cornwall england newspaper


1839 NEWS ARTICLE

MARCH



1 MARCH 1839, Friday


EMIGRATION to SYDNEY, NEW SOUTH WALES - Mr. T.H. Edwards, of Helston, will furnish every information to, and make arrangements with, persons desirous of obtaining a FREE PASSAGE or otherwise. Next vessel sails from Plymouth the eighth of April.

SMUGGLING - Thomas CHAST[?], the boatman named in last week's paper as having been committed to prison for smuggling, was brought before the magistrates at Falmouth on Monday, and threw himself on the mercy of the Court. The fine incurred was GBP 100, and in default of payment to be imprisoned six months. Several persons in court gave him a good character; and as it was his first offense, it is hoped he will soon be discharged. He is very poor and has ten children.

THE LATE ATTEMPT TO MURDER CAPT. JOHN TEAGUE On Monday last, Thomas Adams and George Wills, whose previous examination appeared in our paper on the 8th ultimo, were again brought before the Rev. George Treweeke, and J. P. Mager, Esq., at Andrew's Hotel, Redruth, for final examination. The prisoners came under custody of one of the turnkeys of the county gaol; and the past weeks incarcerations served to have a considerable effect on Wills, who was paler than before, and appeared to watch the proceedings with anxiety and apprehension. Adams, to the contrary, appeared perfectly indifferent to his situation, and seemed to find a brutal satisfaction in insulting the bench and witnesses, and in offering a hideous look of defiance to the scrutiny of the spectators. The public excitement, manifested at the former investigation, was in no degree abated; and it was found necessary to station constables in the passages leading to the ticketing room, in which the magistrates sat, to prevent the inconvenience and danger of too g! reat a press. Thomas Teague, Esq., and several other members of the sufferer's family, attended to witness the proceedings. The interest in the examination was considerably increased by the attendance of Capt. John Teague himself, whose appearance vouched for the severe effect of the injuries he had received. His hurt was principally concussion of the brain, and he was for some time unable to give a distinct account of the assault. With the abatement of the sufferings, however, his recollection of the circumstances had gradually returned, and his deposition was explicit and decisive.   He stated that as he was riding down Blowing-house Hill, he received a violent blow over his eye, by a person he had not previously noticed; and that, as he was falling from his horse, a man, who he distinctly swears was Adams, seized him by his collar. He continued struggling with the assailant some moments, and had struck him a blow with his whip, which made his nose bleed; and he obse! rved him spitting blood, when a woman, whom he [did not] recognize, struck him a blow on the head and stunned him, after which he remembers nothing that occurred previous to Bennett and Launder's taking him, as he thought, from the ground, and leading him home. It will be recollected that Bennetts and Launder, in the course of the former investigation, described Adam's nose as bleeding when they met him, and stated that a woman was holding Capt. Teague's horse. Capt. Teague described himself as still suffering under severe pain in his head, and a sensation of great noise in his ears. In addition to his general statement, Capt. Teague contradicted, in the most positive statement, the account which Adams and Wills had given of the accidental slipping of the horse, and his own fall in consequence. In the course of his examination, he was repeatedly interrupted by Adams, in the most vulgar and insolent manner.

Other witnesses called were Captain Charles PAUL, of Tretuia, and William IVEY, a miner. Both these persons testified to the fact of Adams having been waiting on the hill for some time before the assault. Ivey in particular described the two men as having passed him and his wife on the hill, a little after eight o'clock, as they were going from home to market, and turning back and looking narrowly at them, and then going on again, observing "they (Ivey and his wife) were not the ones." Willis here observed that he could prove his having been in a beer-shop, in Redruth, at that hour. Ivey's description of the person, however, corresponds exactly with what Willis wore on the evening in question, though he could not identify his person.   The impression was that these were the same men. Captain Paul, who knew Adams personally, saw him about ten o'clock, shortly before the assault, and advised him to go home, which he appeared to do, turning into a lane leading off the hill, towards his own house. No other new witnesses were examined; and the prisoners, who declined to ask any questions or to make any further statements, ..., were fully committed to take their trial for assault and attempt to rob at the ensuing assizes; all the witnesses, except Capt. Paul and William Ivey, being bound over to give evidence on that occasion. All classes, and both sexes, of which there was a nearly equal proportion in the room, manifested great sympathy in Capt. Teague's sufferings, and seemed to make it a matter of individual congratulations, that the villains, whoever they might have been, had not accomplished the murder which they had so evidently attempted.

DARING HIGHWAY ROBBERY - On Wednesday se'nnight, about half past seven o'clock in the evening, as Mr. Hill, traveler for Mr. J. Mitchell, grocer, Treville-street Plymouth, was proceeding on his journey in a gig from Bude to Stratton (distant from each other about a mile and a half) he passed a man who immediately gave a shrill whistle, when another man sprang from the hedge and seized the horse by the head; the other fellow then jumped up behind the gig, from which he dragged Mr. Hill and threw him to the ground.   Both the ruffians then rushed at him, and on Mr. Hill repeatedly calling "Murder!" as he laid on the ground, one of the men came behind him, and compressing his knees against his neck, thrust a handful of mud into Mr. Hill's mouth, declaring with an oath that if he uttered another cry, he would 'cut his throat from ear to ear." In this perilous situation, Mr. Hill, having no alternative, was compelled to submit to the mercy of these desperate scoundrels, who immediately rifled his pocket! s of 2s, fortunately all the cash he had with him, having remitted to Mr. Mitchell the previous day, and made their escape by getting over a hedge into a field. Mr. Hill, dreadfully alarmed, followed his horse and gig, which he found proceeding at a slow pace, but was obliged to lead the horse the remainder of the distance, the villains having cut the reins. The numerous and daring robberies committed in this county, within the last month, call for the speedy adoption of some measures likely to lead in the direction of the offenders.

FRIGHTFUL ACCIDENT - On Wednesday afternoon, a carpenter of the name of Bice, in the employ of Mr. E.Cock, of Truro, fell from a wall about twenty-five feet high, and was taken up insensible. The injuries he had sustained appeared at first to be alarming, but on examination by Mr. Belimore, surgeon, it was found that although his arm was fractured, and his wrist dislocated, he was not otherwise seriously hurt, and is likely, under judicious treatment, to recover.


8 MARCH 1839


LISKEARD - We understand that, after surmounting many obstacles, a company has been formed at Liskeard, for lighting the town with gas, and that thirty public lights are to be erected. To the few others of our dark towns we would say - "go and do likewise."

INTERESTING TO FARMERS - Experience has of late years shown the value of straw dung to be so great, especially when mixed with earth as soon as possible after being taken out of the cattle or pigs' house, that a large farmer near Helston has been offered GBP 2.5s per hundred sheaves for all the reed he can spare between this time and harvest for litter.

AWFULLY SUDDEN DEATH - On Wednesday morning last, Mr. Body, land and timber surveyor, of St. Germans, was found dead in a chair, in his bedroom, at the Talbot Inn, Liskeard, partly undressed. It is supposed his death took place at the time he was getting into bed.

COACH ACCIDENT - On Wednesday morning, as the Quicksilver mail was proceeding towards Devonport, on descending the hill near the Watering, about half a mile from St. Austell, a part of the harness belonging to one of the horses broke, and the animal became unmanageable. The driver (Mason) immediately ran the coach against the hedge, and the pole was broken. The concussion was so great, as to pitch the guard (Dunn) from his seat to the ground with such violence as to fracture his leg very severely. The driver also sprained his wrist, and received a deep cut over one of his eyes. Both, however, are doing well. The passengers escaped unhurt. Not the least blame is attributable to any one, the disaster being purely accidental.

AGGRAVATED ASSAULT - At a petty sessions, held at Penzance, on Monday last, before the borough justices, James Corin, jun., was convicted of a most atrocious assault upon a poor German Jew, and fined in the greatest amount the law prescribes, namely GBP 5. It appears that the gentlemen of the mob, at Penzance, fancy they have a prescriptive right, on Shrove-Tuesday, to blacken the faces of persons they meet with burnt cork, and to commit other freaks equally indicative of civilization and good manners; and, accordingly, as the Jew was entering the town on that day, with his little traveling box on his back, he was met by Corin, who seized him, and endeavoured to disfigure his countenance in the most approved fashion of the place. The Jew, naturally enough, resisted, for which Corin knocked him down several times, and beat his head against the pavement with such force that the blood flowed from both ears, and it was for a time feared he was killed. Corin, in default of payment, was committed ! to prison for two months; and we hope this conviction will teach such brutes that they cannot commit their savage freaks with impunity. The correspondent who sends us these particulars suggests the propriety of Penzance following the example of Truro, by immediately organizing an efficient police, which shall be uninfluenced by local feelings.

