Terhune Family

ENDNOTES

1. Genealogies of Long Island Families 1600s to 1800s: Long Island Source Records - Kings County Wills. 1696 Will (Abstract) of Jan Albertse Terhune. Will of John Albertse Terhuiennen [sic] of Flatlands, dated 20 February 1696/1697.

"To wife Margarita Terhuiennen one half of all my estate for life; the other half to children that are now or hereafter shall be born. Sons Roeloff, Albert and Aucke. Daughters mentioned, but not named. Brother Albert Terhuiennen and Reyneer VanSycklyn [sic], guardians. Executors Albert Terhuiennen and Reyneer Van Sycklyn. Witnesses: Henry Ffilkin, Tunis Jansen, Peter Brower." Recorded February 20 1696/1697 in Liber 2 of Conveyances [sic], page 296.
A footnote states: "John Albertse Terhune was a son of Albert Albertse; he married first on 1 July 1683 Annetje Roeloffse Schenck and married second on 6 June 1691 Margrietje Van Sicklen" Genealogical Gleanings from Book 2 of Conveyances, Brooklyn, Kings County, New York also states that this Will appears on page 296 but this notation adds: "Children not of age. Daughters mentioned but not named" No further information is given.

2. Find A Grave: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gsr&GSfn=&GSmn=&GSln=&Frelingh&GSpartial=1&GSby=&GSbyrel=inl&GSdy=&GSdyrel=in&GScntry=4&

    Reverend Theodorus Jacobus Frelinghuysen I
    Birth: 1691 Friesland, Netherland
    Death: 1748 Somerset County, New Jersey
Theodorus Jacobus Frelinghuysen, Reverend (1691 to 1748) also known as Theodore Jacob Frelinghuysen I (born 1691 in Lingen, East Friesland, Netherland and died 1748 at Three Mile Run, Somerset County, New Jersey. Son of Johannes Henrich Frelinghaus. He married Eva Terhune (1708 to ?) and had the following children:
    Theodorus (Theodore) Frelinghuysen II, Reverend (1724 to 1761)
    Johannes (John) Frelinghuysen, Reverend (1727 to 1754) who married Dinah Van Berg
    Jacobus (Jacob) Frelinghuysen (about 1730 to 1753) who died at sea
    Ferdinandus (Ferdinand) Frelinghuysen (about 1732 to 1753) who died at sea
    Henricus (Henry) Frelinghuysen (about 1735 to 1757) who died in Ulster County, New York
    Margaret Frelinghuysen (1737 to 1757) who married Thomas F. Romeyn, Reverend in 1756
    Anna Frelinghuysen (1738 to 1810) who married William Jackson, Reverend
All five sons became ministers and both daughters married ministers. Theodore is the immigrant ancestor for all the Frelinhuysens in New Jersey, and he was born in Lingen, East Friesland, the Netherland which is now part of Hanover, Germany. His monument lies in the very back of the Elm Ridge Cemetery in its own row, trees grow directly behind it and the inscription faces the woods and cannot be read from the cemetery. This may be a cenotaph since his original burial location has been a mystery since he was interred without a marker. He is the oldest born person in the cemetery and one of the earliest burials. He is the only person in the cemetery born in the 1600s. According to Doctor Francis Clark of New Brunswick, the cemetery was facing the original Kings Highway.

3. The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans, Volume IV.

4. Diary of Dina Van Bergh Frelinghausen, translated by Reverend Gerard Van Dyke with introduction and notes by Reverend J. David Muyskens; Historical Society of the Reformed Church in America, New Brunswick, New Jersey (1993) page 121.

5. Ecclesiastical Records State of New York by Hugh Hastings, State Historian, (1902) Volumes 4 to 6, pages 2899 to 2900.

6. Lee, Francis Bazley, Genealogical and Memorial History of the State of New Jersey, Volume 4 (1910) Lewis Historical Publishing Company, New York, pages 6 to 7.

