Walker - Palmer Genealogy Web Site - Person Page 223

Walker - Palmer Genealogy Web Site
Person Page 223

         

Charles Benjamin Coy
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Religion*: He was a Free Christian Baptist.
Birth*: 15 February 1850, Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick
Census: 1851, He is listed as 1 year old in the 1851 census.
Census*: 1871, He is listed as 21 years old in the 1871 census.
Marriage*: 9 July 1874, Principal=Phoebe Coy
Death*: 7 September 1909, Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick, Canada
Burial*: Fairmont Cemetery, Presque Ise, Arrostook County, Maine, U.S.A.

Parents:

Father: William Coy b. 5 April 1807, d. 10 September 1882
Mother: Sarah Cowperthwaite b. 14 January 1814, d. 16 April 1894

Family:

Marriage*: 9 July 1874, Principal=Phoebe Coy

Phoebe Coy b. circa 1856

Children:

Guilford Coy b. 1875
Mary Lee Coy b. c 1876
Edward Coy b. 1877
Guilford Coy b. c 1878
Ada May Coy b. c 1879
William Coy b. c 1881
Andrew Coy b. c 1887

Charles E. Coy Jr.
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Birth*: 1862, Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick
Death*: 26 July 1868, Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick, Canada
Burial*: the Baptist Cemetery, Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick, Canada

Parents:

Father: Charles E. Coy Sr. b. 20 September 1811, d. 28 November 1896
Mother: Margaret Annie Wood b. circa 1824, d. 1901

Charles E. Coy Sr.
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Occupation*: Charles was a Justice of the Peace.
Birth*: 20 September 1811, Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick, Canada
Marriage*: 9 March 1843, They were married by Rev. Benjamin Coy., Principal=Margaret Annie Wood
Census*: 1871, He is listed as 56 in the 1871 census when enumerated at Gagetown, 66 in 1881, 78 in 1891. Listed in the 1891 census was an adopted son, Gilbert Coy, age 19.
Death*: 28 November 1896, Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick, Canada

Parents:

Father: David Coy b. 8 March 1773, d. 28 December 1866
Mother: Mary Ebbett b. 13 January 1778, d. 2 January 1868

Family:

Margaret Annie Wood b. circa 1824, d. 1901

Children:

James Edwin Coy+ b. 28 May 1845, d. 7 Mar 1888
Henry Coy+ b. 8 Jan 1847, d. 1924
Frances Coy b. c 1852
Eliza Coy b. c 1855
Caroline Coy b. c 1856
Annie Coy+ b. c 1857, d. 20 Mar 1933
Ada Coy+ b. bt 1859 - 1861
Charles E. Coy Jr. b. 1862, d. 26 Jul 1868
Charles Coy b. 28 Jul 1863, d. 5 Mar 1864
David Coy+ b. c 1864, d. 25 Sep 1898
Havelock Coy b. c 1874

Charles Henry Coy
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Birth*: 1909

Parents:

Father: Henry Charles Coy b. 30 May 1873, d. 23 April 1942
Mother: Alberta May McCauley b. 4 September 1884, d. 17 September 1967

Charles J. Coy
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Birth*: 28 October 1847, Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick
Death*: 18 March 1854, Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick
Burial*: the Baptist Cemetery, Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick

Parents:

Father: Samuel Coy b. 25 October 1803, d. 23 June 1882
Mother: Ruth Amelia Estey b. 18 December 1824, d. 30 December 1881

Charles Leonard Coy
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Marriage*: Principal=Verda Frederica Allen
Birth*: 8 May 1874, Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick, Canada
Census*: 1881, He was 6 in the 1881 census, 26 in 1901 when he was living at home.
Death*: 2 February 1947, Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick, Canada
Burial*: the Baptist Cemetery, Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick, Canada

Parents:

Father: Henry Coy b. 8 January 1847, d. 1924
Mother: Annetta R. Harding b. 12 July 1850, d. 18 October 1921

Family:

Verda Frederica Allen b. 1905

Children:

Enid Coy+ b. 1932, d. b 1991
Leonard Winston Coy+ b. 1934, d. 9 Apr 1991

Charles W. Coy
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Death*:
Birth*: circa 1886
Census*: 1891, Charles was 5 years old at the 1891 Census.

Parents:

Father: Rev. John Henry Coy b. 1847
Mother: Lydia U. (?) b. 1849

Charlotte Coy
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Census*: 1871, Charlotte Coy was 1 month at the 1871 census. She is not mentioned in LDS records or listed in the 1891 census.
Birth*: 1871

Parents:

Father: Joseph Bonnell Coy b. 19 March 1837, d. 13 October 1917
Mother: Charlotte Augusta MacNeill b. 30 September 1843, d. 27 July 1909

Chauncy Donald Coy
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Birth*: 30 September 1895, Prince William, York County, New Brunswick, Canada
Census*: 1901, He was 5 at the 1901 census.
Marriage*: 6 December 1917, First Baptist Church, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, They were married by Rev. J. Austin Hentley. They were to live in Blackie, Alberta., Principal=Ruby Grant

Parents:

Father: Dr. Judson Coy b. 8 March 1852, d. 1903
Mother: Grace Amelia Ingraham b. 6 April 1866

Family:

Ruby Grant b. 28 May 1898

Christopher Benjamin Coy
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Birth*: 12 December 1877, Collina, Kings County, New Brunswick, Canada
Census*: 1881, He was 4 in the 1881 census, 14 in 1891, 24 at 1901.
Living*: 1906, They were living in Collina, New Brunswick at the time of the wedding.
Marriage*: 2 May 1906, Collina, Kings County, New Brunswick, Canada, They were married at the home of Ezra Long in Collina, New Brunswick by Rev. W. Camp., Principal=Ethel Long
Death*: 9 March 1916, Collina, Kings County, New Brunswick, Canada

Parents:

Father: Joseph Bonnell Coy b. 19 March 1837, d. 13 October 1917
Mother: Charlotte Augusta MacNeill b. 30 September 1843, d. 27 July 1909

Family:

Ethel Long b. 15 April 1884

Children:

Frank Donald Coy b. 20 Mar 1907
Blanche Coy b. 17 Dec 1908
Harry M. Coy+ b. 29 Sep 1913, d. 23 Mar 1976

Clara Coy
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Note*: Clara (Coy) Reeder was the 4th born to Leverett David and Frances Jane (nee Ennis) Coy, on the 07th of September, 1891 and died on the 11th of July, 1963, Seattle, WA. She was born at Alexanders Landing on the west shore of Lake Sammamish, Washington, where her father was working across the lake at a lumber mill at Monahan. She spent her early years living in many places in Washington and Canada (see Leverett and Frances Coy for more details). The family eventually settled at 4218 Latona Avenue in Seattle’s Latona District. Clara met her future husband through neighbors, and they were eventually were married on the 19th of November, 1912 in a ceremony at her parents home. Their honeymoon was spent on a steamship trip to San Francisco, and Clara was seasick the whole time. Clara lived her entire married life in the same home, which she and Tom built before they were married. She was an active member of the Gatewood Baptist Church in West Seattle, beginning before 1920. She was active in P.T.A., also. Clara loved her home and enjoyed even the most menial task in taking care of it. Her life was well ordered and routine was of her success in having such a spotless and beautiful home. Silver was polished on Saturdays, the kitchen floor was scrubbed and waxed weekly, as were the hardwood floors. The ironing board never got behind -- and everything was ironed and much of it starched; dish towels, napkins, sheets, pillow cases, terry towels, washcloths, underwear, pajamas, and of course the shirts, blouses, skirts, and dresses. No permanent press in those days. She enjoyed entertaining and her friends always loved to be invited to her home for lunch, as she was an excellent cook. (Although that was not the part of homemaking she liked best.) She always set a beautiful table with lovely bone china she had collected on their many trips to Van Vancouver, British Columbia, to visit their good friends, Merle and Bill Ramage. She was a gracious hostess and always made her quests feel welcome and at ease. Tom and Clara lived in their home in West Seattle for 51 years, until Clara died of a sudden heart attack on the 11th of July, 1963, at the age of 72. Tom sold their home and moved to a retirement home where he died on the 19th of December, 1965. This account was contributed by Mary ‘Phyillis’ (Reeder) Fletcher -- March 1978.
Birth*: 13 September 1892, Alexander's Landing, near Lake Sammamish, King County, WA., U.S.A.
Marriage*: 19 November 1912, Seattle, King County, Washington, U.S.A., Principal=Thomas Myers Reeder
Death*: 11 July 1963, Seattle, King County, Washington, U.S.A., Cause of death: Heart Attack
Burial*: 15 July 1963, Forest Lawn Cemetery, Seattle, King County, Washington, U.S.A.