WHOLESALE ROBBERY - On Monday last, a man named John Montgomery, who resided in Charles-street, Truro, was brought before Captain Kempe, one of the County Magistrates, at the Town-hall, on a charge of having stolen, at different periods, a great number of shoes. It appeared from the evidence adduced, that the prisoner had been in the habit of attending St. Agnes and other western markets, for the purpose of selling tapes and things of that description, and was generally conveyed to those places in a van belonging to Mr. George Wills, shoemaker, of this borough, and another person, who also attended the markets for the purpose of selling shoes. The prisoner, who is lame, was frequently allowed to remain in the van, while the other persons walked up the hills; and it is supposed that he then availed himself of the opportunity, too frequently afforded him, to plunder his friends of their property. Mr. Wills had repeatedly missed several pairs of shoes, at different times, during the last twelve! months, but could not imagine where, or by whom they were taken, the prisoner never being suspected, on account of his strict religious professions, and his being a regular communicant at St. John's Chapel. On Friday last, Mrs. Wills saw some shoes that had been the property of her husband on the stall of a Mr. Arthur Nicholls, at the market in Redruth, who, when questioned upon the manner in which he had become possessed of them, stated that he bought them, as well as many other pairs, of the prisoner. Mrs. Wills then went to Mr. Nicholls's house, and she there found several pairs more - altogether amounting to 30 pairs of children's shoes, which she and her husband could swear to as having been their property, and some of which they could also swear to never having sold. Other shoes, belonging to Jacob Rowe, James and Thomas Harry, [or Harvey], William Clyma, and Edward Jones, of Truro, and to William Seymour, of Chacewater, who all follow the markets, were also found and traced to having been in the possession of the prisoner. Mr. Nicholls stated that he had bought them at different times of the prisoner, who said, on some occasions, that he had got them in exchange for articles in which he dealt, and on others that he had bought them of different people; and he (witness) always gave what he considered to be a fair and proper price for them, considering that he had to sell them again. The prisoner had sold some shoes in Truro, the property of Mr. Nicholls, which he had stolen from that dealer when he went to sell the shoes that he had previously stolen of the persons whose names we have mentioned. There were about 50 or 60 pairs produced and claimed. On Tuesday, the prisoner was again brought up, and the evidence of Rowe and the other shoe-makers who had lost their property was taken; after which the various parties were bound over to prosecute, and the prisoner was fully committed for trial. An application was made on behalf of the prisoner to be admitted to bail, but this the magistrate refused.

POCKET PICKING - On Wednesday last, Hannah JORY, wife of a chimney-sweeper, residing in this borough, was charged before the Mayor with stealing 12s. 4d from the person of John MAGOR, a carpenter, residing in Gwennap. It appeared that the prosecutor went into a public-house, where he saw the prisoner, to whom, on her asking for it, he gave some beer; he then went to another house, where she remained with him some time, and then suddenly left the house, after which he missed the money. The prosecutor pursued the prisoner, and asked her for his money, and she offered him 4s.1d, saying that at the time that was all she had taken from him. He then gave her into custody. Rowe, the constable, had her searched, and there was found upon her person the amount that the prisoner had said he had lost. The prisoner was fully committed for trial.

ROBBERY - On Saturday last, William Bennetts was charged before J. P. Magor, Esq., at Redruth, with having stolen a quantity of blanketing of a peculiar quality, called plain country blanketing, used chiefly in the west of the county, the property of Philip Blamey, jun., of Gwennap, wool-factor. The prisoner keeps a cook's shop at Camborne, at which the vans stop, and goods are there deposited by different parties to be conveyed to their various destinations by other vans. On the 26th of December last, Mr. Blamey sent some blanketing by his father's cartman to be left at the prisoner's house, and thence to be forwarded to Mr. William Hoskin, of Penzance. Some parcels were forwarded, but one of them never arrived at its destination; and suspicions having been excited against the prisoner, a search-warrant was obtained by Mr. Tippet, the constable of Camborne, who searched his house, and found a quantity of blanketing answering the description of that which was lost. The prisoner wa! s then apprehended, and underwent an examination, after which he was bound over to answer the charge at the Sessions.

SIR CHARLES LEMON'S MINING SCHOOL - It is hardly necessary to repeat the observation that the proposed course of instruction is not undertaken with the view of teaching Mining, for that can only be acquired in the mine itself, and the best opportunities are already afforded in various and extensive works through-out the County. But with respect to those arts and sciences, which, from their close connection with mining, are most valuable to a Cornishman, equal facilities do not abound, nor are they generally within the reach of that large class of mining agents, engineers, and others, who would be chiefly benefited by them. It is proposed experimentally to supply this deficiency; and to afford facilities for attaining useful scientific and practical knowledge in the midst of the Cornish mining district, on the following plan:

The principal course will commence early in July, with appropriate separate series of lectures and examinations in Mathematics, Mechanics, Metallurgic chemistry, and Mineralogy. A detailed programme of this course will be submitted to the public in due time. At present it is only necessary to point out by what steps the student may prepare himself to enter on these studies with the best effect.

Probably two classes will be formed according to the attainments of the pupils. But, as the Professors conducting this course remain in the County only a few months, it is of the greatest importance that, as far as possible, the students should be prepared at once, to take their places in the higher class. To afford the means of such preparation, Mr. Dickenson, a gentleman well versed in the practical applications of science, will reside at Truro, from the end of the month, till the commencement of the principal course, or longer, if it should be found expedient. Probably he will superintend his class four days in the week, at such hours as may best suit the convenience of the students, and at other times, instruct private pupils.

The fee for the preliminary course will be one guinea; and each student will be required to provide himself with a few articles, such as books and instruments, the expense of which will be kept as low as possible.

The subjects taught by Mr. Dickenson will comprise Algebra; the elements of Geometry, which forms the only basis on which an accurate knowledge of planning and drawing sections of mines or machinery can be obtained, and which is indispensable in the execution of many most important works connected with mining. The ELEMENTS of LAND and MINE SURVEYING will be studied with reference to general principles; and the students will also be required to assist in actual Surveys, and will be instructed in the construction of Geological plans and sections.

It is particularly requested that those who wish to attend Mr. Dickenson's class, will lose no time in sending in their names to Mr. W. M. Tweedy, Dr. Carlyon, or Dr. Barham, at Truro; specifying whether it is their intention to go and return each day, or to reside in Truro.

It is not at present in contemplation to form any class at Redruth; but if a demand should exist, arrangements have been made by which that want may be immediately supplied. Some, without doubt, who may wish to take advantage of the July course will find it inconvenient to attend either at Truro, or Redruth; and such persons will do well by other means to make themselves acquainted with Algebra as far as the solution of simple equations, and with two or three books of Euclid.

ALLEGED MURDER AT ST. AUSTELL - On Monday last, an inquest was held at the Workhouse, St. Austell, on the body of Lavinia Bell, aged 25, wife of William BELL, an itinerant tinker, who it was reported had been murdered by her husband, near that town. Much excitement was caused by this report, which, however, we are happy to say, was not fully confirmed by the evidence.

Soon after eleven o'clock, on Monday, J. Hamley, Esq., the Cornoner, having arrived, the jury were sworn, and proceeded at once to view the body, which was placed in a coffin in an upstairs room. On the return of the jury -

Richard BLAMEY, the first witness, was called. Witness is a miner, and lives at St. Blazey Gate, was at the Britannia Inn, St. Blazey, on the night of Saturday last, about eight o'clock, where he saw the deceased. She did not come inside, but witness heard there was a fortune-teller outside the door, and went out. Witness and two other lads accompanied her about a quarter of a mile on the road to St. Austell. She asked how far they were going, as she liked company. She appeared intoxicated. They had not proceeded far before witness saw a man come from the hedge on the side of the road, who said to the woman"you d..d drunken b.___h, where have you been to" and knocked her down, and when down kicked her very hard. Witness does not know exactly where he kicked her, but thinks it was near the abdomen. She then rose and proceeded a little further, and witness followed her, when the man again knocked her down; but witness will not swear he kicked her again. Previously to! his knocking her down the second time, she said something to him, which witness believes was "your d__d bloody eyes." The second blow knocked her down on her hands and knees. Witness did not go further than "Three-Doors" [a hamlet] after them, but heard a cry proceeding from a place beyond that, and blows given, but saw nothing further. The man was dressed in a sleeve waistcoat, corduroy breeches, and leggings.

