Erie Railroad Obituaries - Published in 1926



Selected Obituaries from Erie Railroad Magazine:


From the March, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
CHARLES T. ACKWORTH

Charles T. Ackworth, foreman of the planing mill in the car shops at Kent, O., died of pneumonia January 24. He was born in Kent, August 18, 1875, and married Miss Dora Bertram, October 24, 1897. Besides his widow he leaves a son and grandson. He was employed in various capacities at Kent for thirty-five years and served the company efficiently and faithfully.
(A small photo was also published)




From the December, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

V.S. Akkarian
VICTOR S. AKKARIAN

V.S. Akkarian, transitman at Pier 9, Jersey City, died suddenly of heart failure on the evening of Oct. 11 (1926), aged 33 years. He had been an Erie employe for over ten years. For about five years he was with the Valuation department on Federal valuation and the rest of the time with the Construction department. As "Little Vic," he was well and favorably known on the entire Erie system. He was unmarried. Funeral services were held Oct. 13 at the home of his parents, Dr. and Mrs. S.H. Akkarian, Pelham, N.Y., and burial was in Kensico cemetery.




From the November, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
EDWARD ALDRICH

Edward Aldrich died Oct. 1 (1926) at Miami, Fla., aged 46 years. He formerly lived at Meadville, Pa., and was an engineer on the Erie Railroad. Of late years he had been an engineer on the East Coast Railroad in Florida. He is survived by a widow and one son living at Corry, Pa. The burial of Mr. Aldrich was at Jamestown, N.Y.




From the May, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
CHARLES A. ANDREGG

Following an operation for a tumor on the brain, Charles A. Andregg died April 2 (1926) at the Clinic hospital in Cleveland. His home was at Kent, O., where for twenty-seven years he had worked in the Erie Railroad car shops. Mr. Andregg was born forty-five years ago at Brink Haven, O. Going to Kent in 1898 he began work in the Erie shops as storeroom foreman. He was genial and companionable and a lover of outdoor sports. Surviving are a widow, two sons, Charles junior and Merle Frederick, one brother and five sisters. The funeral was at Kent on Sunday, April 4.




From the March, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
I.D. ASPINWALL

Old-Time Telegrapher -- There died Jan. 28 (1926) at Penn Yan, N.Y., I.D. Aspinwall, for over fifty years a Western Union telegrapher in that village. He was 86 years old and was first employed as a telegrapher by the Erie Railroad Company in the station at Cameron, Steuben county, N.Y. This was in the '60s. In 1873 he went to Penn Yan as operator for the Northern Central Railroad, and a year later began to hold down a key for the Western Union, retiring from active service only a year ago.




From the May, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
LA ROSE PLYMON BAKER

LaRose Plymon Baker, of Youngstown, O., died of pneumonia at the Clinic hospital in Cleveland, March 23, aged 74 years. He was a native of Freedom, O. He early worked on the section of what is now the Erie Railroad, took up engineering and was an engineer on various railroads.

In 1903 he returned to the Erie as division engineer at Meadville, Pa., and three years later became division engineer of the Mahoning division, serving as such until 1917, and since having been assistant division engineer.

His death is lamented by his Erie associates and a large circle of friends. He is survived by five children. Mrs. Baker died only six weeks before her husband's death.




From the April, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
A. E. BALL

Alexander E. Ball died Feb. 27 (1926) at the home of his son in Wayne, Pa., aged 72 years. In 1881 he became a trainman on the New York division of the Erie Railroad and was in the service until a few years ago. During his railroad service he resided variously at Port Jervis and Matamoras. His wife died in 1907. His funeral and burial were on March 3 at Port Jervis.




From the February, 1927 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
C.F. BASCHON

Charles F. Baschon, an Erie trainman living at Port Jervis, N.Y., died of pneumonia on Dec. 30 (1926) at the home of his sister, Mrs. Earl Baisden, of Hawley, Pa. Mr. Baschon was a widower. He was a member of the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen and of St. Mary's church, Port Jervis. His funeral and burial were at Hawley on Jan. 3.




From the February, 1927 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
GEORGE A. BATES

George A. Bates, for many years an employe of the Erie Railroad at Hornell, N.Y., died recently at his home in that city. He was born at Attica, N.Y., in 1852. He is survived by a widow and two sons.




From the October, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
MYRTA MACFARQUHAR BECK

Mrs. Myrta MacFarquhar Beck, wife of Wallace E. Beck, trainmaster of the Buffalo and Southwestern division of the Erie Railroad, died Aug. 17 (1926) at the Deaconess hospital, Buffalo, N.Y., in the forty-fourth year of her age.

She was born at Galion, O., where she spent her early life, later going to Buffalo. In June, 1925, she was married to Mr. Beck and they went to Gowanda to live. Besides her husband and infant son, Wallace Earl Beck, she is survived by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Kincaid, of Galion, O.; a son, W.R. MacFarquhar, of Galion; two step-children, Raymond and DeEtta Beck, of Gowanda, N. Y.; and two sisters, Mrs. August Christman, of Bucyrus, O., and Mrs. J.V. Dye, of Galion.

The funeral was at the family home on Buffalo street, Aug. 19, and the body was taken to Galion, where there was a service at the home of the parents on Aug. 22.




From the February, 1927 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
W. F. BECKING

William F. Becking, a trainman on the Delaware division of the Erie Railroad, died early in December (1926) at his home in Port Jervis, N.Y., aged nearly thirty-two years. He was employed as brakeman, Feb. 22, 1916, resigning Nov. 1, 1924. As his record was clear he was re-employed as brakeman March 12, 1926.




From the January, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
FRANK H. BITTLER

The general staff mourns the untimely passing of Frank H. Bittler, who for over forty years was a loyal employe at Meadville Shop. His service embraced the serving of an apprenticeship and the advancing from a journeyman to supervisory duties. Proficient in all he did, a gentleman at all times, his death is a genuine loss.

Also:

From the March, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
Frank Bittler, apprentice instructor, died recently. he had been in the service forty-three years and during this long term had mde many friends here.




From the April, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
MICHAEL BLAKE

Michael Blake, formerly for a number of years a blacksmith in the Erie Railroad shops at Susquehanna, Pa., died Feb. 23 (1926) after a lingering illness. At one time he was a hotel clerk at Susquehanna and he was long an active member of the Erie hose company.




From the April, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JAMES C. BLAUVELT

James C. Blauvelt died in the Hackensack hospital, Hackensack, N.J., March 18 (1926), aged 88 years. He was formerly for many years an Erie conductor. As conductor he had charge of the first passenger train on the old Hackensack & New York Railroad years ago. In a recent issue of this Magazine there was published a brief sketch of his life, accompanied by a photograph.




From the April, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
DAYTON F. BOOTH

After an illness of several months Dayton F. Booth died Feb. 20 (1926) at his home in Meadville, Pa. A widow and daughter survive. The Tribune-Republican of Meadville says that for many years he was a machinist at the Erie Railroad shops in Meadville and "every one who knew him was his friend."




From the July, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

Charles F. Bowman
CHARLES F. BOWMAN

In the Pennsylvania Railroad collision at Gray station, Pa., at midnight June 16 (1926), when sixteen persons lost their lives, one of the victims was Charles F. Bowman, general agent of the Erie Railroad at Columbus, O.

Mr. Bowman, who was a passenger on one of the two trains involved in the collision, was instantly killed. He was on his way to Mahanoy City, Pa., where he had been called by the illness of his wife's mother.

Charles F. Bowman was born at Columbus, O., Aug. 20, 1892. On Nov. 15, 1914, he took employment with the Erie Railroad as traveling freight agent out of Columbus. During the World war he was in the military service. In March, 1920, he came back to the Erie as traveling freight agent in the division freight agency at Marion, O. Since July 17, 1922, he had been Erie general agent at Columbus. He is survived by a widow and a daughter.

Also, from the August, 1926 issue:
There is deep regret over the death of Charles F. Bowman, general agent of the Erie Railroad at Columbus, O., who lost his life in a Pennsylvania Railroad accident at Gray, Pa., June 16 (1926), while traveling to Mahanoy City, Pa., on a personal errand. Announcement of his death and a statement of his service record were made in the July number of this Magazine.

Mr. Bowman was only 33 years old. When 22 he took employment with the Erie as traveling freight agent out of Columbus, O. In September, 1917, he enlisted in the U.S. Engineers corps for the World war and became a sergeant. Reentering the Erie service in March, 1920, as traveling freight agent out of Marion, O., he was promoted July 17, 1922, to general agent at Columbus.

E.W. Burnett, of Columbus, writes to this Magazine: "Mr. Bowman was jovial and kind, and to know him was to like him. His loss is keenly felt by associates and the commercial world. At his funeral tears were shed by strong men, who were not relatives, but just friends."

It is sad to think of the untimely ending of a career so promising.




From the September, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
EDWARD T. BOYLE

Sympathy is extended to the family of Yard Brakeman Edward T. Boyle, whose death occurred August 3 (1926), from heart trouble.




From the January, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

Henry F. Hanky Bristol

HENRY F. BRISTOL
Henry F. Bristol, believed to be the Erie's oldest former employe in the train and dispatcher's service, died at his home, 34 Highland ave., Jersey City, on November 4 last, of heart trouble after an illness of two days. He had suffered from this ailment for some time past, but remained active until suddenly stricken. He was 87 yearS of age. He was in possession of his faculties up to the last, and was as active at his advanced age as most men of 50, and full of ambition.

He was born in Port Jervis, N. Y., January 22, 1838. As there was no railroad operating through his native town he drifted to the West and became a farmer. Not finding it to his liking he returned in 1858, and secured a position as freight brakeman on the Erie Railroad. He knew what it was to fire a wood-burning locomotive, and he knew how to run one. He was an all-around valuable man on any kind of train. He ran between Port Jervis and Jersey City, and it took about fourteen hours to cover the division.

To him belonged the prestige of having run the first coal train from Port Jervis to Newburgh, at which time he had become a conductor. It was interesting to hear him tell about the wood-burning engines, hand brakes and link couplings. They used to oil the axles by hand because there were no journal boxes.

Later in life Mr. Bristol became a train dispatcher at Jersey City, and still later chief dispatcher. In addition, somewhat earlier, he was a yardmaster. In 1887 he severed his connection with the Erie and became yardmaster of the Lackawanna at Hoboken, which position he retained eleven years. Later he quit railroading and was in charge of a telegraph gang stringing wires along the lines of railroad. This was his last connection with railroading.

It is certain that no active or retired employe of the Erie Railroad knows more of its history than he acquired through his experience in running trains and his connection with the rank and file of men on the old Eastern (now New York) division. He had a fund of valuable information, and was fond of telling stories of his old associates on the road, many of whom he saw rise from humble positions in the Operating department to become high officials of many of the larger railroads of this country, and he always kept as closely in touch with them as conditions would permit.

He was a consistent Christian and a member of the Bergen Reformed church of Jersey City Heights. Burial was in the family plot in Laurel Grove cemetery, Port Jervis.




From the June, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
M.F. BROE

M.F. Broe, Erie Railroad conductor, died of pneumonia on March 23 (1926) at his home in Nyack, N.Y., aged 64 years. He entered the service as a brakeman, July 1, 1880, and became freight and passenger conductor on the Northern Railroad of New Jersey, April 15, 1887, and was thus in the Erie service for nearly forty-six years.




From the January, 1927 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

James W. Brogan
JAMES WILLIAM BROGAN
J. W. Brogan, a locomotive engineer on the Buffalo division of the Erie Railroad, while on his way to work on Thanksgiving eve (1926) in Buffalo met with an automobile accident which resulted in almost instant death.

He lived at 602 Hopkins street, Buffalo. He was the husband of the late Mary Roach and is survived by three sons and three daughters.

Mr. Brogan became a fireman on the Buffalo division of the Erie, Oct. 10, 1891. He was promoted to engineer, May 25, 1904. He was a very conscientious and loyal employe. In a brief sketch, published in this Magazine a year and a half ago, it was stated that his faculty of discovering wrong conditions on engines and cars, and his general interest in the company's welfare, had earned him deserved recognition.




From the May, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
CHARLES A. BRUNN

Charles A. Brunn died at Buffalo, N.Y., April 21 (1926), aged about 70 years. He was a native of Buffalo. He began his career as a messenger for the Western Union Telegraph Company, and later was a telegraph operator. When the Buffalo & Jamestown Railroad was constructed he became associated with the property, and as a young man was appointed superintendent of the railroad, remaining in charge for some years, or until he became superintendent of the Meadville division of the Nypano Railroad under Col. Shaller, the general superintendent.

Later Mr. Brunn returned to Buffalo as superintendent of the Erie's Buffalo division and branches, including the Buffalo & South Western Railroad. He continued as such until 1912, when he became general manager of the Buffalo Creek Railroad property in Buffalo, and later became president of the corporate interests of that property, a position he held until his death. Mr. Brunn was a very high type of railroad executive. He was a man of unblemished integrity. An Erie man who knew him well says: "Charles A. Brunn was one of the ablest and strongest railroad superintendents ever connected with the Erie or any other railroad. He was intensely loyal. He was always fair and just in his dealings with his fellow men. His word was Inviolable and he inspired respect and confidence."




From the December, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
MARIE BURKE

Miss Marie Burke, employed here (Huntington Accounting Bureau) as Assistant Shop Timekeeper for a number of years, died October 12 (1926). Funeral services were held at St. Mary's Catholic Church, Marion, OH, Oct. 14. Miss Burke entered the services of the Erie Railroad July 11, 1916 as a clerk in the mechanical department at Marion. Her death is mourned by a host of friends in Huntington and Marion.




From the January, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
WILLIAM P. CAHILL

The Susquehanna Transcript printed an account of the death of William P. Cahill, and said he was employed in the machine shop in that place, where he had been employed several years. He was 55 years of age.




From the July, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

Timothy J. Callahan
TIMOTHY J. CALLAHAN
After a brief illness, Timothy J. Callahan, for many years a conductor on the Allegany division of the Erie Railroad, died at Salamanca, N.Y., May 26 (1926).