Parents:

Father: Leverett David Coy b. 17 July 1857, d. 27 March 1913
Mother: Frances Jane Ennis b. 5 May 1863, d. 26 May 1941

Family:

Thomas Myers Reeder b. 19 December 1882, d. 20 December 1965

Claudia C. Coy
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Birth*: 1 September 1870, Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick, Canada
Census*: 1871, She was 1 in the 1871 census, 10 in 1881, 20 in 1891.
Marriage*: 15 September 1892, Saint John, Saint John County, New Brunswick, Canada, Principal=Nelson M. Estabrooks

Parents:

Father: Amasa Coy b. 16 March 1832, d. 11 September 1896
Mother: Frances Ann Weston b. 5 December 1834, d. 8 February 1899

Family:

Nelson M. Estabrooks b. 7 December 1870, d. 7 December 1898

Children:

Jarvis Nelson Estabrooks b. 13 Jul 1894
Eva Grace Estabrooks+ b. 24 Nov 1895
Edna May Estabrooks b. 10 May 1898

Daniel Coy
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Birth*: 1685, Norwich (now Preston), New London County, Connecticut, U.S.A.

Parents:

Father: Matthew Coy Jr. b. 5 September 1656
Mother: Anne Brewster b. 1662

Daniel Parent Coy
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Name-Com: Daniel Coy
Marriage*: Principal=Jane (?)
Birth*: 1803
Census*: 1851, He is listed as 48 in the 1851 census, when enumerated in the Parish of St. Marys, York County, New Brunswick.
Occupation*: 1851, He was a carpenter, according to the 1851 census.

Parents:

Father: John Coy Sr. b. 27 January 1766, d. 18 December 1814
Mother: Amy Anne Parent b. 1775, d. 7 December 1860

Family:

Jane (?) b. 1797

Children:

Martha Jane Coy+ b. 1836

David Coy
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Birth*: 9 February 1801, Sheffield, Sunbury County, New Brunswick
Marriage*: 11 January 1823, Sheffield, Sunbury County, New Brunswick, Principal=Maria Martha Estabrooks
Census*: 1851, He was recorded as 50 at 1851 census when the family was enumerated in the Parish of Sheffield, Sunbury Co., New Brunswick. He was also recorded as being a farmer and blacksmith.
Death*: 9 February 1863
Burial*: the Baptist Cemetery, Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick

Parents:

Father: Edward Coy Jr. b. 27 February 1768, d. 14 January 1849
Mother: Jannet A. Murray b. 1778, d. 2 January 1855

Family:

Maria Martha Estabrooks b. 1804, d. 6 June 1865

Children:

Wealthy Ann Coy+ b. c 1829
Dianna Coy+ b. c 1830
Martha Jane Coy+ b. c 1832, d. 1875
Amasa Coy+ b. 16 Mar 1832, d. 11 Sep 1896
Elizabeth Ann Coy+ b. c 1836
Mary Ida Coy+ b. c 1837
James Wood Coy+ b. c 1840, d. Aug 1916
Marie M. Coy b. 1843

David Coy
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Birth*: circa 1860, Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick Canada
Census*: 1861, He is recorded as 6 months in 1861, and 20 in 1881.
Living*: 1916, He was living in Ontario at the time of his father's death.

Parents:

Father: James Wood Coy b. circa 1840, d. August 1916
Mother: Elizabeth Ann McGowan b. circa 1836, d. 27 June 1891

David Coy
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Note*: David Coy. b. ca. 1864 at Gagetown, Queens Co., N.B. (Don Coy file gives birth date as Sep. 7, 1847). d. Sep. 25, 1898 at Upper Gagetown, Queens Co., N.B. He was a captain.
Name Variation: Capt. David Coy
Marriage*: Principal=Adeline 'Addie' Plummer
Birth*: circa 1864, Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick, Canada
Death*: 25 September 1898, Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick Canada
Burial*: the Baptist Cemetery, Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick, Canada

Parents:

Father: Charles E. Coy Sr. b. 20 September 1811, d. 28 November 1896
Mother: Margaret Annie Wood b. circa 1824, d. 1901

Family:

Adeline 'Addie' Plummer

Children:

Charles Coy d. 18 Mar 1864

David Coy
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Note*: David2 COY was born in 1773. 12 He married Mary EBBETT.12 He died on 28December 1866.12 He was buried after 28 December 1866 in Upper GagetownBaptist Cemetery, Upper Gagetown, Queens Co., NB.12 He died at ninetythree years of age. Endnotes 1. Email from Bill Arthurs, 14-Apr-1995, (613) 225-6941,BL368@@FREENET.CARLETON.CA,14-Apr-1995, McCoy. 2. Email from Bill Arthurs, memo. 3. Merritt,J Web Page http://www.umcs.maine.edu/~jmerritt/ancestor.Info obtained 15 Jan 1999, n.d.. 4. Email from Bill Arthurs, memo, place. 5. Email from Bill Arthurs, b. date,b. place. 6. Email from Bill Arthurs, marriage. 7. Email from Bill Arthurs, date, place, memo. 8. Email from Bill Arthurs. 9. Email from Bill Arthurs, place. 10. Email from Bill Arthurs, b. year. 11. Email from Bill Arthurs, d. date. 12. Upper Gagetown Baptist Cemetery. Donated by Dr. Mildred Smith,with notes; update by Cleadie B. Barnett. Found at the Queens County GenWebsite: 'William Brewster of the Mayflower and his descendants for FourGenerations' 14 Jan 1999, n.d.. David Coy was born in 08 Mar. 1773, died 28 Dec. 1866, and was the ninthborn of the family of Edward and Amy (Titus). David married Mary Ebbettwho was born 13 Jan. 1780 and died 02 Jan. 1868 and had a family of sixchildren. In the first part of their married lives, they lived on the Intervale(bottom land) opposite of just below what is now known as Chares (?)Point, (at that time the Intervale side of the river alone was settled,but as the water overflowed the Intervale every spring and every thinghad to be taken from cellars and cattle and hay had to be scaffolded in the barns and sometimes the people wereeven driven to the upper parts of their own houses to live; at lengththey began to get tired of this kind of life and tired of moving over tothe Highlands every spring bring their cattle and household goods withthem and then moving back again after the water went down, but at length they found out that theycould live in the Highland side of the river and work their Intervale toas good advantage, as though they lived on them and also avoid all thebad features of the spring freshet etc. David Coy and his wife, Mary and family were the first to desert theIntervale in this way, and built the first house of any size built on theside of the river in what is now Upper Gagetown. The house is stillstanding, some few changes have been made, such as taking out the oldfashioned chimneys and fireplaces, putting on a sheet iron roof and a newell has been added etc.; but even today it is one of the best built, ifnot the best house in the entire village and also the largest . It isowned and occupied by Franklin Coy, who is also his grandson and a goodpart of the old Coy Homestead property. David and Mary Ebbett, his wife were honest and industrious farmers ofthe old fashioned style. Cooking their food by the old fashionfireplace. Weaving all cloth on their own looms by hand, getting theirshoes made by the village shoe-maker, keeping a large number of cows andmaking home made cheese, cutting all hay with the scythe and raking thesame by hand. In short, farming the same old way, as it has been donefor a thousand or more years or more before and no doubt living ashappily as people do now with all their advantages and improved machineryof all kinds. They lived to a good old age and are buried in the BurialGrounds of the Baptist Church at Upper Gagetown, Queens County, NewBrunswick, Canada. NOTE: This is an extraction from Mary (Coy) Morris Bradley’s book - ‘TheNarrative Of The Life and Christian Experience Of Mrs. Mary Bradley OfSaint John, New Brunswick’, written by herself. Includes extracts fromher diary and correspondence during a period upwards of 60 years, Boston:Published for the author, by Strong and Brodhead, No. 1, Cornhill 1849. From ‘Memorandum Of Family and Business Data and Also Daily Accounts OfFarm Happenings’, by Frederick Ashley Hobe.
Name Variation: Rev. David Coy
Birth*: 8 March 1773, (Coytown), Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick, Canada
Marriage*: 26 February 1801, (Coytown), Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick, Canada, Principal=Mary Ebbett
Death*: 28 December 1866, Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick, Canada
Burial*: the Baptist Cemetery, Upper Gagetown Cemetery, Queens County, New Brunswick, Canada

Parents:

Father: Edward J. Coy Sr. b. 6 May 1725, d. 19 September 1795
Mother: Amy Titus b. July 1733, d. 3 April 1808

Family:

Mary Ebbett b. 13 January 1778, d. 2 January 1868

Children:

Eliza Jane Coy b. c 1803, d. 30 Jan 1895
Joseph Edward Coy+ b. 6 Dec 1805, d. 30 Jan 1895
Sarah Jane Coy b. c 1811, d. Jun 1888
Charles E. Coy Sr.+ b. 20 Sep 1811, d. 28 Nov 1896
Margaret Jane Coy+ b. bt 1812 - 1813, d. 8 Sep 1854
Mary Ann Coy+ b. c 1818, d. 8 Sep 1854

David J. Coy
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Birth*: 1 January 1853, Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick
Census*: 1871, He is recorded as 18 at 1871 census.