Joseph ROWTER, sworn and examined. Is a shoemaker residing at St. Austell, but works at St. Blazey. Was returning from work on Saturday night last, about half past eight o'clock, when near Three-Doors heard a moan, as of persons quarrelling. Two lads requested him to stop, as a man was beating his wife.   Heard blows being given, and very violent language. Heard a woman's voice say "my dear, my dear" and an man answer "go home". Heard this two or three times, and then the man said "it is it not a shame you are not home, and have a young child only five weeks old." Witness did not like to interfere between man and wife, and therefore took a circuitous route to avoid them, which he did until he came to Holmbush, where he overtook the deceased, whom he had seen in the course of the day. Wished her good-night as he passed, which she returned. Witness went into a house in Holmbush, and stopped about 15 minutes, and when he came to Trudgian's house, near the watering, about half a mile from St. Austell, saw several persons assembled, and ascertained that the deceased was there very ill. Told the persons that her husband had been "walloping" her, and he would soon be along. Did not stop long, as he had some club-money to pay for a man, and unless it was paid in St. Austell before a certain hour the man would be fined. In reply to a question by a juror, the witness said he did not know the man was beating her so bad, otherwise he would have stopped, as he was not afraid; only he did not like to interfere fearing he might get a thrashing from both parties.

Jane DAWE sworn. Is a married woman and a mother of five children; her husband is a miner. Lives at Holmbush, and left that place 20 minutes before nine on Saturday night last, to go to St. Austell. Overtook deceased near the mile-and-half stone, and went in company with her for a little distance, when she asked witness to help her along, which she did. She appeared very ill, and said she was very ill indeed. She did not say anything to witness respecting the ill-treatment of her husband. When they came to Mount Charles, witness saw a man standing at the corner of a house, who deceased said was her husband. He passed on, and she said "Bill, my dear, stop." He did not, but went on. From what witness saw of her, she thought she had had a child very recently, but the witness said it was a month since. This however witness did not believe. When they came to the watering, she took witness's hand in her's, and said "I shall die before I reach the town." When they came! to Edward TRUDGIAN's house, she made a stand, and looked witness in the face, but did not speak, and then fell down. Witness asked her to rise, but she could not. A man named Thomas STEPHENS came by, but did not render any assistance as he said the deceased was drunk. She was then vomiting. A man then came forth, and witness proceeded to St. Austell, where she stopped about 20 minutes, and on her return deceased was dead. Before witness left her first, and whilst she was living, Trudgian's wife refused to let her be brought into her house, and not one of the neighbours would admit her.

John PHILLIPS is a miner, and lives at Holmbush. Was returning home from St. Austell on Saturday night about a quarter before nine, and when he came to Trudgian's house, saw the deceased, and Jane Dawe supporting her. Asked what was the matter, and Jane Dawe said that a poor woman there was very ill. Witness asked if she was intoxicated, and was answered in the negative. Witness took her up, and held her head on his knee. She said "Don't beat me." Witness said, "No one here shall beat you."   Witness held her about half an hour. Several of the neighbours were assembled, but all refused to take her into their homes. Some one said she was a drunken wench. While witness was holding her, Capt. Barrett came along, and promised to send help from the town. Witness went to procure some straw for her to sit on, but before he returned she was dead. Before he went for the straw, he heard a "guddle," and asked for a candle; but the women said that a young man should not see what a state she was in, and no candle was brought.

Maria HARVEY sworn. Is the wife of John HARVEY, of St. Austell. Keeps a lodging-house there. Deceased and her husband came there to lodge last Monday, and on Saturday both went on to look for work. Deceased left her children, one three years old, the other a month, with witness. William Bell came home about six o'clock in the evening, and asked whether his wife had returned. He then put down his box and went away. Soon after eight o'clock, he returned, and witness asked if he had seen her. He said yes. Witness asked him if he had beaten her, and he said no, but that he had kicked her two or three times. Witness asked this question, because she knew he was in the habit of beating her. He then went out, and witness had not seen him since. Before he went out, he begged some one to go for her, as he had left her near the watering, in company with some females.

Jane HARVEY sworn. Is sister-in-law to the last witness, and is a single woman. She corroborated the evidence of the last witness, and added that at the request of Bell, she went to look for the deceased.   Went part of the way, but hearing a noise, was afraid to proceed, and returned home. Went away the second time, and on going through the town, heard some one say that Lavinia Bell was dead. When witness came to where she was, some men were putting her into a cart. On witness's return home this time, she heard some one call her when she was near the Fountain Inn; she turned, and found it was Bell, who asked her if she had seen his wife. Witness answered yes, and said she was dead. He said "Dead?" Witness again said yes. He said "Then I will be dead too in a quarter of an hour." He requested witness to send up a boy to him at once, and witness turned to go home, when she saw Bell run as fast as he could down the new road to Truro. The remainder of the witness's evidence was not material, except that she stated in reply to a juror, that when Bell came home the second time, he said he was afraid the constables were after him.

Mr. Thomas Glencott VAWDREY was then sworn, and as his evidence was very important, and was delivered in a remarkably clear and intelligible manner, we give it at length. [it has been condensed] [Surgeon of St. Austell, partner of Mr. ROBINSON. ]   I was requested by Mr. B. NUTT, the relieving officer of the St. Austell Union to accompany him to the watering, as a woman there was very ill, and supposedly recently delivered of a child. I immediately went, but found her dead about half an hour. The body was taken to the workhouse, where I examined it. [ It had bruises on the jaw, but it wasn't fractured; bruises on the arms; bruises in the groin area, about two inches below the spine. The lower garments were saturated in blood. No previous evidence of disease. Unusual lack of blood in the upper part of the body. The uterus was found to be enlarged to twice the size it ought to be at four weeks after parturition; its blood-vessels were much enlarged and empty. There was nothing to indicate that any external blow had directly injured the uterus. ] "The exciting causes of the flow of blood were - first, the cruel treatment of her husband causing a quickened state of the circulation; second, her having drunk largely of spirituous fluids; and thirdly, her having walked a long journey. I, however, feel it is my duty to state that had she, at the time she fell down from faintness, been taken into the nearest house, and put to bed, I can see no reason why she might not have recovered, with judicious medical treatment. But so far from being taken care of, she was permitted to die on the road, without any assistance."

After Mr. Vawdrey had given this evidence, the Coroner requested strangers to withdraw; and on our readmittance we found the jury had unanimously come to the following verdict: That the deceased, Lavinia BELL, came to her death in consequence of a profuse uterine hemorrhage, induced by the excitement attendant on the ill treatment received from her husband, and accelerated by her general habits of intemperance, and the exposure and neglect consequent on a refusal on the part of a person, near to whose house she fell, to admit her.

We subjoin the following particulars which did not come out in evidence: A woman called on Mr. Nutt, the relieving officer of St. Austell, on the night in question. {Told him to hurry, a woman was very ill at the watering, and had just had a child. He engaged two men from the workhouse, and took a cart to the spot - after securing the assistance of the surgeon.] From information which Mr. Nutt received, he was induced to search for her husband, as report said that he had murdered her; and this rumour prevailed, until the whole neighbourhood was in a great state of excitement. He procured a constable, and they searched all the beer-shops and lodging houses in the neighbourhood without success. Messengers were dispatched in every direction, giving a full description of him; but at the time of our writing he has not been taken. He is a traveling tinker, about 5 feet 5 inches tall, of a dark complexion, rather stout made, and has no whiskers; but hair is grown, combed forwards, and curled in front. He had on a green plush waistcoat with sleeves, but no [collar], corduroy breeches and leggings, high shoes, and a new black hat. His name, as we have already stated, is William Bell. The deceased had been at a beer-shop all afternoon, where she had been drinking, and said she was waiting for her husband; but between seven and eight in the evening, she set off on her return to St. Austell with two other women, halted at the Brittiania Inn but refused to enter, and met the witness Blamey. The rest of her history will be seen from the evidence.

We need scarcely add, that on the reason of death becoming known, the excitement, which had been very high throughout the area, abated to a very considerable degree. The body was interred on Thursday, in the St. Austell burial ground. [[no mention of what happened to the children; perhaps they were taken to the Workhouse.]]


