Magdalena Altenbernd

F, #52, b. 23 June 1881, d. 1 May 1954
Relationship
Grandaunt of Sheila Sue Altenbernd
Father*Friedrich Wilhelm Altenbernd b. 23 March 1831, d. 28 August 1905
Mother*Katharine Hill b. 15 December 1842, d. 23 April 1913
     The following information is from the records of Nancy Vogel (#156).
     She was known for her work in her flowers and with her needle. Iris were her favorite, among them Gudrun (white) and Elmohr (deep purple). The 1951 flood took some of her flowers (many of the Mohr iris), but the ones mentioned still bloom at her home, now on Route 4 Box 213 in Grant Township, Douglas County, Kansas. This house can be seen in the ABC-TV movie, The Day After, where it served as the home of the Dahlberg Family. The basement scenes were shot where she kept her pantry (canned peaches, beets, tomatoes). Crocheting was her favorite needlework, and she made large tablecloths for her daughters.
     Her daughter Irene (#97) remembers her mother talking about "Indian raids" at the home place (Wilhelm Altenbernd's (#46) farm, rural Eudora) when she was young. The Indians usually wanted food, and once they were given what they wanted, they left.
     When they went to "Aunt Lena's" (across the Kansas "Kaw" River from Edward C. and Magdalena Altenbernd Schaake's), they would always have goose. Goose is greasy, not like turkey. But, Helen remembers Aunt Louise always had to have goose too. I (Nancy Vogel) can remember how angry my mother (Irene) would get when the telephone would ring and she would need to call my father, somewhere among the barns and machinery, to the house: the geese would make such a quacking racket, she could not make herself heard. Needless to say, the geese did not remain a part of the Schaake-Vogel farm operation for very many years into my life. They did, however, contribute to many soft feather pillows, some of which are still used today.
     In the kitchen, my grandmother Magdalena taught me "Messer, Bale, Loffel" (knife, fork, spoon). The kitchen had a big pantry with cupboards to the ceiling. There I would watch my mother and grandmother make noodles, rolling out golden dough and then cutting the floured strips. Afterwards, we would always have an angel food cake (the noodles called for egg yolks; the angel food, for egg whites). That was before boxed cake mixes.
     Pitting cherries was also done in the pantry; all these jobs were long and tedious but more fun than picking cherries, which were often out of arm's reach up a stickery tree. My mother remembers the hired men they kept liked a fresh pie every day. Grandmother was a good piemaker. Frieda, who was two years older than Irene, would help in the kitchen while my mother carried water to the fields on her pony, Rex. When Rex wanted to roll in the soft valley soil, my mother would have to walk home because she was too small to remount. She did, however, graduate to the kitchen, and her recipe for cherry pie can be found in The Kansas Cookbook (Carey and Naas, 1989). Our family tradition is to have a cherry pie, from my trees now, at Christmas.
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     Nancy has a book of forget-me-nots that belonged to her grandmother. It was a gift to Magdalena from her niece Frances Hoelzel in 1907. It is a little red book with blue flowers on the cover. The volume is about 3 inches by 2 1/2 inches with gold leaf on the pages and illustrations for each of the 12 months. The title "Christliches Vergissmeinnicht" translates to Christian forget-me-nots. Following are some of the entries.
Sept. 3 1907 - Left Kansas City 11:30 am
Sept. 15 - Louis gave a lawn party, consisting of 16 boys and girls.
     Sept. 20 - Louis and I went to Fargo and out to ????
Sept. 21 - Left Sabin 8:30 am and arrived in St. Paul 5:30 pm. Gustie Seltz met me at the Station.
     Sept. 23 - Gustie Seltz and I went to Stillwater and spent several never-to-be-forgotten hours with cousin John and family Rev. Schulzer.
     Sept. 25 - Gustie and I left cousin John Schlch & family & went to Waconia. Gusta Weichmann & Elesi Seltz met us at the station. Went home with G.W.
     Sept. 27 - Gretchen and I took a walk along the Lake and spent several hours with Godfred Lettermein.
     Sept. 29 - Uncle Carls gave a very nice party.
          Oct. 23 - Arrived in Arlington 11:30 am
     Oct. 26 - Gustie Bluzring & I went to Henry Leiskes. Was there two days.
     Oct. 27 - Attended the Lutheran Mission meeting at Henderson.
     Oct. 28 - Left Aunties Monday morning. Called on Mrs. Schupp's before going to station. Arrived in Mankato 12:30 am.
     Oct. 30 - Miss Shuemaker invited several girls to spend the eve.
     Oct. 31 - Went to Truman Thurs. Had a very nice time at Cousin Carl and family. Rev. Seltz. Carl met me at the station.
     Nov. 1 -     Left Truman 10 am.
     Nov. 2 -     Teacher Seltz escorted me through the Lutheran Hospital and school and other worth-while seeing parts of the town.
     Nov. 3 -     We attended services morning and evening. Afternoon Marie and Anna Schulze, Lizzie Abraham and I went out riding.
     Nov. 4 -     Monday evening Aunt Marie invited 4 [or 7] girls. They all accompanied me to the station. Left at 10:30 pm.
     Nov. 5 -     Arrived in K.C. 5:30 pm. Spent several days with Kate's and Reaka. Reaka and children went home with me.

