Woolsey Coat of Arms_1



Cardinal WOLSEY COAT-OF-ARMS






ITEM 1:     

Woolsey      Blazon of Arms:



(1) Sable, on a
(2) Cross engrailed argent,
(3) Gules, a lion passant guardant between
(4) Four leopards; faces azure
(5) On a chief of the second
(6) A rose of the third between
(7) Two Cornish choughs proper







Translation:
1. A black shield (any shape) (may be supported by a lion)
2. A silver cross with concave scalloped edges
3. A red lion, stylized (elongated, dynamic) full body view,
head at left;
face full toward observer (head only) and paw raised.
4. Four blue leopards´ faces, natural picture
(Note: both 3 and 4 are on the cross (2)
5. A silver (chief) section across the top of the shield
6. A red rose (with a gold center), on same in center (of 5)
7. Two Cornish choughs (blackbirds) in natural color, iridescent,
black with pinkish red bill & legs and feet (on 5)
SABLE - black ARGENT - silver AZURE - blue
 GULES - red PROPER - natural color 

ENGRAILED - scalloped outline, points outward   ROSE - a five petal flower, stylized dog rose

ITEM 2: CREST - a naked arm embowed, in the hand a shin-bone, all proper
(This affair sets on a wreath which may be twists of silver and green and should reside on top of a Knight's steel helmet.)

ITEM 3: MOTTO: MANUS HAEC INIMICA TYRANNIS
        Translation: (This is in Latin and roughly translates to:

This hand with shin bone
shall only be raised in anger
against a tyrant
or tyranny itself.

These words go on a ribbon like a pennant or streamer which is gracefully flown above or below the Shield.

The following numbers tell who used what part of the Arms - ITEM #1:
      Numbers 1, 2 and 4 were used by the Earls of Suffolk
      Number 3 came from Pope Leo the tenth
      Number 6 is the Lancaster Rose
      Number 7 Denotes that the Cardinal was a patron of St. Thomas of Canterbury

This Coat of Arms is registered at the College of Heralds in London, England. It is to be seen also at Hampton Court as well as in Christ Church at Oxford.


*****************************************************************************


Another Version


This version was found in the papers of James W. Woolsey of Kennewick, Washington.

Woolsey      Blazon of Arms:

Sable, on a cross engrailed argent,
a lion passant guardant, crowned or,
between four leopards´ faces azure,
on a chief of the second,
a rose of the third enclosed by two choughs proper.
Translation:
The heraldic colour sable (black) denotes Constancy.
The lion represents Strength,
Courage and Generosity.
The rose expresses Beauty and Grace.


Motto: au bon droit.   Translation: By just right.
Origin:     England
Crest:    A naked arm embowed grasping a shinbone.


Robert M. Woolsey in his fairly well-documented The Woolsey Family, states the following: “As of this writing there seems to be no real knowledge of the parents of George Woolsey (2.110B). However, he brought with him this Gentleman's coat-of-arms, of a kind very similar to that of the Thomas Cardinal Woolsey (2.074B).” However, Robert does not document that statement, unfortunately!



Another Version:   The Ancient History of the Distinguished Surname
WOLSEY


The history of the most ancient Anglo/Saxon surname of Wolsey reaches far into the chronicles of the Saxon race. The Saxon Chronicle, compiled by monks in the 10th century, now reposes in the British Museum.

The Saxon race gave birth to many English Surnames, not the least of which was the surname Wolsey. The Saxons were invited into England by the ancient Britons of the 4th century. A fair-skinned people, their home was the Rhine valley, some as far north east as Denmark. They were led by two brothers, General/Commanders Hengist and Horsa. The Saxons settled in the county of Kent, on the south east coast of England. Gradually, they spread north and westward, and during the next four hundred years forced the Ancient Britons back into Wales and Cornwall in the west, and Cumberland, to the north. The Angles occupied the eastern coast, the south folk in Suffolk, north folk in Norfolk. Under Saxon rule England prospered under a series of High Kings, the last of which was Harold.

