Ancestors of Elisha GATCHELL Sr
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John GATCHELL
(Abt 1611-1694)
Wiberough WIBERA
(Abt 1611-)
Jeremiah GATCHELL
(Abt 1648-Between 6)
Hanna SAITH
(Abt 1645-Between 1684)
Elisha GATCHELL Sr
(Abt 1682-1753)

 

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Spouses/Children:
Rachael WILCOX

Elisha GATCHELL Sr 1

  • Born: Abt 1682, Nottingham, Chester County, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Marriage: Rachael WILCOX 1706, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Died: 1753, East Nottingham, Chester County, Pennsylvania, United States about age 71
  • Buried: Calvert, Cecil Co., MD.
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bullet  General Notes:

From THE HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY, by Futhey and Cope (1881); ppg. 561/2 GATCHELL, Elisha, of East Nottingham, was a prominent and active citizen in his day, and had settled in that township prior to 1716. He died at an advanced age in the winter of 1753.4, and his widow, Rachel, about 1760. They became Friends after their arrival in this country. Their children were Sarah, m. to Andrew Job, 9,24,1726; Elizabeth, m. 9,24,1726, to Thomas Hughes, and again, to Edward Mitchell; Abigail, m. 10,24,1747, to Enoch Job, and again, to John Price; Elisha, m. 8,3,1733, to Mary, daughter of Henry Worley; Hannah, m. to Joshua Brown; Esther, m. to Jeremiah Brown; and Anne, m. to Timothy Kirk. The children of Elisha and Mary Gatchell were Jeremiah, b. 9,2,1734, m. 7,3,1753, to Hannah Brown; Nathan, b. 4,29,1737, died young; Lydia, b. 7,26,1741, d. 12,6,1765; Joseph, b. 11,7,1743, m. 1,10,1765, Hannah Churchman; Elisha, b. 12,22,1746, d. 3,25,1758; Samuel, b. 3,18,1749; David, b. 6,25,1751.Samuel, son of Jeremiah and Hannah, of Lancaster County, m. 3,29,1787, Phebe Allen, of East Marlborough. Their son Elisha, born 10,20,1789, married Martha, daughter of George Martin, 11,28,1816, and resided in Newlin township.Dr. Elisha Gatchell was born in Newlin township, Chester Co., April 18,1828. His parents were Elisha and Martha Gatchell. They were members of the Society of Friends, of which society the doctor was also a member. He was educated at Phillips' Academy, Andover, Mass.; at Kimball Union Academy, New Hampshire; and at Brown University, Rhode island. He graduated M.D. at the University of Pennsylvania in 1855. In that year he located at Kennet Square, Chester Co., and entered upon the practice of his profession. He soon found himself engaged in a large and lucrative practice, which he was obliged partly to decline on account of his feeble health, when he became principal of the Eaton Academy in that place. In the summer of 1857 he left home with the purpose of seeking a residence in Kansas, hoping to be benefited by the change of locality.  He became indisposed, however, on his way, in Philadelphia, and died Oct. 5, 1857. Dr. Gatchell was distinguished for a diligent and thorough investigation of every subject to which his attention was directed. He was a good classical scholar, and had a slight acquaintance with some of the modern European languages, and considerable familiarity, for one of his age, with English literature. He gave high promise of future success, not only as a physician, but as a general scholar. He was ardent in that pursuit of his undertakings, and a man of probity and integrity, and was highly esteemed in the community in which his lot was cast.