Born at Cuba, N.Y., Oct. 9, 1868, he had lived at Salamanca for the last twenty-five years. He was a man of sterling qualities, a good husband and father, a man who took a keen interest in public affairs. He was well read and informed and an authority on baseball and boxing. Wherever assistance was needed he was a living exemplar of the "Golden Rule." His death is regretted by a host of friends.

Mr. Callahan was a member of the Royal Arcanum Council 258; of the B. of R. T., of Hornell, No. 186; of the O.R.C, Hornell division, No. 225, and of Salamanca lodge, No. 1025, B.P.O. Elks. He is survived by his widow, Nora Casey Callahan; two sons, George T. and Daniel J. Callahan; four sisters, the Misses Mary, Bea, Catherine and Nellie Callahan. The funeral, with a solemn requiem high mass, took place May 29 at St. Patrick's church, Salamanca. Burial was in Calvary cemetery.




From the May, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
J.C. CALHOUN

Meadville Division Conductor J.C. Calhoun died at his home in Meadville on March 18 (1926).




From the June, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
MARTIN F. CARMODY

Martin F. Carmody, special inspector, Susquehanna Shop, died May 10 (1926), after a long illness. He was a mechanic of exceptional ability and had been in the service of the Erie Railroad for the past thirty-seven years. He was a man of sterling character, took great interest in the civic activities of his home town, as well as in matters pertaining to the railroad business, and will be greatly missed.




From the August, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JOSEPH W. CARPENTER

Joseph W. Carpenter, of Westtown, died June 11 (1926) in the Middletown (N.Y.) sanitarium, aged 83 years. Death was due to a fall by which he fractured his hip. Mr. Carpenter was formerly in the service of the Erie Railroad at Port Jervis.




From the March, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
D.C. CASH

De Lacey C. Cash, 73, died February 11 at Corning, N.Y. Formerly he was for many years a crossing watchman and gate tender for the Erie Railroad in Corning, retiring from the service about three years ago. He is survived by one son, Charles F. Cash, of Corning.




From the December, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JAMES F. CLANCY

James F. Clancy died Nov. 6 (1926) at his home in Susquehanna, Pa., after a week's illness of pneumonia. He was a machinist by trade, and for years worked in the Erie shops at Susquehanna. He is survived by one sister, Katherine, and two brothers, Charles and Patrick Clancy, all of Susquehanna. The funeral was held Nov. 9 at St. John's church in Susquehanna and burial was in Laurel Hill cemetery.




From the July, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

Sylvester L. Clark

SYLVESTER L. CLARK

Sylvester L. Clark, general agent of the Erie Railroad at Omaha, Neb., died June 17 (1926). He was born at Providence, R. L, May 27, 1863, and was thus 63 years old. Mr. Clark had been connected with the Erie Railroad since May 1, 1897, when he became a contracting agent in the general eastern freight office at New York. Since March 16, 1920, he had been general agent of the Erie at Omaha.

He is survived by a widow and a daughter. Mr. Clark formerly lived in Brooklyn, N.Y., and his body was brought to Brooklyn for burial on June 21.

Also, from the August, 1926 issue:
The Magazine in its July issue announced the death on June 17 (1926) at Omaha, Neb., of Sylvester L. Clark. Mr. Clark, who was 63 years old, had been connected with the Erie Railroad since May 1, 1897, when he became a contracting agent in the general eastern freight office at New York. Since March 16, 1920, he had been general agent of the Erie at Omaha. He was a man of high character and was much respected.

There survive a widow and a daughter. The burial was on June 21 at Brooklyn, N.Y.




From the August, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
GEORGE E. CLINE

A dispatch from Susqueharma, Pa., to the Binghamton Press announced the death on July 11 (1926) at his home at Oakland, Pa., of George E. Cline. For a number of years, it was stated, he was an engineer on the Susquehanna division of the Erie Railroad. His funeral was held on July 13.




From the June, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JOHN T. COLBERT

John T. Colbert died April 24 (1926) at his home in Bristow, Okla. He was a telegrapher and his home was formerly at Addison, N.Y., where as a young man he was an Erie Railroad telegrapher. The body was brought to Addison, where the funeral was held April 28.




From the August, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
AL G. COLE

Al G. Cole, of Kent Roundhouse, who entered Erie service at Kent Car Shop sixty-one years ago, when he came from Altoona, PA at the age of 16, died of heart disease at the home of his daughter, Mrs. W.A. Parkinson in Brooklawn, NJ, June 15 (1926). Burial was made at Kent, OH, June 17.




From the Febrary, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JOHN COLLIER

It is with regret the sudden demise of John Collier, stationary engineer at Weehawken, is learned. Mr. Collier had given faithful service to the Erie for the past thirty-seven years.

Also:

From the March, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
John Peter Collier, stationary engineer at the Weehawken local coal dock boilers, died in St. Mary's hospital, Hoboken, Jan. 7, from appendicitis, age 61 years. He entered the service of the Erie Railroad as laborer at the Weehawken local coal dock boilers in 1888. He was made fireman May 1, 1892, and stationary engineer Feb. 23, 1910, which position he held up to the time of his death. He served the Erie faithfully for thirty-eight years. Funeral services were held at his home in Hoboken, N.J.




From the June, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
B.F. COLLINS

Benjamin F. Collins died May 12 (1926) at the New York State Soldiers' and Sailors' home, Bath, N.Y., aged 81 years. He was a veteran of the Civil War, and a few years after the war he went to work for the Erie Railroad, moved to Hornell and was an Erie conductor for about fifty-six years. A widow and one daughter survive him. Conductor Collins was a member of the G.A.R. Post of Hornell, a charter member of the Order of Railway Conductors, and a Mason of long standing and high degree.




From the June, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
FRANK COPPARD

Frank Coppard, for forty two years employed in the paint shop at Kent, died May 2 (1926) from paralysis. He was born in Maidstone, England, Aug. 16, 1863, and came to America when he was 20 years old.




From the September, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
FORD COYKENDALL

Ford Coykendall, formerly for many years an active employe in the Accounting department of the New York World but since 1918 retired on full pay, died July 22 (1926) in a sanitarium at Avon, N.J., aged 93 years. He was born in New Jersey and more than forty years ago was an auditor for the Erie Railroad in Rochester, N.Y.




From the October, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

E.B. Coyle

E.B. COYLE

E.B. Coyle, Erie train dispatcher at Meadville, died August 27 (1926). Sincere sympathy is offered to Mrs. Coyle and family in the great loss they have sustained.

Also, from the November, 1926 issue:
The Late E. B. Coyle
The Magazine for October announced that E.B. Coyle, Erie train dispatcher at Meadville, Pa., died on Aug. 19 (1926), aged 47 years. His health had been failing for some time.

He was a son of Hugh F. Coyle, at one time trainmaster of the Meadville division, then assistant superintendent of the Mahoning division and later for many years a superintendent of the Grand Trunk Railroad.

E.B. Coyle entered the Erie service on Nov. 2, 1897, as a telegrapher. After a time he became passenger equipment clerk and special agent for the transportation manager in New York City, and subsequently was chief train dispatcher at Meadville. A number of years ago he studied chiropractic and was graduated in 1921 as a chiropractor, but stayed with the Erie until his death. He is survived by a widow and one daughter, Miriam, 10 years old.




From the November, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JAMES BATEMAN CURRAN

After a long illness, James Bateman Curran, chief clerk of the Car Record office of the Erie Railroad in New York City, died in the New York hospital, Oct. 5 (1926), aged 53 years.

He was born in Cleveland, O. He entered the service of the Erie, May 10, 1898, as a record clerk, and Sept. 1, 1917, was promoted to chief clerk. His service with the Erie thus covered a period of twenty-eight years, and his record was to his credit. Among the Erie employes Mr. Curran leaves a host of friends.




From the February, 1927 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
EDWARD CURRY

Edward Curry died Dec. 19 (1926), at his home, 276 Ninth street, Jersey City, N.J., aged about sixty years. Formerly for many years he was in the service of the Erie Railroad, says the Jersey Journal.




From the November, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
J. ALFRED DAILEY

J. Alfred Dailey, 73 years old, died on Oct. 18 (1926) at his home at Matamoras, near Pport Jervis, NY. Since 1883 he had been a trainman on the Delaware division of the Erie Railroad. A widow and one son survive.




From the February, 1927 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
CHARLES H. DAVIS

Charles H. Davis died Dec. 15 (1926) at Jamestown, N.Y., aged 44 years. For a score of years he was Erie yard conductor at Jamestown. He is survived by a widow.




From the December, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

George DeFries

GEORGE N. DEFRIES

George N. DeFries, Erie agent at Lancaster, N.Y., died Oct. 25 (1926). He entered the service Sept. 2, 1892, as operator, and was promoted to agent at Lancaster May 28, 1918, holding this position until his death. He is survived by his widow and one son. Funeral services, held at Lancaster Oct. 27, were attended by the following Erie employes on the Buffalo division: W.H. Sexton, H.W. Turner, R.B. Welker, C.M. Bowen, R.E. Muir, W.J. Symington, J.A. Mucha, P.C. Berkwater, I.N. Chase, C.W. Schroeder and G.R. Balcom.

Also, from the January, 1927 issue:
In the December number of the Magazine appeared a notice of the death on Oct. 25 of George N. DeFries, Erie Railroad agent at Lancaster, N.Y. His record of service with the Erie Railroad was as follows: Sept. 2, 1892, became operator at WK tower; Oct. 6, 1915, promoted to agent at Town Line, N.Y.; June 1, 1918, transferred to clerk, East Buffalo freight office; May 28, 1919, promoted to agent at Lancaster, which post he held until his death. George N. DeFries was a capable and popular railroad agent. He is survived by his widow and one son.




From the April, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
ARTHUR G. DeKAY

Arthur G. DeKay, 45, died March 3 (1926) from heart trouble in the hospital at Suffern, N.Y. The Goshen Independent-Republican says he was formerly assistant baggage-master at the Erie station in Goshen and later was in the office of the Erie division engineer at Jersey City. He is survived by a widow, by his mother, Mrs. Henry Lockwood, of Goshen, and two brothers, Willis, of Middletown, and Percey, of New York. The funeral was held in Suffern and the burial was at Mahway, N.J.

Also, from the May, 1926 issue:
Arthur Garfield Dekay, chief clerk to Division Engineers Righter and Malloy at Jersey City, whose death was reported in the April number of the Magazine, entered the service of the Erie April 15, 1901, as assistant baggagemaster at Goshen. On March 15, 1904, he became clerk for the master carpenter. In May, 1907 he was appointed signal supervisor's clerk. By this time, Mr. Dekay had gleaned considerable railroad knowledge and was made maintenance of way clerk in the superintendent's office in June, 1912. In August, 1915, he was appointed assistant chief clerk to the division engineers at Jersey City. It was this position which brought Mr. Dekay in direct contact with those who now miss him most. In May, 1917, he was promoted to the position he held at the time of his death. Mr. Dekay possessed qualities which gained for him a host of friends. He was always willing to lend a helping hand and believed in giving everyone a square deal.




From the April, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JOHN J. DELANEY

John J. Delaney, a former longtime employe of the Erie Railroad, died February 20 at his home, 105 Lafayette avenue, Buffalo, N.Y., aged 79 years.

From a sketch published in the Buffalo Evening Times it is learned that Mr. Delaney was born in Ireland, that he came to this country with his parents at an early age, that in 1858, when sixteen years old, he became a water boy for the Erie Railroad, and after awhile went in the train service as baggage master. In 1921 as the result of an accident he retired. His service with the Erie Railroad covered a period of sixty-two years.

For about half a century Mr. Delaney lived at Port Jervis, N.Y. There, on February 9, 1876, he married Elizabeth E. Mallon, who survives him with two sons, John V. Delaney, of St. Paul, Minn,, and William M. Delaney, of Buffalo. He is also survived by a sister, Mrs. Margaret Finan, and a brother, Frank Delaney, both of Port Jervis.

The body was taken to Port Jervis, where the funeral and burial were held. The six bearers were all nephews of the deceased.




From the October, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
DOMINICK DeMATTEO

Dominick DeMatteo, watchman and laborer (Dunmore, PA Car Shop) for the past 16 years, died at his home, 1032 Mark Street, Tuesday, September 7 (1926).




From the November, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
THOMAS B. DOREMUS

Thomas B. Doremus, one of the oldest employes of the Erie Railroad in point of service, died Sept. 25 (1926) after a long illness at his home, Closter, N.J.

He was born in Piermont, N.Y., June 14, 1844, and on April 4, 1858, entered the service of the Erie Railroad as a carpenter apprentice at the Piermont car shop. After serving his apprenticeship he was transferred to the car shops at Jersey avenue yard, Jersey City, where, about the year 1863, he was employed in making wooden brake shoes then in use on passenger coaches. Mr. Doremus in 1891 suffered an injury to his hand and was unable to work for several months. In 1909 he asked to be given lighter work than that of a carpenter and he was assigned to the job of carman helper, which he held up to the time of his death.

He was a member of Washington camp, 22, P. O. S. of A.




From the June, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
FRANK DRASBA

Frank Drasba, for nearly twenty-five years employed as a car repairer and inspector in the Car department of the Erie Railroad at Jersey City, died suddenly while at work on May 1 (1926). He was a faithful and conscientious employe and a charter member of the Erie Railroad Veterans' Association.




From the February, 1927 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

John Driscoll

JOHN DRISCOLL

In failing health for some time, John Driscoll, a veteran telegrapher and Erie Railroad employe, died at his home in Susquehanna, Pa., Dec. 29 (1926), aged 73 years. A native of Parkers Glen, Pa., he went to Susquehanna as a young man, learned telegraphy and became chief wire operator at that point for the Erie Railroad. For the last fifteen years he had also been manager of the Western Union Telegraph office at Susquehanna.

His service with the Erie Railroad covered a period of about fifty-five years. The Susquehanna Transcript says he was thorough and painstaking and made a fine reputation for efficiency of service. He had been a member and president of the School Board of Susquehanna. The surviving members of the immediate family are a widow and five children. The children are Mrs. Thomas Gorman and Arthur Driscoll, of Binghamton, N.Y.; Mrs. John Norman, of Saranac Lake, N.Y.; Frank Driscoll, of New York; Joseph Driscoll, of Portland, Ore.