Death*: 16 January 1873, Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick, Canada
Burial*: the Baptist Cemetery, Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick, Canada

Parents:

Father: Samuel Coy b. 25 October 1803, d. 23 June 1882
Mother: Ruth Amelia Estey b. 18 December 1824, d. 30 December 1881

Deborah Coy
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Census*: She was 21 in the 1851 census when enumerated in Springfield Parish, Kings County, New Brunswick.
Birth*: circa 1830, Springfield Parish, Kings County, New Brunswick, Canada
Living*: 1929, She lived in Moncton. Westmorland County, New Brunswick in 1929.

Parents:

Father: John B. Coy b. circa 1807, d. 1890
Mother: Rebecca Bunnell-Bonnell b. 1808, d. 1889

Dianna Coy
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Name Variation: Diana Coy
Birth*: circa 1830, (Coytown), Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick
Living*: 1856, Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick
Marriage*: 5 August 1856, They were married by Rev. E.N. Harris., Principal=Angus McIntosh

Parents:

Father: David Coy b. 9 February 1801, d. 9 February 1863
Mother: Maria Martha Estabrooks b. 1804, d. 6 June 1865

Family:

Angus McIntosh b. 1819

Children:

Diana McIntosh+ b. 18 May 1858

Donald Coy
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Birth*: 1905

Parents:

Father: Gilbert Jones Coy b. 10 June 1871
Mother: Myrtle Randall b. 27 September 1870

