Alma Stoerker

F, #57, b. 9 January 1880, d. 3 December 1948
Relationship
Grandaunt of Sheila Sue Altenbernd
Father*Conrad Friedrich Stoerker1 b. 17 February 1851, d. 13 June 1927
Mother*Wilhelmine Cuno1 b. 10 August 1857, d. 20 March 1940
     Alma was born in Brighton, Madison County, Illinois, USA, on 9 January 1880.2,3,1 She was the daughter of Conrad Friedrich Stoerker and Wilhelmine Cuno.1
     Alma Stoerker was listed as Conrad Friedrich Stoerker's daughter on the 1880 US Federal Census in Brighton Village, Macoupin County, Illinois, USA, enumerated 22 June 1880.2 Her age was listed as 5/12. She was shown as born in Illinois. Her father was born in Hannover. Her mother was born in Bayern.2

     Photo in 1893 in Morrison, Osage County, Missouri, USA.


     Alma Stoerker was a Registered Nurse.

     Photo of Ella, Paul, ?, Freida, ?, and Alma Stoerker. Original photo in the possession of Sue Myers (#130.)



     Photo in 1907. Original photo in the possession of Sheila Altenbernd (#172). Standing -- Paul, Alma, Flora, Josephine, Ella, and Julia Stoerker, Frieda and Christian Mohr
Seated -- Conrad, Wilhelmine (holding Theodore) Stoeker
Ground -- Gottlob, Theophil, and Adolph Stoerker, Waldemar Mohr.4

Standing -- Paul, Alma, Flora, Josephine, Ella, and Julia Stoerker, Frieda and Christian Mohr
Seated -- Conrad, Wilhelmine (holding Theodore) Stoeker
Ground -- Gottlob, Theophil, and Adolph Stoerker, Waldemar Mohr

     Alma Stoerker was employed as a Deaconess. She was called Sister Alma.

     Photo of Josephine, Ella, Alma, Julia, and Flora Stoerker. Original photo in the possession of Sue Myers (#130.)

Josephine, Ella, Alma, Julia, and Flora Stoerker


     Photo of Photo postcard of Flora and Gottlob Stoerker sent from Gottlob to his sister Alma. circa 1912. Original photo in the possession of Sheila Altenbernd (#172.)5



     Photo in 1912. Original photo in the possession of Sue Myers (#130). Stoerker Family 1912 -- Back: Fred, Hilda, Theophil, Flora, Alma, Frieda Mohr, Julia, Christian Mohr -- Front: Waldemar Mohr, Conrad, Wilhelmine, Gottlob.

Stoerker Family 1912 -- Back: Fred, Hilda, Theophil, Flora, Alma, Frieda Mohr, Julia, Christian Mohr -- Front: Waldemar Mohr, Conrad, Wilhelmine, Gottlob


     Photo of Sister Alma Stoerker -- Deaconess and Nurse. Original photo in the possession of Sheila Altenbernd (#172.)


     Alma Stoerker received a postcard from Wilhelmine Stoerker on 19 January 1916.
June/January[?] 19, 1916

Dear Alma,

For your birthday I selected this passage from the scriptures because I think it agrees so nicely, so take it as token for the future.

Your Mother.6


     Photo of Standing: Flora and Hilda Stoerker and Frieda Mohr. Seated: Alma, C.Fred, and Julia Stoerker circa 1918. Original photo in the possession of Sheila Altenbernd (#172.)5

Standing: Flora and Hilda Stoerker and Frieda Mohr.
Seated: Alma, C.Fred, and Julia Stoerker


     Photo of Hilda Stoerker, Flora Stoerker, Will Altenbernd, Wilhelmine Stoerker, Alma Stoerker
on ground: Frederick and Eleanor Stoerker. Unknown who is being held. Original photo in the possession of Sue Myers (#130.)