From the November, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JOHN DUGAN

John Dugan, 67, died at Binghamton, N.Y., on Oct. 14 (1926). More than fifty years of his life was spent in the service of the Erie Railroad, and for forty years he was baggage master on the "Carbondale Flyer," running between Binghamton and Carbondale via Susquehanna. He retired last May. His home was at Susquehanna. He is survived by eight children.




From the February, 1927 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

John Earley

JOHN EARLEY

After more than fifty years of service with the Erie Railroad, Erie Conductor John Earley died Dec. 2 (1926) at Port Jervis, N.Y., aged 70 years.

In 1872 he became an Erie brakeman; and within a few years was promoted to freight conductor and then to passenger conductor. He was notably faithful in the discharge of his duties and was ever loyal to the interests of the Erie Railroad.

He was a member of St. Mary's church in Port Jervis and an officer in the local lodge, O.R.C, as well as a member of the Erie Railroad Veterans' Association.

His wife died about two years ago. His sole surviving child is Attorney Edward J. Earley, of Port Jervis, claim agent of the New York division of the Erie. Conductor Earley's youngest son, William J. Earley, former Erie trainman, lost his life in France during the war. His oldest son, John F. Earley, employed in the Signal department of the Erie, died in November, 1921.




From the June, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
FRANK W. ELLIOTT

Frank W. Elliott, for the past twenty years an employe in the car shop at Kent, died April 10 (1926) at his home, 1313 North Mantua Street, Kent. Mr. Elliott was born 49 yrs ago at Randolph, OH.




From the September, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JOHN P. FINN

John P. Finn, an old and well known employe of the Erie Railroad, died July 22 (1926) at his home, 342 Mackinaw street, Buffalo, N.Y. For forty-seven years he was employed at the Buffalo car shop of the Erie Railroad, and during the last thirty-eight years he served as gang foreman and divisional wrecking foreman. He was a baseball player of local renown in the '80s, playing third base for the Traveler baseball club of Buffalo, city champions in 1884-85-86-89. He was also for many years active in politics in the old First Ward of Buffalo.

Surviving Mr. Finn are a widow and two children, John Jr. and Loretta E. Finn. The widow was formerly Mary Crotty. The funeral took place at St. Brigid's church, Buffalo, July 24. Burial was in Holy Cross cemetery. The following nephews of the decedent acted as casket bearers: Henry and Frank Finn, Tames and Thomas Mahoney, William Dalton, John J. Crotty.




From the October, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
SANFORD I. FISHER

Sanford Irving Fisher died Aug. 24 (1926) at his home, 389 Grant street, Buffalo, N.Y. He entered the service of the Erie Railroad. Feb. 22, 1874, as messenger at the Black Rock station. By promotion he became chief clerk at Black Rock, agent at East Ferry street and agent at Main street, which latter post he held at the time of his death. He was a capable and intelligent man and had many friends.




From the September, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
STEWART FLATT

Stewart Flatt, formerly employed as hostler at Bradford shop, was killed at Troy, NY, when a runaway engine struck the engine on which he was working. Death was instantaneous.




From the May, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
MICHAEL FLEISE

Michael Fleise, for forty-five years an employe of the Erie Railroad in the Maintenance of Way department, died March 29 (1926) at his home in Buffalo, N.Y. His health had been impaired for several years but he continued at work until two days before his death. He was born in Posen, Poland, in 1859.




From the July, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
WILLIAM FORREST FORBES

William F. Forbes died suddenly at Hornell, N.Y., June 5 (1926), being stricken on the street while on his way to the Erie roundhouse, of which he was foreman. He was born at Susquehanna, Pa., in 1860, and when sixteen years old started working for the Erie there, and for a number of years was assistant to the late J.O. Prescott, general excursion manager of the Erie. He came to Hornell in 1889, and had since lived there. His service with the Erie thus covered a period of about fifty years.

Mr. Forbes was a member of the First Presbyterian church of Hornell. He is survived by a widow, one son, Arthur, and a sister, Mrs. Nettie Jones, all of Hornell.




From the July, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JOHN L. FREDENSTEIN

John Ludwig Fredenstein died May 5 (1926) at his home at Matamoras, Pa., aged 67 years. In 1883 he became a brakeman on the Erie Railroad, retiring a number of years ago. The Middletown Herald says he was twice married and is survived by one son, John, of Matamoras.




From the January, 1927 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
WILLIAM FULLER

William Fuller, of Whites Crossing, Pa., died Oct. 25 at General hospital, Carbondale, Pa., following a paralytic stroke. He was 70 years old. In the days of his activity he had been employed at various times by the Erie Railroad as a locomotive fireman and engineer.




From the October, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

Martin Gannon

MARTIN A. GANNON

A dispatch from Hornell, N.Y., under date of Sept. 2 (1926), announces the death at Hamburg, N.Y., of Martin A. Gannon, at one time a resident of Hornell and an employe of the Erie Railroad.

Also, from the November, 1926 issue:
Martin A. Gannon
The Magazine for October had a brief notice of the death of Martin A. Gannon, Erie agent at Blasdell, N.Y., near Buffalo. Mr. Gannon died on Sept. 1 (1926) after a short illness. For many years he worked as an operator in the office of the general freight and passenger agent at Buffalo, and subsequently as an operator at various points on the Buffalo division. April 7, 1911, he became Erie agent at Marilla, N.Y., and later was agent at Collins, Hamburg and Blasdell.

He was a very faithful and loyal employe and was active in the solicitation of Erie business. Mr. Gannon had many friends both in and out of the railroad service.




From the December, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
MICHAEL GANNON

Michael Gannon, with 61 years of Erie service, died recently at the age of 82. (He was employed as a crossing watchman at Dunmore, PA, Wyoming Division, at the time).




From the January, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JOHN GARVEY

The Port Jervis Union-Gazette printed a brief account of the death of John Garvey, and said he died at his home in Frankfort, N.Y., after an illness of several months. He had been a brakeman and conductor on the Erie, and later was employed by the New York Central. He was in his seventieth year.




From the March, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JOHN GETTINGS

John Gettings, lineman at Duane street station, died January 31 (1926) at his home in Jersey City, from acute indigestion, age 76 years. He was born in Ireland April 17, 1855, and came to this country with his parents at the age of 10 years. A sketch of Mr. Gettings, together with his portrait, appeared in the July, 1925, issue of this Magazine. He was loyal to the Erie and well liked by his fellow employes. He is survived by a wife and three daughters. Funeral services were held at St. Michael's Roman Catholic church, Jersey City. Burial was in Holy Name cemetery, Jersey City.




From the January, 1927 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
GEORGE W. GIBSON

George W. Gibson, Erie car foreman at Black Rock, N. Y., died suddenly while at work in his office on Nov. 24 (1926). He was born 66 years ago, entered the Erie service in April, 1879, as car repairer, and since March 15, 1907, had been car foreman. His home was at 76 West Northrup place, Buffalo. He is survived by a widow, three sons and one married daughter. The burial on Nov. 27 was under the auspices of Hiram lodge, F. and A. M.




From the June, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JAMES V. GLAVIN

James V. Glavin died Friday, May 7 (1926) in Buffalo, aged 56 years. He was general stock agent for the Erie Railroad. He entered the services of the Erie on Nov. 12, 1885, as a messenger, was later promoted to clerk, and on July 1, 1922, he succeeded Bryant B. Stowits, general stock agent. He was efficient in the discharge of his duties and was well liked. He is survived by a widow, two sons, James F. and Mark J., and one daughter, Mary A. Glavin. The funeral was held Monday, May 10, from the Church of the Holy Name.




From the June, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

Frederick A. Goodwin

FREDERICK ABBOTT GOODWIN, M.D.
Dr. Frederick A. Goodwin, died April 25 (1926) at Binghamton, N.Y., following an attack of influenza. Dr. Goodwin was 61 years old. He was a skilful physician and surgeon and was widely known. For several years he had been Erie Railroad company surgeon at Binghamton. He was also a coroner in Broome county. He formerly lived at Susquehanna, Pa., where he practiced his profession and also founded and organized the Simon Barnes hospital. The funeral was held at Binghamton, April 26, and burial was at Hartford, Conn. Dr. Goodwin is survived by a widow, Minnie H. Goodwin; two daughters, Mrs. Donald Lee Phillips and Miss Dorothy Goodwin, both of Binghamton; and a sister, Mrs. Caroline Goodwin Parker, of Hartford, Conn.




From the May, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
ANTHONY GORKE

Anthony Gorke died at Buffalo on April 5 (1926), aged 56 years. He had been employed for twenty-four years in the Maintenance of Way department of the Erie Railroad. He asked permission to be off duty March 31 so as to attend the funeral of his old friend and co-worker, Michael Fleise, but was taken ill and was unable to attend Mr. Fleise's funeral and passed away a few days later.




From the March, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
DAVID MARSTEN GULICK

David Marsten Gulick, employed at Duane street station as dock clerk, died at his home in Brooklyn, N.Y., January 13 (1926), of heart trouble, aged 74 years. He was active and full of ambition up to the time of his death. Mr. Gulick entered the service April 17, 1901, and held various clerical positions at Duane street station during his twenty-five years' employment. He was in constant contact with the fruit trade and rendered valuable service. He was esteemed by the officers of the Erie Railroad on account of his loyalty and faithful attention to duty. Funeral services were held at his home and burial was in the family plot in White House cemetery, Whitehouse, N.Y.




From the October, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

Helen Gutenschwager

HELEN GUTENSCHWAGER
A Girl Who Will Be Missed -- Apparently in the best of health, gay, light-hearted and carefree, Helen Gutenschwager, 19, a stenographer in the Erie Railroad regional office at Chicago, was one of the merriest girls at the Erie Railroad employes' picnic, held Aug. 14 at Lake Manitou, near Rochester, Ind. She took an active part in several athletic events at the picnic and won two prizes.

Returning to Chicago on Sunday, Aug. 15 (1926), she was stricken with peritonitis and died the next day.

Miss Gutenschwager was born April 8, 1907, at Forest Park, Ill. She became a member of the Erie family, June 25, 1925, as a stenographer in the regional office at Chicago. She was highly esteemed by her associates and her sudden and unexpected death is a great shock to them.




From the April, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
RICHARD GUYLE

Richard Guyle, a former resident of Port Jervis, N. Y., and a former conductor on the Delaware division of the Erie Railroad, died March 10 (1926) at his home in Fort Worth, Tex., aged 76 years. In the '80s Mr. Guyle went to Texas, where he continued railroading until about fifteen years ago, when he retired.




From the June, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
MILAN H. HALL

Milan H. Hall, of Hammondsport, N. Y., died May 12 (1926) from a stroke suffered a few days before. He was 77 years old, had always lived in Hammondsport, was formerly general manager of the Bath and Hammondsport Railroad, and was active in business up to three years ago, when his health began to fail.




From the February, 1927 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

Patick Hanley
Mr. and Mrs. Patick Hanley

PATRICK HANLEY
Patrick Hanley died suddenly on West Center street, Marion, O., Dec. 1, 1926, while walking with his small granddaughter. He was born in Ireland, Oct. 20, 1855. He entered Erie service Dec. 1, 1885, as a car repairer and was later employed as a coach cleaner in the vicinity of the Union station at Marion.




From the April, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
ADAM HARPER

The Corning Evening Leader of March 1 (1926) records the death at Wallace, N.Y., of Adam Harper, who, it says, was "for many years a trusted employe of the Erie Railroad." He was 80 years old.




From the February, 1927 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
T. W. HARRINGTON

Timothy W. Harrington, night train dispatcher at Elmira, N.Y., for crews on the Susquehanna and Tioga divisions of the Erie Railroad, died Dec. 29 (1926) from apoplexy, having been stricken just after he had completed his work and was starting for home. He was fifty-six years of age. He was a native of Steuben county, N.Y., and for many years lived at Addison, where he learned telegraphy. Since about 1890 he had been employed by the Erie Railroad, the last twenty-five years in Elmira. He was unmarried. Two sisters and a brother survive. The funeral and burial were at Addison.




From the May, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JOHN HARRIS

John Harris died April 4 (1926) at Frankfort, N.Y., aged 84 years. He was born in Port Jervis, and in early life was employed on the Erie Railroad. He served in the Civil War and later did railroad work for the Delaware & Hudson Company between Carbondale and Scranton, Pa. For a number of years he was chief of police at Frankfort, N.Y.




From the March, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
THOMAS HENRY HAWKINS

Thomas Henry Hawkins, chief fare clerk of the Passenger Department, New York City, died suddenly at his home in Ridgewood, NJ, Feb. 10 (1926) of an acute heart attack.

Mr. Hawkins was born in New York City, Sept. 7, 1864, and entered the Passenger Traffic Department as messenger in the spring of 1879. He was later promoted to shipping clerk and division clerk, and in October, 1905, was appointed chief fare clerk, which position he filled at the time of his death.

His genial, sunny personality will be sadly missed by his associates and a large circle of acquaintances.

Mr. Hawkins was a resident of Ramsey, NJ, for many years and served as a member of the Borough Council. He is survived by his widow and one son, the latter a resident of Bridgeport, CT.




From the December, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
BURTON P. HEATER

A splendid record of service with the Erie Railroad was brought to a close on Oct. 27 (1926), when Burton P. Heater died. He had been employed since Oct. 6, 1902, when he started as a clerk in the Transportation department. June 25, 1918, he was transferred to the Jersey City Accounting bureau as timekeeper, where he remained until his death. He was born June 12, 1881. Floral pieces from the Accounting bureau and the Clerical association were among the many received from his numerous friends, and the entire office force attended his funeral at Paterson, Oct. 30.




From the September, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
S. GEORGE HERMANOE

Dr. S. George Hermanoe died July 26 (1926) at his home at Clarkson, Orleans county, N. Y., aged 71 years. He was born in Brooklyn and was graduated from the New York Homeopathic Medical College. From 1887 to 1890 he practiced at Avon, N.Y., and was surgeon for the Erie Railroad.




From the May, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

E.M. Hoffman

EDWIN MICHAEL HOFFMAN
Edwin Michael Hoffman, a veteran machinist in the Erie shops at Meadville, Pa., died Feb. 25 (1926), aged 84 years. He was a native of Lebanon, Pa.

