Dolby Days Genealogy Military

William Orlando Dolby
25 April 1840 - 26 December 1901

William Orlando Dolby was born, raised and died in Huntinton County IN. He was the son of Isaac & Caroline Mary (Martin) Dolby Jr and the grandson of Isaac & Dorthea (Dietz) Dolby Sr. William married Susanna Shelly 1 April 1866 in Hungington IN and later married Rebecca Sills 17 March 1880 in Wells County IN. William was in Co F 188th IN Vol Union Army in the Civil War.

GENERAL AFFIDAVIT
STATE OF Indiana COUNTY OF Huntington
In the matter of William Dolby for Restoration Cert. No. 102852 Personally came before me, the Clerk of the Circuit Court in and for the aforesaid County and State, Isaac Dolby, a citizen of Lancaster Township, County of Huntington, State of Indiana whose post office address is Huntington, Huntington County, Indiana, and Caroline Dolby a citizen of Lancaster Township, County of Huntington, State of Indiana whose post office address is Huntington, Huntington County, Indiana, well known to me to be reputable and entitled to credit, and who being duly sworn, declare to relation to the aforesaid case as follows:

They are the father and mother of the said William Dolby and raised him in their home from his birth. The said William Dolby was sound and healthy from his birth until he went into the Army for the suppression of the Rebellion, so far at least as any rupture or hernia was concerned so far as said affiants or either of them had or have any knowledge whatever. He could do and did do all manner of work on farm until he went into the army as aforesaid. Neither of said affiants in caring for and looking after the said William Dolby ever saw or heard of any complaint or indication of any rupture or hernia of the said William Dolby until his return from the Army in 1864.

They further declare that they have no interest in said case, and that they are not concerned in its prosecution

Signatures Of Isaac Dolby and Caroline Dolby

State of Indiana County of Huntington
Personally appeared before me Benjamin B. Hart a resident of the state and county aforesaid who being sworn deposeth and saith that I am personally acquainted with Wm. Dolby who resides in this county and [word?] a pension from the Government.

About the time the first draft was made in this state I met Wm. Dolby who was then on his road to John Falls who resides in Wabash Co. Ind to work for him. I asked him if he was not afraid of being arrested for moving away to avoid the draft, and he answered no that he was not as he said that the Government would soon turn him loose as he was not a sound man, and I asked him why, and he said that as soon as they stripped him they would see that he was not sound. As he had no other apparent ailment at the time he must have referred to the rupture. Christopher Dolby, brother of William Dolby, told me that three of his brothers were ruptured and that two of his Uncles were ruptured and that it was a family complaint. It is frequently talked of him and generally believed that Wm. Dolby was ruptured before entering the service, and I am satisfied that he referred to this complaint when I conversed with him previous to his entering the service.
Benjamin B. Hart
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 17th day of September 1872, Chas. A. Dresser, Special Agent

Department of the Interior
BUREAU OF PENSIONS Washington D.C., Oct. 18th, 1897

Sir:
Will you kindly answer, at your earliest convenience, the questions enumerated below? The information is requested for future use, and it may be of great value to your family.
Mr. William Dolby
Mt. Zion Wells Co. Ind.

No. 1. Are you a married man? If so, please state your wife’s full name, and her maiden name.
Answer: Yes. Rebecca Dolby (Nee Sills)

No. 2. When, where, and by whom were you married?
Answer: in Wabash Co. near Dora March 16th 1880. John Southwood

No. 3. What record of marriage exists?
Answer: Records at Wabash, Wabash Co. Indiana

No. 4. Were you previously married? If so, please state the name of your former wife and the date and place of her death or divorce.
Answer: Yes. Former wife Ann Shelly

No. 5. Have you any children living? If so, please state their names and the dates of their birth.
Answer: Yes.
Mary E. Born Feb. 25 1867
Sarah F. Born March 16th 1870
Martha C. Born 28 February 1872
Lewis H. Born March 16 1874
Charles M. Born Oct. 30 1880
Isaac Elmer Born July 4th 1883
Leroy Born March 23rd 1886.