7. Ibid. page 6,

"Ferdinand and Jacobus Frelinghuysen... were ordained July 17, 1752, and sailed for home. 'They died' on the voyage says their brother, John, in a letter to the Classis, the one seven days after the other, each stricken down with the smallpox, Ferdinand, June 11 and Jacobus, June 18, 1753."

8. Ibid.

9. Diary of Dina Van Bergh Frelinghausen, translated by Reverend Gerard Van Dyke with introduction and notes by Reverend J. David Muyskens, Historical Society of the Reformed Church in America, New Brunswick, New Jersey (1993) page 121.

10. Lee, Francis Bazley, Genealogical and Memorial History of the State of New Jersey, Volume 4 (1910) Lewis Historical Publishing Company, New York, page 6.

"In November 1753, Marbletown, Rochester and Warwarsing Dutch Reformed Churches sent a formal request to the Classis in Amsterdam requesting permission to ordain Hendrick by the Coetus of New York. [primarily because two of his brothers had already died at sea returning to America following their ordination in Amsterdam]. They were repeatedly denied until 1757 when they ordained him [in America] without Classis approval. This denial formed one of the strongest arguments which resulted in the assertion of the independence of the Coetus..."

11. Marriages Previous to 1784, Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore 1968, a reprint of the 1860 edition, page 201.

12. Beard, Timothy F, F.A.S.G., Jackson Family of New York.

13. Marriages Previous to 1784, Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore 1968, a reprint of the 1860 edition, page 201.

14. Beard, Timothy F, F.A.5.G., Jackson Family of New York.

15. Lee, Francis Bazley, Genealogical and Memorial History of the State of New Jersey Volumee 4, (1910) Lewis Historical Publishing Company, New York, page 7.

"John, the second son of the Reverend Theodorus Jacobus Frelinghuysen...died suddenly at the home of his mother's parents, Flatbush [should be Flatlands], Long Island, September 15, 1754 while on his way to attend what proved to be the last meeting of the united Coetus of New York; as April 15, 1755 his brother, Theodore issued his famous call for a special meeting of the Coetus for May 30, which organized the American CIassis, split the church into Coetus and Conferentie parties, and practically declared the independence of the Reformed church in this country"

16. Diary of Dina Van Bergh Frelinghausen, translated by Reverend Gerard Van Dyke with introduction and notes by Reverend J. David Muyskens, Historical Society of the Reformed Church in America, New Brunswick, New Jersey (1993) page 115.

17. Ibid. page 120.

18. Lee, Francis Bazley, Genealogical and Memorial History of the State of New Jersey Volume 4 (1910) Lewis Historical Publishing Company, New York, page 8.

19. Diary of Dina Van Bergh Frelinghausen, translated by Reverend Gerard Van Dyke with introduction and notes by Reverend J. David Muyskens, Historical Society of the Reformed Church in America, New Brunswick, New Jersey (1993).

20. Find A Grave: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gsr&GSfn=&GSmn=&GSln=&Frelingh&GSpartial=1&GSby=&GSbyrel=inl&GSdy=&GSdyrel=in&GScntry=4&

    Reverend John Frelinghuysen
    Birth: 1727
    Death: September 5, 1754
    John Frelinghuysen (1727 to 1754); Reverend
    Son of Theodorus Jacobus Frelinghuysen (1691 to 1748); Reverend
    Marriage: John married Dinah VanBerg and had the following children:
    Eva Frelinghuysen (1751 to about 1826) who married Casparus Van Nostrand
    Frederick Frelinghuysen (1753 to 1804) Major General who was buried in Weston, New Jersey (now Manville)
    Old Dutch Parsonage: John lived in the Old Dutch Parsonage in Somerville New Jersey until his death where he served three congregations. He also tutored students preparing them for the seminary.
    Burial: Old Somerville Cemetery, Somerville, Somerset County, New Jersey
    Record added: January 9 2004 by Richard Arthur Norton (1958- )

21. Lee, Francis Bazley, Genealogical and Memorial History of the State of New Jersey Volume 4, (1910) page 8:

"In 1826 his remains, with those of his nephew, Theodore Frelinghuysen Romeyn, were removed from their original resting place and put with those of another pastor, and the congregation of Raritan erected to the three a monument, known as "the minister's tomb," on which their tribute to Dominee John Frelinghuysen is 'Amiable in disposition, pious in character, zealous in the work of his Master, successful in gaining friends and winning souls, much beloved, much lamented'."