On May 27, 1861, he enlisted in the Union forces for the Civil War, joining Co. "C," 7th regiment, Pennsylvania Reserve Volunteer corps, and serving until 1864, when he was honorably discharged with the brevet rank of captain.

In 1867 he married Luisa Fink, of Reading, Pa., and brought his bride to Meadville, where he got employment with the Atlantic & Great Western Railroad (now Erie), and he continued to work as a railroad machinist up to the time of his death, a period of nearly fifty-nine years.

Mrs. Hoffman died about twenty years ago, since which time the captain made his home with his only child, Mrs. Jacob H. Stolz, of Meadville. Captain Hoffman was active in Freemasonry, and was long secretary of the local Masonic relief association. He was a charter member of Jefferson Lodge, Ancient Order of United Workmen, of Meadville. For a number of years he was a local contributor to the ERIE RAILROAD MAGAZINE.

He was a man of much intelligence, gifted in many ways; he was widely known and commanded the respect of all that knew him.




From the December, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
GEORGE HOFFMAN

Sunday, Oct. 10 (1926), an automobile driven by George Hoffman (Cleveland Freight Office) was struck by a bus on Pearl Road, Cleveland. Mr. Hoffman was taken to Deaconess Hospital in a serious condition and died Monday morning. He had been in charge of the record room for the last six months, and was highly respected and liked by his associates.




From the Febrary, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
EDWARD H. HOGAN

The death of Edward H. Hogan occurred at his home, 140 Lake street, Kent, O., 5:30 a.m., Sunday, Dec. 20, last (1925), after an intermittent illness of eight years, from pernicious anemia.

Mr. Hogan was born in Ravenna, 0., Jan. 29, 1868, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Hogan. He later went to Kent, attending the local schools, and entered the service of the Erie Railroad, June 15, 1882, as clerk, serving in this capacity until shortly before his death. Nineteen years ago he married Miss Alice Roberts, from which union was born a daughter, who died some time ago. He is survived by his widow and two sisters, Mrs. Mary Barnard, of Detroit, and Mrs. Carolyn Turner, of Kent. Mr. Hogan was a member of the Masonic Order. Burial was in Maple Grove cemetery, Ravenna. He was a faithful worker and good citizen.




From the January, 1927 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JOHN GEORGE HOHENSTEIN

John George Hohenstein, a native of Germany but a resident of the United States since he was a boy, died on Nov. 9 at Buffalo, N. Y., aged nearly 77 years. Formerly he lived at Gowanda, N.Y., and at one time was employed by the Erie Railroad.




From the May, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

George H. Holland

GEORGE H. HOLLAND
George H. Holland, an Erie fireman for over forty years, died suddenly at Huntington, Ind., April 3 (1926), while running a switch engine in the Huntington yards. He had taken charge of the engine to relieve for a few minutes the regular engineer, Walter Fields, who returned to the engine to find Fireman Holland dead from heart trouble.

Mr. Holland was born in 1860, at Bellefontaine, O. Since September, 1883, he had lived at Huntington and had been a fireman for the Erie Railroad. Surviving are a widow and two children, all of Huntington. The funeral was at Huntington on April 5.




From the July, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
THOMAS HOLLARN

Thomas Hollarn died May 28 (1926) at Bradford, Pa., aged 62 years. Entering the service of the Erie Railroad Sept. 7, 1888, as a brakeman on the Bradford division, he was promoted to conductor on July 15, 1891, and his record of service with the Erie thus covered a period of thirty-seven years. He was very efficient in the performance of his duties and was popular with the traveling public.

During the severe winter of 1904 he performed meritorious service in getting trains out of the snow and on another occasion was given a merit mark for extinguishing a fire which threatened the destruction of the Riderville trestle.

Surviving him are a widow, living at Salamanca, N.Y.; a brother, John Hollarn, Erie conductor; one son, Thomas Hollarn, of Jamestown, N.Y., and one daughter, who lives in Cottage Grove, Ore. Burial was made at Bradford, Pa.




From the July, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JOHN HENRIETTA

John Henrietta died May 11 (1926) at Spencer hospital, Meadville, Pa., after several months' illness from dropsy. For thirty-four years he was a telegraph operator for the Erie Railroad, his term of service being confined to the Meadville division, first in offices in the Meadville yard and at Venango and Corry and for the last fifteen years in the general office of the Mechanical and Stores departments at Meadville. He was a very intelligent and genial man and had many friends. His wife died in 1925. There survives one son, John Henrietta, Jr., an honor student of Allegheny college, Meadville.




From the February, 1927 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
S.E. HOLT

Sela Edgar Holt, 52, died Dec. 3 (1926) of pneumonia at the Packer hospital, Sayre, Pa. He was a native of Barton, N.Y., and about fifteen years ago moved to Smithboro, N.Y., where he worked as a bridge construction employe for the Erie Railroad. Later he was gate-tender at an Erie Railroad crossing in Corning. He is survived by a widow, three daughters and one son.




From the August, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
MRS. WILLIAM F. HOOKER (AKA Mrs. William Francis)

Mrs. William F. Hooker, who for about ten years edited the Household department of the ERIE RAILROAD MAGAZINE, under the name of Mrs. William Francis, died at her home in New York, July 1 last (1926), after a lingering illness. Mrs. Hooker was buried at Mount Hope cemetery, near Hastings-on-the-Hudson, N.Y.

She was a student of cooking all her life, and made it her pastime. As a young woman she attended a cooking school. Hundreds of the recipes she published originated with her, being the result of careful study and experiment.




From the July, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
HARVEY A. HOUGHTELLING

Harvey A. Houghtelling died June 3 (1926) at Hornell, N.Y., aged 58 years. He was born at Cameron Mills, Steuben county, N.Y. Removing to Hornell and entering the service of the Erie Railroad he became a locomotive engineer on the Susquehanna division. He is survived by two brothers and three sisters.




From the April, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
MARY BLAKE HOYT

Mary Blake Hoyt, wife of Z.G. Hoyt, died May 9 (1926) at her home, 471 Harrison street, Passaic, N.J., aged 49 years. From Jan. 3, 1922, until July 25, 1925, she was ticket clerk for the Erie Railroad at the Harrison street station, Passaic, and resigned her job upon her marriage, less than a year ago.




From the April, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JOHN H. IVEY

John H. Ivey, an Erie Railroad switchman living at Binghamton, N.Y., died April 11 (1926), when a horse he was driving ran away and he was thrown to the ground and his back broken. He was a brother of William Ivey, of Port Jervis, a conductor on the Delaware division of the Erie Railroad. John H. Ivey was 65 years old. He had been an Erie Railroad employe for nearly thirty years.




From the February, 1927 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
OSCAR P. JOHNSON

Oscar P. Johnson, 82, died Dec. 9 (1926), at his home at Lafayette, N.J. He was born in Port Jervis, N.Y., and lived there until middle life, being for a time employed in the Erie freight office. Later he was in the dry goods business at Hackettstown, N. J., and then had a general store at Lafayette. His wife, formerly Elizabeth Denton, of Port Jervis, died six years ago. Mr. Johnson was a past master of Port Jervis lodge, 328, F. & A. M.




From the June, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
IRVING C. JONES

Irving C. Jones died April 18 (1926) at his home in Port Jervis, N.Y., aged 55 years. He entered the employ of the Erie Railroad as a brakeman about thirty years ago, became a trainman and later a conduction the New York division. In 1894 he married Nellie Anderson, of Port Jervis, who with one daughter survives him.




From the April, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
J.B. JONES

J. Benjamin Jones died on March 8 (1926) at Johnson City, N.Y., aged 75 years. Fifty years ago he was for a time a trainman on the Delaware division of the Erie Railroad. Later he had a bakery at Port Jervis. About twenty years ago he moved to Johnson City and re-entered the service of the Erie Railroad as a trainman. He is survived by a widow, four daughters and three sons.




From the October, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
ROBERT JONES

Word has been received in Huntington of the death of Robert Jones at his home in Columbus Grove, OH, August 26 (1926). Mr. Jones was employed in the Huntington Yard Office of the Erie until his health began to fail about a year and a half ago. He was well thought of in Huntington.




From the June, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JOHN D. KANE

John D. Kane was found dead May 2 (1926) in his home in Port Jervis, N.Y. He lived alone, and it was evident that he had fallen down stairs. He was 55 years old and had lived in Port Jervis during most of his life. Formerly for a number of years he was a locomotive fireman on the New York division of the Erie Railroad. His wife died several years ago.




From the February, 1927 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

Peter Kays

PETER KAYS

Stricken with paralysis, Peter Kays, engineer on the New York, Susquehanna & Western Railroad, died Dec. 3 (1926) at his home at Ogdensburg, N.J. He was born Dec. 29, 1871, at Ogdensburg and lived there all his life. He went to work for the Erie Railroad as coal pocket man at Beaver Lake, Aug. 1, 1900, was transferred to locomotive fireman Sept. 23, 1901, and promoted to engineer, March 26, 1907, in which latter capacity he served until his death. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and was highly respected. He is survived by a widow and eleven children, eight of the children living at home. The funeral was from the Methodist church at Ogdensburg, Dec. 7.




From the May, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
B.A. KELLOGG

B.A. Kellogg, former operator and agent at CM Tower, Columbus, PA, (Meadville Division) died at his home in Columbus of acute indigestion.




From the June, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
MICHAEL J. KELLY

Michael J. Kelly, employed at Avoca, PA Car Shop for the past twelve years, died at the family home, Avoca, PA, recently, after a brief illness. Mr. Kelly had many friends and acquaintances in Avoca and Pittston, especially among the members of the various societies of St. Mary's parish, and was highly regarded for his fine qualities.

Mr. Kelly served in the Spanish-American War under the late Col. T. Roosevelt. He also served in the Phillipine Islands and the Boxer uprising in China. He is survived by his wife and one sister. Burial was made in St. Mary's cemetery.




From the February, 1927 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

Edwin M. Kimball

EDWIN MARVIN KIMBALL

Edwin M. Kimball died Dec. 8, 1926, at his home at Matamoras, Pa., aged 72 years. He was an old Erie Railroad employe. When ten years old he was water boy for an Erie section gang at Sparrowbush, N.Y., where his father kept store. In August, 1886, he became a brakeman on the Delaware Division, and he held various positions. For the last ten years he had been baggagemaster on Trains 3 and 8, running between Jersey City, N.J., and Salamanca, N.Y. Along the line he was familiarly and affectionately known as "Pop" Kimball.

Mr. Kimball took a prominent part in local affairs at Matamoras, being noted for his interest in church and school. He was married to Frances H. Smith in Port Jervis, N.Y., Sept. 9, 1884. She survives with four children, namely, Flora M., wife of Charles E. Benjamin, of Matamoras; Helen R., wife of Earl W. Kellam, of Matamoras; Emerson Kimball, of Philadelphia; and Burr Kimball, of Long Branch, N.J. Mr. Kimball is also survived by one brother, Burr W., of Troy, and one sister, Mrs. Lelia A. Mulligan, of Jersey City. The funeral was held on Dec. 12 at Hope Evangelical church, Matamoras.




From the April, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

William Klees

WILLIAM H. KLEES

William H. Klees, chief engineer of the Erie Railroad power house at Hornell, N.Y., died at Hornell on March 20 (1926), aged 62 years. He had been in the Erie service for many years. Before he went to Hornell, in 1906, he was employed in the Erie shops at Susquehanna.

Also, from the June issue:
This Magazine has previously referred to the death March 20 (1926), at Hornell, N.Y., of William H. Klees, chief engineer of the Erie Railroad power house at Hornell.

Born in Germany, he came when a boy to this country with his parents. The elder Klees was a plater and interested in electricity. At the Centennial exposition in Philadelphia in 1876 he saw on exhibition a dynamo for the production of current for electric lights, then a novelty. He conducted tests of the machine and after a time a dynamo was ordered for the Erie Railroad and installed by him in the Erie shop at Jersey City, the first electrical machine, it is said, used by the Erie.

The Klees family moved to Susquehanna, where the son William became a machinist and electrician in charge of electric lighting; while the father did plating for headlight reflectors for locomotives. In 1890 William Klees became engineer of the Susquehanna Light, Heat and Power Co. Three years later he resumed service with the Erie Railroad as stationary engineer and electrician at the Susquehanna shop.

When the Erie power house at Hornell was built in 1906 William H. Klees was put in charge, and with the exception of a period of two years he continued in charge until his death. Surviving are a widow and six children. The widow was formerly Miss Eva Camfield, of Susquehanna, daughter of an Erie locomotive engineer.




From the May, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JACOB KRAFT

Jacob Kraft, (Wyoming Division) passenger trainman, died April 1 (1926), after a short illness. He entered the service Oct. 27, 1891, as brakeman for the Erie & Wyoming Valley Railroad and continued in that capacity until his death. Sympathy is extended to his family.




From the July, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

Fred J. Kriger

FRED J. KRIGER

After an illness that confined him to his home for nearly a year, Fred J. Kriger, chief status clerk in the general freight claim office of the Erie Railroad, 71 West Twenty-third street, New York City, died May 23 (1926) at his home at Lake View, N. J. He was in the 62d year of his age, and is survived by his widow, one son, Stuart, and two daughters, Mrs. Olive Wood and Miss Susan Kriger.

Mr. Kriger had been in the service of the Erie Railroad since Oct. 5, 1882, and made an excellent record for the efficient manner in which he performed the work under his supervision. He was well liked by all who knew him and his death is regretted by a large circle of friends.

The funeral from his late home at Lake View, N.J., on May 25, was attended by a large delegation of Erie employes. Services were conducted by the Rev. D. S. Hamilton, of St. Paul's church, Paterson, N. J., and the Rev. Dr. Frederick W. Evans, of the Church of the Redeemer, Paterson. Burial was at Cedar Lawn cemetery, Paterson.




From the May, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
EDWIN E. LACY

Edwin Erastus Lacy died recently at his home in Buffalo, N.Y., aged 79 years. Entering the service of the Erie Railroad in 1888 as a brakeman, he held various positions and at his death was train baggageman. He is survived by a widow, son and daughter.