Elisha Gatchell, Justice of the Peace, Jailed Twice Updated 11:04 AM ET Nov 30, 2002 Chester County, Pennsylvania (1881) -- On Saturday, June 29th, 1737, Chester County Justice of the Peace Elisha Gatchell1 was beaten, kidnapped and jailed by members in the Maryland garrison. According to the History of Chester County, Pennsylvania, written by J. Smith Futhey and Gilbert Cope and published in 1881, Gatchell was beaten and arrested by men under the command of Maryland Captain John Charlton as the result of an ongoing border dispute at the time between Maryland and Pennsylvania. This was the second such incident that occurred to Gatchell because of his duties as Justice of the Peace and the uncertain boundary between Maryland and Pennsylvania. The earlier event took place nearly 15 years earlier. In both cases, Elisha Gatchell ended up being detained in Maryland jails. The History of Chester County, Pennsylvania cites the following account: On June 29, 1737, Elisha Gatchell, Esq., of East Nottingham, being at the tavern of Thomas Hughes, in that township, there came five men on horseback, said to be from the Maryland garrison, commanded by Captain John Charlton, and after beating and abusing him, they took him with them on a horse belonging to Joshua Littler, which happened to be at the door. After crossing Susquehanna, they spent the night at one Nicholas Savor's, a mile or two beyond, and the next day went to a public-house kept by one Hickeson, where came John Copson, one of the provincial judges of Maryland, to whom Thomas Hughes had gone with dispatch the previous evening. Copson would have released Gatchell and bound over the others but for Nathaniel Rigby, a justice from Baltimore county. He was held to bail for his appearance at the Provincial Court of Maryland in October. The representations of both sides having been laid before the king in council, an order for the cessation of all tumults and prosecutions was received here soon after, and the agreement of 1732 was directed to be carried out. Under this, a provisional line was to be run, fifteen and a quarter miles south of Philadelphia, as far as the Susquehanna, beyond which it was to be but fourteen and three-quarter miles south of the same point. Records of the earlier event can be found in the minute books of the Early Pennsylvania Land Records. At a meeting of commissioners held November 20, 1722, it is thus noted that both Isaac Taylor, surveyor of Chester County and Elisha Gatchel, a Justice of the Peace of the same county, were seized and jailed under the "pretence of their having invaded the Lands of or belonging to Maryland. Taylor and Gatchel appealed to the commissioners in Philadelphia, pleading that they were unjustly arrested ;for no other Cause than their acting in their Stations in the Service of the Prop'r of the Province of Pennsylvania. As a result of their situation, the commissioners agreed to help defray the expenses incurred by Elisha Gatchel and Isaac Taylor for their own defense. The minutes further state it was then the Opinion of the Commissioners that some Money should be advanced to them out of the Prop'rs Estate to support and encourage them in defending their cause, whereupon;3 7s 10d was then paid to them, besides a Pistol given Thomas Reid towards paying for an Express to Philad'a on a like Occasion, four Pounds two Shillings paid Elisha Gatchell, expended by him for an Express to Annopolis and Philad'a. Finally, the minute book states that a further sum of 10 should be advanced to Isaac Taylor and Elisha Gatchell toward supporting their Charges under their Confinem't in Cecil county. The commissioners then agreed further help would be considered in the event additional action was taken by the government of Maryland in this case. Footnote: 1Elisha Gatchell was the son of Jeremiah Gatchell, who was the first cousin of Stanley Getchell's 6th great-grandfather Samuel Gatchell, Jr. of Salisbury, Massachusetts. This makes Elisha a 2nd cousin to Joseph Getchell, Sr., Stanley Getchell's 5th great-grandfather. Elisha's grandfather John Gatchell was the brother of Stanley's 7th great-grandfather Samuel Gatchell, Sr.. Both John and Samuel, Sr., came together from England to America and settled in Massachusetts, John in Marblehead, Massachusetts, and Samuel in Salisbury, Massachusetts.