Hilda Stoerker, Flora Stoerker, Will Altenbernd, Wilhelmine Stoerker, Alma Stoerker
on ground: Frederick and Eleanor Stoerker
unknown who is being held


     Photo of Back: Josephine, Ella, Alma Stoerker
Front: Julia and Flora Stoerker. Original photo in the possession of Sheila Altenbernd (#176.)4

Back: Josephine, Ella, Alma Stoerker
Front: Julia and Flora Stoerker


     Photo of Stoerker Golden Wedding Anniversary -- Back - Theophil, Julia, Paul, Conrad, Ella, Fred, Adolph -- Front - Alma, Wilhelmine, Frieda, Flora, and Gottlob on 2 November 1926. Original photo in the possession of Sheila Altenbernd (#172.)5

Stoerker Golden Wedding
November 2, 1926
Back - Theophil, Julia, Paul, Conrad, Ella, Fred, Adolph
Front - Alma, Wilhelmine, Frieda, Flora, and Gottlob

     They resided in St Charles, St Charles County, Missouri, USA, in 1927.7

     Photo of Hilda Stoerker, Flora Stoerker, Will Altenbernd, Wilhelmine Stoerker, Alma Stoerker
On Ground -- Frederick and Eleanor Stoerker circa 27 May 1927. Original photo in the possession of Sheila Altenbernd (#172.)4

Hilda Stoerker, Flora Stoerker, Will Altenbernd, Wilhelmine Stoerker, Alma Stoerker
On Ground -- Frederick and Eleanor Stoerker

     Alma Stoerker was in an accident circa January 1929. She fell and was in the hospital for a few days.8
     Alma Stoerker, residing at RR2, Lawrence, Kansas received a letter from Wilhelmine Stoerker,residing at at 1021 South 4th Street, St Charles, St Charles County, Missouri, USA, on 16 April 1929. The original is in German.
Dearly beloved,

I just want to send you a few lines. I received your postcard this morning. I think that it is better for Flora if she goes to the hospital. I will be praying for our Flora. May the Lord be with us. I am doing fine. Theophil and family arrived here in Emmaus on Sunday evening in spite of the rain. He phoned real late. Tomorrow, they are going to return home.

Otherwise, everything is well here.
Mama Wilhelmine Stoerker.9

     Photo of Alma Stoerker holding John Altenbernd between May 1929 and June 1929. Original photo in the possession of Sheila Altenbernd (#172.)


     Photo of Alma Stoerker. Original photo in the possession of Sue Myers (#130.)


     Alma Stoerker was mentioned in a lettter sent by Flora Altenbernd to Eleanor Eudora Stoerker in 1930. Note on back of picture: Dear Eleanor: John wishes to thank you for the ball you sent him with Alma. He enjoys it very much. He is a big boy as you can see on the other side. Love from Aunt Flora.5
John Altenbernd
1 year old
Note of back of photo.


     Photo of Alma Stoerker and John Altenbernd (13 months) in June 1930. Original photo in the possession of Sue Myers (#130.)



     Photo of John Altenbernd (#102) and Alma Stoeker (#57) in June 1930. Original photo in the possession of Sheila Altenbernd (#172). John 6 months old.4

Alma Stoerker and John Altenbernd
13 months
Alma Stoerker and John Altenbernd
13 months

ME by John Altenbernd

Aunt Alma's Adventure


     Aunt Alma Stoerker was a nurse. I'm not sure that her whole nursing career was at Deaconess Hospital in St. Louis, so I don't know if this happened at Deaconess. But it happened early on in her career. Mom told me about it when I was quite little.
     Aunt Alma came into a patient's room one night to find him running back and forth in a kind of raving manner. The window was open (this was before air conditioning) and he jumped out. It was the second floor so there was not necessarily disaster here.
Aunt Alma ran into the corridor screaming for help. When she and others reached the front door -- already locked for the night -- the patient, now calmed down, was knocking on the door wanting back in. He wasn't hurt at all.


(.)10
     Wilhelmine Stoerker sold the property at 1021 South Fourth Street, St Charles, St Charles County, Missouri, USA, on 16 March 1936. The property sold for $2910.00. The proceeds were distributed between Alma Stoerker (16%), Ella Stoerker (21%), Julia Stoerker (23%), and Mrs. Flora Altenbernd (40%).11
     George Ferdinand C Orlowsky married Alma Stoerker, daughter of Conrad Friedrich Stoerker and Wilhelmine Cuno, in 1940 . This was her first and only marriage. She was 60 years old.12,4

     Photo of Goerge and Alma Orlowsky -- Marian and Frieda Stoerker at left. Original photo in the possession of Sue Myers (#130.)


