Walker - Palmer Genealogy Web Site - Person Page 298

Walker - Palmer Genealogy Web Site
Person Page 298

         

Nicholas Dyer
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Death*: UNKNOWN
Note*: THE TOWN OF VERNON, Oneida Co., NY : The list of supervisors from 1831 isas follows: 1831-33. Nicholas Dyer
Birth*: after 1796

Parents:

Father: Joseph Nicholas Dyer b. 31 July 1776, d. 15 May 1866
Mother: Rhodinah Austin b. 1776, d. 10 May 1840

Nicholas D. Dyer
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Note*: He was of Joliet, ILL at last 2 Hardy sister marriages.
Birth*: 14 January 1841, Lexington, Ohio
Marriage*: 29 January 1867, Principal=Mary A. Lewis
Marriage*: 6 May 1876, Principal=Juliette V. (Twin) Hardy
Marriage*: 10 April 1878, Principal=Anna Amelia Hardy
Death*: after 1886

Parents:

Father: Daniel Harris Dyer b. 29 January 1797, d. 16 May 1870
Mother: Phila Beverstock b. 16 February 1803, d. 1882

Family 1:

Mary A. Lewis b. 29 September 1847, d. 29 June 1870

Children:

George L. Dyer b. 9 Oct 1868, d. UNKNOWN

Family 2:

Juliette V. (Twin) Hardy b. 22 September 1847, d. 27 December 1876

Children:

Florence B. Dyer b. 20 Aug 1874, d. UNKNOWN

Family 3:

Anna Amelia Hardy b. 29 January 1842, d. 20 August 1894

Children:

Emily P. Dyer b. 14 Apr 1879, d. UNKNOWN
Edward B. Dyer b. 11 Apr 1881, d. UNKNOWN
Marion Dyer b. 5 Feb 1886, d. UNKNOWN

Nona Dyer
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Birth*: 3 August 1863
Death*: 4 August 1864

Parents:

Father: Newcomb Thomas Dyer b. 17 September 1831, d. 27 February 1912
Mother: Emiline M. Wilcox b. 21 November 1840, d. 22 April 1912

Nora M. Dyer
Death*: UNKNOWN
Birth*: after 1847, Paris, Kentucky

Norman Murray Dyer
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Death*: UNKNOWN
Birth*: 11 March 1882, Philadelphia, Jefferson, New York

Parents:

Father: James Samuel Dyer b. 21 December 1847, d. December 1931
Mother: Mary Elizabeth Potter b. 24 May 1857, d. UNKNOWN

Family:

May Sherwood b. 24 April 1900, d. UNKNOWN

Olin Gideon Dyer , Md
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Death*: UNKNOWN
Note*: 1850 Census, Salisbury, Addison Co., Vermont, Roll 920, Page 201 (allborn VT) Olin G. Dyer, 26, M, Physician, Real Estate $600 Annah, 24, F Amelia, 3, F Florence, 1, F
Birth*: 5 December 1822, Clarendon, Rutland, Vermont
Marriage*: 25 August 1846, Principal=Annah Gaines Holt

Parents:

Father: Gideon Dyer b. 28 September 1790, d. 1860
Mother: Elizabeth Reynolds d. before 1850

Family:

Annah Gaines Holt b. 19 July 1826, d. UNKNOWN

Children:

Anna Amelia\Belle Dyer b. 6 Jun 1847, d. 11 Sep 1892
Florence Holt Dyer+ b. 23 Aug 1849, d. UNKNOWN
Charles Olin Dyer b. 22 Feb 1852, d. 1899
Anderson Dana Dyer b. 3 Jan 1859, d. 11 Apr 1886

Olive Dyer
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Death*: UNKNOWN
Note*: PARENTS-SIBLINGS: Wm. Heller Dyar, 'The DYAR (DYER) Families', ms. fromNatl Gen Soc.
Birth*: circa 1793, Shaftsbury, Bennington, Vermont

Parents:

Father: Henry Dyer b. 10 July 1759, d. 2 January 1855
Mother: Sarah Coy b. 1769, d. 26 July 1846

Family:

John March d. UNKNOWN

Children:

Lorenzo March+ d. UNKNOWN

Oliver Dyer
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Note*: An 'Oliver Dyer' Served in Old French & Indian War, in Capt. Fry's Co. in1756. [RI Colonial War Sevicemen, 1740-1762] Oliver Dyer View Image Online™ State: RI Year: 1790 County: Providence Image: 0128 Township: Smithfield Roll: M637_10 buried in Dyer Cemetery in New Berlin, NY (E-mail from Ken Brown, 10-30-98) 'I have been fortunate enough to find two unrelated sources that confirmthe maiden name of Celinda Phillips, wife of Isaac Phillips of NewBerlin, NY, as DYER. Of course, I had surmised as much since she isburied in the Dyer Cemetery in New Berlin next to Oliver and PatienceDyer, whom I suspect were her parents. I have now pretty much filled inthe family of my ancestor, Jeremiah Dyer, son of Oliver and Patience(Sweet) Dyer but I still lack the hard evidence I would like to have. Iam also still looking for the whereabouts of Arthur Dyer (suspectedbrother of Jeremiah, Celinda, and Nehemiah Dyer) after he left NewBerlin. There is still a possibility of finding an obituary. I also have made progress with the parents of Jeremiah Dyer's wife, MarySmith. I am looking for the family of James Smith (her father) a Britishprisoner from the battle of Cowpens who remained in the US after the war,became a citizen, and moved to New Berlin. I have connected one of hisdaughters to Frederick Vail, son of Job Vail, one of the earliestsettlers in New Berlin. I hope to connect the other daughter to JeremiahDyer whom I believe she married in 1806.'
Birth*: between 1740 and 1774
Burial*: New Berlin, Chenango, New York
Death*: New Berlin, Chenango, New York

Parents:

Father: Samuel Dyer b. 1712, d. 1792
Mother: Patience Williams b. 1714, d. 1774

Family:

Patience Sweet b. 1740

Children:

Nehemiah Dyer d. UNKNOWN
Arthur Dyer d. UNKNOWN
Jeremiah Dyer+ d. UNKNOWN
Celinda Dyer b. c 1779