15 MARCH 1839, Friday


ADVERTISEMENTS - CAUTION Whereas my wife, Jane BEST, of the Parish of St. Stephens in Branwell, has left me, and gone to reside in the parish of St. Ewe, this is to caution all persons against trusting her, as I will not be answerable for any debts which she may contract after this public notice. JOHN BEST March 9, 1839

CAUTION. A Separation having taken place between me, the undersigned James TREZISE, and Margaret, my wife. This is therefore to give Notice, that I will not be answerable for any debts she may contract after the date hereof.JAMES TREZISE St. Just in Penwith, March 5, 1839

NEWS - THE TREFFRY VIADUCT - We beg to direct the attention of our readers to a report in another column of the interesting proceedings at the laying of the foundation stone of the Treffry viaduct. We are happy to see that the public-spirited exertions of Mr. Treffry are so highly appreciated by his excellent neighbours, who on this occasion all appeared to vie with each other in praising the hon. Gentleman's unceasing perseverance in works of a beneficial tendency; and we hope the proposition which was mooted by Sir Colman Rashleigh, with respect to the presentations of a public testimonial to Mr. Treffry, will be fully carried out. It is quite evident, from the feeling manifested by the meeting when the subject was mentioned, that such a call will be heartily responded to, and it will be some slight acknowledgement of public regard and esteem to a gentleman who has conferred the most lasting and valuable benefits on his native county.

STRATTON - On Tuesday, the 2nd instant, the foundation stone of a new Wesleyan association chapel was laid at Stratton, by Mr. Joseph May, of Heal. The Rev. Henry Williams preached from 1st of Cor., 3e, 9v after which an address was delivered by Mr. C. Arthur. Notwithstanding the unfavourable state of the weather, the attendance was good.

WHEAL JUAN - Wheal Juan tin-mine, in the parish of Breage, was worked about 80 to 100 years since; and the report handed down in that it was stopped by the want of power to draw off the water. There was only one shaft sunk, to about 18 fathoms deep; and when the old men were driven, they left a very fine course of tin in the shaft. It is extraordinary that during that long period, and particularly five years since, no one should have attempted to ascertain the truth of these reports, till lately, when a party of adventurers erected a steam-engine, and soon cleared up the bottom, finding large and rich stores of tin amongst the attle in their progress. Having done this, it was discovered that the old men worked till they were driven by the water, leaving behind them their cutters, tools, a hat, cap, and a bell; with a very fine course of tin three feet wide, and a level extending west about five fathoms long.

CAUTION - Late on Monday evening last, the family of Mr. Richards, surgeon, of Rosewyn-row, Truro, was alarmed by a fire that had broken out in the servant's bedroom. It appears that the girl had retired to rest, having left the candle near the bed, and when the fire was discovered the bed-curtains were in flames. Fortunately, Mr. Richards was still up, and by his exertions the fire was soon got under without much damage.

NARROW ESCAPE - On Thursday sen'night, as Mr. Charles Pascoe, tailor & c., Helston, was proceeding from thence to Porthleaven, when just past Penrose, his horse, a spirited young animal, suddenly took fright at something passing, started off at a furious rate, and carried him about half a mile, when, in turning a sharp corner leading into Wheal Penrose mine, he was thrown several yards over the horse's neck; he was almost immediately taken up, when it was found he had only received a small wound in the knee, and two or three slight bruises. He is now nearly recovered.

CORONER's INQUEST - On Monday last, an inquest was held before John Carlyon, Esq., coroner, at Mylor Bridge, on the body of Ann Oats, wife of Michael Oats, of Mylor, blacksmith. The deceased made a hearty dinner, and was observed for her more than usually cheerful nature on Sunday last. Immediately after dinner she went out, intending to walk to Restroenguet[?]; but she had not proceeded very far before she dropped down, and died in the road. Verdict, Died by the Visitation of God.


22 MARCH 1839, Friday


29 MARCH 1839, Friday


CORNWALL LENT ASSIZES

CROWN COURT - Wednesday, March 27, 1839 before Mr. Baron Gurney

The calendar was exceedingly heavy, there being 56 prisoners in gaol, a number, we believe, far greater than has ever before been committed for trial in any one assize in this county - and there are also many persons out on bail. Besides these, there are ten prisoners in gaol confined on former orders, most of whom are imprisoned for smuggling. The following gentlemen formed the Grand Jury: Hon. George Matthew Fortescue, Foreman
Sir Wm. Lewis Salasbury Trelawey, Bart.
Sir Charles Lemon, Bart, M.P.
Sir John Colman Rashleigh, Bart.
Sir Joseph Sawle Graves Sawle, Esq.
Edward Wm. Wynne Pendarves, Esq., M.P.
John Hearle Tremayne, Esq.
Gordon Wm. Francis Gregor, Esq.
Edward Collins, Esq.
John Samuel Eays, Esq.
Richard Johns, Esq.
Francis Rodd, Esq.
William Henry Pole Carew, Esq.
Thomas John Phillipps, Esq.
Nicholas Kendall, Esq.
John King Lethbridge, Esq.
George Boughton Kingdon, Esq.
Richard Doidge, Esq.
William David, Esq.
William Arnold Yeo, Esq.
John Lyne, Esq.
Wm. Hext, Esq.
Charles Boone Graves Sawle, Esq.

The Grand Jury having been sworn the usual proclamation against vice and immorality was read. [The Charge was then read, in which His Lordship expressed his views on the cases.]

ROBBERY OF MESSRS. COODE'S BANK - Henry LATCHER, 22, was charged with having broken into the office of Messrs. Coode, bankers and solicitors, St. Austell, and stolen therefrom a large quantity of money &c. Mr. Cockburn and Mr. Montague Smith appeared for the prosecution and Mr, Rowe defended the prisoner. Mr Cockburn stated the case and called - Edward COODE, jun., who was examined by Mr. M. Smith - I am an attorney living at St. Austell, I carry on the business in partnership with my father, Edward COODE, and my brother Thomas COODE., We also carry on business as bankers. I remember the 18th of January; I left the house about nine o'clock; my room is at the top of two pair of stairs. I locked the door and took the key with me. Previous to my leaving the room I locked the drawer in my desk where I keep my cash. There was in it about GBP 95. There was a double sovereign, nine guineas and a half, sovereigns, crown pieces, half-crowns, shillings, sixpences, four penny pieces, and copper coin. There was some of that coin wrapped in paper. One paper contained GBP 15.5s; another paper contained GBP 8.4s. The one that had the GBP 15.5s had the dates on the paper in my own handwriting. There was GBP 3 in silver in a yellow canvas bag. There were two seals in the drawer, one of which had my initials E.C. All the ! coin and these seals were there when I left. In consequence of being applied to, I went to the office between eight and nine the next morning. I found my brother there and several of my clerks, and Elizabeth WILLIAMS, who cleans the office, and the constables. I went to my own room, and found that the door had been broken open, and part of the door had been broken down, and some instrument introduced to force the lock. Two of the drawers that were locked had also been forced open. I looked at the drawer and the money was gone. One seal was taken and the other left. The seal with E.C. on it was taken away. I examined the other parts of the house. In my brother's room the accounts of the bank are carried on, in my own principally attorney's business. The door of my brother's room was just in the same state as my own. In consequence of information received, I went with my brother and constables, on the 24th of June, to the prisoner's house, in St. Ewe. The prisoner was taken into the house and searched by ROBERTS, a constable, who found a purse upon him, which contained a half-sovereign and some sixpences. Roberts, my brother, and MICHELL, another constable, went up stairs, leaving the prisoner with me. After they had been upstairs for some time, they inquired for the key of a chest that was there, and the prisoner said his wife had had it in the morning to take some money out to pay for some fish. After some time, Thomas COODE called out "It is here - it is all right." I then went up stairs, and my brother put into my hand a piece of paper marked GBP 15 and the date, in my own handwriting. I immediately returned it to him. I did not see the money. The prisoner was then handcuffed, and the money counted up stairs, and he was taken immediately before the magistrates. There was a seal found, which was mine.

Cross examined by Mr. Rowe - I last saw that paper not ten minutes before I left the office on the night prior to the robbery.

