Sackett Records 1760-1775

The Mystery Sacketts of Vermont

By Thurmon  King

 

There were some Sackets mentioned in Vermont records during the period between 1763 and 1800 who have descendants but have no obvious connection to Sackett lines listed in Weygant's "The Sacketts of America".  This is an attempt at listing the Sacketts we have found in VT records and consider possible connections.

Sackets in Vermont Records Before 1775

The first known records which mention Sackets are found in the state papers of Vermont.  In the grants for Underhill, Fairfax, and St. George, VT  there are several Sackets listed. These men are the first of our "Mystery Sacketts of Vermont":
According to HEMENWAY'S HISTORICAL GAZETTEER -Name Index these Sackets listed in Township grants:
pg. 762
Sacket, Dr. Francis,  grantee of St. George, i, 851 note  [Chittenden Co.]
Sacket, Joseph, grantee of St. George, i, 851 {note  [Chittenden Co.]
Sacket, James, grantee of Underhill, i, 886 (2) note  [Chittenden Co.]
Sacket, John,  grantee of Underhill, i, 886(2) note  [Chittenden Co.]
Sacket, Joseph, Jr., grantee of Underhill, i 886(2)  [Chittenden Co.]
Sacket, Samuel, grantee of Underhill, i 886 (2) note  [Chittenden Co.]
Sacket, William, grantee of Underhill, i 886(2) note  [Chittenden Co.]
Sacket, Reuben  1781  08 20, Fletcher, Franklin Co.  p. 77
Sacket, Jasper, grantee of Fairfax, ii 166(2) [Franklin Co.]
Sacket, Jasper, Jr.  "        "     "   166 (2)  [Franklin Co.]
Sacket, John, grantee of Fairfax, ii, 166 (2) 168,  [Franklin Co.]
Sacket, Joseph, grantee of Fairfax, ii, 166 (2) 172 (2)  [Franklin Co.]
Sacket, Peter, grantee of Fairfax i, 166(2)  [Franklin Co.]
Sacket, Richard of St. Albans  ii 434  (This is probably the Richard who mar. Kahziah Conger)[Franklin Co.]

This work also has other references to:
Dr. Sackett of Burlington, i. 504 [Chittenden Co.]
Mrs., of Colchester, i. 762  [Chittenden Co.]

The Underhill Grant (June 8th 1763):

"State Papers of Vermont" Vol. II; Vermont Charters; (Harry A. Black, sec. of state); P.H. Gobie Press, Inc., Bellows Falls: 1922; Appendix; pg. 356:
"Underhill -- Town in Chittenden County. New Hampshire grant of 23,040 acres to Joseph Sackett, Jr., and sixty-four associates, June 8, 1763, (State Papers N.H., 26:510-518). ..."

The Sackets listed in the Underhill Grant:
Sacket, James, grantee of Underhill, i, 886 (2) note  [Chittenden Co.]
Sacket, John,  grantee of Underhill, i, 886(2) note  [Chittenden Co.]
Sacket, Joseph, Jr., grantee of Underhill, i 886(2)  [Chittenden Co.]
Sacket, Samuel, grantee of Underhill, i 886 (2) note  [Chittenden Co.]
Sacket, William, grantee of Underhill, i 886(2) note  [Chittenden Co.]

These Sacketts appear to the the sons of 23-Judge Joseph Sackett, viz.
85- Joseph Sackett, Jr. (1707-aft 1757); m. Milicant Clowes; or possibly his son;
(295) Dr. Joseph Sackett (1733-1799); m. Hannah Alsop
90-John Sackett (1716-1783); m. Phebe Burling
93-James Sackett (1722-1784); m. Frances DeKay
94-Samuel Sackett (1724-1780); m. Mary Betts
97-William Sackett (1731-1776); m. Sarah Fish

As was the case with the St. George Grant, below, the grantees never went to Vermont to occupy their land.  "The settlement of this town was commenced about the year 1786."   [Gazetteer of Vermont, Hayward, 1849] And according to Weygant's information these Sacketts lived and died in New York.

The St. George Grant (August 18th 1763):

HEMENWAY'S HISTORICAL GAZETTEER; Appendix, pg. 240:
Province of New Hampshire August 18, 1763 Recorded in the 3d Book of Charters Pages 22 & 23; Pr T. Atkinson Junr, Secry.  Names 65 grantees including "..., Joseph Sacket, Joseph Sacket Doct Frances Sacket..."

The Sackets listed in the St. George Grant:
Sacket, Dr. Francis,  grantee of St. George, i, 851 note  [Chittenden Co.]
Sacket, Joseph, grantee of St. George, i, 851 {note  [Chittenden Co.]
Sacket, Joseph, grantee of St. George, i, 851 {note  [Chittenden Co.]
The transcript of the St. George Grant that I have is a bit confusing.  In the list of names we have "..., Joseph Sacket, Joseph Sacket Doct Frances Sacket, ..."  The lack of a comma before or after "Doct" makes it uncertain as to whether it would be "Joseph Sacket Doct" or "Doct Frances Sacket."  I have no Doc Frances/Francis Sacket(t) in my files.  I also have no Frances/Francis Sacket(t) who would fit in this time frame.  In the list of names there are two Joseph Sackets with no Jr./Sr. designations.  This would seem to indicate that the two Joseph Sackets were not father and son.  However, if these two Joseph Sackets were 85- Joseph Sackett, Jr. (1707-aft 1757); m. Milicant Clowes, and his son (295) Dr. Joseph Sackett (1733-1799); m. Hannah Alsop; then the list would read "... , Joseph Sacket, Joseph Sacket Doct ..."