Oliver Dyer
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Note*: Died: 82 M Dyer, Oliver, author, was born in Porter, Niagara county, N.Y., April 26,1824; son of Jeremiah and Mary Dyer. He was educated at the publicschools and was principal of a school in Lockport, N.Y., 1841-44. Hesubsequently took a course at the Genesee Wesleyan seminary at Lima, N.Y.He became interested in orthographic reform and studied Isaac Pitman'sphonographic shorthand system, becoming an expert in the use ofshorthand, and in 1848 accepted the position of reporter in the senate atWashington. He was admitted to the bar in 1854 and practised in New Yorkcity. The success of his sketch of 'The Wickedest Man in New York'(1868), led to his employment on the staffs of the New York Sun and otherpapers. In 1871 he agreed to write exclusively for the New York Ledger.He was ordained a minister in the Swedenborgian church in 1876 and becamepastor of the New Church society at Mount Vernon, N.Y., where heministered without pay. He is the author of: Great Senators of the UnitedStates Forty Years Ago (1889); Life of Andrew Jackson (1892). In 1899 hewas a resident of Warren, R.I. =========================================== I also have the original editions of his books The Great Senators (all ofwhom he knew personally) and General Andrew Jackson. In fact, I also justfound out that he received the 'Sublime Degree of a Master Mason.' I found the paper inside one of these books where my mother hadput it. According to a newspaper clipping about my grandfather Oliver, he passedthe bar but never practiced law. He did, however, become the editor ofthe New York Ledger in 1871. A post he held for 20 years. (Sincerely, Jean Walsh Quinnett, 8/29/00) ====================================== (from The NY Sun, Nov. 23, 1867) Our friend Oliver Dyer, the popular lecturer, who undertakes to tellpeople how to escape hell, has, we learn, fetched up in Sing Sing prison.He was captured last Sunday morning by the prison chaplain, and takeninto the chapel, where he first preached to the 1,800 male convicts, andprayed with them, in his original fashion, until he brought tears totheir eyes. Then the chaplain made him go to the chapel for femaleconvicts, and talk to them, which he did with even more power than he hadtalked to the males. The upshot of the morning's work was that thechaplain intends to have Mr. Dyer come again, and, in the meanwhile, hasprocured several hundred printed copies of a report of his remarks fordistribution among the inmates of the prison. Yet the Methodist ChristianAdvocate sneers at Mr. Dyer as a lecturer whose name ought not to bementioned even in its advertising columns. ============================================= For VillagePresident, OLIVER DYER OLIVER DYER: Dear Sir:--The undersigned, your friends and neighbors, ask you topermit them to take such action as may be necessary to nominate you forthe Village Presidency. Mount Vernon is year by year growing so rapidly,that it needs for its chief magistrate, a man full of energy, with wisdomand foresight to provide for its wants, with prudence and caution. Tokeep within its means, and with parliamentary skill and firmnessnecessary to give dignity and directness to the proceedings of the Boardof Trustees. In looking for such a man, they naturally turn to you, andhope that you will give them the pleasure of placing you before yourfellow citizens, as a candidate for the village presidency at the ensuingvillage election. (It lists 64 names and says 'and many others') Mount Vernon, May 17th, 1884. Col. Alfred Cooley, Hon. Isaac N. Mills, George R. Crawford, Esq. andothers. Gentlemen-I have read your invitation to me, to be a candidatefor the Village Presidency, with sentiments of profound thankfulness forthe kindness and appreciation which inspired it. I heartily sympathisewith your desires in respect to the government and interests of ourbeautiful village, and accept your invitation. Should I be electedPresident of the village, I will do my best to realize your expectations;and whether you succeed in the canvass or not, I shall never forget theneighborly kindness which prompted you to such an expression offriendship and confidence. Very truly yours, OLIVER DYER ===================================== (from New-Church Messenger Oct. 24, 1900) The Rev. OliverDyer. Oliver Dyer was born in the town of Porter, County of Niagara, andState of New York, on the 26th day of April, 1824. That region was thena dense wilderness. The Erie Canal had not yet been completed. Thesettlers had to chop their farms out of the wilderness. Oliver's parentswere poor and so were all their neighbors. Life was then and thereliterally a struggle for existence and only the fittest survived. When Oliver was six years old his father sold his farm and moved toLockport on the Erie Canal, which had become the great avenue ofcommunication between Albany and the Lakes. Oliver was sent to school,and from the start made rapid progress in his studies. Parents then hadto supply books for their children, and it was difficult for Oliver'sparents to supply the books which his rapid progress rendered necessary,When he was eight years old he began to earn money with which to buy hisown books and continued to do so as long as he remained at school. Hewas liberally helped in his endeavors by some of his teachers and anumber of friends who admired the boy's pluck and ability. Oliver was a boy who always minded his own business. He neverinterfered with others, but if others interfered with him and forced himinto a fight he fought with such desperation as to strike terror to the hearts of the aggressors. This trait of character had an importanteffect upon his career. When he was seventeen years old the trustees ofone of the village schools were looking for a teacher. The school wasutterly run down. The district in which it was situated was infested bya horde of young ruffians from sixteen to twenty-two years of age whoseonly object in going to school was to have a row. They repeatedly brokeup the school and drove the teachers from the door. The trustees were indespair. At last one of them suggested that Oliver Dyer should beengaged to take charge of the school, because his well-known fightingpowers would doubtless enable him to reduce the ruffians to order. Itwas a dangerous experiment to put a boy of seventeen into such asituation, but the experiment was tried and proved to be successful. Mr. Dyer provided himself with an iron-woodpoker about five feet long and two inches in diameter. The first day'ssession of the school passed without any demonstration. On the morningof the second day the hitherto triumphant ruffians broke out into openrebellion. One of them was a burly fellow over six feet in height andevery one of them was larger and more muscular than their teacher. Themoment they showed fight Mr. Dyer felled the leader with his poker andattacked the others with such intrepidity that they were soon lyinghelpless on the floor. The battle was short and the result conclusive.As soon as order was restored the studies of the school went on and werenever again interrupted by the least exhibition of disobedience. All thedefeated ruffians became Mr. Dyer's warm friends and admirers and boastedof the superior order and discipline maintained in his school. The factsabout his battle with the disturbers of the school spread through thevillage and gave intense satisfaction to everybody. He continued as headof the school until the sixth day of June, 1844, when he ended his careeras a schoolteacher with a grand exhibition and festival. His salary hadbeen raised to five hundred dollars a year, the largest then paid in thecounty, and he had saved money enough to pay his way through college. His mother's dearest wish was that Oliver should become a Methodistminister, of which Church he was a member. He yielded to her wishes andwent to the Genesee Wesleyan Seminary in Lima, N.Y., but in a few monthshis mother suddenly died. This broke him up. His scientific pursuitshad caused him to become dissatisfied with the Methodist theology. Heaccepted the teachings of geology, which were then considered atheistic.He also rejected the doctrine of the resurrection of the material body,and that of salvation by faith alone. In short, he was entirely brokenup as to theology. He became a journalist and reporter. In the lattercapacity he officiated in the United States Senate in the years 1848-49.He also studied law and was admitted to the New York Bar, where hepractised for a quarter of a century. In 1865 he became interested in mission work in the slums of NewYork. He spent several years in investigating the causes and the remedies ofthe deplorable state of things which he found there. In 1868 he wrotehis famous article on 'The Wickedest Man in New York', which caused aprodigious sensation and led to the extinction of seventy-two brothelsand dance houses in the vilest portion of the city. Just at this time he becameacquainted with the writings of the New Church. They were just what hehad been looking for for years. They gave him the spiritual peace andsatisfaction which he sorely needed. He united with the Thirty-fifthStreet Church in New York in 1869. The Rev. Chauncey Giles was then thepastor of that Church. He became a warm friend of Mr. Dyer's and urgedhim to become a lay preacher of the doctrines. Mr. Dyer acceded to hiswishes and began preaching. He continued in his pay preaching until 1876, when he wasordained as a minister of the New Church by the Rev. Chauncey Giles. Forseveral years previous he had preached for the New-Church Society at Mt.Vernon, N.Y., where he resided, and he continued to act as the Pastor of that Church, without salary, until 1885, when his poor health compelledhim to give up that work. He continued to preach occasionally in NewYork, Orange, New Jersey, and various other places. Many of his sermonshave been published. One pamphlet, containing 'Six Sermons on New-ChurchSubjects' was published in 1888. In 1892 Mr. Dyer quit all work and removed to Providence, R.I., andsubsequently to Warren, R.I. Since that time his health has been so poorthat his preaching and lecturing and contributions to the press have beeninfrequent. It is probable that he will neither preach nor write anymore. [1892 was the year my mother was born. Actually, it was my grandmotherwho was in poor health due to breast cancer she developed in her mid tolate forties.] (Submitted by Jran Walsh Quinnett, 9/4/00) =============================================
Note*: He was age 67 & she 34., Principal=Annie Russell Brown
Birth*: 26 April 1824, Porter, Niagara, New York
Marriage*: 26 September 1891, Providence, Providence, Rhode Island, Principal=Annie Russell Brown
Burial*: 1907, Forest Hills, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts
Death*: 13 January 1907, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts

Parents:

Father: Jeremiah Dyer d. UNKNOWN
Mother: Mary Smith d. UNKNOWN

Family 1:

(?) Unknown d. 1869

Children:

Oliver Dyer , Jr. b. 15 Jul 1861, d. 14 Mar 1884
Charles L. Dyer b. b 1869, d. UNKNOWN
Jenni Dyer b. b 1869, d. UNKNOWN

Family 2:

Annie Russell Brown b. 15 December 1857, d. 25 October 1919

Children:

Olivia Dyer+ b. 16 Aug 1892, d. 26 Oct 1984

Oliver Dyer , Jr.
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Note*: He died from an unfortunate accident in a boxing match at Yale University. He passed the examination at Harvard when he was only 16 and entered itat the age of 17. His eyes gave him so much trouble that he left and wentto Paris to have them treated. In 1880 he began a scientific course inColumbia college, when his eyes again failed him. He took a sea voyagefor his health, went out West and after two years, with the encouragementof his father entered Yale. (Grandaughter, Jean W. Quinnett has newspaperclippings of her mother's). ============================================================== From 'The East Chester News', courtesy of Jean (Walsh) Quinnett, 9/4/00 A HARVARD MAN ON A TRAMP. HOW SUCH A TRAMP FEELS WHEN HE IS ON THE VERGEOF STARVATION. ___________ Strange experiences.-Recklessness induced by privation of sleep andfood,--The kind of people who tramp.-- Their hardships and enjoyments. While on my way east from the lumber regions of Northern Michigan, itoccurred to me to study tramps and tramping by personal observation andexperience. I had done a good deal of walking in this country and Franceas a student, and I now resolved to tramp from Point Edward, Canada, onthe river St. Clair, to New Bedford, Mass. So, sending my luggage homeby express, I set out on my long tramp on the 23rd of October, 1881, witha meagre supply of money. I had a companion, a young Canadian, whoseparents lived at St. Mary, about seventy, miles from Point Edward. Hehad been to the States to seek his fortune; had been ill a long time inChicago; had become penniless, and was now trying to work his way home asbest he could. Our first tramp was on the Grand Trunk railway, twenty-two miles, toForest. The Canadian's shoes were so tight he could not make good time.Night overtook us. It was cold and rainy. We passed the night undersome boards placed slantwise against a fence so as to form a slopingcover. My fellow tramp was a good English scholar, and familiar withEnglish literature from Shakespeare to Tennyson. We beguiled thetoilsome journey of the day and the tedious hours of the night withliterary discussions. At Forest, my companion having become too lame to walk, we 'jumped afreight' at dusk. 'Jumping a freight' is tramp slang for taking anunobserved and free ride on a freight train. This was my first ridebetween cars. My companion stood on the very narrow platform of theforward car, holding on by a horizontal iron handle, with his handsbehind him. I stood with one hand grasping the same handle, the otherhand on the brake of the hind car, with a foot on each bumper, therebeing no platform on the back car to stand on. In such a position there is LIABILITY TO DEATH by thesudden parting of the train. I was at first uneasy, but familiarity withthe situation soon bred indifference and recklessness. On a subsequentoccasion, while sitting on one bumper, with my feet on the other, Idozed, with my hands in my pockets. Our train stopped at every station, until it reached St. Mary, wherewe wished to get off, and there it did not stop, but went dashing on toStratford, ten miles beyond. The next day we crawled back to St. Mary,not being able to make two miles an hour, on account of my friend'slameness. We had had no hearty food since breakfast on Sunday morning,and it was now Tuesday afternoon. We had eaten during that time a fewapples, a small load of bread, and six thin cookies. At last we procuredsome coarse food at a farm house for twenty cents, and made a heartymeal. On taking leave of my comrade at his home in St. Mary, I walkedsouth at night, passing through London about midnight. A few milesfurther on I saw a large fire of brush and logs in a field. Inattempting to reach it, I got into a swamp up to my knees. Getting uponfirm ground , near the fire, I dried my shoes and socks, and lay downwith my feet towards the burning heap, on a pile of brush between thefire and a steep hillside. Something rustled in the brush under me, butI would not move. Sleep I would, at any hazard. The brush on which I was lying might get on fire and set my clothes ablaze; but therewas water enough in the swamp to extinguish me, and I could easily rollinto it. In my reckless state, indeed by excessive drowsiness, thisthought amused me. I smiled, and fell asleep. A man becomes utterly reckless under privation of sleep. In such astate he will SLEEP AT ALL HAZARDS I have slept soaking with rain, with my hat over my face, besiderailroad tracks and under station platforms, or hanging on between cars.In the latter case my hands kept awake and hung on, while the rest of mybody slept. So doth 'sleep upon the high and giddy mast seal up theship-boy's eyes, and rock his brains in cradle of the rude imperioussurge.' I reached St. Thomas about eight o'clock next morning, having eatenfour small apples on the way. Here I was hospitably received by kindfriends, who were highly amused with my tramping career, and who sent meon my way with a pass across Lake Erie from Port Stanley to Buffalo.Thence I took a night tramp of twenty-two miles to Niagara Falls, taking three naps bythe way; one in a cow-yard, where the cattle ate the straw off me, andthe others on plank sidewalks. At Niagara Falls I reduced myself by extravagance nearly to theimpecunious condition of the true tramp. When I left the railroad bridgeI had sixty-three cents in money, twenty-four cents in postage-stamps,twenty-five cents worth of Canada plug tobacco, and a few matches. I walked, in four days, to Palmyra, about ninety miles, sleeping inbarns, and eating Bologna sausage, raw onions, bread, and a few rawturnips and cabbages. At Palmyra I 'jumped a freight' at dusk, and rode between cars toSyracuse. Wishing to experience a phase of tramp-life to which I was asyet a stranger, I put up at a station-house, and slept on a wooden bench,in an iron cage, next to a crazy man. In the morning, while I was trying to 'hire out' on the canal, asweet-voiced vagabond borrowed tobacco of me; then a mean-looking,vagabond asked for a 'chaw'; then a tattered rapscallion, with a brutalface. This last was 'Billy,' from Oswego. He was a professional beggar,and made, when he stuck to his business, a dollar a day, besides food andclothing. The winter he passed in jail. His two companions were hisparasites, who paid court to him and lived on his acquisitions. Likeevery great man, he had his weakness. He wished to be thought a terriblefighter, though all 'broke up.' His joyous companions profited by hisvanity, paying court to him, flattering him, and keeping him at workbegging, and then cajoling him into spending his earnings upon them. These men presented a phase of human nature that was new to me. Ihad no idea that such a :dead beat' as Billy could have parasites toflatter and cajole him, and live on his revenues, and be content so tolive. But, 'fleas have other fleas to bite 'em.' These were the only really abject men I met; men who preferredbeggary to work and independence. I have often been asked what sort of men tramps are. They are allsorts. No particular kind of man tramps. So far as my experience goes,most of them, are either men who, having left home, have been sick orunsuccessful, and are returning home penniless; or else laboring menlooking for work; or men of limited resources who wish to better theircondition by getting west. Often they are men of education and of goodfamily. There are, of course, a number of ragamuffins, and many vulgarruffians, and the general effect of tramping is, by freedom from therestraints of public opinion, and temptation through hunger, to lower thetone. At Utica, I jumped another freight. After riding forty miles, I wasso cold that I got off and walked to warm myself. Next morning, I foundseven slices of bread and butter beside the track. The morning afterthat, I found bread, meat, and mince pie; on another occasion, a niceroasted chicken. 'The YOUNG LIONS roar after their prey and seek their meat from God. * * * These wait allupon Thee; that Thou mayest give them their meat in due season.' AtSchenectady I spent my last postage stamp. Just out of Albany, I met a well dressed young fellow, who gave mesome tobacco. His method of traveling one division of a railroad, was tolearn the names of a conductor and his brakemen on the next division, andclaim to be of their crew. I jumped my last freight to Pitsfield, Mass.It was too cold to ride. Next day, I kept on east. I was without foodand money. Late in the afternoon, with reluctance I begged at afarmhouse, but being refused, I preferred hunger to further begging.Next day my appetite was improved. I knew of no work for which I was fit. Begging was repugnant.Passing through a village, I picked up a piece of cracker, and a rawturnip in the streets. On the outskirts a fishmonger threw the head anddorsal fin of a fish in the road. From these I chewed the flesh. Ittasted good. I was wild with hunger. I have heard it said that hungermakes one cowardly. This may be so in extreme cases but the contrary istrue as long as the strength is not seriously impaired. The bloodmounted to my face. I was feverish. My eyes felt strange. I have noticed in others that hungermakes the eyes fierce and mobile like a wild beast's. I felt reckless.Nothing seemed repugnant which gave any promise of food. I begged. Atthe first house, a young man came to the door. I heard a woman saywithin, 'If he is a grown man, he sha'n't have anything.' The young mansaid he had nothing. At the next house I asked a woman for a piece of bread. 'No, sir; not a thing!' she answered. I bowed sullenly, and went on. At the third house I saw a saw-horse. My heart leaped within me. Perhaps I could get a chance to saw wood. On my application an oldgentleman came out and gave me permission to work for a meal. Iinstantly had my coat off with a right good will. After I had workedabout ten minutes the old gentleman called me in, saying I could not workwell while hungry, and invited me to take a meal which he evidently hadprepared for me. There was a large, round dish of potatoes warmed inmilk, plenty of beefsteak, bread and butter, a quarter of an apple pie,and part of a loaf of gingerbread. I cleared the table. After finishing my job I kept on east. On reaching Palmer, east ofSpringfield, I turned southeast into Connecticut, intending to go to NewBedford. I reached Killingly, Conn., on Thursday morning, November 17th.Here two men, who had been on a spree, took me for A HORSE THIEF until they learned the whereabouts of their animals from a passing baker. All others treated me with great kindness. I got a job to saw wood, forwhich I was to receive two dollars. It took me a day and a half to doit. As I was finishing it, on Friday night, some of the bystanders, whohad gathered to see me work, helped me out, each sawing a few sticks. I was now about one hundred and forty-five miles from home. Iresolved to spend Thanksgiving with my relatives instead of going to NewBedford. I had five days to tramp the distance. On Saturday night Ireached Mansfield, east of Hartford, dripping with rain. Entering abarn, I stripped to my undershirt and buried my clothes and then myselfin the hay, so as not to have my rest disturbed by any intrusivebarn-owner. I was out before sunrise. There was ice on the ground, anda strong west wind. My coat was soon frozen. My hands were too numb tohold a match to light it. My right arm was numb to the elbow. I wasdemoralized; but fast walking, the wind, and the rising sun, in timedried my clothes and restored my spirits. Pushing through Hartford I made my longest march of forty-eightmiles. About eight miles from New Haven I entered a barn. Here I wrappedmyself in three blankets, and lay in a heap on the seat of a carry-all.About six o'clock in the morning a man with a lantern came to attend tohis horse. I held my breath. He took a pail near me, but evidentlythought I was a heap of blankets. On the noon of Wednesday, November 23d, I reached home, havingtraveled about two hundred miles by freight and five hundred and fifty onfoot in exactly a month. The great question in tramping is food. The more cultured a man isthe more painful is begging. He has a strong repugnance to it, which onlytime and extreme hunger will subdue. As a rule he will even prefer tosteal. Whenever he becomes known as a respectable man, he is apt to betreated kindly; but it is next to impossible to become thus known. Evenif he were to stick up his college diploma or certificate of moralcharacter on the breast of his very seedy coat, it would not overcome thesuspicion which springs spontaneous in the human breast at sight of atramp. Again, a Washington or a Franklin on a tramp would acquire 'a leanand hungry look,' from which all recoil with the instinctive feeling,that 'such men are dangerous.' Doubtless they are. I happened to get aglimpse of myself in a looking-glass in a railroad station near Palmer,Mass. I had a peculiarly bad eye-a shameless, untrustworthy eye. It,perhaps, expressed the soul within. Indeed, it would have required achildlike trust to have then made me custodian of a pantry ornight-watchman of a bakery. In spite of cold, hunger and fatigue, I heartily enjoyed myadventure. I was living a primitive life, a free nomadic life. The life of civilization is made up largely of the pleasures and illsof imagination, the demands of interdependent relations. It was pleasantto me to abandon this life for a time and gauge my happiness by theclemency of the weather and the fullness of my stomach. O .D., Jr.
Birth*: 15 July 1861
Burial*: 1884, Woodlawn Cemetery, Mt. Vernon, New York
Death*: 14 March 1884