From the March, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

R.G. Landon

R.G. LANDON
Conductor R.G. Landon, the oldest conductor on the Bradford Division, died at the home of his daughter Feb. 6 (1926), after an illness of several months. Mr. Landon had been in the train service as freight and passenger conductor on the Bradford Division for thirty-eight years and was a highly respected employe and citizen. He is survived by his widow and three daughters who have the sympathy of their many friends. Interment was made at Oak Hill Cemetery, Bradford. The pallbearers were members of the Order of Railway Conductors.

Also:

From the April, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
Shortly after the Bradford division of the Erie Railroad was completed, a young man of the name of R.G. Landon was engaged in the kindling wood business at Mt. Alton, Pa. The kindling wood business was a good business as such things go, but it was a dry and unsatisfactory occupation for a young man to be in watching while other young men were engaging in the practically new job of railroading. Railroading was an occupation with something of glamor and romance in it, a calling that thrilled the red blood of youth.

So it came to pass that the kindling wood business was placed on the market and sold and that on March 1, 1887, R.G. Landon entered the service of the Erie Railroad as a brakeman on the Bradford division. He was promoted to conductor on July 1 of the same year, and was just rounding out his thirty-ninth year of service in that capacity when his death occurred on February 26 this year.

In his long and honorable term of service as conductor, Mr. Landon was in charge of hundreds of trains and made many friends, to whom he was affectionately known as "Rocky." To make and hold a multitude of fast friends is an accomplishment and a record of thirty-nine years of clean service is an enviable feat - both designate the man. So the Erie Railroad Company is proud that Conductor Landon was in its employ.




From the November, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
THOMAS H. LANNON

Stricken while at work in the Erie Railroad shops at Susquehanna, Pa., Oct. 4 (1926), Thomas H. Lannon was taken to the Barnes hospital and died within a few hours. He was 70 years old and a lifelong resident of Susquehanna.

Learning the machinist trade, he had worked in the Erie shops at Susquehanna for about fifty years. A widow, three sons, two daughters and two brothers survive.




From the June, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
J.D. LENIHAN

Jeremiah D. Lenihan, 74 years old, died April 24 (1926) at his home in Honesdale, Pa. For many years he was a trainman on the Erie express between Honesdale and Port Jervis. Surviving are a widow, one son and two daughters, all of Honesdale.




From the March, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
PATRICK LESTER

The death of Patrick Lester occurred Jan. 19 (1926) at his home at Port Jervis, N.Y. He was a native of Ireland. The Port Jervis Union-Gazette says he came to this country at an early age and worked for the Erie Railroad for about fifty years. For a long time he was a brakeman on the "old immigrant" train. He is survived by one daughter, Miss Mary Lester, of Port Jervis.




From the February, 1927 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
C.W. LINDGREN

Sympathy is extended to the family of Youngstown Yard Brakeman C.W. Lindgren, who died of pneumonia Dec. 17 (1926). He was ill only six days.




From the March, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
CLYDE D. LIVINGSTON

Clyde D. Livingston died January 12 (1926), at Houston, Tex., of aneurism of the aorta. He was born September 7, 1876, near Red Haw, O. Mr. Livingston served as ticket clerk at Ashland and Barberton, and later was made ticket agent at Oil City, Pa. He is survived by his mother and two brothers, Dr. B.W. Livingston, of Ashland, and E.R. Livingston, Savannah, O. The funeral was held at Ashland.




From the March, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JOSEPH F. LOCKWOOD

Jos. F. Lockwood died February 1 (1926) at his home, Hornell, N.Y. He is survived by a widow and one son, Charles F. The Evening Tribune-Times of Hornell says Mr. Lockwood was a native and lifelong resident of Hornell. He was formerly in the service of the Erie Railroad, being for more than a dozen years a locomotive engineer on the Allegany division. Later he worked in the Hornell postoffice and then engaged in business for himself.




From the December, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
SPAULDING H. LOUCKS

The death of Spaulding H. Loucks, of Salamanca, occurred at Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 12 (1926), following a long illness. Mr. Loucks was born May 29, 1879. He entered Erie service as a clerk in the engine dispatcher's office at Hornell, N.Y., Feb. 23, 1908. Then he was transferred to chief caller at Hornell; Apr. 1, 1916, promoted to engine dispatcher at Salamanca; Nov. 13, 1917, appointed assistant yardmaster at Salamanca, which position he held until about four months before his death, when illness forced him to leave his work. He had a sunny disposition and was a good neighbor and citizen. His death is regretted by all who knew him.




From the May, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JAMES H. LYNCH

James H. Lynch died April 9 (1926) at Buffalo, N.Y. and his body was brought April 12 to Corning for burial. For many years he was a track supervisor on the Erie Railroad. Surviving are a widow and three children.




From the April, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
ABRAHAM MABEY

Abraham Mabey, 63 years old, died March 15 (1926) at the home of his sister in Bloomingdale, N.J. The Sussex Independent says that for forty-six years he had been a faithful employe of the Erie and the New York, Susquehanna and Western railroads, and had long been conductor on the Blairstown- Delaware train. The funeral was held March 18 at the home of his daughter, Mrs. George D. Walters, of Blairstown, N. J.




From the August, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
ALBERT MAINS

Albert Mains, for twenty-five years an employe of the Erie Railroad, died June 3 (1926) at his home at Pompton Junction, N.J., aged 52 years. He is survived by five sons and two daughters.




From the May, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
HENRY MALI

Sympathy is extended to the family of Henry Mali, who died of pneumonia. Mr. Mali was night watchman at the (Sharon, PA) freight house.




From the July, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JOHN H. MANTHAI

John Henry Manthai, aged 67 years, died May 29 (1926) at Goshen, N.Y. Years ago he was a trainman on the Delaware division of the Erie Railroad and later was engaged in railroading in the middle west.




From the April, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
WILLIAM MARTIN

William Martin died Feb. 21 (1926) at his home in Jersey City, aged 85 years. For many years he was employed in the Erie machine shops at Jersey City. The funeral and burial were at Schenectadv, N.Y.




From the April, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
WILLIAM C. MARVEL

William Clifford Marvel, Erie agent at West Orange, N. J., died March 1 (1926), aged 61 years. On May 1, 1881, when less than seventeen years old, he became the Erie local agent at Llewellyn, N.J. From 1882 to 1886 he was an operator in the Erie dispatcher's office at Jersey City. In 1887 he became an operator in the office of the general manager of the Erie. Since March 17, 1890, he had been Erie agent at West Orange. Thus his service with the Erie covered a period of almost forty-five years and it was service marked by a fine degree of fidelity and efficiency.




From the August, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JOSEPH MAY

Joseph May, of Port Jervis, N.Y., a trainman on the Delaware division of the Erie Railroad, died June 21 (1926) after an operation for appendicitis. He is survived by a widow, his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Peter May, two brothers, Edwin and Peter, and two sisters, Alice and Agnes May, all of Port Jervis. Mr. May served in the World war and made a good record overseas.

Also, from the September edition:
Joseph May, 32, a brakeman on the Delaware division of the Erie Railroad, died July 21 (1926) at Port Jervis, N.Y. He entered the service of the Erie in November, 1914, and later was in the World war, and served overseas as sergeant in Co. L, 56th infantry. After the war he resumed his railroad duties and married Miss Agnes O'Brien, of Deposit, who survives him. He is also survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Peter May, two brothers, Edwin and Peter, and two sisters, Alice and Agnes May.




From the December, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
FRANK MAZIARZ

Frank Maziarz died Nov. 8 (1926) at Spencer hospital, Meadville, Pa., after a short illness. He was a boilermaker by trade and for about fifteen years had been employed at the Erie Railroad shops in Meadville. He is survived by a widow, seven children, five brothers and five sisters.




From the June, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
ISAAC McCONNELL

Isaac McConnell died May 4 (1926) at his home, 253 Franklin avenue, Kent. He was born at Pavonia, O., Nov. 29, 1846. In the spring of 1889 he became an employe of the Erie Railroad shop at Kent and was employed there until his death.




From the July, 1927 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JAMES E. McCORMICK

A recent issue of the Port Jervis Union-Gazette has an extended notice of a former Erie Railroad man, the late James E. McCormick, who died at his home in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 10, 1926.

In 1886, he entered the service of the Erie Railroad as a car repairer at Port Jervis, and in 1889 was promoted to foreman of car repairs. In 1893 he became general foreman of the Erie Car department at Port Jervis, resigning in 1903 to become general foreman of the Car department of the Southern Railway, with headquarters at Alexandria, Va. From 1907 until recently he had charge of the Spencer territory of the Southern Railway as general foreman of the Car department. The Spencer shops are the largest on the Southern Railway. He is survived by a widow, one son and three daughters, all of Washington, D.C.




From the October, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

Mr. & Mrs. M.H. McCoy

MICHAEL HENRY McCOY
The Magazine has received a belated notice of the death of Michael Henry McCoy, for many years section foreman on the Mahoning division of the Erie Railroad, who died Feb. 26 at Charity hospital, Cleveland, O., aged 72 years.

Mr. McCoy entered the service of the Erie on June 1, 1870. From June, 1873, he had been section foreman. His home was at Lisbon, Oh. A widow, two sons and two daughters survive him.

Our correspondent says: "Mr. McCoy was a good husband and father and a man of sterling qualities. His loyalty to the Erie during his long term of service was an inspiration to other foremen on the Mahoning division. His memory will be cherished by all that knew him."




From the Febrary, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
PETER McGOWAN

After a service of more than fifty years on the Erie, Peter McGowan passed away at St. Francis hospital, Port Jervis, from the effects of a fall received several weeks before. The Union Gazette printed the facts concerning his death.




From the March, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

W.H. McIntyre

W.H. McINTYRE
W.H. McIntyre, passenger conductor on the Erie Railroad, died Dec. 14, 1925, at Hornell, N.Y., aged 67 years.

Mr. McIntyre entered the service of the Erie as a brakeman in January, 1877; on Oct. 24, 1889, he was promoted to be freight conductor, and in August, 1909, became a passenger conductor. His length of service with the Erie Railroad, covering a period of forty-eight years, was notable for the fidelity with which he discharged his duties.

He was ever faithful and loyal, and the Erie Railroad Company in accordance with its custom, directed that there be presented to his widow, Mrs. Ida Mclntyre, the ticket punch used by him as passenger conductor. The ticket punch was engraved with his name, the year he entered the Erie service, and the year of his death.




From the February, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

Thomas McLoughlin

THOMAS McLAUGHLIN
Through Train Baggageman Thomas McLaughlin died in Jersey City on January 9, 1926. Mr. McLaughlin ran between Jersey City and Salamanca. He was many years in the service and the host of friends he made along his run are sorry that he has passed.

Also:

From the March, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
The Late Thomas McLoughlin
In the February number of this Magazine was a brief mention of the death at Jersey City, January 9, of Thomas McLoughlin. He was stricken with paralysis, January 5, and died at St. Francis hospital, Jersey City.

Mr. McLoughlin was 70 years old and for fifty-four years was employed by the Erie Railroad. During the last forty-nine years he was in passenger train service as through baggageman, and his run was on trains 3 and 6 between Jersey City and Salamanca. He made his last run on train 6 on the 3d of January. He was a very capable baggageman and was well liked by all that knew him. Mr. McLoughlin was unmarried, and left no near relatives.




From the Febrary, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
FRANK JOSEPH McVEY

The death of Frank Joseph McVey occurred in Cuba, NY on December 21 (1925). Mr. McVey was employed as warehouseman at Cuba, having entered the service on October 29, 1916. Burial was at Cuba.




From the March, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

Theodore Mead

THEODORE MEAD
Theodore Mead, employed in the Department of Structures of the Erie Railroad in New York City, died January 24 (1926). He was born in Newark, N.J., February 9, 1849, and resided there until his death.

Mr. Mead entered the service in the Department of Structures in December, 1917. Owing to ill health, he was granted a furlough in February, 1921, and returned in July of that year.

He was a Bible student and wrote several interesting articles, which were published in various magazines.




From the February, 1927 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

Ambrose Meredith

AMBROSE BROADAWAY MEREDITH
Ambrose Broadaway Meredith, assistant baggagemaster at the Erie Railroad terminal in Jersey City, died on Nov. 27 (1926) at his home at Jersey City in the sixty-eighth year of his age. He was born on April 29, 1859, at Petersburg, Del., the son of a clergyman. His maternal and paternal grandfathers were clergymen. Young Meredith came North and in 1879 went to work for the New York, Susquehanna & Western Railroad, and when that railroad line eventually had its terminus in the Erie's terminal at Jersey City he became assistant baggagemaster, a post he held until his death.

In May, 1888, he married Julia Shader, who with one son, Ambrose junior, and one daughter, Mrs. E.M. Farrier, of Rumsey, N.J., survives him. The husband of Mrs. Farrier is president of the Lincoln Trust Co., Jersey City. Mr. Meredith was chaplain of Hiram lodge, F. & A. M., Jersey City, secretary of Acacia Council, Royal Arch Masons, and a member of the Erie Railroad Veterans' Association. His burial was at Arlington, N.J.




From the Febrary, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
FRANK MERRITT

Frank Merritt, 67 years old, died Jan. 6 (1926) at the Jersey City hospital where he was taken on New Year's day following a stroke. He was born at Piermont, N.Y., and for more than forty years was employed in the grain elevator of the Erie Railroad in Jersey City. He was a memher of Enterprise lodge, No. 48, F. & A.M., of Jersey City. He is survived by two sisters, Mrs. L. Evans, of Asbury Park, N.J., and Mrs. Elizabeth Preston, of Piermont, N.Y., and one brother, George P. Merritt, of Pompton, N.J.




From the Febrary, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
HENRY G. MICHLER

Henry G. Michler died Jan. 8 (1926) at his home in Hornell, N. Y., after a long illness. He was born in Germany 65 years ago. The Hornell Tribune-Times says that for about a third of a century he had been a machinist in the Erie shops at Hornell, being well known and highly regarded. He was a member of St. Paul's Lutheran church, Hornell, and of the Knights of the Maccabees. He is survived by a widow, one son, two sisters and a brother. The funeral and burial were at Hornell Jan. 11.




