columbus in Susquehanna, and Binghamton Lodge of Elks. Besides his mother, he is survived by three brothers, one of whom is the Rev. H. A. Mooney, of Corfu, N. Y.




From the April, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ANDREW MURTHA
From the Port Jervis Union the death of Andrew Murtha is learned. He passed away from an attack of pneumonia at the age of 28 years. For a short time he was employed as fireman on the New York division. He is survived by his widow, a son, a daughter and his mother.




From the July, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

THOMAS JOSEPH NAVIN
The death of Thomas Joseph Navin is reported in the Marion (Ohio) Star. The notice says he died of hardening of the arteries at the age of 54 years. For the past twenty years he had been employed as car inspector. Surviving are two sons, his mother, four brothers and five sisters.




From the March, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN NAZUR
A newspaper report of the death of John Nazur states that he died at the Arnot-Ogden hospital, Elmira, N.Y. He met with an accident in the Southport yards.




From the December, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHARLES NORTON
The Hornell Tribune-Times printed an account of the death of Charles Norton, a life-long resident of Hornell and for many years an employe of the Erie freight house in that city.




From the April, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

EARL NORTON
Announcement is made in the Hornell Tribune-Times of the death of Earl Norton, employed as switchman in the local yards, at the age of 29 years. Pneumonia was the cause. He passed away at St. James Mercy Hospital. He was a member of Joseph Bailey Lodge, No. 186, B. of R.T. He is survived by his widow, two sons, one daughter and his father. A pathetic incident in connection with this young man's death was that his mother, who was also stricken with pneumonia, died within a few hours of her son's death, and a double funeral resulted.




From the October, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ABRAM OAKLEY
The death of Abram Oakley is learned from the Suffern, N. Y., Independent, which stated that he was 77 years old, and was one of the early engineers running on the New Jersey & New York railroad. He passed away at the home of his daughter in Spring Valley, in which village he had been a life-long resident. He was among the oldest members of Amity Lodge, No. 192, I. O. O. F. Decedent is survived by a son, three daughters and two sisters.




From the July, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

BARTHOLOMEW O'HERN
From the Elmira Gazette the death of Bartholomew O'Hern is learned. The notice stated that he passed away at the home of his daughter in that city after an extended illness. He had resided in Elmira for about twenty-five years, where he was employed as watchman at the First street crossing. Decedent was a member of St. Patrick's church, and is survived by two daughters.




From the February, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ARTHUR HENRY ORMSBY
The announcement of the death of Arthur Henry Ormsby states that he passed away from an acute attack lasting one day, although he had been ill for some time. He was 23 years old and had been employed as assistant supervisor of the Bradford division. He was a young man of great promise, and, through his kindly disposition, enjoyed a wide circle of friends. He is survived by his parents and three sisters. His father, J. D. Ormsby, has been for many years a train dispatcher on the Bradford division.




From the December, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

GEORGE L. PACE
The Elmira Advertiser records the death of George L. Pace. He died at the Buffalo General hospital after two weeks' illness. His home was in Hornell, where he was employed by the Erie, and his age 40 years.




From the March, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

FREDERICK G. PARET
From the Middletown, N.Y., Herald is learned the death of Frederick G. Paret, a trainman, same occurring in Jacksonville, Fla. He was a resident of Middletown, at which city the funeral was held. It was attended by a large delegation of members of the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen.




From the April, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JACOB PERSBACKER
The Sullivan County Democrat announces the death of Jacob Persbacker, same occurring at his home in Callicoon, N.Y., from a complication of ailments, in the 66th year of his age. In 1867 he entered the service of the Erie as water boy, in a track gang on the Delaware division, and later was in the train service as flagman and conductor in construction work. Returning to maintenance of way work, he quit the Erie in 1883. In 1884 he re-entered the Erie service and was assigned to the Wyoming division as inspector of mason work. Later he worked on the Delaware and Buffalo divisions, and performed brief duty on the Allegheny division. In 1908 be retired from duty, finishing his long career in the mason gang on the Delaware division. He is survived by his widow, two sons, a daughter and a sister.