The possibilities for known Joseph Sackets who were NOT father and son are:
(85) Joseph Sackett 1706-1757; m. Milicant Clowes; or his son
(295) Dr. Joseph Sackett (1733-1799); m. Hannah Alsop
(120) Joseph Sackett (1724- aft Mar 1768)[brother of (118)], m. Hannah Budson; son of (26) Rev. Richard Sackett 1686-1737) and Eizabeth Kirtland,
(278) Joseph Sackett (b. abt 1740-1746) of New Haven, CT, son of (81) Joseph Sackett,
(343) Joseph Sackett, b. abt 1741-1746; son of (118) Hon. Nathaniel Sackett (1720-1768) and
Anne Bush

Any of these men could have been the Joseph Sackets named as grantees of St. George.  However, it appears that none of the St. George grantees ever went to their grant.  During the Revolutionary War, at least eight of the grantees were loyalists and ended up in Canada after the end of the war. ". . . The settlement [of St. George] was commenced here in the spring of 1784, by Joshua Isham, from Colchester, Ct.  The next year several others joined the settlement."   [Gazetteer of Vermont, Hayward, 1849.]


The Fairfax Grant (August 18th 1763):

This grant was made to Edward Burling and 62 others, entitling them to 23,040 [acres]. The usual restrictions and reservations incident to the New Hampshire grants were contained in this charter, though there seems to have been little given to them by the settlers, or by the grantees themselves, none of whom, however, ever located in the town.  "Broadstreet Spafford and his two sons, Natah and Asa, came into this township from Piermont, N.H., in 1783, and began improvements. They soon after removed their families here.  A  Mr. Eastman started from New Hampshire with them, with his family, but died on the road, and was buried in a trough on the flats in Johnson. His family came to Fletcher."       [Gazetteer of Vermont, Hayward, 1840.]

The Sackets listed in the Fairfax Grant:
Sacket, Jasper, grantee of Fairfax, ii 166(2) [Franklin Co.]
Sacket, Jasper, Jr.  "        "     "   166 (2)  [Franklin Co.]
Sacket, John, grantee of Fairfax, ii, 166 (2) 168,  [Franklin Co.]
Sacket, Joseph, grantee of Fairfax, ii, 166 (2) 172 (2)  [Franklin Co.]
Sacket, Peter, grantee of Fairfax i, 166(2)  [Franklin Co.]

I have do not have a Jasper Sacket(t) in my files. The first Peter Sackett I have in my files is 762-Peter Sackett b. 1757 and he was too young to be a grantee in 1763.  Because Edward Burlling is listed as a grantee in the Fairfax Grant and 90-John Sackett m. Phebe Burling; I am inclined to believe that John and Joseph in this grant are (90) Joseph and 85- Joseph Sackett, Jr. (1707-aft 1757); m. Milicant Clowes;or possibly (295) Dr. Joseph Sackett (1733-1799); m. Hannah Alsop, son of (85) Joseph Sackett, Jr..

The Underhill, St. George, and Fairfax grants were made following the close of the French and Indian Wars in 1763.  At this time the French surrendered all claim to the area now known as Vermont.  In 1760 the Governor of New Hampshire, using authority granted in 1740 by King George III to the Governor of NH, began to issue land grants in the area west of the Connericut River and north of the MA border to within 20 miles of the Hudson River and bordering Lake Champlain on the west.  By 1763 he had  granted no less than 138 townships.  Most of the grants by Governor Wentworth were made to men from MA and CT.  However, an examination of the names of the grantees of the St. George, Underhill, and Fairfax grants shows that most of these grantees were from the area around New York City and southwestern CT.

In 1763 Lieutenant-Governor Tryon, of the Province of New York, laid claim to the territory by virtue of the grant made by Charles II to the Duke of York in 1664, which included "all the land from the west side of Connecticut River to the east side of Delaware Bay.  A contoversy ensued and on the application of the government of New York, it was decided by George III, in council of July 10, 1764, that the "western bank of the Connecticut River should thereafter be regarded as the boundary line between the province of New York and province of New Hampshire."

Following that ruling Governor Colden of New York issued a proclamation, on the 10th of April, 1765, giving a copy of the order of the king changing the boundary of the territory, and notifying "his majesty's subjects to govern themselves accordingly." He then proceeded to grant the lands to claimants other than the New Hampshire claimants, declaring that all previous grants were vacated.  And when the latter applied to the New York government for a confirmation of the grants they already held, such enormous patent fees were demanded as to make it impossible for them to comply.  The titles of the residents of Vermont were made void; effectively stripping them of their lands.

As was noted with the three grants above; some of the holders of shares in the New Hampshire grants never were in Vermmont but sold, or virtually gave away their share of the grant to others.  Others relinquished their claims and moved on.   Some of those who had actually settled to Vermont used force to repel the claimants from New York and some of the claimants from New York also resorted to force in an effort to gain possession of their grants.  A civil disturbance ensued and in 1769 the king prohibited the governor of New York from issuing any more grants "until his majesty's further pleasure should be made known."  However the conflict continued and the seriousness of it increased.  The Rev. War served as an added complication when some of the settlers in Vermont joined the Loyalist forces.  Some of the residents were taken prisoner by the British and others removed to safer areas in the southern part of the territory or into MA until the war was concluded.  This divided the attention of the residents of Vermont as they were forced to do battle on two fronts and the controversy was not settled until after the Rev. War was concluded.

From the records, it appears that the Sackets listed among the grantees of Underhill, St. George, and Fairfax were among those who had their grants vacated by the Governor of New York.  It does not appear that any of these Sackets ever went to Vermont and actually started to develop land in the grants.  Therefore, with a couple of exceptions, it is not safe to assume that any of the Sackets among the grantees are the same as any of the  Sackets we find in the Vermont records from 1775-1800.


Part II: 1775-1790