In America Heraldica, among the two hundred and fifty-six colored plates of Arms belonging to American families I find one belonging to George Woolsey, with the following statement “George Woolsey died in 1698 leaving descendants entitled to his Arms.”

Arms - Sable, on a cross engrailed argent, a lion passant gules, crowned or, between four leopards´ faces azure; on a chief of the second a rose of the third between two Cornish choughs proper.
Crest - A naked arm embowed, grasping a shin bone, all proper.

These arms are also found in Burke´s Encyclopedia of Heraldry, published in 1851.

For the explanation of Arms, I have taken the following from History of Heraldry, published in the Magazine of American Genealogy, August 1929:

The colours common to shields and their bearings are called tintures, and are of seven different kinds; two metals and five colors, viz., or, gold; argent, silver; azure, blue; gules, red; vert, green; purple, purple; and sable, black. Some writers on the science admit two additional, tawney or tenie, orange; and sanguine, blood colour; but they are rarely to be met with in British Arms.


Status of the Woolsey family in England is given in Burke´s Landed Gentry, thus: “people of gentle birth, education and good-breeding, those between the nobility and yeomanry, having landed estate.”

Research is on-going in English records to determine if the American Woolsey truly can claim one of these arms.

        

A DIFFERENT WOOLSEY COAT OF ARMS


[This comes from a generic
commercial parchment of the
Wolsey Coat-of-Arms,
(see below)
that is quite current today.
I have not researched it yet to
find if a dog appears on a
Woolsey-Wolsey Coat-of-Arms. www.]

        



STANHOE COAT OF ARMS



George 'Joris' Woolsey may have been entitled to a Coat of arms through his grandmother Elizabeth Stanhowe. Much more research is needed but it appears as though she could have been entitled to the Stanhoe Coat of Arms, as she descended from Lord Hervey de Stanhoe [Herevi de Stanhowe] of Berwick and Stanhowe, Norfolk, England.

01. E 461 Hervey de Stanhoe [Herevi de Stanhowe] Barry of twelve or and azure a bend ermine.
02. From East Anglian Pedigrees. Lord John Stanhawe of Bedingham. Barry of eight or and azure, over all a bend guiles.


Hervey de Stenhowe of Bedwick/Stanhowe       Lord John Stenhowe of Bedingham
        
______________________
. Brewer, Hester Woolsey. Family of George Wood Woolsey and Wife Sarah Nelson Woolsey. p. 14-15.
ON-LINE: www.briantimms.com/rolls/StGeorgeE6.html - Feb 2005 - St. George's Roll, part 6. E - 461 - Hervey de Stanhoe - Herevi de Stanhowe - Barry of twelve or and azure a bend ermine [coat of arms]
. Family History Library: Campling, Arthur, F.S.A. EAST ANGLIAN PEDIGREES. Norfolk Record Society. 1940. p. 211-213. STANHAW of WOODTON, co. Norfolk. Arms: Barry of eight or and azure, over all a bend gules. John Stanhawe of Bedingham. Will dated 3 Dec -- Joan 1414; proved 13 Feb 1419/20 (Norw. Cons. This has only eight parallel bars with a plain red bend.


*****************************************************************************




STANHOE ARMS






EDMOND WOLSEY
of Newton, Norfolk, England
Here is a different coat of arms for another Woolsey family, connection not known.

The Visitations of Norfolk, 1563, 1589, and 1613. p. 319.

WOLSEY
Harl. 1552, fo. 12.

Arms - Or, on a chevron azure,
between three pallets each charged
with a woolsack argent,
as many garbs of the field.

Crest - A beaver [?] azure, finned down the back or.

Edmond Wolsey of Newton in co. Norfolk
= 1) Dorothy da. To Thomas Byllingford of Blackford
hall in Stoke Sancte Crucis within the county of Norfolk
01. Thomas Wolsey of Newton in co. Norfolk
= Thomazin dau to Wm. Methold of Langford in co. Norf., esq.
02. Robert Wolsey
03. Elizabeth Wolsey
=2) Alice da. To Tho. Sexton & had no issue
=3) Dorothy da. To John Whight.