Thomas COODE examined: I was at the office on Friday night the 18th of January. The last room I was in was the clerk's office on the ground floor. I left them about ten o'clock, when I locked the outer door. Before I left I heard a slight noise in the passage. The door of the room that I was in, as well as the street door, was open. I did not go to ascertain what the noise was caused by. I and CROKER, a clerk, were the last persons that left the office. My room is on the first floor; which I locked when I left. I had locked two of the drawers myself; the others were all locked. There was money in three different drawers that were locked - between GBP 3 and 4 in one, in silver and pence, GBP 33 in silver in another, in a canvas bag, and there was some gold and silver in another drawer to the amount of between GBP 7 and 8. No one but myself and a clerk named MARTIN had keys of these drawers. Very shortly before I left the office, I had occasion to go into that room; I locked the outer door after me, and come down into the room on the ground floor again. When I left the room the drawers were all locked. I was called soon after seven the next morning. I found the door had been forcibly broken open, and all the drawers had been broken open and the money taken away. There was a key of an iron box which had been taken away as well.   The witness then went on to state that on the 24th he went to the prisoner's house with his brother - that when he asked the prisoner's wife for the key of the chest which he said she had had, she denied that she had had it - that he and the constables then searched the room and found a key which fitted the chest between the sacking and the bed. On unlocking the chest, the constable ROBERTS put his hand down into the corner, and said here is a bundle of money, and I called out to my brother - it is all right we have found it. There was a seal there which I knew to belong to my brother, with the initial! s "E.C." upon it, and I found the key of the iron chest which was in my office.

Hugh Ebrington CROKER stated that it was his duty to close the windows and shutters of the prosecutor's premises - that he did so on the 18th of January - that on the 19th, about seven in the morning, he found the lower sash window thrown up as far as it would go and the window-shutters open. The shutters opened from the inside.

Elizabeth WILLIAMS, an old woman who cleans the offices, stated that when she came on the 19th, she found the outer door of the office locked, but the inner doors were broken open and also the drawers. She gave the alarm. Matthew ROBERTS, constable, confirmed the statements of Mr. Edward and Mr. Thomas Coode, and produced the money found in the prisoner's chest, as well as the seal, the piece of paper, the canvas bag, and other things stolen, most of which Mr. Edward Coode recognized as his property.

Thomas LEAN examined: I was at a beer-shop on Friday evening, the 18th of January. The beer-shop is a few yards from Messrs. Coode's offices in St. Austell.   I saw the prisoner there first about eight o'clock, and had a conversation with him. He took out a dark lantern, and said "this is a handy thing"; and he showed how it acted. He turned it round. He took out a piece of candle to put into it, and lighted it, but it was too long, and he then took out another piece which was smaller. This he lit and put into the lantern. He ten turned round something and it was dark. He put it into his pocket, and covered it over, and said "no one can see this." I think when he left it was about half-past nine, or a quarter to ten. Mr. ROWE said a few words in defense of the prisoner, and then called several witnesses who gave the prisoner a good character for honesty up to the present charge. GUILTY.

His Lordship, in passing sentence, said it is lamentable to see a man, young and able like yourself to earn an honest and respectable livelihood, engaged in midnight plunder. The law has annexed a severe punishment to your crime, and to deter others I shall make an example of you. You will have to spend a large portion of your life in a very dismal country, in a very laborious employment, working in chains upon a public road, and having bitterly to lament that you did not pursue the path of honesty in your own country, which would have enabled you to work for yourself to advantage, while you will there have to work for others. His Lordship then sentenced him to 15 years transportation.

Anne BRAY, 22, was charged with having stolen two sovereigns and a half sovereign, the property of William BILLING, her master.   It appeared from the evidence, that the prosecutor is a farmer living at St. Stephens, near Saltash, and that he engaged the prisoner as a servant on the last day of January, from which time she lived with him till the 9th of February, when he and his wife went out. On their return, they found the prisoner had gone away, and on looking into their room, they discovered that a drawer had been opened at the back and the money in question abstracted from it. The prisoner was apprehended in Devonport, on the 14th, and on searching her lodgings a lot of new finery and a new bonnet were discovered. She was taken into custody, and underwent an examination, which was adjourned. When she was taken to the lock-up house, she requested that she might not be put in there, and said she would tell where the money was, and also what she had done with a ring t! hat she had stolen if they would put her somewhere else. She then stated that the ring was under the floor in her bedroom at Mr. Billing's, where it was afterwards found. GUILTY - six months' hard labour.

Thomas DAVEY, 15, was charged with having stolen a pair of gaiters and a jacket, the property of William WILKINS. The prosecutor is a working miner, and was employed at the Great Consols Mines, in Gwennap. On the 3rd or 4th of January, he left his clothes in a changing house, the door of which he locked, and when he came again he found the lock had been broken and the door was open. The stated things were gone. He immediately went, in consequence of what he heard, to look for the prisoner, whom he found on the railroad at work, with his jacket dovetailed so as to fit his comparatively very diminutive person; but still not so far altered as to prevent the [prosecutor] from recognizing it, and describing certain marks in the interior to a gentleman who was by, and who examined the jacket to see that it answered the description. The boy also had the gaiters on. The things were produced in Court, and sworn to by the prosecutor, the prisoner had also confessed that he had taken them. The boy, who was an intelligent youth, appeared very penitent, and made good use of his eyes. The jury found him GUILTY, and the Judge sentenced him to 14 days hard labour, one week's solitary confinement, and to be once privately whipped. The last part of the sentence was directed to be carried out in such a way as to make the prisoner's penitence more deep-seated than ever.

William SMITH, 18, pleaded GUILTY to having feloniously broken and entered the dwelling-house of James COLLINS, on Penryn, and stolen therefrom one cloth coat and one pair of cloth trowsers, the property of Mr. Collins. The Learned Judge, in passing sentence, said he found that he had been in custody five times before, and had been convicted once. He had abused the mercy shown him, and had returned to his wicked courses, and he must deliver society from such a pest. The sentence of the Court was that he be transported beyond the seas for the term of his natural life.

William COWLE, 26, was charged with having stolen a bag containing barley, from the barn of William LANG, of St. Germans. The prosecutor is a farmer, and the prisoner was employed by him. In consequence of information, a farm servant in Mr. Lang's employ, named Isaac CATER, went into the barn, on the 19th of January, and he there saw a bundle of straw with a bag containing about three pecks of barley in it. The straw was bound round with two bands, one at each end. Cater locked the door and took the key with him. In the evening, the prisoner asked for the key, and Cater went with him to the barn. The prisoner then took up the bundle of straw, but was prevented from taking it away; and when he found that he had been discovered, he begged the witness would let him off. This Cater refused to do; and the prisoner then appealed to the prosecutor's wife, and afterwards to the prosecutor himself, but without success. GUILTY - three months' hard labour.

Robert LEAN, 37, was charged with having stolen a quantity of barley in the sheaf, the property of James ROWE. The prosecutor resides in Breage, about a mile and a half from the prisoner, who was his tenant. He had a bullock's house which adjoined a pig's house of the prisoner's, and the prisoner "meated" his cattle, in return for which he lived rent free. There is a hole in the wall communicating from the bullock's to the pig's house; and in consequence of what he heard, William ROWE was, on the 6th of January, induced to watch the prisoner's motions, and he then saw him bring into the bullock's house a bundle of straw, which he was in the .. of passing through the hole in the wall for the benefit of the porkers, when the prosecutor laid his astounding hand on his collar, and made him drop it. The prisoner was then given into custody to a constable, named HUDY, who had a conversation with him. The constable asked him why he did it, and the prisoner replied that he did! not know, but it was very foolish. He said he had done it at different times - he did not want it - but he had done it, and he must bear the punishment. The prisoner now said that he had never received any thing from the prosecutor for what he had done for him, and he did not consider that he was doing any wrong in taking the straw. He then called Mr. James PAYNTER, who gave him a good character, saying that the prisoner had worked for him three years, and he had found him a very honest man, and would again employ him immediately he was freed from this charge. The jury found him GUILTY, and the JUDGE sentenced him to one month's hard labour.

William TREVARTHER, 21, pleaded guilty to the charge of having stolen a quantity of candles, the property of John NORTHEY, of Gwennap. The prisoner had been convicted before, and the court sentenced him to 14 years' transportation.

