Bair's Meeting House Burial Ground

(Photos taken September 2002)


(The following was excerpted from "History of York county Pennsylvania" by John Gibson, 1886):

Bair's Meeting House was a Mennonite meeting house located about 3 miles east of Hanover on the York Road.  The land on which it was built was granted to Michael Danner, in trust for the Mennonite congregation, on August 8, 1774 by John and Thomas Penn, sons of William Penn.  Michael Danner was a prominent man of his day and, in 1749, was one of the commissioners appointed to lay off York County.  The grant to Michael Danner was "in trust to and for the only proper use of the Mennonites, their heirs and successors forever".  For many years, the Mennonite services had been held in the homes of members.  For the purpose of erecting a building, for a school and for religious worship, a tripartite indenture and agreement was made May 14, 1775, between Michael Danner, Sr., then of Hanover on the first part, John Shenck, of Manheim and Jacob Keagy of Heidelberg, ministers, of the Mennonites, John Welty and James Miller, both of Manheim (now Heidelberg), elders of the Mennonite congregation of the second part, and Adam Eichelberger of the third part, concerning the disposition of the land, which was named "Danner's Repository", and when granted adjoined lands of Michael Newman, Andrew Shenck and Adam Eichelberger, and contained twelve acres.  It was agreed upon by the heads of the congregation, "to hold equally in common, and for the use of said congregation erect a schoolhouse and meetinghouse, and locate a place to bury the dead, and for the use of the German Lutherans and German Reformed Calvinists, who may join in erecting a schoolhouse thereon, and supporting a schoolmaster, and also for a place of burial for their dead."  They then released unto Adam Eichelberger the right of being a trustee for the Lutheran and Reformed congregations and for a school building, but "reserving and retaining for themselves entire use and their successors forever; a house of worship to be erected on some part of said land when said Mennonite congregation may see fit to erect one."