From the March, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES M. POWERS
It is learned from the Middletown, N.Y., Herald that James M. Powers, employed as gateman at the Erie's Main street crossing, Elmira, N.Y., is dead of pneumonia after a brief illness.




From the June, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM J. PRALL
From the Passaic, N. J., Herald the death of William J. Prall is learned, same occurring in St. Joseph's hospital, Paterson. He was employed as crossing gateman at Summer street. He was 39 years of age. Surviving are two brothers.




From the December, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOSEPH W. PRICE
The Stroudsburg Record records the death of Joseph W. Price. He died at his home in South Stroudsburg at the age of 60 years, the cause being a stroke of paralysis. Decedent was for a long time foreman of the Machine department of the Erie shop.

Also:
Joseph W. Price, employed at the Stroudsburg NYS&W RR Shops for the past twenty years, died at his late home, 21 Mahlon Street. Mr. Price was taken seriously ill one week before his death with a paralytic stroke, from which he never recovered. He came to Stroudsburg from Elizabethport in the year 1900, taking a position as machinist in the Locomotive department, and later he was promoted to machine foreman, which position he held until his death. Much sympathy is expressed by the shop men for the members of his family. Mr. Price enjoyed the friendship of the entire community, his kindly nature gaining for him the love and respect of all who knew him.




From the May, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN E. REYNOLDS
From the Elmira Advertiser the death of John E. Reynolds is learned. The account stated that he had been a passenger conductor, and he died at his home in Waverly, N.Y. Surviving are his widow and one sister.




From the September, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

DANIEL RICE
The death of Daniel Rice, one of the oldest conductors on the Erie, is reported in the Elmira Star. It stated that he was 67 years old and died after a lingering illness. He was a prominent citizen of Hornell, in which city he passed away. Decedent was a member of Evening Star Lodge, No. 44, F. & A. M., and Order of Railway Conductors, of which he was chief conductor for many years. Surviving are his widow, a son and two sisters.




From the May, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

DAVID H. RICE
The death of David H. Rice is recorded in the Hornell Tribune-Times. The account stated that he was among the best known conductors on the road, and was 54 years of age. Most of his life had been spent in Hornell. His death occurred at the home of his sister in Canisteo following a lingering illness. Fraternally he had membership in the Masonic order and Order of Railway Conductors. Surviving are three sisters and a brother.




From the December, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

A.J. RICH
A.J. Rich, who was a conductor on the Atlantic & Great Western system, died October 16 (1920), age 92 years. Mr. Rich was a conductor for many years. He is survived by one daughter. Mr. Rich was a member of the Masonic Order, also of the O.R. Conductors.




From the April, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

A. W. RICHARDS
The death of A.W. Richards is announced in the Kent, 0., Courier. He was employed during the greater part of his life by the Erie at Kent, and was in his 73d year. He was a veteran of the Civil war, and was discharged with an honorable record. His surviving relatives are his widow, a daughter, a grandchild and four brothers.




From the November, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ARTHUR RINEHART
An account of the death of Arthur Rinehart appeared in the Stroudsburg, Pa., Record. It stated that he died in that city at the age of 59 years, and that dropsy was the cause. He had been a resident of Stroudsburg since 1900, since which time he had been employed on the N. Y., S. & W. division of the Erie, filling the position of traveling carpenter between Yatesville and Beaver Falls. He was the type of man who commanded the respect of his fellow railroad men and the community in which he resided. Surviving him are a son, a daughter, a brother and three sisters.




From the March, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN A. ROBBINS
A report of the death of John A. Robbins appeared in the Marion, Ohio, Star. He died after an operation for the removal of gallstones at the Orchard hospital. He was 46 years old and was employed as engineer, having a run between Marion and Kent. Decedent was a member of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, Wayside Lodge, 864, IOOF., and the Knights of Pythias. He is survived by his widow, a son, two daughters, two brothers and a sister.