Donald Raymond Coy
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Note*: I am Donald Raymond Coy, born 31 January, 1927, at Seattle, King County,Washington, married to Evelyn Louise Nilson, born 5 Sep 1927 in Seattle,WA. and am the sixth child born to Roy David Coy, Sr. and Hazel RuthSnyder. They had seven children by this marriage, all born in Seattle.One child, we don’t know whether male or female died the summer of 1923in infancy, a sister, Barbara, born Abt 1928, died in 1928, leaving,Jewel Ruth 'Ruth', Helen Louise, Roy 'Dave' David, Jr., Grace Elizabethand me. The family lived in a houseboat on south side of Portage Bay just east ofthe University Bridge for some years before moving the houseboat farthereast to 3008 ½ Fuhrman Ave. N., which my parents paid rent to Mr. andMrs. Clark, who had two children , one name Earl that was about my sameage. There was a row of different businesses up on the street above usand across from the Clarks, to get there, we had to go up about three orfour flights of wooden stairs and then walk about 90 feet to the street.There was Bill Wolfered’s barber shop, Gregg’s grocery store, a cleanersand Dick’s Delicatessen. During the spring and summer months my brotherand sisters and me would pick dandelion greens until our hands were blackfrom the juice. Our mom would boil the greens at least twice to get theoil off and this was substitute for spinach. We had a 32 foot pleasure boat called the, Malola, that my dad hadpurchased the hull from a man named Jake K. Farrow that built boats in alarge building on the shore of Portage Bay at the foot of Shelby Street.The boat was just the hull without any cabins on it. Dad completed theboat, complete with a fore deck (seen in the picture in his scrapbook)and wheelhouse, after cabin and after deck over the stern. I attended Seward Grade School located at 2515 Boylston Ave. E., Seattle,and graduated in January, 1939. I attended Broadway High School locatedat Broadway Ave E. & E. Pine St., in Seattle from 1939 to 1942 when Iwent into the Merchant Marine in August, 1942 during World War II, goingthrough boot and advanced training at Santa Catalina Island, located offthe coast off California (Los Angeles area). After completing thistraining, I came home on leave just before Christmas. My brother, Davewas already in the Merchant Marine as an officer, having gone throughboot training in California and had completed Officer Training at PortHueneme near Oxnard, California. He was also home on leave at the sametime. So it was nice that our folks had both their sons home forChristmas. The Lord moves in mysterious ways. The Merchant Marine was not part of the Armed Forces at that time, butwas a very important part of the over all reason that our great countrycame out on top at the end of that war. The ships were used the carryover 89 % of the supplies, ammunition, fuel, and all sorts of equipmentand food for the troops overseas. During the very first few months ofthe war, there were more men lost or missing or killed, than any part ofthe armed forces put together. That is because of the convoys of 400 to500 ships were being sent from the east coast ports full of Aviationgasoline, ammunition and etc. were being intercepted by the GermanU-boats that were paroling off the East coast. Many of the convoysheading for Murmansk, Russia and England were attacked with out anywarning, because at that time sub detectors were very primitive so ourships and their guardians were at risk. This, you might think, would not be the type of service for a young manto get into to help his country, but again, being raised on the water, Iwas right were I wanted to be. I sail on six different ships over the period between October 18, 1943and October 16, 1946, & went to many ports during World War II, fromSeattle to the Islands of Hawaii, Enewetak, Guam, Okinawa in thePacific. From Seattle to Long Beach, California, through the PanamaCanal to Baltimore, Maryland, New York City to Genoa, Italy toPhiladelphia and then flew back to Seattle in a chartered DC 3 airplane,the first airplane I was ever on. The ships were: SS Kekoskee, Official #220686, Steam, Ocean CoastwiseTanker Date of shipment 10-18-44, Place of Shipment, Los Angeles,Calif., Date of Discharge 1-21-45, Place of Discharge,Seattle,Washington. SS Bering, Official #217255, Steam, Ocean Coastwise, Date of Shipment3-23-45, Place of Shipment, Seattle, Washington, Date of Discharge May01, 1945, Place of Discharge Seattle, Washington. Liberty Ship, James McNeil Whistler, Official #242397, Steam, Foreign,Date of Shipment, 10 May 1945, Place of Shipment, Seattle, Washington,Date of Discharge 08 Oct., 1945, Place of Discharge, San Francisco. Victory Ship, Terre Haute Victory, Official #247370, Steam, Foreign, Dateof Shipment 09 Sept 1945, Place of Shipment, Seattle, Washington, Date ofDischarge 28 Nov 1945, Place of Discharge, Los Angeles, Calif., St. Cloud Victory, Official #247220, Steam, Foreign, Date of Shipment 27Dec 1945 Place of Shipment, Seattle, Washington, Date of Discharge 20May 1946, Place of Discharge, New York City. I came home after signing off the St. Cloud, and spent some time helpingDad get the Malola ready for their annual cruise to Canada. Dad said heneeded to replace the exhaust pipe, so we were down on the boat doingjust that. The pipe was 3' in diameter and there were two sectionscoupled together with a 3' pipe union. This union had to be unscrewed todismantle the old pipe. Dad had two large pipe wrenches to do the work.He put the wrenches on and we tried to undo the fitting, it didn't wantto come loose so he crank down hard, that's when he felt an awful pain inhis right shoulder. He sat for a minute, but the pain would not go away. I told him that we should go up to the house so he could lay down, hesaid OK. I had to help him, as the pain was excruciating. We got up tothe house and he went in and laid down on their bed. He laid there for ashort time and said the pain was still there. We called Dr. Guyer, a good friend and a fellow Queen City Yacht Clubmember and his sent an ambulance right away. They took him to theDoctors Hospital where he died of Coronary Thrombosis, a blocking of acoronary artery by a thrombus. (Thrombus- a clot of blood formed within ablood vessel and remains attached to its place of origin) at DoctorsHospital in Seattle, Washington, and is buried in Forest Lawn Cemetery,in West Seattle. After I that sad time, I signed on the: Simmons Victory, Official #247689, Steam, Intercostal,Date of Shipment 01 Aug., 1946, Place of Shipment, Seattle, Washington,Date of Discharge 16 Oct 1946, Place of Discharge, Philadelphia, PA. I was in the Merchant Marine for a little over four years. Finally, thewar was over and I quit going to sea. After relaxing at home for awhile,I had some money from my last trip at sea and went over to EastlakeAvenue and look at some used cars at a lot called 'Honest Johns.' Saw anold 1933 two-door Chevie that was in pretty good shape. John wanted$133.00 for it, so I walked back home and asked my sister, Grace, if shewould sign for me on the Title, she said she would, so, back to the lot.At that time, I was still too young, not yet 21 years old by a month. Ipaid for the car and not knowing how to drive, Grace and I got in and Idrove away a little shaky from trying to get used to the stick shift, butwe got home okay. After practicing on our block, I went with Grace totake my Drivers Test. To Graces' surprise and mine, I passed the firsttime. I then worked for The Boeing Airplane Co. from mid January, 1947, in theParts Department at Plant 2. There was a labor strike that lasted forthree months, so I quit that job, as I needed money. In April, 1947 I wasa messenger for Pacific Telephone Company downtown Seattle. This lastedfor a few months & so not making very much money at that job, I quit. I applied at Sears, Roebuck & Co. in October, 1947 and was hired to workin the Catalog Order Will Call Department and worked sorting andwrapping packages for a $1.00 an hour. This was during the Christmasrush time and my fellow workers and me were very busy. While workingthere, I met my lovely wife, Evelyn Louise Nilson. We dated quite oftenand then the Christmas rush was over I got laid off because there was noneed for many people to work. After 4 months of dating Evelyn and me took our marriage vows in an oldchurch in Port Townsend, Washington. Boy what a nice honeymoon. We wentto Vancouver, British Columbia and drove to Harrison Hot Springs inBritish Columbia and had a ball. When we came home, we lived at the family home at 2607 12th Ave., N.(which is now Boyer Ave. E.). Evelyn went back to her job at Sears, and I started looking for a job. On July 3rd, 1948, I had an opportunity to skipper a 42 foot pleasureboat that was owned by a trucking company named West Coast Fast Freight.They had just bought it in Bellingham & it was to be used to entertainsales customers. They changed the name from Haleddie to West Coast.I skippered the boat on many trips to the San Juan Islands, sometimes upinto British Columbia, taking trips that would last for just week-ends ortwo weeks at a time. This was very enjoyable, it reminded me of thetimes being raised in a house boat and went we had the pleasure boatMALOLA in the family when we were young. Also after going to sea on largecargo ships to many different places on this earth. After two years ofworking and having fun doing it, the West Coast was sold and I was out ofa job. Within a week, an opportunity to skipper another boat came along. Theowner and president of a large real estate company in Seattle hadpurchased a brand new 48 foot Chris Craft yacht from the factory inMichigan which he and his wife called the Duchess and needed someone toskipper it. I applied for the job, and was hired. This yacht was shippedby flat car from the factory. This was a first class yacht, it had justabout everything a person would want, refrigerator, furnace, flyingbridge, dual controls, twin 165 horse power motors, slept 6 peoplecomfortably and etc. This boat was also used to entertain prospectivecustomers. I skippered this boat on many trips and to many of the sameplaces. Again, after having fun and enjoying it, the Duchess was sold,as the owner had passed away. This was the 31st of August, 1950. So Iwas unemployed again. Evelyn s' dad worked for Seattle Sears Mail Order at 1st So. and Landersince 1920 and mentioned that I should go down to the Sears employmentoffice and see if they would hire me. So, I went and applied for a job.They hired me and I was to report to the Seattle Mail Order Annex at 41051st. Ave., S on Monday morning on the 20th of September, 1950 at 8:00AM. The wages at time were not very high, but if you consider thosetimes, it was a living at $1.10 per hour! During that time, people wererecovering from the war and things started to boom. I remember working 8hours a day at regular time from 8 to 5 and then working overtime at timeand a half until nine at night, five days a week and then all daySaturday at time and a half from 8 in the morning until 5 PM. This wenton for maybe 8 or 9 years, by then, the wages were higher and thestandard of living went up. Our family grew as the children were bornabout every two years until the fourth one, Karl was born in 1961 andthat was it. I had cataract surgery in 1959 in my left eye and a year later, had myright eye done. It seems that cataracts are hereditary in our family asmany of my ancestors had them. My mother had them, and all five of uschildren had had them. The doctor that did mine, Dr. Feris Ketchum, toldme that cataracts were cause by eye injury, diabetes or hereditary. Iwear hard lenses as at time implants were only being done Europe. Thismeans taking them out at night and putting them in in the morning. I had a 1939 Ford two door, flat head six with a stick shift on thesteering wheel that I drove to work. In those days, the high rise WestSeattle bridge wasn't even though of then. So traffic was very heavyacross the two Spokane street low level bridges, one for the east boundand the other for west bound. These bridges crossed the Duwamish Riverand attached West Seattle to Harbor Island and then there were two fixedwooden bridges back to the main land again. Many times, I would get stuckin traffic either going to work or coming home by either a train crossingSpokane street on the island or either one or the other or both bridgewould be up because of a ship or tug going up or down the DuwamishRiver. This created a problem in getting to work on time until I startedleaving the house at 7 AM, then there was no more problem. Later, westarted work at 6:30 in the morning, then I left at 5 AM, getting to workwith time to spare and read the morning paper and have a cup of coffee. Our three sons were in Cubbing Scouting when they were young. When theyreach the age to join Boy Scouts, I volunteered to be Scoutmaster oftheir Scout Troop. The boys like Scouting real well. Lots of backpacking in the Olympic Mountains west of Seattle. Eventually all threesons earned the Eagle Scout rank which made both Evelyn and I very proud. I received The Silver Beaver Award for distinguished service to boyhoodon the 18th of January, 1975. I worked for Sears for 37½ years then on the30th of January, 1987, Searsclosed the Seattle Catalog Order plant for good. I appreciate all that Sears has done for me and my family in those 37½years. You might say they paid for my children, my nice home, most allthe the furnishings, my cars and all the items it takes to live and raisefour lovely children and all the medical bills acquired with a family. Iam also thankful that my lovely wife, Evelyn, who has stood by me allduring that time. I turned 60 the day after the Sears Catalog Orderclosed, and took an early retirement. I cashed in all my Sears sharesand rolled it over into an IRA.. As of this day, 29th of August, 1998, I have no regrets and have so farhad a very relaxed retirement, and having fun besides. For a hobby, Ihave a family tree program on our computer and an constantly editing itand searching for my ancestors. It has been very rewarding in that I havefound a very rich source about our history. I have E-mail capabilitiesso I can communicate with others that have information about the bigfamily. As example, I found an ancestor named: Unknown Coye the was bornin England in 1555. From there the descendants go on up to this day, 1stNovember, 1999. A note about my heart condition: 1 November, 1999. My name is Donald Raymond Coy, I am now 71 years old, and very humblethat my God has given me three lives to live. First, in the summer of 1974, I was backpacking in the Olympic Mountainswith 10 Boy Scouts, including three other adults. We were on a fiftymile hike for nine days, traversing the Olympics. On the eighth day,while hiking out, I started getting very tired, my pack weighedforty-five pounds, and it was hard to keep up the pace of the otherhikers. My youngest son, Karl stayed back with me while I lagged behind.We did get out the next