     They resided in Blue Springs, Jackson County, Missouri, USA, between 1943 and 1948.1
ME by John Altenbernd

Blue Springs Pastors' Home


     Uncle George Orlowsky's last position before his very brief retirement and death was Superintendent-Pastor of the Retired Pastors' Home in Blue Springs, Missouri, near Kansas City. He and Aunt Alma went there in the early 1940's. This wasn't really a "home". It was a number of homes, separate smaller houses for pastors who had retired with meager financial resources. This was before ministers were covered by Social Security and when pension funds had been virtually non-existent during their years of active pastoral service.
     The home had an entire dead-end street for itself on the edge of Blue Springs, houses on both sides of the street. No one else lived on the street, so this was sort of an isolated little community. A local physician treated the people at minimal cost. (I don't know whether that was a formalized retainer-type relationship with the Home or just the Doctor's voluntary service.)
     Uncle George and Aunt Alma lived in a larger house, the first one on that street. The house included an office and a chapel for Sunday services, which Uncle George conducted. Uncle George often wondered to my mother when we visited there why the denomination had put a retired pastors' home in Blue Springs where there was no congregation of our denomination (still Evangelical & Reformed at that time).
     These were all pastors (and wives) well into retirement years --with one exception which I'll mention later. Some were the last of that then vanishing breed, the German-born Evangelical pastor with a heavy accent. I met some of them when we visited the Orlowskys.
     I recall one heavily accented retiree -- late 70's probably -- who told Uncle George he had sent his name to a small rural Missouri church that was looking for a pastor. They had written him expressing possible interest. He had written back, asking them if they would be wanting Confirmation instruction to be in English or German. "I never heard from them again," the old pastor said with some puzzlement. To me, the reason seemed obvious, given his question about Confirmation. This, after all, was the mid-1940s.
There was another old German couple, the husband of which was of the old German school -- the man dominated the household with rank and privilege. Mom and I would see the couple out for a walk "together" on occasion. He was always twenty feet or so ahead of her. Or we would see them walking home from the grocery store. He again would be walking ahead of her -- and she would be carrying all the groceries.
     There was also a retired missionary couple who had lived most of their adult lives in India.
The really sad case was a younger couple, Rev. and Mrs. Kissling. Rev. Kissling some years before had become afflicted with some kind of a disease that caused progressive paralysis. When I first saw him he could move nothing from his neck down, and he could speak only with difficulty. His wife had to somehow get him back and forth from bed to chair and wait on him hand and foot. She had to be a most remarkable woman. Rev. Kissling sat in a chair with a towel on his hands since, if a fly lit there, he would be unable to swat it away.
     They had two sons who had spent their growing years there. I never met the older son. Maybe he no longer lived there. I don't recall. The younger son, Carl, was a couple of years older than I.
     Once when we were visiting the Orlowskys Carl invited me to go into Kansas City with him one evening for a movie. Carl was a student at what was then the University of Kansas City. I was a freshman at KU at the time, so I was 18.
     I remember that we stopped at a road house outside Blue Springs on the way home. I was underage at 18, of course, and I'm sure he knew that, but that didn't bother him. I had a beer, even though at the time I didn't even like the stuff.
     Liking beer, I think, is an acquired taste. In due course in my adult life I acquired a taste for it. Then, as with coffee, I lost the taste for it after I quit smoking.
In later years the UCC sold its houses in Blue Springs and opted for an apartment complex, really a better situation for older retired people who may have difficulty keeping up with conventional housework. Still later it became a retirement home for anyone, not just pastors. Also -- in 1976 -- a UCC congregation was begun in Blue Springs.


( Blue Springs, Missouri, USA.)13
ME by John Altenbernd

The Passing of the Orlowskys


     Aunt Alma Orlowsky, afflicted with Hodgkin's Disease, reached a point of rapid deterioration in the Fall of 1948. Even before things had reached too bad a point she said, "I don't think I'll be here Christmas." She wasn't, although I can't recall exactly when she passed on.
     The last days for her were a screaming horror, according to my mother. Aunt Alma had all sorts of horrifying hallucinations. Mom and Aunt Julie both went to Blue Springs, Missouri, to help Uncle George take care of her. George's son, Bernhard, and his wife were there too (I can't remember her first name).
     There was a funeral service at Blue Springs, and then the body was taken to St. Charles, Missouri, for burial. Mom and I made that trip across the State with George - as did Aunt Julie.
     George continued on as Superintendent of the Retired Pastors' Home in Blue Springs, but his zest for life was gone. It might have returned, given enough time for grief to subside, but a heart attack intervened, which laid him low.
     Bernhard and his wife returned to Blue Springs to care for him. Their stay stretched into months. Barney was a jeweler, and he got enough odd-job work in the area and in Kansas City to "keep the wolf away from the door," as he put it. But obviously this could be no permanent arrangement.
     When Uncle George had regained sufficient health to travel, he moved to Rogers, Arkansas, to live with his son.
We never saw nor heard from him again. Within a very short time Uncle George had another heart attack, a very bad one which killed him.