Date of reply, November 12th, 1897 William Dolby (signature)

ACCRUED PENSION Act of March 2, 1895

WESTERN Division,
Certificate No. 102.852 Last issued February 15, 1896
Pensioner, William Dolby Act July 14, 1862
Date of death, December 26, 1901
Claimant, Rebecca Dolby, widow
R.4.D. to [?] 1 Leystone, Wells County Indiana
Submitted for Adm. May 15, 1905.

BOARD OF REVIEW
Approved for admission Pay widow at above
W.W. Kinsley [sign.] Reviewer, May 16, 1905
M. Thomas [sign.] Rereviewer, May 19th 1905

CERTIFICATE DIVISION
Accrued Pension Certificate and Order Issued May 22 1905
Mailed “ 25, 1905
Payable to widow
Hon. George W. Crowen[?] Claimant signs by mark

United States Pension Agency
Indianapolis, Ind. Jan. 29, 1902

Certificate No. 102,852 Class A
Pensioner William Dolby Service PC F118th Ind.

The Commissioner of Pensions.
SIR: I have the honor to report that the above-named pensioner who was last paid at $10.00, to Nov 4 1901 has been dropped because of Death - Dec., 26th 1901. Very respectfully,
A.O. Marsh [signature] United States Pension Agent.

Application for Accrued Pension
State of Indiana, County of Wells, SS:
On this 2nd day of January, 1902, personally appeared Rebecca Dolby who, being duly sworn, declares that she is the Lawful widow of William Dolby, deceased; that he died on the 26 day of Dec. 1901; that he had been granted a pension by Certificate No. 102852, which is herewith returned (if not, state why not); that he had been paid the pension by the Pension Agent at Indiana police[?] up to the 4 day of Nov. 1901 after which date he had not been employed or paid in the Army, navy or Marine service of the United States, except ________________; that she was married to the said William Dolby on the 7th day of Mar, 1877 at Wabash Co. Ind. in the State of Indiana; that her name before said marriage was Rebecca Sills; that she had been previously married; that her husband had been previously married; that she hereby makes application for the pension which had accrued on the aforesaid Certificate to the date of death; and that her residence in No._______________ Street, City of _______________, County of Wells, State of Indiana, and her Post Office address is Mt. Zion Indiana. Rebecca Dolby [her mark]

Also personally appeared David H. Dolby, residing at Huntington Co. Ind. and Lewis Dolby residing at Huntington Ind., who, being duly sworn, say that they were present and saw Rebecca Dolby sign her name (or make her mark) to the foregoing declaration; that they know her to be the lawful widow of William Dolby who died on the 26 day of Dec., 1901, and that their means of knowledge that said parties were husband and wife, and that the husband died on said date, are as follows: Lived together for years as husband and wife and were at funeral.
David H. Dolby Lewis Dolby
Signatures of Witnesses

Sworn to and subscribed before me on the 2 day of January 1901 and I certify that the affiants are reputable persons; that they know the contents of their depositions, and that their statements are entitled to full faith and credit. I further certify that I have no interest, direct or indirect, in the above claim.
[can’t read signature] Notary Public

Deposition A
Case of William Dolby, No. Cert. 102802

On this thirty first day of May, 1887, at Mt. Zion, County of Wells, State of Indiana, before me, Howard Hovay, a Special Examiner of the Pension Office, personally appeared William Dolby, who being by me first duly sworn to answer truly all interrogatories propounded to him during this Special Examination of aforesaid pension claim, deposes and says: My age is 27, am a farmer, address and post office as above. I was the identical Wm. Dolby who was a private of Co. F 188th Ind. Vols. I enlisted in June 1863 and was discharged March 4, 1864. I was never in the military or naval service of the United States except as above stated.