From the March, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

FREDERICK P. ROBINSON
The Port Jervis Gazette printed the story of the death of Frederick P. Robinson, an employe in the Erie's steel car shop. He died at St. Francis hospital, Port Jervis, from injuries received at Neversink Beach when he proceeded to dive in the water. He was 26 years old and was a member of the Carmen's Union, Brotherhood of all Railroad Employes and Delaware Council, No. 9, J. O. U. A. M. Surviving him are his mother, a brother, a sister and his step-father.




From the July, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

CHARLES ROLOFF
A long article concerning the death of Charles Roloff, an old, favorably known and faithful employe of the Erie, appeared in the Youngstown (Ohio) Telegram. He had been the vigilant watchman at Phelps Street crossing, Youngstown, for fourteen years, and every Erie man from the high officials to the humblest among them, had a kind word for him, realizing that he always paid strict attention to duty, and performed that duty well. During the many years he guarded the busy Phelps street crossing he had not permitted an accident to happen, which is a tribute to his eternal vigilance. He was a German by birth, and before casting his lot with the Erie was an employe of the Carnegie company, on whose pension list his name appeared. His death occurred suddenly at his home at the age of 75 years. He was a charter member of the Martin Luther church, and took an active interest in all matters concerning it. Surviving are his widow, three sons and two daughters, besides eight grandchildren and five greatgrandchildren.




From the February, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

THOMAS F. RYAN
The death of Thomas F. Ryan is reported in the Hornell Tribune, same occurring at his home in that city at the age of 63 years. For the past fifteen years be had been the Erie's freight agent at Hornell, and was among the most favorably known residents of the city. He had been ill for about eight months. For forty-three years he had served the Erie well and faithfully in the station service, having been agent at four different points.




From the November, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM H. RYMER
The Susquehanna Transcript printed a brief account of the death of William H. Rymer, for many years foreman of the Erie roundhouse in that city. He died at Cooper, N. Y., at the age of 50 years. He had left Susquehanna about fifteen years ago, and had always been kindly remembered by the wide circle of friends that he left behind.




From the June, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM R. SAMPSON
The death of William R. Sampson is reported in the Port Jervis Union, the cause being an operation for appendicitis. Mr. Sampson was 43 years old. He was an Erie conductor. Decedent held membership in the Reformed church and the Elks. Surviving are his widow, two children and four step-children.




From the April, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JACOB S. SCHULER
The death of Jacob S. Schuler is reported in the Kent, 0., Tribune. He was employed as moulder in the Kent shops. His surviving relatives are one son and two brothers.




From the July, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WARREN SCHULTS
From the Port Jervis Union the death of Warren Schults is learned. The notice stated that he died at his home after a week's illness at the age of 26 years. He wasemployed at the ice house in that city. Surviving are his widow, one son, a daughter, his parents and a brother. He was a member of the Sparrowbush M. E. church.




From the November, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

FRANK SHADENFROH
A notice of the death of Frank Shadenfroh appeared in the Youngstown Vindicator, which stated that he died of a complication of diseases, at the age of 66 years. He was employed as engineer, was widely known, and was a member of the B. R. T. Surviving him are his widow, two sons and four daughters.




From the December, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

SOL SHAFFER
The death of Sol Shaffer is reported in the Youngstown Vindicator. It says he died in St. Elizabeth's hospital of a complication of diseases, after a period of several weeks. He was 68 years of age. His position with the Erie was crossing watchman at Champion street.




From the January, 1921 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM SHEEN
William Sheen, air-brake machinist, died at Spencer Hospital (Meadville), Tuesday, Nov. 9 (1920), after a short illness.




From the May, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

FRANK T. SHERIDAN
From the Legal department, the death of Frank T. Sheridan is learned. He died at the home of his daughter in Brooklyn, N.Y., after a prolonged illness, at the age of 71 years. Paralysis was the cause. Mr. Sheridan had been connected with the Erie's Legal department for more than forty-two years as special investigator, and was held in high esteem by his many friends and associates. Fraternally he was a member of Montgomery Lodge, No. 68, F. and A. M., of New York City, and the Erie Mutual Benefit Association. He is survived by a son and three daughters.