( Blue Springs, Missouri, USA, in 1948.)14
     Alma Stoerker was mentioned in a lettter sent by Adolph Stoerker residing at Aurora, Kane County, Illinois, USA, to Flora Altenbernd on 23 November 1948.
November 23, 1948

Dear Flora:-
Let me again thank you for being so very good to Sonny and. myself during our short stay with you. I was uneasy and restless while I was away because I left in the thick of work. However I did not want to see Sonny disappointed entirely to have someone come to Denver to meet him halfway. So I went. And now I feel that I might have been led to make the trip. For I had a good visit with you, got to see Alma before her departure, saw Theo and Frieda, and proved to be instrumental in sending help to all of you in getting Josie to go to Blue Springs. I had made up my mind that she or Marie had to go. But I am glad that Josie went because I feel that she can do a better job since Alma feels closer to her. I was so glad when she said that she would go.

Sorry that you were out when I called you Friday night. I just wanted you to know that help was coming.

Here is the address which I promised to send: Eden Cemetery Association, 9851 Irving Park Boulevard, Shiller Park, Illinois. Rev. Paul Stoerker, Secretary. Please write to him again. He needs some reminders so that he will meet some of his long neglected obligations.

You can be proud of John. He is a fine young gentleman and will make a very promising preacher.

Wishing you both blessings for health and strength!

Sincerely, your brother
Adolph.15

     Alma died on 3 December 1948 in Blue Springs, Jackson County, Missouri, USA, at age 68. The cause of death was parkinson's disease. George Ferdinand C Orlowsky provided the information on the death certificate.16,1 Alma Stoerker was buried on 5 December 1948 in St Charles, St Charles County, Missouri, USA.1
Last Edited=7 June 2022

Family: Alma Stoerker and George Ferdinand C Orlowsky

Citations

  1. [S728] Alma Orlowski (#57), Death Certificate file no. 37042 registration no. 215 (December 10, 1948), unknown repository, unknown repository address . Hereinafter cited as Deatgh Certificate.
  2. [S131] Conrad Friedrich Stoerker household, June 22, 1880 U.S. Federal Census, Macoupin County, Illinois, population schedule, town of Brighton Village, enumeration district (ED) 106, supervisor's district (SD) 6, sheet 41, dwelling 198, family 301, National Archives micropublication . Viewed at www.ancestry.com . (Document Source Number: 131). Hereinafter cited as Stoerker, Conrad (#14) - 1880 Census.
  3. [S81] Theophil Stoerker unknown date.
  4. [S25] John Stoerker Altenbernd unknown date.
  5. [S157] Sheila Sue Altenbernd unknown date.
  6. [S525] Wilhelmine Cuno Alma Stoerker. January 19, 1916.
  7. [S609] Conrad Stoerker (#14) Obituary, St Charles Newspaper, St Charles, Missouri, USA, June 13, 1927 . Hereinafter cited as St Charles Newspaper.
  8. [S1084] Letter from Wilhelmine Stoerker (#20) (1027 South 4th St Charles, Missouri) to Flora Altenbernd (#63) (699 Clark Street, Jefferson City, Missouri), October 21, 1929; unknown repository (unknown repository address).
  9. [S1070] Letter from Wilhelmine Stoerker (#20) (1021 South 4th Street, St Charles, Missouri) to Alma Stoerker (#57) (RR2, Lawrence, Kansas), April 16, 1929; unknown repository (unknown repository address).
  10. [S1352] John Stoerker Altenbernd,"Aunt Alma's Adventure" in ME; Page(s) 32.2; Published:.
  11. [S1081] Stoerker, Wilhellmina (#20) Receipt.
  12. [S75] Marion Adolph Stoerker unknown date.
  13. [S1353] John Stoerker Altenbernd,"Aunt Alma's Adventure" in ME; Page(s) 288.1 - 288.2; Published:.
  14. [S1355] John Stoerker Altenbernd,"The Passing of the Orlowskys" in ME; Page(s) 402.1; Published:.
  15. [S1638] Adolph Stoerker (#65) Flora Altenbernd (#63). November 23, 1948 301 Fifth Street, Aurora, Illinois. (1948). (Document Source Number: 00065-1948-11-23-01).
  16. [S130] Ruth Arlene Stoerker unknown date.
 

Compiler: Sheila Altenbernd
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