I was ruptured while in the service and two or three years after my discharge I made application for pension which was granted me and I drew $4 per month until 1872 when I was notified that my name had been struck from the roles. Why this was done I never knew and I have applied to have my pension restored. When I enlisted I had been living about a year a mile south of Dora Wabash Co Ind. with John Fall who now lives in Dora.

Before going to Dora I had been living for about two years with my father five miles south west of Huntington Ind. and had been working around the neighborhood.

Up to and at the date of my enlistment I was perfectly sound and healthy in every respect and was entirely free from rupture or other disabling cause.About a month or so after enlistment I was de[?word] by the quartermaster of the regiment whose name I forget as assistant commissary Sgt. And served in that capacity until I was hurt. On November 25, 1863 we were near Greenville, Town[?] and a number of men were butchering cattle a short distance from camp and I had a man and a team and was hauling meat from where they were butchering to the quarters and was issuing rations of meat to the orderly Sgt. of the company. There was a platform scales where they were butchering and I took up a quarter of beef weighting 125 lbs. From the scales to throw on the wagon. It had either been raining or there had been a heavy dew and the grass was slippery. The wagon slowed close to the scales. I raised the beef from the scales and went to throw it into the wagon with a swing and as I did so my feet slipped out from under me forward. It stopped the swing of the beef so it did not go on to the wagon and as I fell the quarter of beef struck in the left groin and at the same time as I fell my back struck the corner of the iron platform of the scales. I felt a severe pain in my groin at once and there immediately came a swelling there almost as large as my fist. My back hurt me terribly and there was a d[?] [?]ight in the backbone low down where I struck the scales. I lay quiet a little while till the others loaded the wagon and then rode to camp and went on with my duties issuing beef. My injuries pained me severely all the time but were easier[?] when I lay down and in a day or two I went to Dr. Blowist[?] and told him where I was hurt and he gave me some medicine. He did not examine me there but I got home and a week or two afterward he did examine my rupture and the injury in my back. He did not say much about it. They never did. About a month after my injury I got a truss. The rupture was so sore I could not wear one earlier. I had access to the stores from my position and I got my truss off the wagon. I wore it about three weeks and then it hurt my sore back so I had to take it off. I have never wore a truss since though I have got different ones and tried them. I was never at hospital but was with the regiment in camp till I came home.

I was not able to do any duty and my back kept getting worse all the time though the rupture did not hurt me so much after the first soreness was gone. I got so I was not able to walk at all and got so I could not straighten up at all without intense pain. In February 1864 Dr. Blowst[?] and Major Saylor[?] brought home a squad of sick men and I was among them. We came as far as Indianapolis and there was furloughed for 8 or 10 days. I came home to Huntington and then went back to Indianapolis and was discharged with the regiment. I came home to my fathers, stayed a few days and then went back to John Fall’s at Dora Wabash Co. Ind. I stayed there and worked for Falls until 1879. The first season I did not do much of anything. My back was very lame and crippled me all over so I could do little work. It got better and stronger eventually till I could do fair work by spells but I have suffered more or less all the time since I was hurt. [NEXT SENTENCES VERY FADED] [word?] few days in [word?] I have luck and spells[?] it affects to st[?]t is the rupture was back [?rest of sentence or two] In 1864 I moved to Polk Tp. Huntington Co. and lived there till 1881 when I came to my present residence. I have followers foraging[?] all the time. I claim I have been one half disabled in my injuries above described above [rest of sentence?] I desire the following witnesses examined [rest of sentence?] John Fall a [words?] , the [?] McGinness a preacher, Dr. Counts[?] of Dora South West of Huntington, Samuel Beaver, Jack Good Miller, Elijah Smith, Peter Nine[?] As to my enjoining[?] I cannot name any who were present. The drive was not only back from my [?]ite and I don't know his name. Thomas Drake of Co. 4 was my barrack and tent mate but he is way west and I don’t know his address. Ira Owen of Lincolnsville Ind. and Caswell McKi[?] in that neighborhood and Orias[?] Ellis[?] Mor[?]ant [?words] knew about my injury. [unreadable sentence]. Those named about Dora and Huntington knew my condition after I came home and while I lived near those places.