day and met the rest of the party at the cars. After arriving home I felt ok. The following Sunday, my wife and I wentto church. We arrived a little early that morning and went in thesanctuary and sat. Suddenly, I felt a strange feeling in my chest, likea tightness. Going out to the lounge, one of the members of our church,who just happened to be my barber, Larry Daulame, asked if I was alright.I said I had a tightness in my chest. Larry had heart troubles himself,so he gave me a little white pill out of a small brown bottle and said toput it under my tongue and let it dissolve. This I did, and shortly wasfeeling very relaxed. The next day I called my doctor and related what had happened. He had mecome in to see him, and after checking me over, referred me to aCardiologist by the name of Kenneth Eire (Dr. Eire has since stepped outof the profession). Through a series of tests and a tread-mill test,which I failed at 2 miles an hour, he said I probably have some blockagesin some arteries in my heart. He referred me to Dr. Tom Jones at the West Seattle Hospital in September of 1974. Dr. Jones said I should have surgery to open the blockages. Over a periodof time I put off having anything done. But after going through thewinter, cold weather really bothered me. Finally, I set up an appointmentto entered the Providence Heart Center on April 1st 1975, April Fools Dayfor the surgery. Dr. Tom Jones was my Surgeon. (it so happened, I was notthe fool). After the surgery, which was on the 3rd of April, I was eventually movedto ICU, and after a day, I was moved to recovery. The nurses were thegreatest, puffing up my pillow, changing the water, an etc. I was up walking the second day I was in recovery, (which, by the way,was a makeshift place in a hallway, because of the many remodelingefforts going on at that time at Providence) and was feeling as well ascan be expected. I remember my first walk was with my nurse to amakeshift nurses station, here was a big fat doctor sitting at a deskwith a big smelly cigar in his mouth. (I’m sure glad that Providence Hospital no longer allows smoking on their premises). I was back home inthree days. My family was very receptive and my lovely wife, encouragedme back to getting on with my life. I went back to work at Sears,Roebuck, and Co. about a month later. The amazing thing is that SearsMedical paid for just about everything, what Sears didn't pay, KingCounty Medical did. So much for group hospital programs. After a year ofa very active live, working eight hours a day at Sears, I was outback-packing in the Olympic Mountains with the Scouts again. My lifewas full and I was able to do anything and everything, with no sign ofany pain. I had regular check-ups with my doctors and things were great. For fourteen years everything was going my way. Then it happened, I was sitting watching TV one evening, when I startedgetting angina pains going from my left shoulder down across my chest tomy right side. I knew in an instant what it was, my old nemesis, I saidto myself, there’s your old enemy. I told my wife, what had happenedafter taking a couple of nitro pills. The next morning, Dr. Jones was called. We set up an appointment. Afterconsulting with Dr. Jones, an Angiogram was set up for the latter part ofNovember 1990. Dr. Peter Demopulos did the honors. Guess what? Fourblockages this time. I was up to about 189 pounds, and I had not watchedmy weight or my diet. Too many burgers, and fries and too much fattyfood. Some people seem to take longer to get the message, right? The surgery was scheduled for the middle of December 1990. By the time Icame out of surgery, the doctors had done a quadruple by-pass. This timeit took a little longer for me to leave the hospital, but again thenurses, and doctors, internists and all the help were just great. I laidthere in that hospital bed and though to myself, you dummy, did you thinkall this stuff about cholesterol was just bunk? Home again, one day before Christmas, what a joyous and thankfulChristmas present to be home with my wonderful family. To be alive andagain recovering from a very tough surgery. It took a little longer, butas usual, I came back to my full health. By this time I was retired fromSears, so I had lots of time to recuperate. I walked my two and a halfmiles each day if it wasn't’t raining too hard. Then I saw my Cardiologist, Dr. Peter Demopulos in January of 1991, amonth after the surgery. The week before the appointment, I had my blooddrawn so he would have the read out when I came in. My triglyceridecount was good, but he noticed that the glucose was quite high. Oh no, Ithought not diabetes! I was right (my mother, two of my three sisters,(Helen died of it had diabetes, it goes back to my grandparents and great uncles and aunts). Peter said that there wereclasses at Swedish Hospital to learn more about diabetes. My wife, Evelynand I attended the series of three classes of two hours for three days. I learned a lot in those classes about looking for food with out or verylow ingredients of sugar. I now have that disease under control withmedication and injections of 9 units of insulin each night. In May of 1996 I had another Angiogram to check on a possibility of aslight blockage. Dr. Peter Demopulos said he could repair that with anAngioplasty procedure. It worked for a while until the fall of 1996, while my little ShetlandSheep dog named Ginger, was taking me on my two mile walk at a fast pace,I noticed some tightness in my chest again. Oh no, I though, not again.Sure enough, after seeing Dr. Demopulos, he set up another Angiogram forthe 16th of December, 1996. While having that procedure done it showedthat I again had blockages. Surgery was inevitable. On the 17th ofDecember, 1996 my wife and I went to see Dr. Dev R. Manhas to see if hewould do the surgery. After consulting with him, he said yes, he woulddo the surgery. On the20th of December, 1997, I checked in to ProvidenceHospital at 6;30 am for pre-op. Then my time had come to go down tosurgery. I vaguely remember how the room was painted a soft blue, myfavorite color. A triple by-pass was performed. This time I was a lotslower in recovering. But, by the Grace of my Lord, Jesus Christ mySavior, I still came home in less than a week. As with the othersurgeries, the people at Providence Hospital are the best. The summer of 1998 Dr. Peter Capel had discovered through a routineexamination that he couldn't find a pulse beat in my Carotid Artery on myleft side of my neck and suggested I have a Doppler Scan and made anappointment at the Spencer Vascular Vascular Lab at the out patient ofProvidence Hospital for a cerebrovascular Doppler ultrasound exam. I wasfound to have a percentage of 50-79% stenosis. Since then I have had theprocedure every six months and the results come back - no change. I thankmy Lord for letting me live a happy and healthy life even under thisthreatening things. My next Doppler scan is scheduled for January 2001.I am very fortunate to have what is called 'Circle of Willis', whichallows the blood to go up the right side of the brain and then go the theleft side of my head and return back to the right and return to the heart. At this time, August 21, 1998, I am taking 7 pills in the morning and 3at night, and am down to 159 pounds, and I am still taken for my daily 2½ mile brisk walk by my Shetland Sheep dog, Ginger. I have appointments to see my diabetic doctor, Dr. Peter Capel and myCardiologist, Dr. Peter Demopulos in the middle of September 1998. Ihope everything will be ok. From what I understand, that during my three by-pass surgeries, my heartwas stopped and I was put on a heart-lung machine. That means to me thatlogically, I was dead three different times. (Of course not brain dead).To this day, I thank my Heavenly Father that He guided those doctors tokeep me alive and am able to enjoy this wonderful world that our Lord andGod has created for us. December 5, 1998, I had my Gall Bladder removed at Providence Hospital,Seattle, Washington. I believe that our Father and Mother were the best parents we childrencould have had. They made sure we were clothed and nourished and madesure that we were brought up as Christians and accepted Jesus Christ asour personal Savior and Redeemer. We went to the Tabernacle Baptistchurch, which was located on the corner of 15th avenue and HarrisonStreet, Seattle, WA. It was a large wooden structure with a tallsteeple. I have my Cradle Roll Certificate, signed by theSuperintendent, Georgie Gault, and signed by Dwight Waton, Sunday SchoolSuperintendent and the Pastor, George L. Lorimer. The certificate isdated June 15, 1930. I also have my Primary Department PromotionCertificate from the Primary Department to the Junior Department on the27th of June, 1937, signed by Mrs. H. Ragge, Superintendent of thePrimary Department and signed by Broadus Haynes, Sunday SchoolSuperintendent and Pastor, George L. Lormer. And last, I have myCertificate of Promotion from the Junior Department dated the 1st ofOctober, 1939, signed by Cecile M. Oelschlagel, Supt. of the JuniorDepartment and signed by J. Ray Swanson, Supt. of Sunday School andGeorge L. Lormer, Pastor. I will always thank my Lord Jesus Christ mypersonal Savior for being given the opportunity to live my life for thisvery short length of time on His precious Earth. I accepted Jesus Christas my personal Savior while I was in the Junior Department on October 1st1939 and was baptized in Christ on that day. Evelyn, my wife, and me and our four children, our daughter, Karin, (notmarried) and the three boys, Steve, Gary and Karl and their families areall members of The First Lutheran Church of West Seattle, 4105 CaliforniaAve. SW, 98116 Seattle, Washington. 'We are the children of many sires, and every drop of blood in us in it'sturn betrays its ancestor.' Ralph Waldo Emerson Compiled by Donald Raymond Coy, 3806 51 Ave., SW, Seattle, Washington98116-3615 Phone: 1-206-938-4493 E-mail: Up dated - 13 May, 2001 More updates to come later, 12 December 2001. National Maritime Day Proclamations by President George W. Bush honorAmerican Merchant Marine National Maritime Day Proclamation 2001 by the President of the UnitedStates of America A Proclamation Throughout our history, America's economic prosperity has been closelytied to its maritime geography. From indigenous peoples navigating ourmajestic rivers to colonists settling along the New World's easternshores, natives and immigrants alike have relied on the sea and ourbountiful inland waterways for commerce and security. In colonial days and in the 19th century, America's maritime industriesfacilitated the exchange of goods and the migration of pioneers. DuringWorld War II, some 6,000 American seafarers and more than 700 U.S.merchant ships fell to enemy action, many in the infamous Run toMurmansk. No branch of our Armed Forces, save the Marine Corps, suffereda higher casualty rate. Today, our Merchant Marine continues this proudtradition. As recently as the Persian Gulf War and during humanitarian and militaryoperations since, a unique partnership of Government, industry, and laborhas continued its vital maritime service to our Nation. Many civilianmerchant mariners crew the Maritime Administration's Ready Reserve Force,which is observing its 25th anniversary. Today, the U.S. maritime fleet has decreased in the number of vessels inthe international trades, but it transports goods more efficiently andeconomically than ever before. These U.S. ships deliver a billion tons ofimports and exports each year in our foreign trade and another billiontons of waterborne domestic trade. Many merchant seafarers are trained atoutstanding institutions such as the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy atKings Point, New York, the six State maritime academies, and severalunion and industry training facilities. To help ensure continued competitiveness, we must tailor our maritimepolicy to the challenges of the 21st century. America's MarineTransportation System will help determine our long-term economic healthand improve our ability to respond quickly and effectively in crisis.Within the next 2 decades, cargo will double. Accordingly, myAdministration is working with Government agencies, the maritimeindustry, shippers, labor unions, and environmental groups to ensure thatour waterways continue to serve as a sound transportation option in theface of ever-growing congestion on highways and rail lines. In recognition of the importance of the U.S. Merchant Marine, theCongress, by joint resolution approved on May 20, 1933, has designatedMay 22 of each year as 'National Maritime Day' and has authorized andrequested that the President issue an annual proclamation calling for itsappropriate observance. NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United States ofAmerica, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution andlaws of the United States, do hereby proclaim May 22, 2001, as NationalMaritime Day. I call upon the people of the United States to celebratethis observance and to display the flag of the United States at theirhomes and in their communities. I also request that all ships sailingunder the American flag dress ship on that day. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighteenth day ofMay, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of the Independence ofthe United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth. George W. Bush.
Name-Com: Don Coy
Birth*: 31 January 1927, Seattle, King County, Washington, U.S.A.
Education*: between 1939 and 1942, Don attended Broadway High School in Seattle.
Baptism: 1 October 1939, Tabernacle Baptist Church, Seattle, King County, Washington, U.S.A.
Milit-Beg*: August 1942, Don entered the Merchant Marine during World War II.
Milit-End*: 20 May 1946, Don was discharged from the Merchant Marines in Seattle, Washington.
Employment*: January 1947, Jan 1947 Don worked for the Boeing Airplane Co., in the parts department.
Apr 1947 Don worked as a messenger for the Pacific Telephone Company in Seattle.
Oct 1947 Don worked for Sears, Roebuck & Co., where he met his future wife.
Confirmation*: 9 April 1967, First Lutheran Church of West Seattle, Seattle, King County, Washingto, U.S.A.
Retirement*: 30 January 1987, Roebuck, & Co. Seattle, King County, Washington, U.S.A.
Death*: 19 April 2002, Seattle, King County, Washington, E-mail message received from Matthew Coy: "....my grandfather went in for his fourth major heart surgery a few weeks ago (triple bypass and a heart valve replacement). He was recovering fine during the past few weeks, but on Tuesday (16th April 2002) or so he wasn't feeling well and went back to the Providence Hospital in Seattle. Wednesday or Thursday, he was moved from a regular room to the Intensive Care Unit. It was determined that his kidneys had failed, he had a temperature of 104, and there was fluid in his lungs. Thursday night he was sedated while they tried to bring his fever down. On Friday (19th April), at 5:56am, he passed away in his sleep."