Parents:

Father: Oliver Dyer b. 26 April 1824, d. 13 January 1907
Mother: (?) Unknown d. 1869

Olivia Dyer
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Birth*: 16 August 1892, Narragansett Pier, Rhode Island
Marriage*: 22 September 1916, Kansas City, Jackson, Mo, Principal=William Thomas Walsh
Burial*: 1984, Orlando, Florida
Death*: 26 October 1984, Orlando, Florida

Parents:

Father: Oliver Dyer b. 26 April 1824, d. 13 January 1907
Mother: Annie Russell Brown b. 15 December 1857, d. 25 October 1919

Family:

William Thomas Walsh b. 29 September 1887, d. 16 May 1973

Olney Dyer
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Note*: 1850 RI Census, Olney Dyer, #246, Ward 4, Providence. died 68 years. 1840 Dyer Olney will A6008 'Mrs. Hannah, wife of Olney, in this town (Providence), in 46th year, Aug7, 1815' REF: Vital Records of RI, Vol X111 Deaths, Arnold.
Birth*: 24 April 1771
Marriage*: 18 July 1792, Principal=Hannah Tourtelotte
Marriage*: 11 September 1816, Providence, Providence, Rhode Island, Principal=Sybil Perrin
Death*: 28 March 1840, Providence, Providence, Rhode Island

Parents:

Father: Charles Dyer b. 21 November 1742, d. 14 August 1823
Mother: Phebe Pearce b. 25 May 1743, d. 5 May 1822

Family 1:

Hannah Tourtelotte b. 11 October 1769, d. 7 August 1815

Children:

John Dyer b. 10 Oct 1794, d. 14 Oct 1794
Davis Dyer+ b. 1 Nov 1795, d. 4 Dec 1831
Cyrus Dyer+ b. 3 Nov 1797, d. 22 Mar 1864
Paris Dyer+ b. 21 Feb 1798, d. 17 Dec 1870
Almira Dyer b. 20 Sep 1799, d. 23 Apr 1824
Eliza Dyer b. 15 Apr 1804, d. 27 Oct 1805
Hannah Dyer+ b. 15 Apr 1806, d. 26 Dec 1827
Olney Dyer b. 3 Aug 1807, d. 10 Sep 1807
Harriet Dyer b. 26 Sep 1810, d. 9 Aug 1811

Family 2:

Sybil Perrin b. 11 September 1784, d. 5 December 1875

Children:

Charles Perrin Dyer b. 20 Nov 1817, d. 5 Mar 1902
Benjamin Bruce Dyer+ b. 6 May 1819, d. 17 Aug 1884
John Perrin Dyer b. 12 Jan 1821, d. 9 Dec 1821
Mary Elizabeth Dyer+ b. 29 Apr 1823, d. 25 Sep 1868
Martha Whitney Dyer+ b. 23 Apr 1825, d. Apr 1898

Olney Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Birth*: 3 August 1807
Death*: 10 September 1807

Parents:

Father: Olney Dyer b. 24 April 1771, d. 28 March 1840
Mother: Hannah Tourtelotte b. 11 October 1769, d. 7 August 1815

Otis Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Death*: UNKNOWN
Birth*: before 1797

Parents:

Father: Anthony Dyer , Jr. b. 1765, d. 1835
Mother: Chloe Bucklin d. 8 June 1797

Otis Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Death*: UNKNOWN
Birth*: after 1762

Parents:

Father: Anthony Dyer b. 23 June 1743, d. 2 December 1808
Mother: Sarah Bishop b. 1744, d. 16 February 1841

Otis Theron Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Birth*: 31 January 1844, Portage, Livingston, New York
Burial*: 1898, Dyer Vault, Olivewood Cemetery, Riverside, Ca
Death*: 15 August 1898, Riverside, Humboldt, Ca

Parents:

Father: Leman Wright Dyer b. 1808, d. 1855
Mother: Philena F. Green b. 11 June 1806, d. 25 June 1885

Family:

Mary Weed d. UNKNOWN

Children:

Fanny E. Dyer+ b. 1871, d. 1895
Leman W. Dyer b. 1873, d. 1893
Grace G. Dyer+ b. 1875, d. UNKNOWN
Mate J. Dyer b. 1877, d. UNKNOWN

Palmer Dyer , Rev.
Pop-up Pedigree

Note*: He graduated from Hamilton College, became an Episcopal minister, he hada church in Manlius NY. He died at the home of his friend Erastus Hulett. REF: Hist. Clarendon VT; Franz Buse. Also had churches in Wells and Granville and Brandon VT 1824 Rev. Palmer Dyer of the Protestant Episcopal Church of Keeseville, N. Y.;he was accidentally drowned at Keeseville Falls by a misstep in assistinga lady who was viewing the falls. (Newcomb2.doc)
Birth*: 24 October 1798, Clarendon, Rutland, Vermont
Marriage*: 30 June 1828, Principal=Sarah Maria Newcomb
Death*: 1 August 1844, Ausable Chasam, Essex, New York

Parents:

Father: Edward Dyer b. 23 June 1774, d. 11 May 1854
Mother: Sally Bowman b. 18 February 1782, d. 1 August 1816

Family:

Sarah Maria Newcomb b. 11 May 1798, d. 6 September 1860

Children:

Ellen Maria Dyer b. 20 Oct 1829, d. UNKNOWN

Palmyra Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Birth*: 1793
Death*: 13 September 1875

Parents:

Father: Joseph Nicholas Dyer b. 31 July 1776, d. 15 May 1866
Mother: Rhodinah Austin b. 1776, d. 10 May 1840

Pardon Bowen Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Birth*: 1795
Death*: 1796

Parents:

Father: Benjamin Dyer , Dr. b. 8 July 1768, d. 15 May 1831
Mother: Abigail Pearce b. 1763, d. 21 April 1831

Paris Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Note*: Paris & Julia Ann were cousins. 1850 Census Brooklyn, Windham, Ct., Paris Dyer 51 Farmer $34000, b.Cranston, RI; Julia Ann 49, b. Providence, RI; Caroline E 16, b.Providence, RI.
Note*: Field Genealogy gives May 16, 1818, Principal=Julia Ann Dyer
Birth*: 21 February 1798, Cranston, Providence, Rhode Island
Marriage*: 14 May 1818, Providence, Providence, Rhode Island, Principal=Julia Ann Dyer
Death*: 17 December 1870

Parents:

Father: Olney Dyer b. 24 April 1771, d. 28 March 1840
Mother: Hannah Tourtelotte b. 11 October 1769, d. 7 August 1815

Family:

Julia Ann Dyer b. 20 June 1799, d. 25 January 1883

Children:

Henry Augustus Dyer+ b. 18 Feb 1819, d. 31 Jul 1871
Albert Francis Dyer b. 5 Jan 1821, d. 14 Sep 1823
Caroline Eliza Dyer b. 6 Jun 1823, d. 27 Jul 1862
George Frederick Dyer b. 17 Jun 1825, d. 3 Nov 1827
Francis Sumner Dyer b. 1 Apr 1843, d. 3 Oct 1843

Parnell (Nee?) Dyer
Note*: In Feb 1755, Edward Dyre was appointed guardian of Parnell Dyre, widow of Elisha, and on Jul 14 1755 he was given administration on Elisha's estate.
Death*: 5 June 1771, North Kingstown, Washington County, Rhode Island

Family:

Elisha Dyer b. circa 1672, d. before 1755

Children:

Phebe Dyer+ d. UNKNOWN
Elizabeth Dyer d. UNKNOWN

Patience Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Note*: Robert Rathbun 687 Beech Bend Rd; Bowling Green KY (1991)
Birth*: 1749, Cabage Neck, Rhode Island
Death*: 14 November 1832, Burlington, Vermont

Parents:

Father: Samuel Dyer b. 1712, d. 1792
Mother: Patience Williams b. 1714, d. 1774

Family 1:

William Howard d. UNKNOWN

Children:

William Howard , Capt.

Family 2:

Joseph Foster d. UNKNOWN

Children:

Deborah Foster+ d. UNKNOWN

Patience Hicks Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Charts:
Descendant Chart for Philip Slocombe

Birth*: 1826
Marriage*: 5 August 1849, Middletown, Newport, Rhode Island, Principal=Edward M. Cornell
Death*: before 1852

Parents:

Father: Christopher Dyer b. 1793, d. 25 February 1870
Mother: Mary Hicks b. 4 August 1792, d. January 1880

Family:

Edward M. Cornell b. 19 September 1825, d. UNKNOWN

Patience Lorain Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Note*: She was held in much esteem, both for her superior mental and socialqualities and for her sincere piety; and her sudden death was felt to beno common bereavement. She was a lineal descendant of William Dyer,Secretary of the Rhode Island Colony, Commander-in-chief upon sea againstthe Dutch for Rhode Island in 1653, and one of the founders of Newport;and his wife Mary, the Quaker, who suffered religious martyrdom on BostonCommon in 1660; of Roger Williams, founder and governor of the samecolony, and of Captain Edward Hutchinson, of Boston, killed in KingPhilip's War (1675), and a grand-daughter of Major Gideon Olin, of theRevolutionary Army, who was member of Congress from 1803 to 1807.
Birth*: 6 August 1801, Clarendon, Rutland, Vermont
Marriage*: 28 November 1833, Principal=Alonzo Huntington
Death*: 23 October 1861, Chicago, Cook, Illinois

Parents:

Father: Daniel Dyer b. 16 October 1764, d. 14 February 1842
Mother: Susannah Olin b. 9 November 1767, d. 8 September 1845

Family:

Alonzo Huntington b. 1 September 1805, d. 1881

Children:

Susanna Maria Huntington b. 11 Nov 1835, d. 22 Dec 1839
Stella Aurelia Huntington b. 28 Dec 1837, d. 21 Dec 1839
Henry Alonzo Huntington+ b. 23 Mar 1840, d. 30 Jul 1907
Daniel Dyer Huntington b. 25 Jul 1842, d. 2 Jan 1845
Jay Galusha Huntington b. 23 Oct 1844, d. c 1864
Frances Huntington+ b. 2 Feb 1848, d. 20 Jun 1904

Patience Martha Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Death*: UNKNOWN
Note*: was it Tabitha that was called Martha? (AWM)
Note*: Prov. Journal of Nov 17, 1823, Principal=Otis Irish
Birth*: 1803, Little Compton, Newport, Rhode Island
Marriage*: 25 September 1823, Little Compton, Newport, Rhode Island, Principal=Otis Irish

Parents:

Father: Head Dyer b. 20 April 1777, d. after 1850
Mother: Tabitha Earle b. August 1774, d. 9 February 1853

Family:

Otis Irish b. 30 March 1796, d. UNKNOWN

Children:

Emily N. Irish b. 1833, d. UNKNOWN

Patience S. Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Charts:
Descendant Chart for Philip Slocombe

Death*: UNKNOWN
Birth*: 1851

Parents:

Father: Samuel Hicks Dyer b. 4 June 1823, d. 27 May 1853
Mother: Emily Amelia Sexton Manchester d. UNKNOWN

Pattie Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Note*: This daughter was, according to census returns, born 1790/1800. Almost certainly the sister of Samuel described in his Obituary in 1883as 'He has a sister, who his 90 years of age, living in Worcester,Mass,who can see, hear, and walk as erect as she could fifty yearsago.'[Calais Advertiser, 19 Sept. 1883, p2] [JP] She married Westbrook KNIGHT (b. 1777; a son of Jonathan KNIGHT[1737-1828] and Mary ATKINS [baptized 1745]). Pike's Diary (p. 15) saysthat 'Westbrook Knight married Patttie Dyer, daughter of James Dyer,sister of Sam Dyer. Their children were Joel, Levi, Rebecca, Luther,Sobrina married John HERALD'. [JP]
Birth*: circa 1793, Prob. Calais, ME
Marriage*: 7 November 1805, Principal=Westbrook Knight
Death*: after 1883

Parents:

Father: James Dyer , Sr. b. 24 July 1762, d. February 1800
Mother: Martha Bailey b. between 1763 and 1769, d. 1831

Family:

Westbrook Knight b. 22 April 1777, d. UNKNOWN

Children:

Luther Knight b. a 1805, d. UNKNOWN
Sobrina Knight b. a 1805, d. UNKNOWN
Atkins Knight b. a 1805, d. UNKNOWN
George Knight b. a 1805, d. Jun 1828
James Dyer Knight b. 10 Oct 1806, d. UNKNOWN
Rebecca Holms Knight b. 8 Nov 1808, d. 30 Oct 1874
Levi Baylief Knight b. 16 Feb 1811, d. UNKNOWN
Joel Knight b. 27 Apr 1813, d. UNKNOWN

Peter Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Note*: From Leslie Dyer; all children and their info. Civil War Veteran [Gedcom,Pat Miller]
Birth*: 18 January 1829, East Berne, Albany Co, New York
Marriage*: 18 January 1860, Newark, Tioga Co, New York, Principal=Susan Helen Burton
Burial*: 1910, Glen Aubry, New York
Death*: 8 March 1910, East Berne, Albany, New York

Parents:

Father: Dexter Dyer b. 11 April 1803, d. 20 December 1880
Mother: Mary (Maria) Pier b. 9 December 1802, d. 14 February 1875

Family:

Susan Helen Burton b. 8 May 1846, d. 9 February 1912

Children:

Peter Jay Dyer b. 2 Apr 1861, d. 4 May 1940
James Henry Dyer b. 23 Jan 1863, d. 14 Apr 1888
Sidney Dyer b. 22 Jan 1865, d. 12 Apr 1949
George Franklin Dyer b. 12 Jan 1867, d. 27 Feb 1944
Rosa Louisa Dyer b. 26 Dec 1868, d. 31 Mar 1956
Sarah Jane Dyer b. 15 Apr 1871, d. 15 Apr 1928
Ida May Dyer b. 16 Apr 1873, d. 1 Nov 1915
Justin Dyer b. 2 Sep 1875, d. 10 Jan 1912
Eli Calvin Dyer+ b. 14 Oct 1877, d. 29 Apr 1953
Thelma Dyer b. 3 Mar 1881, d. 18 Apr 1957
Floid Adelbert Dyer b. 28 Jan 1886, d. 27 Mar 1965

Peter Jay Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Birth*: 2 April 1861
Death*: 4 May 1940

Parents:

Father: Peter Dyer b. 18 January 1829, d. 8 March 1910
Mother: Susan Helen Burton b. 8 May 1846, d. 9 February 1912

Peter W Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Note*: PARENTS: Dyer Search;;;Volume 7, number 1;;pub by Alice Dyer Finley,1629 18th Ave. NW, New Brighton, MN 55112
Birth*: 13 January 1820
Marriage*: 5 May 1844, Principal=Susan Arvilla Dyer
Death*: 31 May 1897, Adams Center, Jefferson, New York

Parents:

Father: John Dyer b. 9 May 1798, d. 13 December 1823
Mother: Aurilla Matteson b. 2 September 1797, d. 15 March 1879

Family:

Susan Arvilla Dyer b. 22 August 1820, d. 9 March 1886

Children:

Mary Antoinette Dyer+ b. 2 Apr 1845, d. 4 May 1898
Prudence A. Dyer b. 13 Dec 1849, d. 13 Aug 1851
Henrietta A. Dyer+ b. 16 Feb 1853, d. 7 Mar 1924
John S. Dyer b. 17 Jun 1854, d. 20 Jun 1854
Charles F. Dyer b. 28 Jul 1857, d. 12 May 1925
Fred Adelbert Dyer+ b. 22 Jun 1864, d. UNKNOWN

Peter W. Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Note*: Resided in 1846 in Rodman, Jefferson, NY died age 66 years
Note*: Married by Rev. Putman, Principal=Nancy Farnham
Birth*: 12 October 1796, Vermont
Marriage*: 7 September 1818, Richfield, Otsego, New York, Principal=Nancy Farnham
Marriage*: 7 June 1824, Richfield, Otsego, New York, Principal=Aurilla Matteson
Burial*: 1862, Keeler Cemtery, Keeler, Mi
Death*: 4 September 1862, Lawrence, Van Buren, Mi

Parents:

Father: Charles Dyer , Capt. b. 4 July 1753, d. 27 October 1845
Mother: Susannah Wright b. 23 April 1762, d. 15 June 1820

Family 1:

Marriage*: 7 September 1818, Richfield, Otsego, New York, Principal=Nancy Farnham

Nancy Farnham b. 27 May 1798, d. 13 April 1823

Children:

Nancy Dyer b. a 1818, d. 13 Apr 1823
Laura Ann F. Dyer b. 3 Dec 1819, d. UNKNOWN
Abigail Susan Dyer+ b. 12 Aug 1821, d. 12 Sep 1899

Family 2:

Marriage*: 7 June 1824, Richfield, Otsego, New York, Principal=Aurilla Matteson

Aurilla Matteson b. 2 September 1797, d. 15 March 1879

Children:

Levi Latham Dyer+ b. 1 Nov 1825, d. 13 Apr 1910
Luman H. Dyer+ b. 7 Jan 1827, d. UNKNOWN
Isaac Dyer b. 20 Feb 1829, d. 20 Aug 1830
Warren Whitney Dyer b. 13 May 1830, d. 13 Sep 1830
Newcomb Thomas Dyer+ b. 17 Sep 1831, d. 27 Feb 1912
Adoniram Judson Dyer+ b. 3 Jun 1833, d. 17 Mar 1916
Frances Ann Dyer+ b. 25 May 1835, d. c 1890
Andrew Jackson Dyer+ b. 6 Mar 1837, d. 1 Nov 1911
Arvilla Ann Dyer+ b. 3 Apr 1842, d. 4 May 1909

Phebe Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Death*: UNKNOWN
Note*: In the registry of St. Pauls Ch (Episcopal), Narraganset appears 'Phebe Strengthfield, wife of William, daughter of Edward Dyer, clinical baptismat Quidnesset, Dec 19 1741' ' Also in NEHGR Vol 54 p311 'Ancestry of Lydia Strengthfield (b. 1746 d.1800)' the following: ' My great grandfather by my mother's side, whose name was Dyer, was one of those Quakers who was persecuted by the Presbyterians at Boston and was obliged to fly with many of that sect to Rhode Island andas they had saved part of their fortune they established a town and called it Newport.' This is probably the Phebe Dyer identified in RI Census of 1782, 2females age 22-50 living together in No. Kingston. See NEHGR 128 p135 - along with families Samuel Dyer, Edward Dyer, John Dyer, & Charles Dyer all nameswhich fit ancestors. SPOUSE: FOR KING AND COUNTRY; ;Orange Co. CA Gen Soc, VOL II; pp 81-83;San Diego FHC;
Marriage*: 19 November 1741, Rhode Island, Principal=William Strengthfield

Parents:

Father: Edward Dyer b. 6 January 1700/1, d. 13 March 1788
Mother: Freelove (Nee?) Dyer b. circa 1701, d. UNKNOWN

Family:

William Strengthfield b. after 1705, d. UNKNOWN

Children:

Phebe Strengthfield b. c 1742, d. UNKNOWN
Lydia Strengthfield b. 17 Apr 1743, d. 13 Oct 1800
William Strengthfield b. c 1745, d. UNKNOWN
Edward Strengthfield b. c 1747, d. UNKNOWN
Elizabeth Strengthfield b. c 1747, d. UNKNOWN

Phebe Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Death*: UNKNOWN, Exeter, Washington County, Rhode Island
Note*: She married Peleg Greene Children: surname GREENE Elisha d a young man Lydia Peleg married 1762 2/ Almy Ralpe Mary Phebe Amm married Edward Lawton REF: TAG 22:212 July 1945

Parents:

Father: Elisha Dyer b. circa 1672, d. before 1755
Mother: Parnell (Nee?) Dyer d. 5 June 1771

Family:

Peleg Greene d. UNKNOWN

Children:

Elisha Greene d. UNKNOWN
Lydia Greene d. UNKNOWN
Peleg Greene d. UNKNOWN
Mary Greene d. UNKNOWN
Phebe Greene d. UNKNOWN
Ann Greene d. UNKNOWN

Phebe Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Death*: UNKNOWN
Note*: born Dec. 26, 169-
Birth*: between 1692 and 1698, Newport, Newport, Rhode Island
Marriage*: 9 November 1730, Trinity Church, Newport, Rhode Island, Principal=John Wallein

Parents:

Father: Nathaniel Dyer b. between 1667 and 1668, d. 2 October 1738
Mother: Elizabeth Parrot b. circa 1663, d. UNKNOWN

Family:

John Wallein d. UNKNOWN

Phebe Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Death*: UNKNOWN
Note*: Married by Rev. Othniel Campbell. [WFT Vol. 5, #1242] Little Compton Families shows them as m. 20 Nov 1751 in Tiverton,Newport, Ri. Dartmouth VR's shows intention 10 Nov 1750, both of Dartmouth.
Birth*: 18 July 1726, Little Compton, Newport, Rhode Island
Marriage*: 20 November 1751, Tiverton, Newport, Rhode Island, Principal=James Dyer

Parents:

Father: Charles Dyer b. 22 March 1696/97, d. April 1768
Mother: Elizabeth (Sheriff) Shreve b. 20 May 1698, d. July 1778

Family:

James Dyer d. UNKNOWN

Phebe Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Birth*: after 1742, West Greenwich, Kent, Rhode Island
Marriage*: 6 October 1770, West Greenwich, Kent, Rhode Island, Principal=Caleb Arnold
Death*: circa 1803, West Greenwich, Kent, Rhode Island

Parents:

Father: Samuel Dyer b. 1703, d. circa 1760
Mother: Tabitha Niles b. circa 1706, d. 1795

Family:

Caleb Arnold b. 28 June 1750, d. UNKNOWN

Children:

Roby Arnold+ b. a 1770, d. UNKNOWN
Peleg Arnold b. 18 Jun 1771

Phebe Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Death*: UNKNOWN
Birth*: 1708

Parents:

Father: Edward Dyer b. circa 1670, d. 1760
Mother: Mary Sayles Greene b. 3 January 1676/77, d. 1761

Phebe Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Birth*: 12 October 1736
Marriage*: 30 December 1756, Cranston, Providence, Rhode Island, Principal=Benjamin Thurber
Death*: 20 September 1818

Parents:

Father: Charles Dyer b. 1710, d. 1777
Mother: Abigail Williams b. before 1717, d. UNKNOWN

Family:

Benjamin Thurber b. 14 July 1734, d. 28 April 1807

Children:

Dyer Thurber b. 8 Oct 1758, d. 14 Mar 1759
Alice Thurber b. 2 Jul 1761, d. 9 Oct 1798

Phebe Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Birth*: 1781
Marriage*: 6 July 1803, Providence, Providence, Rhode Island, Principal=John Francis Greene
Death*: 25 August 1863

Parents:

Father: Charles Dyer b. 21 November 1742, d. 14 August 1823
Mother: Phebe Pearce b. 25 May 1743, d. 5 May 1822

Family:

John Francis Greene b. 9 June 1773, d. 7 September 1852

Children:

Charles Dyer Greene+ b. 3 Apr 1804, d. UNKNOWN
Phebe Pearce Greene b. 4 Oct 1805, d. UNKNOWN
William Henry Greene+ b. 8 Jan 1807, d. 9 Mar 1880
Anne Gladding Greene b. 10 Dec 1808, d. UNKNOWN

Phebe Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Death*: UNKNOWN
Birth*: 16 April 1822
Marriage*: 22 May 1842, Westport, Bristol County, Massachusetts, Principal=Benjamin West , Jr.

Parents:

Father: Samuel Dyer b. 1 June 1792, d. UNKNOWN
Mother: Lydia Hoxie b. 7 October 1791, d. 26 October 1870

Family:

Benjamin West , Jr. d. UNKNOWN

Phebe Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Birth*: 1814
Death*: 17 December 1820
Burial*: Pocasset Cemetery, Pocasset, Massachusetts

Parents:

Father: John Dyer b. 1775, d. 21 March 1826
Mother: Patience Sprague b. 2 August 1785, d. 20 July 1876

Phebe C Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Birth*: circa December 1844, Calais, Washington County, Maine
Death*: 6 May 1846, Calais, Washington County, Maine
Burial*: 8 May 1846, Calais, Washington County, Maine

Parents:

Father: Edward Sidney Dyer b. 1804, d. 5 October 1875
Mother: Harriet D. Carleton b. 6 December 1809, d. 1882

Phebe Louise Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Death*: UNKNOWN
Note*: [Lost.FTW] res. River Road, New Bedford, Mass.
Birth*: 11 August 1869, Wickford, Rhode Island
Residence*: 24 June 1870, North Kingstown, Washington County, Rhode Island
Marriage*: 18 March 1888, Newport, Rhode Island, Principal=Elmer Ellsworth Braley