Arms - Or, on a chevron azure, between three pallets each charged with a woolsack argent, as many garbs of the field. Crest - A beaver [?] azure, finned down the back or.

Edmond Wolsey of Newton in co. Norfolk
= 1) Dorothy da. To Thomas Byllingford of Blackford hall in Stoke Sancte Crucis within the county of Norfolk

01. Thomas Wolsey of Newton in co. Norfolk
= Thomazin dau to Wm. Methold of Langford in co. Norf., esq.
02. Robert Wolsey
03. Elizabeth Wolsey
=2)Alice da. To Tho. Sexton & had no issue
=3) Dorothy da. To John Whight.


_______________
. The Visitation of Norfolk in the year 1563, taken by William Harvey, Clarenceux King of Arms. From Harleian MSS in the British Museum. Vol. II. Edited by Brig.-General Bulwer. Norwich. Printed by Agas H. Goose, Rampant Horse Street. 1895.

BRERETON of ARMINGHALL, co. NORFOLK

Argent, two bars sable.

William Brereton of Hoxne, co. Suff. d. 11 Sep, pr. 22 Sep 1544 (Suff. Arch.) = Elizabeth, d/o Thomas Grene of Norwich. Their son John Brereton of Yelverton, co. Norf., gent. Freeman, Norwich 1566. Will d. 1 Sep 1585, pr. 29 Apr 1586 (Norw. Cons.) = Alice ____. Their son Thomas Brereton of Seething, co. Norf, yeoman. Bur. There 18 Jun 1632. Will d. 10 Jun pr 7 July 1632. (Norf. Arch.) = Elizabeth, d/o William Wolsey of Kirstead, co. Norf., yeoman. Bur. Seething 15 Oct 1638. Thomas Brereton and Elizabeth Wolsey had a large family.



STANHOE FAMILY



STANHOE, Henry (Hervey) de, Lord of Stanhope (sic Stanhowe?), was born in 1222, of Berwyck and Stanhowe, Norfolk, England. (ARMS: barry of twelve or and azure a bend ermine). He was Sheriff of Norfolk (1259-61), and Keeper of the Laity in Norwich in 1272. Died 1297. He married Isabel ____. Their son:
        STANHOE, John de, Lord of Stanhowe, was born in 1248 of Berwyck and Stanhowe.
         (ARMS: Barry of eight or and azure, over all a bend guiles). He married Ela de Bellemont, born 1252, of Stanhowe, Norfok.

Stanhoe: All Saints, Norfolk 3

STANHOE, a scattered village, 2 miles E. of Docking, and 4 miles S.S.W. of Burnham Market, has in its fertile and well cultivated parish 334 souls, and 1,413 acres of land, mostly the property of Derick Hosete and John Calthrop, Esqrs.; the former of whom is lord of the manor, and the latter resides at Stanhoe Hall, a neat mansion with pleasant grounds. Also, here are the remains of an ancient cross; and in Chapel-field are traces of the foundations of a religious house.

__________________

     1. Family History Library: Campling, Arthur, F.S.A. EAST ANGLIAN PEDIGREES. Norfolk Record Society. 1940. p. 23 - 26. William Brereton of Hoxne, co. Suff. d. 11 Sep, pr. 22 Sep 1544 (Suff. Arch.) = Elizabeth, d/o Thos. Grene of Norwich.
Studies in Heraldry - Brian Timms - http://www.briantimms.com/index.shtml
. William White's History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Norfolk - 1845.
The main features of this church indicate that it was built nearly 700 years ago. The main doorways appear to be late 13th century, the Y tracery windows about 1300, and the flowing tracery early 14th century work. So we can speculate whether these were all part of one building programme, possibly spanning 50 years, or whether one dominant character achieved the rebuilding of the whole church, perhaps using more advanced styles in certain parts. Just inside the door of the church lie a pair of tapered grave slabs. They bear an omega sign and are made of Barnack stone. These have been attributed to just such a dominant character, namely Sir Hervey de Stanhoe (d.1297) and Isabel his wife. He was Sheriff of Norfolk (1259-61), and Keeper of the Laity in Norwich in 1272. So he could have started to build this church about 1280 and died before it was completed.