Parents:

Father: Roy David Coy Sr. b. 18 February 1889, d. 2 July 1946
Mother: Hazel Ruth Snyder b. 20 July 1891, d. 8 October 1966

Dorothy Coy
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Birth*: 1909

Parents:

Father: Gilbert Jones Coy b. 10 June 1871
Mother: Myrtle Randall b. 27 September 1870

Douglas Edward Coy
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Note*: Douglas Coy. m. Audrey _____. Lived in Upper Gagetown, Queens Co., N.B. in 1996.
Name-Com: Douglas Coy
Birth*: 26 September 1937, Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick, Canada
Death*: 15 April 1998, Oromocto, Sunbury County, New Brunswick, Canada

Parents:

Father: Arthur Brooks Coy b. 22 March 1903, d. 12 April 1996
Mother: Clara Lydia Merritt b. 17 June 1914, d. 27 March 1969

Edward Coy
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Birth*: 1877, Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick, Canada

Parents:

Father: Charles Benjamin Coy b. 15 February 1850, d. 7 September 1909
Mother: Phoebe Coy b. circa 1856

Edward A. Coy
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Note*: He never married. Edward Coy was 4th born to William Coy and Sarah (Cowperthwaite).
Birth*: 20 April 1843, Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick, Canada
Census*: 1851, He was 8 in the 1851 census, 28 in 1871.
Death*: 1 May 1901, Grenfell, Saskatchewan, Canada
Burial*: Grenfell Cemetery, Grenfell, Saskatchewan, Canada

Parents:

Father: William Coy b. 5 April 1807, d. 10 September 1882
Mother: Sarah Cowperthwaite b. 14 January 1814, d. 16 April 1894

Edward B. Coy
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Birth*: 1837, Avery's Portage, (Holtville) Northumberland County, New Brunswick, Canada
Census*: 1851, He was 14 in the 1851 census, 25 in 1861.
Marriage*: 1858, Principal=Catherine (?)

Parents:

Father: William T. Coy b. circa 1812
Mother: Frances Nevers b. circa 1812

Family:

Catherine (?) b. 1835

Children:

Allaphine E. Coy b. 1859

Edward J. Coy
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Birth*: between 1802 and 1805, Prob. Sheffield, Sunbury County, New Brunswick, Canada
Marriage*: 26 March 1856, Principal=Lydia Sarah Ellen Denton

Parents:

Father: Edward Coy Jr. b. 27 February 1768, d. 14 January 1849
Mother: Jannet A. Murray b. 1778, d. 2 January 1855

Family:

Lydia Sarah Ellen Denton

Children:

Harvey Coy+ b. 24 Apr 1857

Edward J. Coy Sr.
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Religion*: Sheffield, Sunbury County, New Brunswick, They were members of First Presbyterian Church.
Note*: HISTORY OF THE COY FAMILY This note is from Florence Cecelia Estabrooks (Florence C. Estabrooks), compiler of the book, 'Genealogy of the Anglo-Dutch Estabrooks of the Saint John River, New Brunswick.', states the following; 'I am indebted for the following history of the name MacCoy to Mr. W. J. Watson, Professor of Gaelic at the University of Edinburgh, F.C.E. Note: Florence Cecelia Estabrooks is listed in this family tree, her parents are: Leander M. Estabrooks and Henrietta Rebecca Hoben. ' The name Mac Coy is Irish and is an anglicized form of Mac Aodha or MacAoidh, the former (Aodha) being the older form of the Genitive sing, of Aodha, the latter (Aoidh) being a later form used mostly in Scotland. Aodh appears in Adamman’s Life of Columba in the Latin form of Aidus, in old Irish it is Acd, Gen, Aedo; then Middle Irish it is Aed and Aedh; gen, Acda and aecfha: modern Irish Aodh, gen, aodh. Acd means fire. In early Celtic it appears in Acdui, the name of the Gaulish tribe.
Edward Coy, Sr., was born on the 6th of May, 1725 in Pomfret, Windham county, Connecticut, and was interned Aft 19th of Sep 1795 in Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick. He was also known as J. Edward Coy and also as Edward Coy, Sr. Edward Coy, grandfather of Nancy and Mary Coy, came from Pomfret in Connecticut to New Brunswick in 1763 and settled on the banks of the Saint John River in that part of the country now called Canning (then Waterborough) Queens Co., N.B. He and his family spent their first summer in a cave which he dug in the bank of the intervale but which he was obliged to relinquish for a camp on the high land on the approach of winter and autumn floods. During the first few years in their wilderness home Mr. Coy and his family experienced the severest hardships, living chiefly on fish, manly bass, which at that time abounded in the river, and ground nuts which grew plentifully on the intervale. The latter, when roasted, is not unlike the sweet potato. During the second year he was obliged to dig out the potatoes which he had planted in order to keep his family from starving, and on one occasion, after the children had retired for the night, Mrs. Coy approached their emaciated forms to discover whether or not they were living. In the following winter food became so scarce that he was obliged to travel on snowshoes with a toboggan or hand sled to the mouth of the Saint John -- where there were a few French houses -- in search of provisions. All he could obtain was half a barrel of eels. With these he set out on his homeward journey, but on coming up the river to a certain point, he mistook an inlet for the main channel, and darkness setting in, was obliged to make his bed on the snow. From this circumstance the Mistake derived its name.