In investigating my case I desire the {?]verlization to come[?] all that [word?] above described. I waive my right to be present when the witnesses are examined as I am not able to go. I understand the questions asked me and [rest of sentence?] [?] stripped and examined by a Surgeon or Board of Surgeons at enlistment. I was examined by a surgeon at Indiana [rest of sentence faded].
William Dolby

Deposition A
Case of William Dolby No. Cert 102,801
(cont’d) Q. Were you ever drafted or did you reenlist after your first service.
A. I was drafted in Wabash Co., Ind. in the fall of 1864 and was examined and rejected on account of my rupture.

Q. Have you had any medical treatment since your discharge from the service?
A. I have not been treated except by Dr. [?] of Mt. Zion Ind. who has given me medicine for misery[?] in my bowells about my rupture.

Q. State again the day on which you received you injuries in services.
A. November 25 1863.

Q. How do you fix this date?
A. I remembered it at first [?] where my application was made {?]ially I went[?] to set that date in a day book.

Q. In your original application you [two more questions unreadable]

Deposition B
Case of William Dolby, No. Cert 102,852

On this third day of June, 1887, at Huntington, County of Hutington, State of Indiana, before me, Howard Hovey, a Special Examiner of the Pension Office, personally appeared Elijah Smith, who, being by me first duly sworn to answer truly all interrogatories propounded to him during this Special Examination of aforesaid pension claim, deposes and says:

My age is 63, am a farmer. I live in Lancaster Tp. Huntington Co. Ind. Huntington Ind. is my post office address. I lived in this township 37 years and have known the Dolbys ever since they came here 28 or 30 years ago. They lived a mile east of me and the old Gentleman Isaac Dolby lives there yet. Before the War Wm. Dolby made his house with the old folks and worked around the neighborhood. I think claimant was working at Wm. Huston’s [?]row abad[?] when he enlisted.

I was well acquainted with [?word] before his enlisted and saw him frequently and knew him as I did other young men in the neighborhood. I don’t remember whether he had worked any for us or not. He had the appearance of a stout man outwardly. I don’t know whether there was anything the matter with him before enlistment or not. I have understood for a good many years that he is ruptured but I am not sure when I first heard of that. I am of the opinion that I did not hear of it till during or after the war. I don’t remember that I ever heard that he had his back hurt in any way or had anything the matter with his back. I understood he drew a pension for rupture but did not know it had been stopped.

Q. Have you any reason to believe claimant was ruptured before he enlisted?
A. Only what Dr. Grayston told me. He spoke of some man in my neighborhood as drawing pension for a disability he had before enlistment. He did not name the disability nor the man but I got the idea he referred to claimant, and he doctored the family before the war.

I have heard the matter spoken of by thus but by no one who claimed to have actual knowledge about it except Dr. Grayston. I don’t recollect whether claimant came back and stayed at home after the service or not. If he did I don’t remember that anything ailed him but I don’t remember much about him just then. In fact he has not lived to near me since the war or before but I have seem him occasionally. I never knew he had anything ailing except that rupture. I am not interested in this claim nor related to the claimant. I am on perfectly good terms with him. I understand the questions asked me and my answers are correctly recorded herein.
Elijah Smith [signature]

Deposition E
Case of William Dolby, No. cert. 102, 852

On this Seventh day of June, 1887, at Huntington Huntington, County of Hutington, State of Indiana, before me, Howard Hovey, a Special Examiner of the Pension Office, personally appeared Isaac Dolby, who, being by me first duly sworn to answer truly all interrogatories propounded to him during this Special Examination of aforesaid pension claim, deposes and says:

My age is 79, am a farmer. My residence and post office address are Huntington, Ind. I am the father of the claimant. The claimant lived always with me and worked at home and among the neighbors until six or eight months before he enlisted when he went to John Falls at Dora Ind. and worked there till he enlisted. The claimant was in good health always until he went to the army and while in the army he got ruptured. He told me he did it throwing a quarter of beef into a wagon. The first I knew of it was when he came home. He showed me his rupture and told me where he got it. It was in the groin but I don’t recollect on which side as I never saw it but once. I never knew him to have any other injury or anything else the matter with him except this rupture. That is all he ever told me about.