Parents:

Father: Warren H. Dyer b. January 1835, d. 1913
Mother: Mary (Greene) Johnson b. 1836, d. 1912

Family:

Elmer Ellsworth Braley b. 9 January 1862, d. UNKNOWN

Children:

Susie Emily Braley b. 13 Sep 1889, d. UNKNOWN
Mary Elizabeth Braley b. 18 Jul 1891, d. UNKNOWN
Walter Mandell Braley b. 27 May 1894, d. UNKNOWN
Almira Augusta Braley b. 9 Apr 1896, d. UNKNOWN

Phebe Pearce Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Note*: WASHBURN William, of Taunton, and Mrs. Phebe Pearce Penno, daughter ofDr. Benjamin Dyer, of Cranston, at Cranston, by Rev. Mr. Wilson, Sept.26, 1821, Principal=William Washburn
Birth*: June 1791, Providence, Providence, Rhode Island
Marriage*: 21 June 1813, Providence, Providence, Rhode Island, Principal=Nathaniel Penno
Marriage*: 26 September 1821, Cranston, Providence, Rhode Island, Principal=William Washburn
Death*: 21 December 1849, Taunton, Bristol County, Massachusetts

Parents:

Father: Benjamin Dyer , Dr. b. 8 July 1768, d. 15 May 1831
Mother: Abigail Pearce b. 1763, d. 21 April 1831

Family 1:

Nathaniel Penno b. 4 November 1791, d. before 1821

Family 2:

William Washburn d. UNKNOWN

Children:

William Dyer Washburn b. Jun 1823, d. 10 Jan 1837
Benjamin Dyer Washburn+ b. 3 Mar 1825, d. UNKNOWN

Phila Jane Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Death*: UNKNOWN
Note*: Called Jennie P. Dyer at marriage (Wallbridge Gen.)
Birth*: after 1853
Marriage*: 18 April 1883, Principal=John Brady Wallbridge

Parents:

Father: Henry Harris Dyer b. 9 April 1831, d. 24 November 1881
Mother: Zula Jane Westcott b. 26 July 1837, d. UNKNOWN

Family:

John Brady Wallbridge b. 24 June 1851, d. UNKNOWN

Children:

Edith Wallbridge b. 16 Jan 1898, d. UNKNOWN

Phila Maria Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Note*: Info on all the children from: The Abridged Compendium of AmericanGenealogy by Frederick Virkus 4:449 dates from Virkus 4:449
Birth*: 9 January 1823, Clarendon Rutland, Vermont
Marriage*: 28 March 1843, Lexington, Ohio, Principal=Isaac Richardson Watson
Death*: 1904

Parents:

Father: Daniel Harris Dyer b. 29 January 1797, d. 16 May 1870
Mother: Phila Beverstock b. 16 February 1803, d. 1882

Family:

Isaac Richardson Watson b. 1819, d. 1875

Children:

Samuel Dyer Watson+ b. a 1843, d. UNKNOWN
Helen Adeline Watson b. a 1843, d. UNKNOWN
Henry Albert Watson b. a 1843, d. UNKNOWN
Mary Richardson Watson b. a 1843, d. UNKNOWN
Susan Estella Watson b. a 1843, d. UNKNOWN
Phila Jane Watson b. 28 Sep 1857, d. UNKNOWN

Philip Sidney Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Birth*: 1857, Calais, Washington County, Maine
Marriage*: 1890, Principal=Maude Miller
Death*: 1919

Parents:

Father: George Washington Dyer , Esq. b. 1823, d. 1889
Mother: Mary Elizabeth Shaw Kelley b. 10 March 1828, d. 15 December 1863

Family:

Maude Miller b. 1867, d. 1915

Children:

Marjorie Dyer b. a 1890, d. UNKNOWN

Polly (B.?) Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Birth*: 28 March 1831
Marriage*: 15 October 1854, Jefferson, Schoharie, New York, Principal=John B. Gallup
Death*: 21 May 1893

Parents:

Father: Calvin Dyer b. 5 November 1799, d. 26 April 1885
Mother: Elizabeth 'Betsey' Sherwood b. 15 January 1803, d. 8 November 1886

Family:

John B. Gallup b. 24 October 1829, d. 17 January 1900

Preserved Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Note*: By his second wife Deborah he had more children, two daughters anyway. Preserved Dyer State: MA Year: 1790 County: Bristol Image: 0756 Township: Westport Roll: M637_4
Note*: Dartmouth VR's: Preserved (Dyre) and Susanna Head, both of D., int. Feb.23, 1765. Married by Restcom Sanford, Justice., Principal=Susannah B. Head
Note*: intention, Principal=Deborah Gifford
Birth*: 10 February 1737/38, Little Compton, Newport, Rhode Island
Marriage*: 4 April 1765, Tiverton, Newport, Rhode Island, Principal=Susannah B. Head
Marriage*: 7 December 1793, Westport, Bristol County, Massachusetts, Principal=Deborah Gifford
Death*: 27 March 1829, Westport, Bristol County, Massachusetts

Parents:

Father: Charles Dyer b. 22 March 1696/97, d. April 1768
Mother: Elizabeth (Sheriff) Shreve b. 20 May 1698, d. July 1778

Family 1:

Marriage*: 4 April 1765, Tiverton, Newport, Rhode Island, Principal=Susannah B. Head

Susannah B. Head d. before 1793

Children:

John Dyer+ b. 2 Jan 1766, d. 8 Feb 1846
Joseph Dyer+ b. 21 Sep 1768, d. 3 Mar 1847
Bathsheba Dyer b. 8 Nov 1774, d. UNKNOWN
Head Dyer+ b. 20 Apr 1777, d. a 1850
Susannah Dyer b. 8 Nov 1780, d. UNKNOWN

Family 2:

Marriage*: 7 December 1793, Westport, Bristol County, Massachusetts, Principal=Deborah Gifford

Deborah Gifford b. 27 September 1761, d. before 1846

Children:

Preserved Dyer+ b. 17 Sep 1798, d. 23 Oct 1850
Charles Dyer , Capt. b. c 1803, d. b 1830
James Dyer b. c 1805, d. 10 Jun 1877

Preserved Dyer
Pop-up Pedigree

Note*: 1850 Census Tiverton, Newport, RI., Preserved Dyer 51 Shoemaker, b.Mass.; Anna 52; Elisa A 27; Mary 23; Charles 21 Carpenter; Horace 13.(With them Elizabeth Durfee 78 yr) Old Stone Cemetery
Marriage*: Principal=Annie Tabor
Birth*: 17 September 1798, Westport, Bristol County, Massachusetts
Death*: 23 October 1850, Tiverton, Newport, Rhode Island

Parents:

Father: Preserved Dyer b. 10 February 1737/38, d. 27 March 1829
Mother: Deborah Gifford b. 27 September 1761, d. before 1846

Family:

Annie Tabor b. 21 February 1798, d. 9 August 1878

Children:

Henry Dyer+ b. c 1820, d. 19 Jan 1878
Elizabeth Ann Dyer b. Sep 1821, d. 22 Apr 1856
Almira Dyer b. 1824, d. 9 Apr 1899
Mary A. Dyer+ b. 25 Nov 1826, d. 26 Jun 1904
Charles Dyer+ b. Jan 1829, d. 14 Jun 1908
Horace George Dyer+ b. 25 Dec 1837, d. 4 Feb 1922


         

Compiler:
David Walker
Edwards, Ontario, Canada

This page was created by John Cardinal's Second Site v1.9.4. 44,493 people