Mr. Coy was a member of the first Presbyterian church organized in Sheffield. Edward Coy married Amy Titus in Connecticut, they were married by Pastor David Ripely. Edward was the first born to Jonathan Coy, but at this time, his mother is not known. Edward Coy, Sr. died 19 Sep 1795 in Upper Gagetown, New Brunswick. Township of Gage, Queens County, Yeoman. His Will dated 22 January 1795, proved 11 December 1795 in the Township of Gage, Queens Co., N.B. reads as follows: 'Wife Lot 7 in Waterbough and half the improvements on the high Land in the Township of Gage during her life while my widow. Sons Amasa, John, Edward, David, and Benjamin the remainder of my real and personal estate, they to pay their sisters Sarah 10 pounds, Lavine 12 pounds, Hannah 15 pounds, Mary 12 pounds and Anna 10 pounds.' Son Amasa and son-in-law Thomas Turney executors. Witnesses: Zebulon ESTY, Benjamin NEWCOMB, Jr., Elijah ESTABROOKS, Jr. Inventory, dated: 'March ye 19' 1796, valued at 605 pounds by Thomas HARTT and Silvanus PLUMMER included a note of hand of Eleaser SLOCUM and Andrew JOSLIN to Amasa COY, Lots 6 and 7 in Waterbough, land in Gagetown and livestock. Edward Coy,Sr. and Amy Titus were married 02 JAN 1755 in Pomfret, Windham County, Conn. Edward and Amy were married in the Abigton Congregational Church. Some information from Florence Cecelia Estabrooks; 'The name was originally McCoy but the Mc was dropped by Edward Coy's grandfather owing to some mistake in registering property.' Note: See his daughter, Mary Coy's comments about her family in her 'more notes'. Note: Elder William Brewster, born 1567 and died 1644, who led the Mayflower Pilgrims, married a Miss Coy. At this time, it is not known what connection she was to Edward 'McCoy', Sr. +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++ Below is a E-mail received on the date stated: From: 'Lorna Burke' To: 'Donald R Coy' Date: Sat, 30 Jan 1999 15:41:50 -0400 Subject: Re: Miss Coy Hello Don & Evelyn: I have been reading a book entitled, 'The Mayflower', by Kate Cuffrey and it gives Elder William Brewster's wifes name as Mary but does not give her last name. It states that they had a son Jonathan born 1593, a daughter Patience born 1600 and another daughter Fear born 1606. He also states that he died April l8, 1643, but that is all the information that I have. It would be interesting to know more about her. Lorna -----Original e-mail Message is below. From: Donald R Coy To: lburke@nbnet.nb.ca Date: Tuesday, January 26, 1999 9:04 PM Subject: Miss Coy Elder William Brewster, born 1567 and died 1644, who led the Mayflower Pilgrims, married a Miss Coy. At this time, it is not known what connection she was to Edward 'McCoy' Coy, Sr. who was born 06 May 1725 in Pomfret, Windham County, Connecticut, and was interned Aft 19th of Sep 1795 in Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick. +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ NOTE: The following statements about Edward is stated in the book, 'The St. John River and It's Tributaries', by Esther Clark Wright, copyright 1966 .... ' Edward was one of the original grantees of Maugerville, his lot being opposite the head of Gilbert's Island. He was an active member of the Congregational Church and one of the signers of the original Church Covenant. In 1770, he settled at Upper Gagetown under arrangements with Col. Wm. Spry. He sold his land at Maugerville to Moses Coburn. At the outbreak of the Revolutionary War, he moved his family again to Sheffield, Sunbury County, New Brunswick, but returned to Gagetown in a few years and his section of the place became known as Coytown. At times enduring all hardships connected with settling in a new country, then very new, it is related that, at one time when they were at the point of starving, their lives were saved by an Indian, who, when passing their tent in his canoe, threw into it a fat beaver's tail and hence the friendly relations between the Coys and the Indians ever since. ' Edward received a large grant of intervale land.' +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ NOTE: These statements are found first on page 99 in the book, 'The St. John River & Its Tributaries'., by Esther Clark Wright, © 1966, Canada: 'When Beamsley Glasier came to the much talked-of St. John River to pick out lands for his fellow officers, he chose sites for five townships, Gage, Burton, Sunbury, Conway and Newton. 'The intervale lands on the St. John are wonderful' he said, 'not a stone and black mold six feet deep, no underwood, large hardwood; you may drive a coach though the trees, we can cut what grass we please and we may approve the land immediately.' Then on Pages 82-83: 'At the head of the Long Reach there are three openings. The one on the right is Belleisle, in a continuation of the trough parallel to the Kennebecasis. The middle opening is the main St. John River. The one on the left was the Mistake. It is related, that as the first settlers were obliged to row to the mouth of the river or what is now St. John City for supplies, that while rowing back, a certain Captain Coy sailed up inside the Mistake Point, instead of the main river and soon found the green grass growing all around the sailed back again. 'Coy's Mistake,' old river men chuckled as they passed by, and the name stuck. Although the Topographical Survey marks it as Mistake Cove.
Name Variation: Edward McCoy Sr.
Birth*: 6 May 1725, Pomfret, Windham County, Connecticut
Marriage*: 2 January 1755, Abington Congregational Church, Pomfret, Windham County, Connecticut, (U.S.A.), Principal=Amy Titus
Immigration*: 1761, He was a Pre-Loyalist from Connecticut, and was the first of the Coys to arrive in what is now Canada. He was granted land in Maugerville. In 1763 he moved to Canning, Queens County, New Brunswick.
Will*: 22 January 1795, Township of Gage, Queens Co., Yeoman. Will dated 22 January 1795, proved 11 December 1795. Wife Lot 7 in Waterborough and half the improvements on the high Land in the Township of Gate during her life while my widow. Sons Amasa, John, Edward, David and Benjamin the remainder of my real and personal estate, they to pay their sisters Sarah 10 pounds, Lavine 12 pounds, Hannah 15 pounds, Mary 12 pounds and Anna 10 pounds. Son Amasa and son-in-law Thomas TURNER executors. Witnesses: Zebulon ESTEY, Benjamin NEWCOMB Jr., Elijah ESTABROOKS Jr. Inventory, dated 'March ye 19' 1796, valued at 605 pounds by Thomas HARTT and Silvanus PLUMMER included a note of hand of Eleazer SLOCUM and Andrew JOSLIN to Amasa COY, Lots 6 and 7 in Waterborough, land in Gatetown and livestock. Edward 'came to New Brunswick in 1763 and settled on the banks of the St. John in that part of the country now called Canning. He and his family spent their first summer in a cave which he dug in the bank of the intervale but which he was obliged to relinquish for a camp on the high land on the approach of winter and the autumn floods. During the first few years in their wilderness home Mr. Coy and his family experienced the severest hardships, living chiefly on fish, mainly bass, which at that time abounded in the river, and the groundnut which grew plentifully on the interval. The latter, when roasted, is not unlike the sweet potato. During the second year he was obliged to dig out the potatoes which he had planted in order to keep his family from starving, and on one occasion, after the children had retired for the night, Mrs. Coy approached their emaciated forms to discover whether or not they were living. In the following winter food became so scarce that he was obliged to travel on snowshoes with a toboggan or handsled to the mouth of the St. John--where there were a few French houses--in search of provisions. All he could obtain was half a barrel of eels. With these he set out on his homeward journey, but on coming up the river to a certain point, he mistook an inlet for the main channel, and darkness setting in, was obliged to make his bed on the snow. From this circumstance the Mistake derived its name. Mr. Coy was a member of the first Presbyterian church organized in Sheffield' (History of Queen's County, N.B.).
Death*: 19 September 1795, Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick
Burial*: the Baptist Cemetery, Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick

Parents:

Father: Jonathan Coy b. 1687

Family:

Marriage*: 2 January 1755, Abington Congregational Church, Pomfret, Windham County, Connecticut, (U.S.A.), Principal=Amy Titus

Amy Titus b. July 1733, d. 3 April 1808

Children:

Elither Coy
William Coy
Sarah Coy+ b. 15 Jul 1755, d. 31 Jul 1829
Amasa Coy+ b. 31 Jul 1757, d. 18 Jul 1838
Asa Coy b. 24 Jul 1759, d. 1784
Lavina 'Lavine' Coy+ b. 30 Aug 1761
Hannah Jane Coy+ b. 20 Sep 1763
John Coy Sr.+ b. 27 Jan 1766, d. 18 Dec 1814
Edward Coy Jr.+ b. 27 Feb 1768, d. 14 Jan 1849
Mary Coy b. 1 Sep 1771, d. 12 Mar 1859
David Coy+ b. 8 Mar 1773, d. 28 Dec 1866
Amy Coy+ b. c 1777
Rev. Benjamin Coy+ b. c 1778, d. 14 Mar 1865

Edward Coy Jr.
Pop-up Pedigree

Birth*: 27 February 1768, Maugerville, Sunbury County, New Brunswick, Canada
Marriage*: circa 1798, New Brunswick, Canada, Principal=Jannet A. Murray
Death*: 14 January 1849, Sheffield, Sunbury County, New Brunswick, Canada
Burial*: the Baptist Cemetery, Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick, Canada

Parents:

Father: Edward J. Coy Sr. b. 6 May 1725, d. 19 September 1795
Mother: Amy Titus b. July 1733, d. 3 April 1808

Family:

Jannet A. Murray b. 1778, d. 2 January 1855

Children:

Matthew Coy b. 1801, d. 1 Jun 1868
David Coy+ b. 9 Feb 1801, d. 9 Feb 1863
Edward J. Coy+ b. bt 1802 - 1805
John B. Coy+ b. c 1807, d. 1890
William Coy+ b. 5 Apr 1807, d. 10 Sep 1882
Gersham Coy b. c 1808
Mary Coy+ b. c 1809, d. 1882
Nancy Jane Coy+ b. 17 Nov 1811, d. 27 Feb 1879
Amy Coy b. 1815

Edwin Gilbert Coy
Pop-up Pedigree

Note*: Edwin Coy. b. Jul. 31, 1898. (2 at 1901 census).
Name-Com: Edwin Coy
Birth*: 31 July 1898, Burtt's Corner, York County, New Brunswick, Canada
Census: 1901, Edwin Coy. b. Jul. 31, 1898. (2 at 1901 census).

Parents:

Father: Gilbert Jones Coy b. 10 June 1871
Mother: Myrtle Randall b. 27 September 1870

Eleanor Coy
Pop-up Pedigree

Birth*: circa 1867, Springfield Parish, Kings County, New Brunswick, Canada
Census*: 1881, She was 14 at the 1881 census when enumerated in the Parish of Springfield, Kings County, New Brunswick.

Parents:

Father: Alfred Coy b. 29 April 1838
Mother: Isabella Lightfoot b. 9 May 1848

Elither Coy
Pop-up Pedigree

Note*: Elither Coy. m. _____ Smith. Not mentioned in her father's will.