The Church (All Saints in Stanhoe) has a lofty tower, and the living is a rectory, valued in the King's Book at 16 lbs, and in 1831 at 360 lbs. The inhabitants of Barwick attend the church here, from which the parish is sometimes called Stanhoe-with-Barwick.

The tower stands in the position of a S porch and serves for that purpose. It has no buttresses and few openings like an Early English tower, but the belfry windows have tracery suggesting a 14th century date. It contains one bell cast by William Dobson of Downham Market in 1828. Ladders are used to ascend the tower. There is a scratch dial on the E side of the entrance, and another on the SE buttress of the chancel.



WOODTON, NORFOLK


The origin of the name of Woodton: Wdetuna, settlement in the woods. Old English wudu (woods) + tun (enclosure, settlement, farm).

Prehistory bronze age. A number of Ring-ditches dated between 2350 BC and 701 BC where identified between Church Road and Hempnall Road. First reference
Woodton can be referred as Wodetuna, Wodetone, Wudetuna, Uidetuna or Wootton. It seems that the first mention of the site is in the Domesday book in 1086.



Medieval village A number of clues show that the medieval village was certainly located in the area north to Church road. The center was relocated (probably after the plague) where it stands now at a date that remains to be determined. Did you know?



ON-LINE: Woodton (Norfolk - UK), and it area.

Church road was situated north to the church until at least 1797. Indeed,
the entrance to the church was moved to the south. The South porch
was built during the restoration in 1876-9. The photograph shows the initial
porch (Left/North) and the new one.





William Wolsey, yeoman, of Kirstead-cum-langhale and Elizabeth
Stanhoe, of Woodton, were married in All Saints Church, in Woodton,
Norfolk, England. This branch of the Wolsey Family was centered in
Woodton, Kirstead-cum-Langhale, Seething, and Brooke, and were all
within five miles of each other. They are located a few miles north-west
of Yarmouth, between Norwich and Bungay.


The DOMESDAY BOOK (1086)

In the Domesday book, Woodton is found in the Hundred of Loddon ("Hundret of Lothninga"). Woodton is referred to as Wdetuna, Wodetuna or Wodetona. It is worth remembering that the Domesday book (1086) was commissioned by William The Conqueror and it was the first comprehensive survey of England. Its main goal was to determine who owned what and what it was worth before and after the conquest. King Edward the Confessor is mentionned instead of King Harold II before the conquest as William always claimed that Harold was not a "legal" king of England. The book refers to Harold's father Godwin to describe his estate.

You will find below the main owners in Woodton. For completeness, I added some lands in Topcroft and Bedingham

LANDS OF COUNT HUGHIn Wdetuna 2 freemen and a half of whom Alger had commendation, (with) half a ploughland. Then as now 2 villeins and 1 bodar. Then 1 plough, afterwards nothing, now a half, and 1 acre of meadow. Then and afterwards the whole was worth 40 shillings, now 4 pounds. The soke (belonged) to Stigand; and it is 1 league in length and 1 in breadth, and (pays) 8 pence for geld.



LANDS OF ROBERT MALET:br> Wodetona was held by Ulketel a freeman of Edric's by commendation, for 30 acres and Walter holds it. Then as now 5 bordars. Then 2 ploughs, afterwards1, and now 2. Then as now half a plough belonging to the men. Wood for 4 swine, and 1 acre of meadow; now 7 swine; now 40 sheep. And there were there 8 freemen of Ulketell's in commendation T.R.E. (with) 30 acres of land. Then as now among the men 1 plough. Then and afterwards it was worth 20 shillings and now 30. It is 1 league in length and half in breadth and (pays) for geld 15 pence. The soke is in the hundret.