From the June, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

Patrick Minehan
PATRICK MINEHAN
Patrick Minehan, terminal superintendent of the Erie Railroad at Youngstown, O., died May 8 (1926) at his home, 115 Walnut street, Sharpsville, Pa., aged 60 years. He had been in ill health for some time and his death was caused by heart trouble.

Born at Silver Creek, N.Y., he had lived at Sharpsville since he was seven years old. At nineteen he worked as a brakeman on the Pennsylvania Railroad between Erie, Pa., and Lawrence Junction. On Sept. 2, 1887, he entered the service of the Erie Railroad as a brakeman, and two years later became a freight conductor. On Dec. 2, 1892, he became yardmaster for the Erie at New Castle, and after five years was transferred to Ferrona. On Sept. 20, 1902, he was appointed general yardmaster at Youngstown, and after a year was appointed trainmaster. On Feb. 8, 1918, he was appointed assistant terminal superintendent at Youngstown, and March 1, 1920, was made terminal superintendent.

His thirty-nine years of service with the Erie were characterized by loyalty and the able and faithful performance of duty. He was a member of the Knights of Columbus council and the Elks lodge at Sharon.

Mrs. Minehan died twenty years ago. There survive one daughter, Mrs. Edward Young; four sisters, the Misses Josephine and Julia Minehan, Mrs. Michael McCarthy, Mrs. William O'Donnell, and one brother, William Minehan.

The funeral was at St. Bartholomew's church, Sharpsville, on Tuesday, May 11, the Rev. P.J. Lynch officiating. The sermon was by the Rev. J. N. Traynor, pastor of St. Columba's church, Youngstown, of which Mr. Minehan was a member. Burial was in St. Mary's cemetery, at Sharon.




From the May, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

William J. Moody
WILLIAM J. MOODY
William J. Moody, treasurer of the Erie Railroad and its subsidiary companies, died of apoplexy, Monday, April 26 (1926), at his home, 1272 Kenmore Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. Up to the day he was stricken he had been in apparently excellent health. On Saturday, April 24, he was at his office, 50 Church street, New York City, performing his usual duties. Monday, April 26, feeling indisposed, he remained at home. After supper that evening he lay down. Shortly afterward it was noticed that he was unconscious, and he passed away before a physician could arrive.

William J. Moody was born at Kingston, Ontario, Sept. 9, 1871, and was thus in the fifty-fifth year of his age. In 1887 he entered the railway service as a messenger for the Trunk Line Association. His subsequent railway career is thus summarized: One year as bill clerk for the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad; two years as rate clerk for Merchants Despatch Transportation Co.; from 1890 to 1905, assistant to chief clerk, Accounting department, Erie Railroad; 1905 to 1908, clerk in Treasury department, same railroad; 1908 to 1918, chief clerk in same department; 1918 to 1919, assistant treasurer; 1919 to date of death, treasurer of Erie Railroad Company.

Mr. Moody aided materially in the organization of the Flatbush State Bank, Brooklyn, N. Y., and was a vice-president of the bank until its merger with the Mechanics' Bank of Brooklyn. He was recently elected a director of the Commercial Trust Company of New Jersey. He was a member of the Executive committee of the Railway Treasury Officers' Association and at one time was chairman of the New York-Philadelphia section.

He was a member of the Catholic Club of the city of New York. Mr. Moody spent more than half his life in the city of Brooklyn, and was widely known in that city for his public spirit. He was educated at St. James' Academy and De La Salle Institute, where he was a fellow student of Cardinal Patrick J. Hayes.

Oct. 26, 1898, he was married in Brooklyn to Margaret Ryder, who survives him with four daughters and one son. The daughters are the former Thelma Ryder Moody, now wife of Francis A. Regan, Jr.; the former Estelle Rita Moody, now wife of Dr. William L. O'Connell; and the Misses Dorothy and Josephine Moody. The son is William R. Moody. The Misses Thelma and Estelle Moody were brides at a double wedding held in Brooklyn, Dec. 26, 1925.

The service of William J. Moody with the Erie Railroad covered a period of thirty-six years - sixteen years in the Accounting department and twenty years in the Treasury department. Starting in a modest way he rose to a very important post, steadily growing in capacity. By his knowledge, his sound and matured judgment, his devotion and integrity he commanded the confidence of his official superiors, and by his fairness, his kindness, his consideration, he inspired the respect and liking of "the rank and file." Personally, he was noted for his innate courtesy, his sociability, his charm; the friends he had were fast friends and always found him true and steadfast.

The death of Mr. Moody, in the prime of his life and usefulness, is an occasion of sorrow and regret among a wide circle of men, both in and out of the railway world. The funeral services were largely attended at 10 o'clock A.M., Thursday, April 29, at Our Lady of Refuge church, Brooklyn, N.Y., of which decedent was an active member. Burial was in Calvary cemetery.




From the February, 1927 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
MELVIN MOORE

Melvin Moore, 72, a resident of Owego, N.Y., and formerly an Erie Railroad gate-tender in that village, died Dec. 8 (1926). He is survived by a widow and two sons.




From the November, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
THOMAS MORAN

Thomas Moran, one of the oldest employes of the Erie Railroad, died on Oct. 7 (1926) at his home at Susquehanna, Pa., aged 94 years.

He was a native of Ireland and when a young man came to Deposit, N.Y. and began work for the Erie Railroad. Later he moved to Susquehanna and until his death worked in the railroad shops. His service with the Erie Railroad covered more than sixty years.

He was a member of the Erie Railroad Veterans' Association. There survive a widow, one daughter, Mrs. David Scales, and three sons, Thomas, Peter and James, all of Susquehanna.

Some time ago (Feb., 1925) the ERIE RAILROAD MAGAZINE contained a portrait of this faithful employe and highly regarded man and citizen.




From the January, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
DANIEL E. MORGAN

It is learned from the Port Jervis Union-Gazette that Daniel E. Morgan died at his home after a lingering' illness at the age of 62 years. He was for many years employed as block signal tower operator at Middletown, N.Y.




From the January, 1927 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JOHN MOROSKI

After a lingering illness, John Moroski, car inspector in the Erie Car Department at Jersey City, NJ, died on Oct. 13 (1926). Entering Erie service in 1891 as a car repairer, after a year he became night foreman at the Jersey City station, in which capacity he continued for twenty years. At his own request he was then made a car inspector, which post he held until his death.

An Erie official tells the Magazine that Inspector Moroski's trained ears and keen eyes were always on the alert, discovering many defects in cars that might have escaped the ordinary observer. Mr. Moroski was a member of the Erie Railroad Veterans' Association and of the Erie System Federation.




From the October, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
FRANCIS J. MURPHY

Francis J. Murphy, 78 years old, died Aug. 22 (1926) at St. Francis hospital, Jersey City. In March, 1886, he began work for the Erie Railroad as a car repairer. A few years ago he was transferred to the Penhorn shop as watchman. He is survived by a niece, Miss Elizabeth Castello, and a step-niece, Mrs. J.W. Gallagher, of Philadelphia.




From the Febrary, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
MICHAEL MURPHY

The Hornell Tribune-Times has a notice of the death of Michael E. Murphy, which occurred Jan. 4 (1926) at his home in Hornell. He was a conductor for a number of years on the Buffalo division of the Erie, and was highly regarded in railroad circles and by friends and neighbors.




From the Febrary, 1927 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
MARTIN NEVILLE

Martin Neville, for about twenty-five years a passenger conductor on the Buffalo division of the Erie Railroad, died in Buffalo on Dec. 12 (1926), aged nearly 68 years. He entered Erie service as a brakeman, May 1, 1881. Six years later he was promoted to freight conductor, and March 2, 1901, to passenger conductor. He is survived by two sisters, Mrs. John Jackson, of Buffalo, and Mrs. John Holleran, of Nunda, N.Y.




From the October, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
WILLIAM C. NOLAN

On his way to work, Monday morning, September 13 (1926), William C. Nolan, an old employe of the Erie Railroad, was run down by a public bus on the county road near Secaucus, N.J., and his skull was fractured. He died the next day in Jersey City hospital.

Mr. Nolan was 72 years old. He had been in the employ of the Erie as conductor and shopman for forty-six years. He lived with his daughter, Mrs. Carrie Wogatz, 136 Romaine avenue, Jersey City. Besides Mrs. Wogatz there survive two other daughters, Mrs. May McCann and Mrs. Minnie Durnan, and a son, William.




From the March, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

Jabez T. Odell

JABEZ T. ODELL
Jabez T. Odell, 82, died Feb. 13 (1926) at his home at New Rochelle, N.Y. In early life he was a telegrapher on the Atlantic & Great Western Railroad, now a part of the Erie system. At one time he was a vice-president of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, and for the last twenty-two years president of the Bessemer Marquette Docks & Navigation Company of Pennsylvania.




From the August, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
THOMAS P. OLIVER

Sympathy of the friends and fellow workmen of Thomas P. Oliver, who passed away July 2 (1926), is extended to his family. He was 70 years of age and had been in the service since 1905, all of this time in the Buffalo Car Department, in various capacities. He was a faithful and conscientious worker.




From the April, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
THOMAS O'NEILL

Thomas O'Neill died Feb. 20 (1926) at his home at Hornell, N.Y., after a long illness. He was 74 years old and is survived by a son and four daughters. The Hornell Tribune-Times says that he was a switch tender, and for more than fifty years was employed in the Erie Railroad yard at Hornell.




From the August, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
HERMAN PANKAU

Sympathy is extended to the family of the late Herman Pankau, interchange clerk at the (Elmira) yard office. Mr. Pankau, while riding his bicycle to work at noon, June 17 (1926), was struck by a motor truck and died from the result of injuries sustained.




From the Febrary, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
FRANK PARMELEE

The death of Frank Parmelee occurred suddenly at his home in Kent, Ohio, on December 22 last (1925). He was born in Copley, March 12, 1852, and came to Parmelee Heights with his parents at the age of 9 years. The family later came to Kent, where Mr. Parmelee's father became prominent in business circles.

Growing to manhood in Kent, Mr. Parmelee first married Miss Alice Caris, to which union two children were born. The mother and child passed away, leaving the father and one son, Paul, now a resident of Akron.

Later Mr. Parmelee married Miss Lillian Wilson, who, together with five children, survives. They are Luther, Mrs. Ida Redmond, Wilson, Mrs. Frances Walters, and Hester, all of Kent.

Mr. Parmelee was one of the oldest employes of the Kent shop, where he had worked for thirty-three years. He was well and favorably known to a large circle of friends. Possessed of a jovial spirit, he had a cheerful word for all. He was a good neighbor and citizen.




From the June, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JAMES W. PATTEN

James W. Patten died April 28 (1926) at Cleveland, aged 75 years. he formerly lived in Kent, where he was employed in the car shop.




From the May, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
L.J. POOL

L.J. Pool, for the past 14 years employed as a boilermaker foreman (Meadville Shops), passed away at Spencer Hospital recently, after a long illness.




From the March, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
CLIFTON POTTER

Clifton Potter, 28 years old, died at Susquehanna, Pa., Feb. 5, as the result of monoxide gas poisoning generated by the motor of his automobile, around which he was working in his garage. The door of the garage had been open, but it blew shut and the treacherous gas soon overcame him. He was dead when found. Mr. Potter was employed as night engineer in the Erie shop at Susquehanna.




From the November, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
CHARLES PURDY

Charles Purdy, an old employe of the Erie Railroad, died on Sept. 24 (1926) at Middletown, N.Y., aged 74 years. He entered the Erie service at an early age and in 1883 became baggage master at Middletown, after which he worked in the Middletown freight house and then retired. He is survived by a widow.




From the July, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
F.H. QUACKENBUSH

Frank Henry Quackenbush, 33 years old, employed as a trainman in the Erie Railroad yard at Port Jervis, died May 19 (1926). He is survived by a widow and two sons.




From the August, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
EDWARD J. QUICK

Edward T. Quick died June 13 (1926) at Port Jervis, N.Y., aged 65 years. Most of his life was spent in Port Jervis where he was in the employ of the Erie Railroad. His wife died several months ago. He is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Bessie Smith, of Port Jervis, and Mrs. Ruth Williams, of New York City; and two brothers, Sylvanus Quick, of Port Jervis, and Daniel B. Quick, of Kingston.




From the October, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
FRANK E. RAMSEN

Frank E. Ramsen died September 17 (1926) at his home at Montclair, N.J., aged nearly 67 years. Mr. Ramsen was born October 23, 1859. He began work in the Auditing department of the Erie in New York City, January 7, 1884. From 1903 to 1909 he was chief clerk to the comptroller of the Erie, and from 1909 until his death chief clerk to the auditor of freight accounts.

His health had been impaired for some time, but he was quite active up to the last. A widow and a daughter survive. The funeral was from his home in Montclair on September 20, and the burial at Bloomfield, N.J. Mr. Ramsen was past master of Belleville Lodge, 108, Free and Accepted Masons, Belleville, N.J.




From the July, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

George N. Randall

GEORGE NELSON RANDALL
George N. Randall, who died Jan. 30 at his home, Meadville, Pa., had been for nearly forty-five years in the service of the Erie Railroad. He was born at Albion, Erie county, Pa., Feb. 6, 1859. In March, 1881, he became a brakeman on the Meadville division, Jan. 9, 1890, was promoted to freight conductor, and Nov. 1, 1906, was promoted to extra passenger conductor. On Oct. 31, 1904, he married Miss Anna S. Staley, by whom he is survived.




From the December, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
OSCAR F. RELPH

Oscar F. Relph, night watchman (Dunmore Car Shop), was found dead at 6:40 a.m., Oct. 8 (1926), by Foreman C.H. Weber. He was last seen attending to his duties at 6:30 a.m. Death was due to a heart attack.




From the February, 1927 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

Granville Alfred Richardson

GRANVILLE ALFRED RICHARDSON
After a brief illness Granville Alfred Richardson died Dec. 14, 1926, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Zoe D. Pereless, 181 Upper Mountain avenue, Montclair, N.J. He was born in Maumee, O., Nov. 26, 1861, the son of a Methodist clergyman and the youngest of nine children. He entered the railway service in 1878 as clerk on the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton Railroad. From 1880 to 1885 he was agent of the same road and the Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati & Indianapolis Railway, now a part of the Big Four. From 1885 to 1901 he was with the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad as clerk and chief clerk in the general superintendent's office, and as assistant superintendent and superintendent assigned to special duties.