No I never heard he had his leg hurt in the service nor that he had his back hurt in any way only he said he kind of strained his back when he threw the beef in the wagon.

When he came home he was dirty and louzy but his general health was good except his rupture and always has been. He lived with me for a year or so after he came home and worked on the place. Since then he has lived around other places near here.

I never knew anything ailed him except the rupture. Yes, he says his back bothers him [?word] from the strain he gave it but not as much as the rupture does. He never told me he was hit in the back or struck there or injured any way except by straining it.

Q. Is it not true that your son William was ruptured before he enlisted.
A. No sir. I never knew of it till he came home. I had seven sons five of whom are living and not one is ruptured except William to my knowledge. I am not ruptured. I have an enlargement in my groin which caused from an injury I got two years ago but it is not ruptured

I understand the questions asked me and my answers are correctly recorded herein.
Isaac Dolby [signature]

Deposition F
Case of William Dolby, No. Cert 102, 852

On this eighth day of June, 1887, at Huntington, County of Hutington, State of Indiana, before me, Howard Hovey, a Special Examiner of the Pension Office, personally appeared William Good Miller, who, being by me first duly sworn to answer truly all interrogatories propounded to him during this Special Examination of aforesaid pension claim, deposes and says:

My age is 44, am a farmer, residence and post office as above. I have known Wm. Dolby ever since he was a child. I knew him in Wayne Co. Ind. before the war and after his folks came to this county about 1859. They lived within half a mile of me and have ever since. We have always been [?word] and I have known claimant as well as I have anyone. We were together as young fellows before war and used to work together at log rollings and such places.

As far as I know claimants health was fair before he enlisted. I never knew him to be sick to amount to anything and he was a sound man in ever way as far as I know. Since the war he has not been as stout as before he enlisted but I don’t know of any particular injury he has. I never heard until now that he was impaired that I can remember.It don’t seem to me he could have been impaired before the war and I not know it because he used to be jumping and carrying on with us boys. I recollect his coming home on a furlough and he was so bad he had to be brought home in a buggy. I went to see him several times and he was lying down and apparently very weak. I don’t remember what ailed him but think he said it was from being sherved[?]. He had not been hurt or wounded or injured in any way that I know of. He got better after awhile and I don’t know that he has had any permanent disability since the war. I have never heard him complain of any back trouble. I have not been with him so much since the war as before though I have seen him occasionally all along.

I am not interested in this claim nor related to the claimant. I understand the questions asked me and my answers are correctly recorded herein.
William Goodmiller [signature]

AFFIDAVIT
STATE OF Indiana County of Huntington

In the matter of PENSION CLAIM Additional No 592 354 Of Rebecca Dolby, widow of William Dolby, deceased, late a private of Company F of the 118 Regiment of Ind. Inf. Volunteers. Personally came before me, John I. Williams a Notary Public in and for said County and State Rebecca Dolby aged 72 years, a resident of the Postoffice of Keystone R.F.D. # 1, County of Wells, State of Indiana, well known to me to be reputable and entitled to credit; who being duly sworn, declares in relation to the aforesaid case as follows, to-wit:

That she is the claimant in the above cited pension claim for additional pension under the provisions of the Act of September 8, 1916. The claimant, Rebecca Dolby, says that she was born November 1, 1844 and that she is seventy two years of age and that she is now drawing a pension of $12.00 per month under certificate No. 592 354 under the Act of April 19, 1908.