It appears that Elisha Gatchell came to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, with his father Jeremiah Gatchell at the suggestion of Elizabeth Boude's brother Grimstone Boude, who moved from Massachusetts, first to Perth Amboy, New Jersey, and then to Philadelphia, where he kept a tavern. Elisha Gatchell was settled in Philadelphia by 1704. He married Rachel Wilcox before June 27th, 1706, and was initially a shoemaker by trade in Philadelphia. He and his wife moved to Nottingham, near that Pennsylvania-Maryland border in 1715. Elisha was on the East Nottingham tax list from 1718 through 1753. In 1722, he joined the Quakers at the Friends New Garden Monthly Meeting in the Spring of 1722. In Vol. 70 of the National Genealogical Society Quarterly, author A. Day Bradley cites the minutes of the New Garden Monthly Meeting dated 12 2mo. 1722: ;Elisha Gatchell of Nottingham appeared att this meeting signifying his sincere desire to be joined as a member to this meeting, he believing ye to be ye truth which we make profession of which request of his being consider of was granted by the meeting. Elisha Gatchell served as a Justice of the Peace for many years in Chester County, Pennsylvania, but this responsibility caused him repeated problems with the authorities in neighboring Maryland. As the result of an ongoing border dispute between Pennsylvania and Maryland, Elisha was arrested on multiple occasions and jailed by officials of Cecil County, Maryland. The following record appears in the minute book of the Early Pennsylvania Land Records. At a meeting of commissioners held November 20, 1722, it is noted that both Isaac Taylor, surveyor of Chester County and Elisha Gatchel, a Justice of the Peace of the same county, were seized and jailed under the pretence of their having invaded the Lands of or belonging to Maryland. Taylor and Gatchel appealed to the commissioners in Philadelphia, pleading that they were unjustly arrested for no other Cause than their acting in their Stations in the Service of the Prop'r of the Province of Pennsylvania. As a result of their situation, the commissioners agreed to help defray the expenses incurred by Elisha Gatchel and Isaac Taylor for their own defense. The minutes further state it was then the Opinion of the Commissioners that some Money should be advanced to them out of the Prop'rs Estate to support and encourage them in defending their cause, whereupon 3 7s 10d was then paid to them, besides a Pistol given Thomas Reid towards paying for an Express to Philad'a on a like Occasion, four Pounds two Shillings paid Elisha Gatchell, expended by him for an Express to Annopolis and Philad'a. Finally, the minutes state that a further sum of 10 should be advanced to Isaac Taylor and Elisha Gatchell toward supporting their Charges under their Confinem't in Cecil county. The commissioners then agreed further help would be considered in the event additional action was taken by the government of Maryland in this case. The History of Chester County, Pennsylvania with Genealogical and Biographical Sketches, written by J. Smith Futhey and Gilbert Cope and published in 1881, details an account of a similar incident that occurred 15 years later: On June 29, 1737 (Saturday), Elisha Gatchell, Esq., of East Nottingham, being at the tavern of Thomas Hughes, in that township, there came five men on horseback, said to be from the Maryland garrison, commanded by Captain John Charlton, and after beating and abusing him, they took him with them on a horse belonging to Joshua Littler, which happened to be at the door. After crossing Susquehanna, they spent the night at one Nicholas Savor's, a mile or two beyond, and the next day went to a public-house kept by one Hickeson, where came John Copson, one of the provincial judges of Maryland, to whom Thomas Hughes had gone with dispatch the previous evening. Copson would have released Gatchell and bound over the others but for Nathaniel Rigby, a justice from Baltimore county. He was held to bail for his appearance at the Provincial Court of Maryland in October. The representations of both sides having been laid before the king in council, an order for the cessation of all tumults and prosecutions was received here soon after, and the agreement of 1732 was directed to be carried out. Under this, a provisional line was to be run, fifteen and a quarter miles south of Philadelphia, as far as the Susquehanna, beyond which it was to be but fourteen and three-quarter miles south of the same point. Some researchers have indicated that Elisha Gatchell represents a separate immigration from England to America, unconnected to the original New England Gatchells and Getchells. If that is the case, he and his descendants are misplaced here as the son of Jeremiah Gatchell. However, the account The Inter-Colonial Grimstone Boude and His Family researched and written by Francis James Dallett, F. A. S. G., and published in The Genealogist (New York), Vol. 2, 1981, should put that suggestion to rest. This article is thoroughly researched and solidly substantiated by multiple, detailed references from court records found both in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and in Essex County, Massachusetts. It's a must-read for all descendants of Elisha Gatchell of Philadelphia and Nottingham, Pennsylvania, especially pages 82-85, which detail the family of Jeremiah Gatchell and Elizabeth Boude, the sister of Grimstone Boude. There's also a follow-up article published in The Genealogist" (New York), Vol. 6, No. 2, Fall 1985, pages 232-243. It is also interesting that family naming traditions used by Elisha Gatchell's descendants match closely to those names used by contemporary Gatchell families in Massachusetts. In particular, it's striking that the male given name of Increase and the female name of Tabitha both appear in Gatchell families in both Massachusetts and Pennsylvania in subsequent generations. As to the parentage of Elisha Gatchell, a significant uncertainty remains. While it's certain that Jeremiah Gatchell of Marblehead was his father, there appears to be no direct evidence as to who his mother was and there appear to be two possibilities. The marriage of Elisha's father Jeremiah Gatchell to Hannah Saith is documented in New England Marriages Prior to 1700" and was also reiterated to me in a letter written in 1979 by another genealogist by the name of Theodore Gatchell. Other researchers have documented her name as Hannah Smith. It appears most genealogists favor the Saith spelling as opposed to the Smith spelling. It's most likely this will remain uncertain forever. There are no records of any births with this first marriage of Jeremiah Gatchell to Hannah Saith/Smith, although there are records that indicate Jeremiah Jr.'s birth as 1679. His tombstone indicates he was born in that year. According to Francis James Dallett, F. A. S. G., and published in the article in The Genealogist (New York), Vol. 2, 1981, Elizabeth Boude was married to Jeremiah Gatchell some time before Aug. 1683, and many secondary references estimate that Elisha was born about 1682. That would seem to make Elizabeth most likely Elisha's mother, and Dallet states that conclusion when outlining the family of Jeremiah Gatchell and Elizabeth Boude. In his article, Dallet did not offer any direct evidence of Elisha's birth and proof as to who his mother might have been, so it appears he was assuming the Elizabeth Boude gave birth to Elisha and his older brother Jeremiah Gatchell, Jr. However, Dallet makes no mention of the Jeremiah Gatchell/Hannah Saith/Smith marriage, so it appears Dallet was either not aware of the Hannah Saith/Smith marriage record, or he discounted that marriage as another Jeremiah Gatchell. In the 1670s, however, no other Jeremiah Gatchell of marriageable age is known to be in New England at that time. Perhaps Hannah died around 1682, possibly while giving birth to Elisha, and Jeremiah Sr. quickly remarried to Elizabeth. Such circumstances occurred frequently back then. However, given the apparent proximity in time of Jeremiah Gatchell's marriage to Elizabeth Boude and the apparent year of Elisha's birth, it seems most likely that Elizabeth Boude was Elisha's mother.

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bullet  Events in his life were:

Occupation: Orphans Court Judge.


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Elisha married Rachael WILCOX, daughter of Barnabas WILCOX and Sarah, in 1706 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. (Rachael WILCOX was born on May 2, 1685 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and died on February 17, 1760 in East Nottingham, Chester County, Pennsylvania, United States.)

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Sources


1 Dean G. Newhouse, Newhouse-Getchell Family Home Page.


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