James Henry MICHELL, 14, and Richard PERRY, 12, were charged with having stolen a lead weight, weighing about 50 lbs, the property of Robert MILLETT, of Marazion. It appeared that a weight had been taken out of the prosecutor's store, at Marazion, which he saw about a fortnight to three weeks before the 29th of December. He next saw it at Wheal Fortune mine, in Ludgvan. Mr. HILL, the store-keeper of the mine, stated that he had received it from a person named OATES.   Mr. OATES was next called, and he stated that his wife had purchased the lead in question as old metal, and he had afterwards conveyed it to Wheal Fortune mine.   Mrs. OATES, in her evidence, stated that the weight she bought was 53 lbs., and she bought it of MICHELL, who said he had picked it up on the Orcas rock. She gave 4s.3d for it. Her husband afterwards took it away. The evidence as to the identity of the weight produced, being the same as that she had bought of the prisoner, and which had also been conveyed away by her husband, being very unsatisfactory, the jury found both prisoners NOT GUILTY. The Learned Judge censured the conduct of Mr. Oates for having p! urchased the lead of these boys, and ordered that he should not be paid his expenses. The Grand Jury found no bills against John MILL, 22, charged with having stolen from Carn Brea Mines, a flannel shirt, the property of Edwin PRIDEAUX; and William MEDLIN, 12, charged with having broken into the dwelling-house of Jonathan MALLET, of Penryn, and stolen therefrom a quantity of bread and butter.

The Court rose shortly before six o'clock.

MIRACULOUS ESCAPE - Last week, a little boy, about [xx] years of age, son of John Mitchell, owner of one of the Newquay vans, while playing with some other children at the top of the cliff in that village, fell over. The [dis]tance which he must either have slided or rolled was measured, and found to be 63 feet; and as the bottom of the cliff projected considerably, he must have fallen perpendicularly 26 feet, alighting on a quantity of small [lode]stones, which had been washed up by the late high spring tides, and which, it is supposed, gave way and eased his fall. Happily, the little fellow received no other injuries other than a few slight bruises, and was able to resume his amusements next day.

THE LATE CAPTAIN THOMAS TEAGUE - On Thursday, the 21st instant, at the Tresavean ticketing, Truro, at which this enterprising, disinterested, and worthy gentleman had for many years presided, Mr. Borlase, solicitor, who happened to attend, paid a just tribute to his memory in an appropriate speech, which was ably seconded by Mr. Vice, and unanimously responded to by all present. Mr. Borlase's eulogy was as well timed as it was justly merited by the public and private worth of the lamented gentleman to whom it referred.

CHACEWATER - On Tuesday last, being the day on which Matthew MOYLE, Esq., attained his 91st year, having lived 21 years beyond the computed age of man, a splendid dinner was given him by his friends, at the Lion Inn, at which 35 gentlemen attended. The room was tastefully decorated, and the dinner and wines provided for the occasion by Mr. Sims did him great credit. The health of the venerable and worthy philanthropist, who was the guest of the company on this occasion, having been introduced by the chairman, Mr. Gill, in an excellent speech, in which he described the value of such characters to the community at large, it was drunk with enthusiasm. Mr. Moyle was so overpowered by his feelings as to be unable to return thanks, which was done for him by Mr. Borlase. Several gentlemen also ably addressed the meeting, and lastly Mr. Moyle, who expressed his gratitude in most eloquent language, for the great mark of respect that was shown him by his brother parishioners and friends. An excellent band of music attended, and played many beautiful airs between the songs; and throughout the evening uninterrupted harmony prevailed.

BOSCASTLE INSTITUTION - On Friday, the 15th inst., Mr. John Mead delivered a lecture to this society on the Natural Properties and Operations of the Human Mind. The lecturer must have made his subject a matter of frequent study, as we have seldom heard the powers of the mind explained or treated on with such perspicuity. . .

NISI PRIUS

Baragwanath vs Richards - Mr Erle and Mr. Butt for plaintiff, Mr. Crowder for defendant. The plaintiff, Michael Baragwanath, kept the hotel in St. Ives. The defendant, Thomas Richards, was his son-in-law. The declaration stated that the wife of plaintiff, and his two daughters, had, in March, 1837, voluntarily left his house; and that the defendant had received and harboured them contrary to the wishes and against the will of the plaintiff, whereby he had lost the society of his wife, and the assistance of his daughters. The defendant pleaded first the general issue; secondly, that he harboured the wife and daughters with the leave and licence of plaintiff; and thirdly, that the plaintiff had behaved so violently toward them that defendant had received them out of humanity.

Robert QUICK, cabinetmaker and joiner, had been for several years acquainted with plaintiff, who kept the hotel at St. Ives. Knew his wife, and his daughters Elizabeth HICHENS, and Matilda, who were now about 16 and 14 years old. [Witness testified that what violence he saw was started by the wife, who often slapped or hit him. Had seen the husband "groggy", but never violent. She left her husband in 1835, and came back again not long before she left in March, 1837.   Richards was a poor man, and had but two rooms and a small garret. Witness had also seen plaintiff's children cut his head open with a mug or candlestick.]

Robert TOY was ostler and brewer at the St. Ives Hotel. [ Was there when the wife and daughters left in March, 1837. Testified the wife said the goods were as much her's as his, and she took the teapot, and "smote" the things down from the dresser. Said he'd seen children spit on father when he was drunk, and insulted him.]

Cross-examined - had often seen his master drunk at ten or eleven o'clock in the forenoon. He would then sit in one place from morning till night. He was the weakest man alive when drunk. Henry RICHARDS, carrier, of St. Ives, gave evidence to the same effect.

Mr. Crowder addressed the Jury for defendant, alleging the improbability of this action being really brought by the plaintiff, to be restored to the society of those who the witnesses had said treated him so unnaturally. The learned gentleman then dwelt on the proved poverty of Richards, and contended that nothing but the direst necessity could have induced the wife and daughters to seek refuge in his house, where there was not even a bed for their use.

Ann BLIGHT called; lived at the hotel from Aug. 1831 to June 1835.   Baragwanath took to drink in 1831. Witness often saw him very drunk, nearly all the day through. He was then very violent with his family, and used abusive language. She left his employ in 1835, due to his drinking. [described a very violent fight just before the wife left in 1835]; wife was a very quiet and industrious woman, never spoke except to vindicate herself. Joseph JOHNS kept an inn at St. Ives. Had often seen Baragwanath very drunk. He was then almost mad. Wife was a very clever, quiet, industrious woman, and was very much afraid of him. John RICHARDS, father of defendant, said when Baragwanath was drunk, he was wild drunk and would follow his wife [making comments, and criticizing, then threatening.]

Witness talked to him about his wife, and said "a house divided can't stand." He said "he would bring her a pauper on the town." Never saw him smite her. Mr. James Nicholas PENALUNA, of Helston, was at St. Ives on the 23rd of February, 1837, and took a bed at the hotel. This witness spoke of an outrageous noise that was made by Baragwanath, and continued for five or six hours during the night; adding that he (witness) thought he should have had to defend his life. Mr. Erle replied; and after the Learned Judge had summoned up, the jury retired, and in the evening, returned a verdict for plaintiff.

The court rose about seven o'clock.

Court Cases

James Henry MICHELL, 14, and Richard PERRY, 12, were charged with having stolen a lead weight, weighing about 50 lbs, the property of Robert MILLETT, of Marazion. It appeared that a weight had been taken out of the prosecutor's store, at Marazion, which he saw about a fortnight to three weeks before the 29th of December. He next saw it at Wheal Fortune mine, in Ludgvan. Mr. HILL, the store-keeper of the mine, stated that he had received it from a person named OATES. Mr. OATES was next called, and he stated that his wife had purchased the lead in question as old metal, and he had afterwards conveyed it to Wheal Fortune mine.   Mrs. OATES, in her evidence, stated that the weight she bought was 53 lbs., and she bought it of MICHELL, who said he had picked it up on the Orcas rock. She gave 4s.3d for it. Her husband afterwards took it away. The evidence as to the identity of the weight produced, being the same as that she had bought of the prisoner, and which had also be! en conveyed away by her husband, being very unsatisfactory, the jury found both prisoners NOT GUILTY. The Learned Judge censured the conduct of Mr. Oates for having purchased the lead of these boys, and ordered that he should not be paid his expenses. The Grand Jury found no bills against John MILL, 22, charged with having stolen from Carn Brea Mines, a flannel shirt, the property of Edwin PRIDEAUX; and William MEDLIN, 12, charged with having broken into the dwelling-house of Jonathan MALLET, of Penryn, and stolen therefrom a quantity of bread and butter.

The Court rose shortly before six o'clock.