From the May, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

HENRY SHERMAN
The news of the death of Henry Sherman, an Erie conductor, is learned from the Susquehanna Transcript. It stated that he was found unconscious in his caboose in the Susquehanna yards, and taken to a hospital in Hornell, where he died. Surviving are his widow and a daughter.




From the May, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

W. HARRY SMETHURST
A notice of the death of W. Harry Smethurst appeared in the Susquehanna Transcript. It stated that he had been at one time employed, first in the Erie shops, then an officer in the shops. After leaving the Erie service he was elected night police officer of Susquehanna borough, and later was chief of the borough fire department. He had been ill several weeks, but remained on duty until obliged to give up. Besides his widow he is survived by a daughter, a brother and four sisters.




From the July, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

H.L. SNODGRASS
The death of H.L. Snodgrass, Erie conductor, occurred after a protracted illness at Magnetic Springs. The cause was heart disease. He was 53 years old. The Galion Inquirer, which printed the report of his death, stated that he began life on the Erie as brakeman thirty-three years ago, and rose to be conductor, running in the freight service for 31 years. His record was an enviable one. Surviving are his widow, a daughter, his mother and a brother. He held membership in the ORC and Knights of Pythias.




From the June, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN RICHARD SMITH
The death of John Richard Smith is recorded in the Marion, Ohio, Star. The report stated that he was first trick operator at the Erie depot, and that he died of tuberculosis in his 50th year. He had been in the Erie's employ nineteen years and was a member of the Order of Railroad Telegraphers. Surviving are his widow, two sons and one daughter.




From the April, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

DANIEL FLETCHER STANLEY
From the Mansfield, O., News, the death of Daniel Fletcher Stanley is learned. He died of heart trouble at his home, at the age of 68 years. The position he filled was watchman at the Main street crossing, Mansfield. Decedent is survived by his widow, four brothers and one sister.




From the March, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

ABNER STRODE
News of the death of Abner Strode, operator of the Erie at VS tower, Spencerville, Ohio, has been received from that point. He was 50 years old, and death resulted from a complication of diseases. He had been many years in the service and was favorably known. His surviving relatives are his widow, one son and two brothers, both of whom are operators.




From the October, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOSEPH PERCY SUTTON
Joseph Percy Sutton died on July 28, 1920, at the age of 65, after thirty-two years' service with the Erie railroad. Death was caused by a complication of diseases.

He entered service as a yard brakeman at Youngstown, Ohio, January 16, 1888, and worked continuously as a yard brakeman and yard conductor until Aug. 18, 1917, upon which date he suffered a paralytic stroke which incapacitated him until May, 1918, when his condition bettered to such an extent that he was able to fill the duties of time checker in the Maintenance of Way department, in which work he was engaged until October, 1918, when he was appointed crossing watchman at Youngstown, Ohio, which position he held until July 3, 1920, when it was necessary for him to discontinue work on account of ill health.




From the April, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

THADDEUS B. TANNERY
Thaddeus B. Tannery died at his home in Hornell after an illness of several weeks, at the age of 73 years. He was among the best known conductors on the Erie system, and was called "Thad" by everyone who knew him. His term of service with the Erie was about fifty-four years. He was prominently identified with the Masonic order, and was a member of the Eagles and the Order of Railway Conductors. Having been a veteran of the Civil war he was a member of Doty Post, G. A. R. During the latter years of his life he filled the position of station agent at Hornell. Surviving him are his widow, a daughter and other near relatives.




From the February, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

F. B. THAYER
The Susquehanna Transcript announces the death of F. B. Thayer, an old-time locomotive engineer of the Erie in the days when wood was used to fire engines. After retiring from railroad life he entered the grocery business and was successful.




From the April, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

OSCAR THOMPSON
The Susquehanna Transcript reports the death of Oscar Thompson, at the age of 77 years. He had been in ill health for a long time. His position with the Erie was draftsman in the local shops. Surviving him are his widow and one son.




From the June, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

THOMAS D. TIMSON
A report of the death of Thomas D. Timson appeared in the Galion, Ohio, Inquirer. It stated that he died of tuberculosis after a lingering illness. He was 30 years old and had been employed as fireman for a number of years. He is survived by his widow, a daughter, his mother and other relatives.