The claimant further says that she has not remarried since the death of her said husband William Dolby. That she makes this declaration for the purpose of being placed on the pension roll of the United States under the provisions of the Act of September 8, 1916, at the rate of $20.00 per month.
Witness: Warren E Oliver and Roy Dolby Signatures: Signed Rebecca Dolby (MARK)

Certificate No. 102 852 Department of the Interior
Name William Dolby
BUREAU OF PENSIONS, Washington, D.C.,
January 15, 1898.

SIR:
In forwarding to the pension agent the executed voucher for your next quarterly payment please favor me by returning this circular to him with replies to the questions enumerated below.
Very respectfully,

First. Are you married? If so, please state your wife’s full name and her maiden name.
Answer. Yes. Rebecca Sills Dolby

Second. When, where, and by whom were you married?
Answer. In Huntington Co. Ind by Sq. McKinney

Third. What record of marriage exists?
Answer. Recorded in the Holy bible.

Fourth. Were you previously married? If so, please state the name of your former wife and the date and place of her death or divorce.
Answer. Ann Shelly died Aug. 20th 1878

Fifth. Have you any children living? If so, please state their names and the dates of their birth.
Answer.
Mary E. Dolby Feb 25th 1864
Sarah F. March 16th 1870
Martha C. March 28 1872
Lewis H. March 16th 1874
Charley M. Oct 30 18[?]
Elmer July 4th 1883 Roy March 23 1886

William Dolby Date of reply, April 9th, 1898

William Dolby to Rebecca Buzzard Be it Remembered, That heretofore, to wit, on the 17 day of March 1880 the following Marriage License was issued to-wit:
Indiana, to-wit: Wabash County,
To all who shall see these Presents, Greeting.
Know Ye, That any person empowered by law to solemnize marriages is hereby authorized to join together as HUSBAND AND WIFE
William Dolby and Rebbecca Bussard
And for so dong this shall be your sufficient authority.
IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I, Clark W. Weesner Clerk of the Wabash Circuit Court hereunto subscribe my name and affix the seal of said Court, at Wabash, this 17 day of March 1880
Clarkson W. Weesner, Clerk [signature]
Be it further remembered, that afterward, to-wit: on the 24 day of April 1880 the following certificate of marriage was filed in my office, to-wit:

Indiana, to-wit; Wabash County, SS:
This Certifies, that I joined in marriage as HUSBAND AND WIFE, Wm. Dolby and Rebecca Bussard on the 17 day of March 1880.
J.W. Southwood [signature]

State of Indiana, Wabash County, SS:
I, J.H. Lefforge Clerk of the Circuit Court within and for said County of Wabash, and State of Indiana, do hereby certify the foresail to be true and correct copies of the Marriage License and Certificate of Marriage of William Dolby to Rebecca Bussard as the same now appears upon the marriage Record now on file in my office.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto subscribed my name, and affixed the seal of Said Court, at Wabash, Wabash County, Indiana on this 24 day of March 1902
JH Lefforge Clerk of the Wabash Circuit Court.

General Affidavit,
For Any Purpose.
STATE OF Indiana COUNTY OF Wells

In Pension Claim [?] No. 754 409 in case of widow of Wm Dolby late a private of Co F, 118 Regiment Indiana Volunteers, personally appeared before me, the undersigned a Notary Public within and for the County and State aforesaid, D. C. Huffman aged 47 years, whose post-office address is Craigville Ind and by occupation a Physician who being duly sworn, according to law, declares in relation to the aforesaid case as follows:

That he was the attending physician at the birth of LeRoy child of soldier and claimant. That said child was born March 25, 1886. That he has made an affidavit in this case and he interceded to give the birth as March 25, 1886 but he is informed that it appears in the affidavit as March 26, 1886. This is an error and evidently was a mistake of the scrivener. [?] has no interest in the case.
D.C. Kauffman M.D.

Transcribed by Jodi Reifsnyder Adrian