From May 1, 1901, to Jan. 1, 1904, he was assistant to the president of the Erie Railroad. From Jan. 7, 1903, to Jan. 1, 1904, he was also secretary of the Erie, and from Jan. 1, 1904, to Jan. 1, 1916, was vice-president of the Erie, in charge of finances and accounting. From Jan. 1, 1916, to the time of his death he was chairman of the board and executive committees of the Pennsylvania Coal Co., Hillside Coal & Iron Co., Northwestern Mining & Exchange Co., Blossburg Coal Co. and the New York, Susquehanna & Western Coal Co. Mr. Richardson was a man of unusual capacity. He was a student of railway and financial problems, and being a clear thinker his judgment was invaluable. He also displayed sound administrative ability, and was strong and steady in all he did.

The surviving family consists of a son, C.G. Richardson, of Brooklyn, N.Y.; a daughter, Mrs. Zoe D. Pereless, of Montclair, N.J.; and three sisters, the Misses Ella, Emma and Lida Richardson, of Maumee, O. The funeral was held from his late residence on Dec. 16 and the body was taken to Columbus Grove, O., for burial.




From the March, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
LESTER ROBISCH

Lester Robisch, supervisor's clerk at Callicoon, NY, died January 15 (1926). He entered the service in October, 1914, as clerk at Callicoon, and was tranferred to report clerk in the superintendent of terminals office, Jersey City, on Oct. 8, 1920. On Jan. 16, 1924, he returned to clerical duties at Callicoon. He became ill a few days before Christmas and was removed to the Post-Graduate Hospital, where he died. E.F. Bunnell, chief clerk in the Supt. of Terminals office, attended the funeral services, which were held in Callicoon.




From the July, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
J.P. ROLLING

Sympathy is extended to the family of (Cleveland Yard) engineer J.P. Rolling, whose sudden death from aheart attack occurred May 11 (1926) while on his way home from work. His funeral from his late residence was held May 15.




From the May, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

Edward R. Sanders and wife

EDWARD ROYAL SANDERS
At Leavittsburg, O., on March 10 (1926), died Edward Royal Sanders, passenger conductor on the Erie Railroad. He was 68 years old last December.

Early in life he became a freight brakeman on the New York, Pennsylvania Ohio Railroad (now Erie); April 1, 1890, he was promoted to freight conductor; June 6, 1911, he was promoted to passenger conductor.

Conductor Sanders was in charge of Erie passenger trains 620 and 687 between Cleveland and Pittsburgh. He lived at Youngstown until a year ago, when he moved to Leavittsburg.

He discharged his duties with credit to himself and loyalty to his employer; he was well liked by his associates and the traveling public. Conductor Sanders had been in failing health for some time. He passed away after undergoing a serious operation.




From the September, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
E.W. SAXTON

E.W. Saxton died Aug. 10 (1926) at his home, Clarks-Green, Pa., aged 90 years. On April 1, 1882, he entered the employment of the Erie Railroad as carpenter-foreman on the Jefferson division, was promoted to master carpenter, Sept. 1, 1888, and in December, 1919, became master carpenter on the Wyoming division, retiring about a year ago. Mr. Saxton leaves one brother, Charles H. Saxton, of Elizabethtown, N.J., the only survivor of a family of nine brothers and sisters. The funeral of E.W. Saxton was held Aug. 12. Burial was at Owego, N.Y.




From the March, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
E.M. SCHULTZ

E.M. Schultz died Jan. 18 (1926) at his home in Callicoon, N.Y. He was formerly employed as yard clerk for the Erie Railroad at Susquehanna. He is survived by a widow.




From the May, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
J.M. SCHUMACHER

J.M. Schumacher, boilermaker foreman (Port Jervis), died recently after a short illness. He was born jan. 7, 1856 in Agenbach county, Gabb, Wurttemberg, germany, and came to the United States in the spring of 1880. He entered the service of the Erie Railroad in July of the same year as boilermaker helper. In 1886 he was promoted to boilermaker. He held that position until May 1, 1911, when he was promoted to boilermaker foreman.

Mr. Schumacher was a loyal employe, with a good service record, and one who was held in high esteem by the officers and employes of the Erie.




From the Febrary, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
WILLIAM B. SECRIST

William B. Secrist, of Marion, Ohio, freight conductor on the Erie Railroad, while engaged in the work of overseeing the switching of cars on the Marion and Ashland switch run at Caledonia, January 13 (1926), stepped on an adjoining track and was struck by a locomotive of the Big Four Railroad running light. He was taken to the Marion hospital, where he soon died. Mr. Secrist was an old Erie employe. He formerly lived at Galion. A widow and four children survive.




From the Febrary, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
PETER L. SHANNEBURG

Peter L. Shanneburg, 61 years old, died Jan. 6 (1926) at the home of his sister, Mrs. George E. Ferguson, of Port Jervis, N.Y. For nearly a quarter of a century he was an employe in the Erie shops at Port Jervis. His wife died many years ago. He was a member of the Port Jervis Nest of Owls.




From the February, 1927 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
ROY A. SHARP

Roy A. Sharp, 50 years old, an Erie Railroad employe at Meadville, Pa., died Dec. 30 (1926). Surviving are his widow and two children, his father and one sister.




From the October, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
EPHRAIM SHAY

Ephraim Shay, 87 years old, died August 6 (1926) at his home at Port Jervis, N.Y. He was a veteran of the Civil War and later entered the employ of the Erie Railroad and for many years was a train conductor. It is estimated by the New York Times that during his service as a conductor for the Erie he rode 1,500,000 miles.




From the May, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JOHN SHEA

Meadville Division Conductor John Shea died at his home in Meadville on March 20 (1926).

Also, from the July, 1926 isue:
JOHN H. SHEA John H. Shea, Erie Railroad conductor, died at his home, Meadville, Pa., March 21 (1926), aged 67 years. He was a native of Meadville and in November, 1882, was employed as a brakeman on the Meadville division. Sept. 15, 1890, he was promoted to freight conductor, and Nov. 3, 1906, was promoted to extra passenger conductor. He was secretary and treasurer of Division 32, Order of Railway Conductors, for ten years, and also committeeman and local delegate from the local division to the last three sessions of the convention of the Grand division. He is survived by a widow, two sons and four daughters.




From the March, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JAMES L. SHEARER

James Lester Shearer died Feb. 2 (1926) at Salamanca, N.Y., aged 72 years. He was a native of Saegertown, Pa. He moved to Salamanca when a young man and worked for the Atlantic & Great Western Railroad, now owned by the Erie, and the Salamanca Republican Press says he spent fifty years in railroading, in his later years he being assistant yardmaster at Salamanca. A widow, three sons and three daughters, all living at Salamanca, survive.




From the May, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
WILLIAM J. SHEEHAN

William J. Sheehan died April 10 (1926) at his home at Dunmore, Pa. He was employed by the Erie Railroad as train dispatcher at Dunmore. Formerly he worked as telegraph operator at Susquehanna, Pa., and Port, Jervis, N.Y. He is survived by a widow and daughter.




From the January, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
A. A. SHOPP

It is learned from Black Rock that A.A. Shopp died at his home on West Delevan avenue of pneumonia after an illness of three days. He had been employed at Black Rock station since 1890, and had always been noted for his punctuality and strict attention to business. He was a general favorite among his associates and had many friends among them. He was identified with the Odd Fellows. His fellow employes contributed a floral piece. At the time of his death he was working on miscellaneous revenue reports.




From the January, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
CHARLES A. SHUMATE

From the Lima News the death of Charles A. Schumate is learned. The notice said he died at his home in that city due to tumor on the brain after an illness of six months. He was an Erie engineer.




From the January, 1927 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
H.E. SIEGEL

With his hand on the throttle of his engine, Herman E. Siegel, Erie engineer, was stricken with apoplexy on Nov. 24 (1926) as he was driving engine 2018 up west hill at Attica, N.Y. He was brought to the hospital at Buffalo, where he died a few hours later. He became a fireman on the Erie Railroad, June 12, 1905, and was promoted to engineer, April 10, 1913. He was a Mason and a member of the B. of L. E. His burial was at Mitchell, Ontario, Canada.




From the February, 1927 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
H.F. SKEEHAN

Henry F. Skeehan died Dec. 15 (1926) at his home in Buffalo, aged 67 years. In September, 1882, he went to work for the Erie Railroad as a brakeman. In May, 1887, he was promoted to passenger trainman, and in July, 1904, to train baggageman. He was a member of the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen and the Erie Railroad Veterans' Association. He is survived by a widow and one daughter, Mrs. Joseph Davenport.




From the September, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

Henry L. Slauson and family
In the group picture above, the names from left to right are: Florence Smith, Mrs. Henry L. Slauson, Mr. Slauson, Mrs. F. A. Taylor.

HENRY L. SLAUSON
After a long illness, Henry L. Slauson, Erie Railroad ticket agent at Port Jervis, N. Y., died Aug. 6 (1926), aged 72 years.

He was born in New York City, and in early life went to Port Jervis and became a ticket clerk for the Erie Railroad, continuing in the employ of the company until his death. He was widely known for his courtesy and desire to be of service and was very popular with the traveling public. He was a Free and Accepted Mason, a Knight Templar, a Shriner and a communicant of the Episcopal church.

The surviving family consists of a widow, two sons, three daughters and a sister. The sons are H. Lewis Slauson, of East Orange, N.J., and Charles T. Slauson, of Sacramento, Cal. The daughters are Mrs. Lillian Kirkman, Mrs. Mary Dunn and Miss Kathryn Slauson, all of Port Jervis. The sister is Miss Lillian Slauson, of Port Jervis.

The funeral was held Aug. 10 from his late home, 5 East Main street, Port Jervis, and the burial was at Hancock, N.Y.

Also, from the October, 1926 issue:
The Magazine for September announced the death of Henry L. Slauson, veteran Erie ticket agent at Port Jervis. His death occurred Aug. 6 (1926), the funeral was held Aug. 10 and burial was at Hancock, N.Y.

Mr. Slauson had been in the service of the Erie Railroad since Sept. 1, 1872, when he became a clerk at Honesdale, Pa. In March, 1873, he was transferred to Hancock, N.Y., as clerk and operator. Sept. 1, 1880, he was transferred to the superintendent's office at Jersey City. On Jan. 1, 1882, he was transferred to the auditor's office as clerk. On Dec. 1, 1884, he was appointed ticket agent at Port Jervis, where he remained until his death. He was a very capable and popular Erie employe.




From the July, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
AMASA SMITH

Amasa Smith, for twenty years a crossing flagman for the Erie Railroad in Corning, N.Y., died May 25 (1926), aged 79 years. He is survived by one daughter, Mrs. Martha Haight, of Corning.




From the May, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
DOUGLASS H. SMITH

Douglass Harry Smith, M.D., died suddenly in Bath, N.Y., March 4 (1926). He was born in Bath and became a physician and for twenty years was very successful in his practice. For a number of years he was Erie Railroad physician and surgeon at Bath. He was active in the business and political life of Bath and had high rank in his profession. His death in the prime of life removes a man of great usefulness.




From the August, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
HENRY SMITH

Henry Smith, machinist at Dunmore for twenty years, died at the Mercy Hospital, Scranton, PA on June 12 (1926). Burial was made in Massachusetts.




From the Febrary, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JOHN M. SMITH

It is learned from the Port Jervis Union-Gazette that John M. Smith died at his home in that city of blood poisoning after a brief illness. He was 29 years of age. He had been employed as switchman for the past ten years.




From the March, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JOHN M. SMITH

John M. Smith, aged 75 years, died Feb. 2 (1926) at Port Jervis, N.Y., after a short illness of pneumonia. He was a native of The Netherlands. For more than twenty years he was a machinist in the Erie shops at Port Jervis. His wife died in 1915. Three sons and five daughters survive him.




From the December, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

John W. Smith

JOHN W. SMITH
HEREWITH is a portrait of John W. Smith, switchtender in the Erie Railroad yard at East Buffalo, N.Y., who died of heart failure Oct. 23 (1926), aged 75 years. He had been in continuous service for forty-six years, and was a conscientious and loyal employe. He is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Ella B. Bennett.




From the September, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
FREDERICK W. SOKAT

Frederick William Sokat, plumber foreman, New York Terminal division, Erie Railroad, with headquarters at Jersey City, died suddenly while at work on Aug. 2 (1926). He was born Jan. 11, 1866, at Memel, East Prussia. On May 14, 1891, he entered the service of the Erie Railroad as a carpenter. On Nov. 1, 1902, he was promoted to carpenter foreman. On Jan. 1, 1918, he became assistant plumber foreman, and on May 10, 1925, he was made plumber foreman of the New York Terminal division. Surviving Mr. Sokat are his widow, two daughters and three sons. The funeral on Aug. 5 from his late home, 37 Hillman street, Paterson, N.J., was attended by many employes of the Erie Railroad, who were warm friends of Mr. Sokat.




From the Febrary, 1927 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
HOWARD N. STAPLES

Howard N. Staples, Erie station agent at Upper Montclair station, N.J., died at his home, 20 Cleveland street, Wednesday morning, Dec. 22 (1926), after two hours' illness from heart trouble. Mr. Staples was 38 years old and a native of Elmira, N.Y. On Sept. 2, 1908, he entered the Erie Railroad service as clerk and operator at Leonia, N.J. In turn he was transferred to clerk and operator at Caldwell, N.J., agent at Great Notch, Demarest and Pompton, and finally, May 8, 1914, was appointed agent at Upper Montclair station, where he served until his death.

He was held in high regard by all that knew him. He was a Master Mason, a Shriner, a Knight Templar and a member of the State Commandery, K.T. He is survived by a widow and two daughters, Dorothy and Mildred, and four brothers.




From the Febrary, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
EDWARD F. STELLMAN

It is learned from a fellow workman in Cleveland that Edward F. Stellman, employed in the Erie yard in that city, met death while in the performance of duty. He had been employed as yard brakeman and was a young man of more than ordinary ambition. During his leisure hours he studied law. He had many friends among the men with whom he was associated in the Erie service.