NISI PRIUS - Baragwanath vs Richards - Mr Erle and Mr. Butt for plaintiff, Mr. Crowder for defendant. The plaintiff, Michael Baragwanath, kept the hotel in St. Ives. The defendant, Thomas Richards, was his son-in-law. The declaration stated that the wife of plaintiff, and his two daughters, had, in March, 1837, voluntarily left his house; and that the defendant had received and harboured them contrary to the wishes and against the will of the plaintiff, whereby he had lost the society of his wife, and the assistance of his daughters. The defendant pleaded first the general issue; secondly, that he harboured the wife and daughters with the leave and licence of plaintiff; and thirdly, that the plaintiff had behaved so violently toward them that defendant had received them out of humanity.

Robert QUICK, cabinetmaker and joiner, had been for several years acquainted with plaintiff, who kept the hotel at St. Ives. Knew his wife, and his daughters Elizabeth HICHENS, and Matilda, who were now about 16 and 14 years old. [Witness testified that what violence he saw was started by the wife, who often slapped or hit him. Had seen the husband "groggy", but never violent. She left her husband in 1835, and came back again not long before she left in March, 1837. Richards was a poor man, and had but two rooms and a small garret. Witness had also seen plaintiff's children cut his head open with a mug or candlestick.]

Robert TOY was ostler and brewer at the St. Ives Hotel. [ Was there when the wife and daughters left in March, 1837. Testified the wife said the goods were as much her's as his, and she took the teapot, and "smote" the things down from the dresser. Said he'd seen children spit on father when he was drunk, and insulted him.]

Cross-examined - had often seen his master drunk at ten or eleven o'clock in the forenoon. He would then sit in one place from morning till night. He was the weakest man alive when drunk. Henry RICHARDS, carrier, of St. Ives, gave evidence to the same effect.

Mr. Crowder addressed the Jury for defendant, alleging the improbability of this action being really brought by the plaintiff, to be restored to the society of those who the witnesses had said treated him so unnaturally. The learned gentleman then dwelt on the proved poverty of Richards, and contended that nothing but the direst necessity could have induced the wife and daughters to seek refuge in his house, where there was not even a bed for their use.

Ann BLIGHT called; lived at the hotel from Aug. 1831 to June 1835. Baragwanath took to drink in 1831. Witness often saw him very drunk, nearly all the day through. He was then very violent with his family, and used abusive language. She left his employ in 1835, due to his drinking. [described a very violent fight just before the wife left in 1835]; wife was a very quiet and industrious woman, never spoke except to vindicate herself.

Joseph JOHNS kept an inn at St. Ives. Had often seen Baragwanath very drunk. He was then almost mad. Wife was a very clever, quiet, industrious woman, and was very much afraid of him. John RICHARDS, father of defendant, said when Baragwanath was drunk, he was wild drunk and would follow his wife [making comments, and criticizing, then threatening.] Witness talked to him about his wife, and said "a house divided can't stand." He said "he would bring her a pauper on the town." Never saw him smite her.

Mr. James Nicholas PENALUNA, of Helston, was at St. Ives on the 23rd of February, 1837, and took a bed at the hotel. This witness spoke of an outrageous noise that was made by Baragwanath, and continued for five or six hours during the night; adding that he (witness) thought he should have had to defend his life. Mr. Erle replied; and after the Learned Judge had summoned up, the jury retired, and in the evening, returned a verdict for plaintiff.

The court rose about seven o'clock.

John BLAKE, 60, was found guilty of stealing a pair of cart-reins from the stables of the Exeter Inn, at Launceston, on the 16th of March. The reins were the property of a butcher named Sampson PARSONS, and they were left in the stables while he went to the market. Six weeks' hard labour.

Robert BARNES, 42, was found guilty of stealing a piece of salt pork from the shop of William TEAGUE, at Redruth, on the 20th of March. The prisoner was seen in the act of taking the pork, and he first attempted to put it into his breeches' pocket, but in that he did not succeed; and while trying to force the pork into other quarters, he was taken into custody. Six weeks' hard labour.

John WILLIAMS, 29, was charged with having feloniously assaulted and robbed Elizabeth Ann GREGOR of eighteen five pound notes, and a certain bill of exchange, a silk bag, and other articles. Mr. Montague SMITH appeared for the prosecution; Mr. Smirke for the prisoner. The case having been stated:

Elizabeth Ann GREGOR was called and examined. I am the daughter of Capt. Wm. Gregor. I live at Praze, about three miles from Camborne.   On the afternoon of Saturday, the 19th of January, I went from my own house to Camborne. I started about two in the afternoon. I had to take a bag containing a letter and GBP 95 in five pound notes; and a letter directed to Mr. Newton of Camborne, which contained a bill for GBP 18.18s. They were in my own silk bag. I reached Camborne a little after three, and went towards the bank, which I found closed. I carried my bag on the outside of my arm. After returning from the bank, I remained at Camborne about twenty minutes, and then returned towards Praze along the high road. I observed a man following me. About two minutes afterwards something happened to me. I had got only a mile from Camborne, and the man who was following me came up, and seized the bag from my arm. He pulled for some time, and I resisted; he either pulled or k! nocked me to the ground, and whilst I was there he took the bag from my arm. He cut my mouth very bad, and knocked my teeth very loose. I fell upon my face, and stayed there about two minutes, and just after I got up from the ground he went over the hedge. Soon after that, a man and a young woman came up to me, and put me into a house. I believe the prisoner to be the man who knocked me down. He wore a fustian jacket and a red cravat, which I believe to have been worsted. He had on light trowsers.

Cross-examined: Some of the notes were of the Union and some of the East Cornwall Bank. I saw them myself. I did not myself see the amount. I observed the prisoner near the lodge at Pendarves. I had observed him following me twice, once at a good distance behind me. There are two lodges at Pendarves; it was the first one from Camborne. I was very much frightened when he came up on me. When I was first spoken to about this, I was asked about his height. I said he appeared to be about five feet seven inches high; he did not then appear to be standing at his height. He was stooping when he was walking along. Many people were walking on the road. I saw the prisoner about seven weeks afterwards on a hill near Gweek; that was the day before he was taken before the magistrates; he was not then in custody. We were in quest of him, and met him accidentally   My mother and Mr. TIPPET, the constable of Camborne, and myself were together, and I expressed my belief he was the person. I had two dozen all black hooks and eyes in my bag which I had bought at Camborne. By Mr. Smith - I saw Mrs. EUSTACE and Mrs. WINNOW before I was attacked.

Mrs. EUSTACE examined: I am the wife of Henry EUSTACE. I remember going to Camborne market on the 19th of January last, and meeting Miss Gregor between three and four in the afternoon. I met her near the first footpath leading toward Pendarves, about a quarter of a mile from Mr. Pendarves's lodge. At the time I met her, I observed a man following her. I met the man, he was about three yards from Miss Gregor when I passed him. To the best of my knowledge the prisoner was the man; he was dressed in fustian clothes; I did not observe his cravat. I believe that his other clothes were nearly all one colour. Cross-examined: He did not appear to be standing to his height by a great deal; he was doubled up. There had been a great deal of talk about this before we went to the magistrates.   The morning had been stormy, but it was a dry afternoon. I cannot swear positively that this is the person, but I have not a doubt about it.

Grace WINNOW examined: I am the wife of James WINNOW. [testimony was much the same as above, except that Grace Winnow was asked at a later time to pick out the person she saw following Miss Gregor, and she picked out the prisoner without his being pointed out to her.]