LANDS OF ROGER BIGOTIn Wodetuna 1 freeman belonging to the same with 20 acres and under him 1 freeman and 1 bordar with 4 acres, and then half a plough. Then and now it was worth 32 pence; 1 church with 12 acres, it is worth 12 pence.
In Bethingaham (Bedingham) Offo a thegn(?) of Stigand's held for a manor 1 ploughland T.R.E.; now the same holds it. Then as now 12 bordars and 2 serfs. Then as now 2 ploughs on the demesne, and 3 ploughs belonging to the men, and 3 acres of meadow. Then as now 2 horses on the demesne and 9 swine. Then as now 20 goats. Then it was worth 10 shillings, now 30.

LANDS OF THE ABBOT OF ST EDMUND
In Topecroft (Topcroft) Berenger holds 2 ploughlands of the abbot, which 2 priests held T.R.E. then as now 4 villeins and 10 bordars. Then 2 serfs, now 1. Then as now 2 ploughs on the demesne and 3 ploughs belonging to the men. Wood for 3 swine, 3 acres of meadow and 1 sokeman with 2 acres. It was then worth 30 shillings, now 40.

LANDS OF EUDO SON SPIRUWIN Topecropt (Topcroft) was held by Godwin(5), a freeman of Gert by commendation only; T.R.E. for a manor (of) 3 ploughlands. Then (there were) 12 villeins, afterwards and now 2. Then (there were) 30 bordars afterwards and now 36. Then 7 serfs, now 4. Then (there were) 4 ploughs on the demesne, now 2. Then 7 ploughs belonging to the men, now 5. Woodland) for 20 swine, and 4 acres of meadow. And under him (eodem) 4 freemen (with) I ploughland delivered to Henfrid his predecessor instead of land (pro terra). And under them 5 villeins and 12 bordars. Then. (they had) 5 ploughs among (them) all, now 4, and 1 horse in the homestead (aula), now 40 swine and 20 goats. The whole was then worth 6 pounds, now 8. There also Godwin, a freeman-half Edric's and half St. Edmund's by commendation only T.R.E. held 1 1/2 ploughlands, where Covin (Couinus) held. Then as now (there were) 8 villeins and 11 bordars. Then as now 4 serfs. Then (there were) 2 ploughs, now none. Then (there were) 8 1/2 ploughs belonging to the men, now 5 1/2, and 3 acres of meadow. Then the whole was worth 30 shillings, now 40. It is 1 league and I furlong in length and 9 furlongs in breadth and (renders) 20 pence of geld who-ever holds there.
In Wodetuna (Woodton) he also (idem) holds 11 freemen of Godwin(5) (Goduini) Tokesone and another Godwin under King Edward and (?of) Gert, (with) half a ploughman and 4 bordars. Then (they had) 3 ploughs, now 2, and 1 1/2 acres of meadow. It has been included in the valuation. The soke (is) in the hundret.

LANDS OF ISAC
In Wudetuna 2 freemen, Godwin's by commendation only T.R.E., were delivered instead of (pro = for) 60 acres. Then (they had) 2 ploughs and afterwards, now 1; and half an acre of meadow. Then and afterwards they were worth 10 shillings, now 5. The king and the earl (have) the soke.

(1) T.R.E.: Tempore Regis Edwardi "In the time of king Edward" (the Confessor). This means before the conquest by the Normans.
(2) Villein: Unfree tenant of a manorial land.
(3) Bordar: Smallholder who farmed land of irregular shape, brought into cultivation from waste land (especially woodland), on the edge of settlements.
(5)Godwin: died on 15th April 1053, he was the most powerful man in England during at the beginning of of the reign of Edward the Confessor. He was Earl of Wessex and Kent. He married his daugther, Edith, to Edward. His son Harold suceeded to Edward.



All Saints Church, Woodton, Norfolk, England. View from the south east.





Main Index

E-mail Contacts





Build your website with Arachnophilia