From the October, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JOSEPH B. STEWART

The death of Joseph B. Stewart occurred in August (1926) at Greene, N.Y. He was formerly a well-known railroad man. He had been superintendent of the Bangor and Aroostook Railroad, of the Pennsylvania division of the New York Central and of the Elmira, Corning and Waverly Railroad (electric).




From the April, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

Clinton E.  Stickles

CLINTON E. STICKLES
After a short illness of pneumonia following an attack of grip, Clinton E. Stickles died March 23 (1926) at his home in Owego, N.Y. For more than half a century he had been an Erie Railroad employe.

Born September 28, 1849, in the town of Corning, he entered the service of the Erie in 1866 as brakeman. Losing an arm as the result of an accident he was promoted to be a freight conductor on the Susquehanna division, and served in that capacity for more than thirty years. In 1909 he was promoted to be supervisor of crossing tenders on the Susquehanna division and was such until his death.

For thirty-one years Mr. Stickles had lived in Owego. He was interested in fraternal organizations, being a Red Man, Odd Fellow and Elk. He was instrumental in the organization of Owego lodge, 1039, B. P. O. Elks, rose to be exalted ruler and at his death was a trustee of that lodge. He was a member of the Order of Railway Conductors and also of Wave Hose Company, No. 2, of Owego. His record of service on the Erie Railroad was notable for excellence. He was very intelligent, active and wide-awake; he was ever faithful and loyal; he discharged his duties with an eye single to the doing of the work in hand. It is not too much to say that he was one of the best known employes of the Erie on its Susquehanna division. "Clint" Stickles passes on amid the keen regret of all that knew him.

He is survived by a widow and two sisters. The sisters are Mrs. Thomas S. Baxter, of Corning, N. Y., and Mrs. Jacob Troll, of Painted Post, N. Y. There was a large attendance at the funeral, held from his late home in Owego on March 25. The Rev. Robert S. Boyce, M.E. pastor, officiated. Burial was in Tioga cemetery.

Also, from the June, 1926 issue:
Resolutions Adopted
Elmira division, No. 9, Order of Railway Conductors, has adopted resolutions on the death of the late Clinton E. Stickles, of Owego, N.Y. The resolutions, prepared by a commitee consisting of C.M. Bowman, J.A. Rothwell and W.G. Stratton, refer to Mr. Stickles as "our chief conductor" and declare:

"In the death of Brother Stickles Division No. 9, O.R.C., has lost one of its most efficient and loyal brothers, whose counsel has always been considered and whose interest was centered in the welfare of the organization." A sketch and picture of Mr. Stickles appeared in the April number of the RAILROAD MAGAZINE.




From the March, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
F.J. STURTEVANT

Sympathy is extended to the family of Baggageman F.J. Sturtevant whose death occurred Jan. 25 (1926). (From Cleveland Yard Office news)




From the January, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

James H. Sweeney

JAMES H. SWEENEY
James H. Sweeney, superintendent of stores of the Erie Railroad at Meadville, died at his home in that city after a short illness, at the age of 34 years.

Mr. Sweeney entered the service of the Erie Railroad as clerk in the Cleveland storehouse in 1906, and was continuously in the service to the day he died. His industry and signal ability won him early promotion, and before attaining his last position was successively storekeeper at Cleveland and general storekeeper of the company's great central storehouse in Meadville.

Mr. Sweeney took a sane and healthy interest in life as he found it. From the most humble beginning and without any influence other than his own hard work and ability he early reached a desirable and important place in the Erie service, and achieved the respect and confidence of all its officers and employes. His helpfulness, his cheerful presence and his kind and generous nature will not soon be forgotten in the great family in which his life's work was done. The floral contributions from his fellow employes were many. Burial was in Cleveland.




From the September, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
PATRICK TERRY

Patrick Terry, 73, died July 23 (1926) at his home, 446 Dodge street, Kent, O. He had been in ill health for two years. He was born in Waterford county, Ireland, and for four years was in the British navy, once making a cruise around the world. Coming to Kent, O., after the Civil war he began work with the P. and W. Railroad, now the B. and O., and after fifteen years went with the Atlantic and Great Western and then with the Erie. Soon after coming to Kent he married Miss O'Sullivan, who with seven children survives him. The funeral was at St. Patrick's church, Kent, July 26, and burial in Standing Rock cemetery.




From the July, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
WILLIAM THOMPSON

William Thompson, formerly manager of telegraph on the Susquehanna division of the Erie Railroad, died May 16 (1926) at his home in Endicott, N.Y., aged nearly 76 years. He was born at Owego, June 9, 1850, and in 1865 became a telegraph operator on the Allegany division of the Erie. In 1906 he was transferred to the Susquehanna division. He retired from the service in 1922. He is survived by a widow and two brothers, the latter being Judson, of Washington, D.C., and Anthony, of Brooklyn, N.Y.




From the May, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

Horace P. Trimmer
HORACE P. TRIMMER
After a brief illness Horace P. Trimmer died March 23 (1926) at his home at Avon, N.Y., aged 63 years. For about thirty years he was an accountant in the division offices of the Erie Railroad, according to the Avon Herald, which speaks highly of him as a man and citizen. He is survived by a widow and one son. The funeral was held at Avon on March 26. Present were delegations from the local lodges of Odd Fellows and Masons.




From the March, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JOSEPH TRODD

Joseph Trodd died Jan. 27 (1926) at his home, 494 Grove street, Jersey City, aged 43 years. For a number of years he was in the employ of the Erie Railroad as a turntable operator at the Pavonia avenue roundhouse in Jersey City. He is survived by a widow and two children.




From the January, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JAMES T. TURNER

A notice of the death of James T. Turner appeared in the Port Jervis Union-Gazette. It said he died suddenly in the caboose of his train at Croxton, N.J., after completing his run. Heart disease is supposed to have been the cause. He had been a freight conductor for some time and was well known in Port Jervis, in which city he resided.




From the August, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
WILLIAM W. TURNER

William W. Turner, 43 years old, died July 2 (1926) at his home in Port Jervis, N.Y., after two months' illness. He had lived in Port Jervis for twenty-four years and was employed by the Erie Railroad in the freight house. He is survived by a widow, one daughter and several brothers and sisters. The funeral was held on July 6.




From the April, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
GEORGE W. TUTHILL

George W. Tuthill, Erie Railroad engineer, died recently at Susquehanna, Pa., aged 43 years. He formerly lived at Port Jervis, N.Y. The body was brought to Shohola, Pa., and the funeral, which was in charge of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, was held from the Methodist Episcopal Church in Barryville, N.Y.




From the August, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
EDGAR A. TYLER

Edgar A. Tyler, an operator in the Erie Railroad BQ tower at Lackawaxen, Pa., died July 3 (1926), aged 42 years. He had been in ill health for a long time. The funeral took place on July 6 at Lackawaxen and burial at Narrowsburg, N.Y.




From the January, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
CHARLES P. UTLEY

Charles P. Utley, employed in the office of the operating vice-president, New York City, as special agent, died at his home in Elmira, N. Y., November 1, at the age of 79 years.

Mr. Utley was born in Pardeeville, Wis. At an early age he took up the study of telegraphy and became an expert. He became associated with the Milwaukee Railroad, with which he remained many years. Later he entered the service of the Erie Railroad, and for several years was general agent at Hammondsport, N.Y. From there he went to Elmira, N.Y., and became superintendent of the Erie's Railway Training school. He was transferred to Jersey City and assigned to the office of General Superintendent A.J. Stone. His last position was in the office of the operating vice-president. He had been ill several months.

He leaves a son, who resides in McKeesport, Pa., and a daughter, Mrs. J.C. Bothwell, of Belchertown, Mass. His remains were placed in the mausoleum in Elmira beside those of Mrs. Utley. There is a small village in Wisconsin named after Mr. Utley. It is on the: C. M. & St. P. Railroad.




From the March, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
WARREN P. VAN LOAN

The death of Warren P. Van Loan, employed by the Erie Railroad in Susquehanna, Pa., occurred Sept. 29 (1926) at his home, Hallstead, Pa. He is survived by a widow, two daughters and four sons.




From the March, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
RALPH VAN HORN

Ralph Van Horn, clerk at Duane street station, died January 16 (1926) at the Suffern hospital after a short illness from ulcers of the stomach, aged 46 years. He entered the service October 2, 1922, and up to the time of his death worked as clerk in the agent's office at Duane street station. He was kind and generous and well liked by his fellow employes. He leaves a widow and one child. Masonic funeral services were held at his home in Suffern, N.Y., and interment made in Airmont cemetery, Suffern.




From the January, 1927 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JOSEPH VOYDO

Joseph Voydo, laborer (Dunmore, PA Car Shop), age 48 years, died at his home in Scranton, PA, Nov. 15 (1926).




From the February, 1927 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
RICHARD WALL

Richard Wall, Erie Freight Checker (Lighterage Dept., Jersey City) for many years, died Nov. 20, 1926. He entered the service in July, 1910.




From the January, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JOHN S. WALLACE

John S. Wallace died Jan. 27 (1926) at his home at Susquehanna, Pa., aged 75 years. Born in Paterson, N.J., he lived for 73 years at Susquehanna. In 1868 he got a clerkship with the Erie Railroad and for over fifty years was in the company's employ. The Susquehanna Transcript says he was a thirty-second degree Mason and a member of the Knights of Pythias, and he was highly respected. A widow and three brothers survive him.




From the February, 1927 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

William A. Wallace
WILLIAM A. WALLACE
Stricken with heart trouble William A. Wallace, commercial agent of the Erie Railroad at Philadelphia, died suddenly in the Pennsylvania Railroad station at Coatesville, Pa., Wednesday morning, Dec. 29 (1926). He had gone to Coatesville for the purpose of visiting shippers and had completed his business. After a few jovial words with the station men he sat down to await a train and while thus sitting the end came without warning. As he had been in apparently excellent health and was in good spirits his death came as a great shock. But he died as he would have wished "in harness."

His body was taken to Baltimore and laid to rest on New Year's day in the family lot. The bearers were chosen from among his old railroad friends in Baltimore and Philadelphia. General Agents Miller and Young represented the Erie Railroad. Among the beautiful floral tributes were offerings from the Traffic club of Baltimore, the Erie's Freight Traffic department in New York, the Erie's Baltimore and Philadelphia agencies.

William A. Wallace had served the Erie for twenty-eight years in various capacities, both East and West, his last service being as commercial agent at Philadelphia. His genial presence and loyal heart will be missed.




From the January, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
KEARN WARD

It is learned from the Port Jervis Union-Gazette that Kearn Ward, employed as conductor on the Delaware division, died at the home of his sister in that city of a complication of diseases at the age of 60 years. He had been an employe of the Erie forty years, always in the train service, and for several years was conductor. He was a member of the Holy Name Society, St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church, Order of Railway Conductors, and was a veteran of the Spanish-American war.




From the July, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
M. HARRY WARE

The Jersey Journal records the death on May 19 (1926) of M. Harry Ware, of 558 Boulevard, East Weehawken, N.J. He was a clerk in the employ of the Erie Railroad. He was 32 years old and is survived by a widow, two brothers and three sisters.




From the January, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
WILLIAM M. WARNER

The Owego Times printed a brief account of the death of William M. Warner, and said he died at his home in that city. He had spent most of his life in Owego, where he was employed as gate tender at Main street.




From the February, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:

George Westall

GEORGE WESTALL
Cleveland shop has lost an old and faithful employe in the death of George Westall, which occurred at the home of his daughter in Bedford, O. He was 76 years of age. From October 18, 1868, when he was employed as brakeman, up to the time of his death, he had been in continuous service on the road and at the Cleveland shop in different capacities. Failing health, however, necessitated his confinement in the hospital and at the home of his daughter during the past five months. In less than a year after he entered the service he met with an accident by which he lost his right arm while coupling cars, but despite this disability he had always made himself a valued employe in whatever department he was engaged.




From the January, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
SYLVESTER C. WHEELER

It is learned from the Port Jervis Union-Gazette that Sylvester C. Wheeler, a veteran of the Civil War and for many years a fireman on the Delaware division, died in St. Francis hospital after a short illness at the age of 81 years. He was a native of Clinton township, Pa., and came of a Revolutionary family.




From the Febrary, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
WILLIAM H. WILKINSON

William H. Wilkinson, employed in the office of the Erie's general auditor, New York City, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. G.L. Scheer, Fairway road, Ridgewood, N.J., January 24 (1926), at the age of 78 years. Mr. Wilkinson was employed September, 1883, as bookkeeper for the Erie Railroad coal companies. In 1886 he was made Erie Dispatch bookkeeper, and held this position through all changes in management until the Erie Dispatch was abolished in 1918. In November, 1894, the Erie Dispatch office was removed to Cleveland, Mr. Wilkinson going to that city and making his home there until October, 1896, when the office was moved back to New York City. Interment was made in Woodlawn cemetery, New York City, where Mrs. Wilkinson is also buried.




From the June, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
WILLIAM M. WILLIAMS

William Melvin Williams, for about twenty years an employe of the Erie shops at Hornell, N.Y., died April 20 (1926), aged 69 years. He is survived by a son and four daughters.




From the August, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
EDWARD A. WOLF

Edward A. Wolf died recently in Memorial hospital, Buffalo, N.Y., after four months' illness. He was connected with the Police department of the Erie Railroad. He was president of Buffalo Nest, fraternal order of Orioles. He is survived by a widow and two children.




From the May, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
DOLPHIE YOUNG

Sympathy is expressed to the family of Cleveland Yard Brakeman Dolphie Young, whose death occurred March 13 (1926), after a lingering illness.




From the August, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
JACOB ZOELLER

Jacob Zoeller, car repairer (Dunmore Car Shop), died suddenly at his home on River Street, Scranton, PA, on June 23 (1926). He had been empoyed at Dunmore for three years, and his death caused heartfelt sorrow.




From the April, 1926 Issue of Erie Railroad Magazine:
GEORGE ZOLTON

George Zolton, a respected citizen of kent, and for many years an employe in the Passenger Coach Repair department of the Erie, died recently after a short illness. He was well-liked by all who knew him and the shop employes extended sympathy to his family.


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