From the July, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOSEPH E. TITSWORTH
From the Port Jervis Union, the death of Joseph E. Titsworth is learned. The notice stated that he passed away at his home in that city at the age of 49 years, the illness which resulted in death being of long duration. He had been a machinist in the employ of the Erie for thirty-two years. He was a member of Tri-States Lodge No. 110, International Association of Machinists; Delaware Council No. 9, J. O. U. A. M., and Port Jervis Hose Company No. 4. Surviving are his widow, a daughter, his mother, a brother and a sister.




From the September, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM H. TODHUNTER
Announcement of the death of William H. Todhunter was made in the Marion Star, which stated that he died as a result of a motorcycle accident, and was about 50 years old. He had been formerly an operator and yard switchman at Galion. He was a member of the B. of R. T., Moose of Galion, and Knights of Malta of Crestline.




From the March, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

FRANK B. TOWNER
The death of Frank B. Towner is reported in the Elmira, N.Y., Gazette. His age was about 70 years. An operation was performed on him in the Hornell hospital, and his death followed. He had been a passenger conductor and for the past year had acted as Erie station master at Hornell. He was a veteran of the Civil war and is survived by his widow, two sons and a daughter.




From the November, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

EDWARD L. WAGNER
The Susquehanna Transcript printed an account of the death of Edward L. Wagner, which stated that he died in the Packer hospital, Sayre. Pa., after an operation. He was employed as carpenter. Besides his widow, he is survived by two sons and three daughters.




From the September, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

WILLIAM L. WELLS
From the Republican Press, Salamanca, is learned the death of William L. Wells, an old and faithful employe of the Erie. He was 65 years of age, and had been with the Erie forty years. Six years ago he was stricken with paralysis, which compelled him to retire from the ticket agency at Bradford, a position he held for many years. Mr. Wells was a native of Dunkirk, N. Y.. and began life with the old A. & P. Telegraph Company, and in 1872 came with the Erie. Surviving are his widow, two sons and a daughter.




From the September, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JAMES WELSH
The death of James Welsh is learned from the Hornell Tribune, which stated that the end came at Silver Lake, where he had gone several weeks ago in the hope of improving his health. He was 33 years of age, and had been employed first as yard switchman at Hornell and later was airbrake inspector. He was a member of the B. R. T., Hornell Lodge No. 210, L.O.O. Moose, and the Carmen's Union. Surviving is one sister.




From the April, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

JOHN J. WILLIAMS
The death of John J. Williams, one of the Erie's well-known Meadville division conductors, is reported in the Meadville Messenger, same occurring at the home of his brother-in-law in Carbondale, Colo. He was a member of the O. R. C., and I. O. O. F. His surviving relatives are his widow, two sons and two daughters.




From the November, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

MAURICE WILLIAMS
From the Olean Herald the death of Maurice Williams is learned. The account stated that he died at his home in that city, after an illness of two years, at the age of 53 years. He had been employed as baggagemaster at Salamanca for twelve years until failing health compelled him to retire from active duty. He was a member of the K.O.T.M. Surviving him are his widow, a daughter, a brother and a sister.




From the July, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

F. Winkleman

FRED WINKLEMAN
The Huntington (Ind.) Herald printed an account of the death of Fred Winkleman, employed as section foreman, whose age was 68 years. Surviving are his widow and seven children.




From the August, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine (Dunmore Shop News):

CHARLES G. WORZEL
From the Port Jervis Union the death of Charles G. Worzel is learned. The announcement stated that he was an Erie section foreman and that he died at his home in Pond Eddy after a brief illness, at the age of 48 years. He had been in the Erie service twenty-eight years, and for a long period had been located at Pond Eddy. He held membership in the Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employes and the Shohola Lutheran church. Surviving are his widow, four sons, two daughters, his father and a sister.




From the March, 1920 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine (Dunmore Shop News):

MICHAEL YUHAZ
Michael Yuhaz, car inspector at Gypsy Grove, Summit, died: influenza.




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