Magdalena was born at home as were all of the Altenbernd children.
     Maggie and Ed were married in her parent's (Wilhelm and Katharine) house in rural Eudora, Kansas.1

     Magdalena was born in Douglas County, Kansas, USA, on 23 June 1881.1,2,3 She was the daughter of Friedrich Wilhelm Altenbernd and Katharine Hill.
     Her common name was Maggie Altenbernd.
     Magdalena Altenbernd was listed as Friedrich Wilhelm Altenbernd's daughter on the 1900 US Federal Census in Eudora Township, Douglas County, Kansas, USA, enumerated 11 June 1900.4
Her birth date was listed as June 1881, age 18. She was born in Kansas. She was single. Her father was born in Germany. Her mother was born in Germany.4 Her occupation was student. She was able to read, able to write, and able to speak English.4 She attended school for 8 months.4

     Photo of Altenbernd Family (About 1905)

Left to Right Back Row: William, Emil Holzel, Fredericka Hoelzel, Fred, Mary (Fred's wife), Carl, Louise

Left To Right Front Row: Frank Hoelzel, Katharina Helzel, Wilhelm (Father), Magadalina, Katherine (Mother), Louis

Children: Hildegarde Hoelzel, Francis Hoelzel circa 1905. Original photo in the possession of Sheila Altenbernd (#172.)5

Altenbernd Family Picture
Altenbernd Family (About 1905)

Left to Right Back Row: William, Emil Holzel, Fredericka Hoelzel, Fred, Mary (Fred's wife), Carl, Louise

Left To Right Front Row: Frank Hoelzel, Katharina Helzel, Wilhelm (Father), Magadalina, Katherine (Mother), Louis

Children: Hildegarde Hoelzel, Francis Hoelzel

     Magdalena Schaake was Housewife.1
     Edward Charles Schaake married Magdalena Altenbernd, daughter of Friedrich Wilhelm Altenbernd and Katharine Hill, near Wilhelm Altenbernd's House, Eudora, Douglas County, Kansas, USA, on 30 November 1911.1
Edward and Magdalina Schaake -- November 30, 1911

     Magdalena Altenbernd was listed as the nearest relative of Edward Charles Schaake on his WWI draft registration card.6
Magdalena Altenbernd hosted a family reunion on circa 1920 at in Grant Township, Kansas, USA. Among the attendees were Magdalena Altenbernd, Frieda Schaake and Irene Dorothy Schaake.

     They resided Grant Section 28, R7, Lawrence, Douglas County, Kansas, USA, in 1920. They owned 267 acres.7
     Magdalena died on 1 May 1954 in Lawrence, Douglas County, Kansas, USA, at age 72.1 She was buried on 4 May 1954 in Lawrence, Douglas County, Kansas, USA.1
Last Edited=28 June 2021

Children of Magdalena Altenbernd and Edward Charles Schaake

Citations

  1. [S1602] Nancy Vogel (#156) Sheila Altenbernd (#172). August 1992 Lawrence, Kansas. (Document Source Number: 00097-1992-08-00-01).
  2. [S119] Katharine Hill unknown date.
  3. [S485] Friedrich Wilhelm Altenbernd household, June 11, 1900 U.S. Federal Census, Douglas County, Kansas, population schedule, town of Eudora Township, enumeration district (ED) 54, supervisor's district (SD) 2, sheet 21A, dwelling 195, family 194, National Archives micropublication T623 479 , William Altenbernd (#46). Hereinafter cited as Altenbernd, Wilhelm (#46) -- 1900 Kansas Census.
  4. [S485] Friedrich Wilhelm Altenbernd household, June 11, 1900 U.S. Federal Census, Douglas County, Kansas, population schedule, town of Eudora Township, enumeration district (ED) 54, supervisor's district (SD) 2, sheet 21A, dwelling 195, family 194, National Archives micropublication T623 479 . Hereinafter cited as Altenbernd, Wilhelm (#46) -- 1900 Kansas Census.
  5. [S789] Personal knowledge of Sheila Altenbernd (#172) (12230 W Washington Street, Avondale, Arizona 85323) .
  6. [S331] "Schaake (#95), Edward -- WWI Draft Registration"; www.Ancestry.com; unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "WWI Draft Registration."
  7. [S1513] Unknown author, "Douglas County Farmers' Directory," The Pioneer, 3, XIII, Page: 132, File Number: Genealogy 978.101 D74DCGA 1989-1991 (Published: Spring 19990) Viewed: 2007. (Document Source Number: 00095-1920-00-00-02).
 

Compiler: Sheila Altenbernd
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