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The 
Walton
Road

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Introduction

Road Trip

Internet Resources

Image Gallery

 

 

Introduction

Introduction

 

    The Walton Road, also known as the Cumberland Road or Old Walton road, was initially opened in 1795 as an alternative route to the “Cumberland settlements” located along the Cumberland River in what is now the Tennessee counties of Davidson, Sumner, Montgomery and Robertson.       This road was completed under the

supervision of William Walton of Carthage in 1802 and connected Fort Southwest Point located at Kingston in eastern Tennessee at the junction of the Clinch and Tennessee rivers with the junction of the Caney Fork and Cumberland Rivers at Carthage.  Thus Carthage's topographical location made it an important shipping and steamboat port throughout the first half of the 19th-century.  The road thus linked Tennessee's two principal river systems, the major "highways" of commerce at the time, and greatly facilitated travel and commerce between the Knoxville area in the eastern part of Tennessee with new and growing communities located

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in the Cumberland region of Middle Tennessee. The Cumberland Turnpike Company operated the Road as a toll road from 1802 to 1811 under charter from the Tennessee General Assembly, but the State resumed control of the road in 1811.  However, the Assembly still granted individuals the right to operate portions of the Road and to charge tolls to cover maintenance.  As a result of this practice and the opening of the Sparta Turnpike in its paved form in 1828, the Walton Road declined and some portions fell into disrepair.

     Today's U.S. Highway 70N follows roughly the same route in many places.  The overall route between Kingston and Carthage is about 100 miles in length.  A 16 mile section of the old road between Monterey and Cookeville travels along Tennessee Route 62 to Brotherton.  From there it transitions to several back roads into Cookeville, Tennessee.  

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Winding Road 1

Road Trip

Road Trip

Winding Road 2

If you have traced your 18th or 19th century ancestors to any of the counties listed below it is quite possible that they traveled to that location along this migration route.  Therefore you may find additional relevant information about your ancestral lineages by taking the following road trip through these localities.

COUNTY (Road Trip Segment)

COUNTY (Road Trip Segment)

COUNTY (Road Trip Segment)

Cumberland County, TN (1,2)

DeKalb County, TN (4)

Fentress County, TN (2)

Jackson County, TN (2,3)

Loudon County, TN (1)

Morgan County, TN (1)

Overton County, TN (2)

Putnam County, TN (2,3)

Roane County, TN (1)

Smith County, TN (4)

Sumner County, TN (4)

Trousdale County, TN (4)

White County, TN (2,3)

Wilson County, TN (4)

 

Genealogy Road Trip

This “Genealogy Road Trip” is divided into segments that require between 1 and 2 hours of driving time.  The entire 101 mile journey should take approximately 2.25 hours to drive at 45 miles per hour.  Within each segment you will find links to resources* that will assist you in planning a successful and enjoyable experience.  The following maps are designed to show a close-up view of the counties and communities along this migration route.  Relevant county seats are designated with aStar yellow-green 32x30, beginning and end points of each segment are noted with a Bullet (red ball) dk green2 and historical sites with a purple circle.

 

SEGMENT 1

From: Kingston, TN

To: Crossville, TN

SEGMENT 2

From: Crossville, TN

To: Cookeville, TN

SEGMENT 3

From: Cookeville, TN

To: Carthage, TN

 

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Segment 1

SEGMENT 1

From: Kingston, TN

To: Crossville, TN

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Driving Distance = 35 miles;   Driving Time = approximately .75 hours

Start your trip along the “Old Walton Road” at the site of Fort Southwest Point.  This historical site is, built in 1792, is located in the city of Kingston the county seat of Roane County, Tennessee. From the entrance to the park turn left on to S. Kentucky Ave then turn left onto US Route 70 (W. Race St.).  Follow this route across the  Watts Bar Lake on the on the US Route 70 bridge.  Pass through the city of Rockwood.  During the late 1700s and early 1800s the Cherokee village of Chief Tallentuskie, a Cherokee leader, was located here.  At Eureka turn right to continue on US Route 70 (Historic Avery Trace).  Continue on US Route 70 towards the town of Crab Orchard.   Crab Orchard's position in a gap in the Crab Orchard Mountains made it an early "gateway" to the Cumberland area as early as the late 1700s. Pioneers passing through the area named it for its abundance of wild crab apple trees.  From Crab Orchard continue on US Route 70 (Knoxville Highway) into Crossville, Tennessee. Crossville, the seat of Cumberland County, has its roots in the intersection of several early American roads.  It is here that the Old Walton Road branches off on US Route 70N.  

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Use the following LINKS to find information about the counties and localities found along this segment of the Route.