John MEDLIN. Constable. On the 15th of March I went to search the prisoner's house. He lives about half a mile before we reach Gweek, in Boskenwin Downs. I saw the prisoner near his house in conversation with Mr. Magor. When I came up, Mr. Magor was asking him a question about a mine. The prisoner said it was nearby; Mr. Magor asked him to put him into the road, and he would reward him for it. He did so partly, and went about 12 yards, when he turned round and said he wished to .. in his great coat. Mr. Magor said "nonsense", but the prisoner refused to go, and Mr. Magor then laid hold of his collar and I took him. I told him we were going to put him to Gweek. After we had put him in our way to Gweek, he said "what is the matter? I have committed no highway robbery." Mr. Magor asked him "who said you did my man? Have you heard of any in the neighbourhood of late?" He said he had heard of some robbery in the neighbourhood of Redruth. Then there was no conversa! tion until we reached Gweek. The prisoner was afterwards brought to the house.   The prisoner was taken upstairs, and we found, in different apartments, GBP 81.3s. That consisted of 60 sovereigns and a half, four GBP 5 notes, and 13s in silver. After we had searched the down stairs room, we proceeded up stairs; knowing that the prisoner's wife was absent, I asked him if he had the key of the chest - if he had not, we should be under the necessity of breaking open the chest. He put his hand at the top of the bedstead and took down the key; when the chest was unlocked, he reached down his hand into the corner of it, and took up this bag. He said "now you may search the chest." I said "You give me the bag, and then I will search the chest." He would not; Mr. Magor insisted upon it, but he refused to give it. Two other constables being present, we made him give it up. We found 50 sovereigns and four GBP 5 notes in the bag. Then I put my hand in the chest, and took up a small bit of paper, which contained three sovereigns and a half mo re. He then said, now you may search the house over, there is no more money here." Mr. Magor said he would not take his word. On a further search, Mr. Magor found a woman's "housewife". Mr. Magor said there is cash here. He said there is no cash there unless it is a few half-pence.  On opening it, there were seven sovereigns and eight shillings, and then in another small piece of paper there were two half-crowns. The whole amounted to GBP 81.3s. After we had found the "housewife", he said "that is money my wife has been saving unknown to me." The prisoner's cottage was very mean. I would not give GBP 8 for all that was in it after taking away the wearing apparel.

John Penberthy MAGOR, Esq., proved the signature of the prisoner to his statement, in which he declared that he had not been in Camborne for two years previous to the robbery.

Cross-examined: He might have asked to be allowed till the following Monday to produce evidence to show that he was not at Camborne on that day. He said he had been attending a dying horse at home till three o'clock in the afternoon, when he left for Helston market, and he arrived at Helston a little after four, when he went to see Russell's horse, but it was too dark. That was not put into the prisoner's statement. He asked for some time, and witness told him that the case must go before a jury.

George Dennis JOHN, Esq., examined by the Judge: Am clerk to the Magistrates. I remember the prisoner making the observation about his being in Helston. The reason they are not written I believe to be this - that his examination had been taken down before. I believe that he afterwards asked for time, and it was on account of the Magistrates having closed the case that that was refused.

John MARTIN examined - I live at Camborne, I carry on the business of innkeeper. I have known the prisoner for 21 years; but I have not seen him often during that period. I saw him on the day in question. I am positive of the day now. When I came out of the house, he was standing close by the door looking towards the back. He saluted me and said "hallo" I said "hallo!" He said "I suppose you don't know me now: I was at school with you." He said "my name is Williams" and I knew him then. I cannot say to half and hour up or down, but that was somewhere between two and four o'clock. While I was speaking to this man, Mr. MATTHEWS came forth and asked me how the people on the bus had got on. He said his son came home on last Sunday, and asked him to buy him a portable desk. The bazaar had not been there more than one Monday, and left on the following Monday.   I was telling him as we were going up there I had not spoken to the prisoner for twenty years. The bazaar ! was at my house from the Friday week before till the Monday following. It was there two market days. I was enabled to say that it was on the day in question that I saw the prisoner because Mr. Matthews said his son was there the Sunday before. I am sure he is the man. I said to him you have got here then, have you? He said yes. I said "how long have you been here?" He said "a week or two." He denied ever seen me in his life, and said that he did not know me.

Mr. MATTHEWS examined: I live at Camborne. I remember the day on which Miss Gregor was robbed - I saw the last witness on the day of the robbery. I went to Martin's house. Martin was talking to somebody who I thought was a person belonging to the Bazaar. All I heard when I came up was, Martin said "I know you well, we were in school together." and he then left him.   I asked him how he was getting on with his bazaar - whether there many people in? He said "no, very few." [Said he wanted to purchase a desk; bank was closed; thought other man was with bazaar, but previous witness said no, he was an old school-fellow of mine; I remember him perfectly well, but he has not seen me upwards of 20 years.]

The witness underwent a long cross-examination, but neither his evidence, nor that of the previous witness was at all shaken.

Mr. Smirke then addressed the jury at considerable length, on behalf of the prisoner, stating the facts of the evidence that he should produce in order to prove an alibi, and to show that the prisoner had been in possession of some money before the time of the robbery. He then called: Mary TRIPP. I am an unmarried woman, and live near the prisoner - a mile or a couple of miles from him in the parish of Wendron. I never heard anything against the prisoner. I saw him at Helston market on Saturday the 19th of January. I heard of the robbery several times after it was committed. I had gone to market that day. [.] My father lives out at Tressel. I went to the market to buy [my sister] a pair of shoes; she had left the employ of Mr. PASCOW on Thursday the 17th. When I got there [to market] I saw the prisoner Williams and his wife, and I bid them the time of day, and went on. By Judge: My sister is not here. I had my attention called to this matter last week by the prisoner's wife. She asked me whether I did not remember seeing her and her husband on the 19th.

Thomas RUSSELL examined: I am a cattle dealer at Helston, and frequent the market there. I remember seeing the prisoner on the 5th of January. He asked me if I had got any horse that would suit him. He wanted to purchase one. I said I had not at the present time, but I might be able to get one for him. [Met prisoner later at Horse and Jockey, asked prisoner if he had the money to pay for the horse, and twice was answered "yes". ] He pulled out his purse and showed me ten sovereigns. There was more money left in the purse. He then agreed to meet me on Monday to go to St. Keverne, but he did not come in on the Monday. I asked him how much he would go, and he said ten or twelve pounds, it did not much matter. I said I would get one as soon as I could. I next saw him on the 19th. It was the market day at Helston. . We went to the Red Lion, and we drank the share of three pints of beer together. [noted time was 20 min. before four, when they left pub, as he had an! appointment with a farmer named LAWRY at Tresidder's.] [Later in evening, about seven, met prisoner at Tresidder's.] Saw Bennett POLKINGHORNE there; the prisoner was in sight, and wished him good night. Prisoner came the next day, and paid the agreed sum [GBP 6.6s] for the horse. I had no acquaintance with the prisoner before, but I knew him by sight.

Cross-examined: I was sent for on the Sunday night, after the prisoner was committed on the Saturday. Mr. JULIAN's son, of Helston, fetched me.   I was asked several questions about the prisoner, and I then said I had seen him on the 19th of January at Helston. I am sure of that because I have the day of the month down that the farmer (Mr. Lowry) paid me the money, and the day that I sold him the horse. Here is the book. That writing was made on the day that the horse was bought. I have books of my transactions for the past four years. ... I have not shown the book produced to Mr. Rogers, since I have been in Bodmin. By the Judge - I keep my cattle-dealing accounts in a larger book than that. Some of my sales of horses are entered there. They are not all entered in that book, because this is a smaller one for me to carry in my pocket than the other. I don't know how to spell his name, for I am no scholar. I can't write. (This reply to the searching enquiries of the Learned Judge caused the greatest sensation in court, as it came out only by accident, the witness being one of those gentlemen who prefer repeating, for some private reasons of their own, every questions before they give it answer.)   These rows are not my entries. I did not write any of that book - my neighbour put down the entries for me. John WILLIAMS has put down what is there; that is not the prisoner. He is not here.

Thomas Borlase ROBERTS examined - I am a mercer and draper at Helston. I know the prisoner and his wife; they have dealt with me; I remember they bought articles of me in January; they bought cloth, merino, and a great many other articles, amongst the articles there were I think two dozen hooks and eyes. I believe the whole amount that the bought was somewhat about GBP 4. He pulled out a purse and paid me in sovereigns.

Richard GUNDRY - I am a farmer living at Helston. I have a farm about two miles and a half out. I know the prisoner's house at Boskenwin Downs - it is about half a mile from my farm. Just before Christmas I was at my farm in a cattle house in one of my fields. It is an open house. When I went there I had 84 sovereigns and four GBP 5 notes in a bag. (MEDLIN the constable was here recalled to produce the bag.) That is my bag; I cannot say whether I should know my notes again. I put them in the side of the linbay under some straw, and left them there. It was a Saturday before Christmas-day. Never found the money since.

Mary THOMAS - I am housekeeper to Mr. Gundry, the last witness. I made a bag for him. The bag produced is the bag. Mr. Rogers was called to prove the distance of Helston from Camborne. After which Mr. Smith addressed the jury. The Judge summed up, in the course of which he dwelt with great force upon the evidence of Russell, especially the book he had produced, which he said tainted the whole. The Jury found a verdict of GUILTY. The case excited the greatest interest in Court during the many hours which it occupied.




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