Parents:

Father: Edward J. Coy Sr. b. 6 May 1725, d. 19 September 1795
Mother: Amy Titus b. July 1733, d. 3 April 1808

Eliza Coy
Pop-up Pedigree

Name-Com: Liza Coy
Birth*: circa 1855, Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick, Canada
Census*: 1871, Eliza (Liza) Coy was 16 at 1871 census, not at home in 1881.

Parents:

Father: Charles E. Coy Sr. b. 20 September 1811, d. 28 November 1896
Mother: Margaret Annie Wood b. circa 1824, d. 1901

Eliza Jane Coy
Pop-up Pedigree

Birth*: circa 1803, (Coytown), Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick
Marriage*: 18 March 1830, Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick, The New Brunswick Courrier of 27 Mar 1830 announced the marriage of Eliza, eldest daughter of David Coy, to Israel Parent, by Rev. S. R. Clarke at Gagetown on 18 Mar 1830., Principal=Israel Parent
Death*: 30 January 1895, Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick, Canada

Parents:

Father: David Coy b. 8 March 1773, d. 28 December 1866
Mother: Mary Ebbett b. 13 January 1778, d. 2 January 1868

Family:

Israel Parent

Eliza Jane Coy
Pop-up Pedigree

Birth*: 19 March 1836, (Coytown), Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick, Canada
Census*: 1851, She was 15 in the 1851 census, 32 in 1871.
Marriage*: 13 October 1859, Principal=Thomas Turney Brooks
Death*: 30 November 1885
Burial*: Simonds, Carleton County, New Brunswick, Canada

Parents:

Father: William Coy b. 5 April 1807, d. 10 September 1882
Mother: Sarah Cowperthwaite b. 14 January 1814, d. 16 April 1894

Family:

Thomas Turney Brooks b. 1832

Children:

Harry Fitch Brooks+ b. 19 Jan 1867, d. 19 Jan 1941

Elizabeth A. Coy
Pop-up Pedigree

Birth*: 5 November 1842, Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick
Death*: 16 January 1864, Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick
Burial*: the Baptist Cemetery, Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick

Parents:

Father: Samuel Coy b. 25 October 1803, d. 23 June 1882
Mother: Mary Jane 'Eunice' Currey b. 15 May 1810, d. 5 November 1861

Elizabeth Ann Coy
Pop-up Pedigree

Birth*: circa 1836, (Coytown), Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick
Marriage*: 1848, Principal=Lebaron Estabrooks

Parents:

Father: David Coy b. 9 February 1801, d. 9 February 1863
Mother: Maria Martha Estabrooks b. 1804, d. 6 June 1865

Family:

Lebaron Estabrooks b. 1835

Children:

Lebaron Estabrooks b. 1854
Rebecca Estabrooks b. 1856
Percy Estabrooks b. 1858
Gordon Estabrooks b. 1860

Ellen Coy
Pop-up Pedigree

Marriage*: Principal=Elias William Long
Birth*: 14 August 1879, Springfield Parish, Kings County, New Brunswick, Canada

Parents:

Father: Alfred Coy b. 29 April 1838
Mother: Isabella Lightfoot b. 9 May 1848

Family:

Elias William Long b. 14 August 1865

Children:

May Ruth Long+ b. 28 Oct 1889
Alberty Long b. 1 May 1892
Edith Long+ b. 29 Oct 1893
Albert Long+ b. 3 Jun 1895
Roy Harold Long , Sr.+ b. 1900
Myrtle Long+ b. 1901
Mabel Long b. 1904
Howard William Long b. 1906
Hilda Esta Long+ b. 1908

Elsie Coy
Pop-up Pedigree

Birth*: 3 August 1899, Burtt's Corner, York County, New Brunswick, Canada
Census*: 1901, She was 1 at the 1901 census.

Parents:

Father: Gilbert Jones Coy b. 10 June 1871
Mother: Myrtle Randall b. 27 September 1870

Enid Coy
Pop-up Pedigree

Birth*: 1932
Death*: before 1991

Parents:

Father: Charles Leonard Coy b. 8 May 1874, d. 2 February 1947
Mother: Verda Frederica Allen b. 1905

Ernest H. Coy
Pop-up Pedigree

Residence*: 746 Charlotte St., Fredericton, York County, New Brunswick, Canada
Birth*: 7 February 1889, Fredericton, York County, New Brunswick, Canada
Census*: 1891, He was 3 at the 1891 census when enumerated in Queens Ward, Fredericton, York County, New Brunswick, and 12 in 1901.
Milit-Beg*: 1916, He is listed in 1916 as one of the Fredericton residents who had joined the army.

Parents:

Father: Havelock Coy b. 25 April 1858, d. 21 March 1930
Mother: Helen Jemima McKeen b. 6 April 1866, d. 13 December 1937

Estelle Pearl Coy
Pop-up Pedigree

Census*: 1891, She was 1 mo. in the 1891 census, 10 in the 1901 census.
Birth*: 28 March 1891, Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick, Canada
Marriage*: 25 June 1918, Fredericton, York County, New Brunswick, Canada, Her Marriage Certificate found at the Provincial Archives, Fredericton, York C0., N.B. states that she was 25 when she married and was Methodist. Information taken from the, 'The Estabrooks of New Brunswick', by Darryl Bonk at the Provincial Archives, Fredericton, N.B., Principal=Neil Cuthbert Turner
Death*: 3 April 1973, Saint John, Saint John County, New Brunswick, Canada

Parents:

Father: George William Coy Jr. b. 28 January 1862, d. 18 June 1939
Mother: Josephine Rebecca Jones b. 23 October 1861, d. 11 January 1948

Family:

Neil Cuthbert Turner b. circa 1890

Ethel M. Coy
Pop-up Pedigree

Marriage*: Principal=William Belding
Birth*: 17 August 1888, Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick, Canada
Census*: 1891, She was 3 in 1891, 13 in the 1901 census records.
Living*: 1970, She lived in Chance Harbour, Saint John County, New Brunswick, in 1970.

Parents:

Father: Joseph Edward Coy b. 13 July 1856, d. before 1935
Mother: Frances 'Fanny' Jane Harding b. 2 March 1855, d. 1 February 1935

Family:

William Belding b. 25 March 1885

Ethel Stevens Coy
Pop-up Pedigree

Note*: Ethel Stevens Coy was one of eight children born to Harvey and Mary Coy. Ethel is buried in Grenfell Cemetery, she died at age 27 years, Land Location NW Sec. 33 T16 R9 W2. See 'GRIT and Growth, the story of GRENFELL', by Annie I. Yule, 1970 edition, page 46, 1980 edition page 88,
Birth*: 19 September 1885, Grenfell, Saskatchewan, Canada
Death*: 7 February 1912, Grenfell, Saskatchewan, Canada
Burial*: Grenfell Cemetery, Land location Nw W Sec 33 T 16 R 7 W 2, Grenfell, Saskatchewan, Canada

Parents:

Father: William Harvey Coy b. 1854, d. 4 October 1936
Mother: Mary Hoben b. 1857, d. 2 May 1943

Eunice P. Coy
Pop-up Pedigree

Birth*: 28 April 1833, Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick
Death*: 14 April 1858, Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick
Burial*: the Baptist Cemetery, Upper Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick

Parents:

Father: Samuel Coy b. 25 October 1803, d. 23 June 1882
Mother: Mary Jane 'Eunice' Currey b. 15 May 1810, d. 5 November 1861

Eva Winnifred Coy
Pop-up Pedigree

Birth*: 6 August 1896, Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick, Canada
Census*: 1901, Eva Winnifred Coy was 4 years old in the 1901 Census.
Death*: after 1901, Died young

Parents:

Father: Joseph Edward Coy b. 13 July 1856, d. before 1935
Mother: Frances 'Fanny' Jane Harding b. 2 March 1855, d. 1 February 1935

Fanny Rebecca Coy
Pop-up Pedigree

Birth*: 29 April 1840, Fredericton, York County, New Brunswick, Canada
Death*: October 1848, Fredericton, York County, New Brunswick, Canada, Her obituary noted that she was the sixth daughter of Asa Coy.

Parents:

Father: Asa Coy b. 14 July 1799, d. 1 February 1874
Mother: Mary Ann Ring b. 10 March 1805

Florence L. Coy
Pop-up Pedigree

Marriage: Principal=Ewart Arthur Clair Atkinson
Marriage: Principal=Robert Torrens
Birth*: 19 April 1899, (Coytown), Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick, Canada
Census*: 1901, She was 1 in the 1901 census.

Parents:

Father: George William Coy Jr. b. 28 January 1862, d. 18 June 1939
Mother: Josephine Rebecca Jones b. 23 October 1861, d. 11 January 1948

Family:

Ewart Arthur Clair Atkinson b. 1896, d. 29 September 1967


         

Compiler:
David Walker
Edwards, Ontario, Canada

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