General Profile

Genealogy & History Resources

Historical Sites

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Segment 2

SEGMENT 2

From: Crossville, TN

To: Cookeville, TN

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Driving Distance = 36 miles;   Driving Time = approximately .75 hours

In Crossville turn right on to TN Route 1 (West Avenue) located about two blocks past Main Street.  Continue on West Avenue out of town as it will then become US Route 70N.  Follow this route to Monterey, Tennessee.  Enter Monterey on E. Stratton Ave. and then turn right onto TN Route 84 (S. Holly St.).  At TN Route 62 (Commercial St.) turn left.  At about four blocks transition left onto Woodcliff Road towards Brotherton.  The 16 miles along this route from Monterey to Cookeville is part of the original road.  At Brotherton turn left on to Buck Mountain Road and follow this road towards Cookeville, Tennessee.  About a mile north of the intersection of E. Broad Street and Dry Valley Road is White Plains an antebellum plantation house that was a key stopover along the Walton Road during the 19th century.  As you enter Cookeville the road will become E. Broad Street.   Just past the Belle Acres Golf Course turn left at Elm Street go one block and reconnect with US Route 70N (E. Spring St.).  Turn right and continue into the center of Cookeville the seat of Putnam County. 

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Use the following LINKS to find information about the counties and localities found along this segment of the Route.

General Profile

Genealogy & History Resources

Historical Sites

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Segment 3

SEGMENT 3

From: Cookeville, TN

To: Carthage, TN

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Driving Distance = 30 miles;   Driving Time = approximately .75 hours

Leave Cookeville on US Route 70N towards Baxter, Tennessee.  Go through Double Springs  and Chestnut Mound then cross the Caney Fork River.  About 1 ¾ miles further you will see on the right the confluence of the Caney with the Cumberland River.   Go through South Carthage on US Route 70N and soon after turn left and take the Carthage Bridge over the Cumberland River into the city of Carthage, Tennessee.  William Walton (1760-1816), arrived in what is now Carthage during the late 1780s.  Around 1800, Walton directed the construction of the Walton Road.  Walton operated a ferry and tavern along the road, around which a small community developed. In 1804, Walton's community was chosen as the county seat of the newly formed Smith County and soon after the town of Carthage was laid out.  End your trip along the “Old Walton Road” at the Smith County Count House located at 122 Turner High Circle in Carthage.

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Use the following LINKS to find information about the counties and localities found along this segment of the Route.

General Profile

Genealogy & History Resources

Historical Sites

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WWW (tan left)

Internet Resources

Internet 
Resources

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The Google search engine

 button  and following web

sites    may     provide    you

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with additional information

to assist with your research

about   this   topic. 

General Resources

·         American Migration Patterns

·         Migration Routes, Roads & Trails

·         Brethren Life: Migrations

·         Trails West

·         Historical U.S. roads and trails - Wikipedia

·         U.S. Historical Maps - Perry-Castañeda Collection

·         Early American Roads and Trails

·         Frontier Trails: A Brief History

·         MIGRATIONS.org

·         ROOTS / MIGRATIONS

·         American Migration Fact Sheets

·         Map guide to American migration routes,1735-1815

·         Migration Book Store

·         Early Migration Routes

·         The Overland Trail Links--Ancient Indian Trails

·         American Westward Expansion

·         Migration Message Boards – Ancestry.com

·         The African-American Migration Experience 

·         Migration Trailsmap of many U.S. trails

·         Migration Information & Maps By Ethnic Group

Topic Specific Resources

·         Putnam Co Topography & Migration 

·         Walton Road Newspaper Article

·         TN Encyclopedia: WALTON ROAD

·         The Alliance for the Cumberlands

·         Amazon.com: The Walton Road

·     Standing Stone State Park

·     Monterey, Tennessee Commerce Assoc.

·     A Section of the Olf Walton Road

·     Crab Orchard, Tennessee

Download a free 2-page Fact Sheet

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about American migration routes

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Family Historian's
Reference Library

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The following Link will take you to our library of genealogy reference books.   Here you will find books about historic American roads, trails, and paths.  In addition, there are texts that pertain to ethnic and religion groups, history, geography as well as other books that will assist you with your research.

This Link will take you to our

Research Library - button 1

collection of reference books.  

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Image Gallery

Image Gallery

During our research we have collected images and photographs that are of general interest to a variety of historic American roads, trails and migration.  Some of them are presented on this website because we believe they tend to provide the reader with additional information which may aid in the understanding of this topic as well as our ancestors past lives.

White Plains, TN (Historical Marker)

Historical Marker located at White Plains, TN

Use this LINK to see the “Image

Image Galleries - Road Trip

 Gallerythat pertain to this topic.

If you have any photographs or maps or other images relating to historic American 
roads, trails and migration routes we would greatly appreciate hearing from you.

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Free Image Search
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Use the power of Google™ to find more interesting images about this topic. This button will link you to the Google Images Search   page.   Enter   the   topic   you   are

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searching in the box and click “Search Images”. At the “Images” display page you will see the image, as well as the website of which it is associated.

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About this webpage

About This Webpage

 

CONTACT INFORMATION

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-- This webpage was last updated on --

01 March 2013

Diggin for Roots (2 shovels)

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Diggin for Roots (2 shovels)