22. Ibid. page 7,

"After his father's death (about 1747 or 1748) ...three churches, Raritan, Harlingen and Readington, united and called John Frelinghuysen, at that time studying under the Classis of Amsterdam...he preached his introductory sermons, at Raritan, August 3, 1750..."

23. Diary of Dina Van Bergh Frelinghausen, translated by Reverend Gerard Van Dyke with introduction and notes by Reverend J. David Muyskens, Historical Society of the Reformed Dutch Church in America, New Brunswick, New Jersey (1993) page 115.

24. Find A Grave: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gsr&GSfn=&GSmn=&GSln=&Frelingh&GSpartial=1&GSby=&GSbyrel=inl&GSdy=&GSdyrel=in&GScntry=4&

    Ann Yard Frelinghuysen
    Birth: 1764
    Death: December 29, 1839
    Ann Yard (1764 to 1839). Wife of Frederick Frelinghuysen, Major General (1753 to 1804).
    Burial: Hillsborough Reformed Church Cemetery, Millstone Somerset County, New Jersey
    Record added: Dec 25, 2003 by: Richard Arthur Norton (1958-).

25. Somerset County Historical Quarterly Volume I 1912

Weston Burying Ground Inscriptions

Abstracts by Miss E. Gertrude Nevius, East Millstone, New Jersey.

Frelinghuysen, Gertrude (consort of Frederick and daughter of Henry and Magdalene Schenck), died March 11, 1794 at age 41 years 3 months 9 days.

and... Find A Grave: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gsr&GSfn=&GSmn=&GSln=&Frelingh&GSpartial=1&GSby=&GSbyrel=inl&GSdy=&GSdyrel=in&GScntry=4&

26. Lee, Francis Bazley, Genealogical and Memorial History of the State of New Jersey, Volume 4, (1910) Lewis Historical Publishing Company, New York, page 10,

"...with his command he joined Washington in his retreat across New Jersey and took part in the crossing of the Delaware and the battle of Trenton February 28, 1777...was promoted to Colonel of the First Battalion, Somerset County Militia and placed with the command under Major General Dickinson..."

27. Find A Grave: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gsr&GSfn=&GSmn=&GSln=&Frelingh&GSpartial=1&GSby=&GSbyrel=inl&GSdy=&GSdyrel=in&GScntry=4&

    Sarah Frelinghuysen
    Birth: 1796
    Death: 1825
    Sarah Frelinghuysen (1796 to 1825). Daughter of Frederick Frelinghuysen, Major General (1753 to 1804) of Flatbush, (Long Island), Kings County, New York and Ann Yard (1764 to 1839).
    Burial: Hillsborough Reformed Church Cemetery, Millstone (Somerset County)Somerset County, New Jersey. Record added: December 25, 2003 by: Richard Arthur Norton (1958 to ?).

28. Lee, Francis Bazley, Genealogical and Memorial History of the State of New Jersey Volume 4, (1910) Lewis Historical Publishing Company, New York, page 11.

29. Find A Grave: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gsr&GSfn=&GSmn=&GSln=&Frelingh&GSpartial=1&GSby=&GSbyrel=inl&GSdy=&GSdyrel=in&GScntry=4&

30. The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans: Volume IV Frelinghuysen, Theodorus Jacobus page 188

Frelinghuysen, Theodore, educator, was born in Franklin township, Somerset county, N.J., March 28, 1787, son of General Frederick Frelinghuysen. He attended the grammar school connected with Queens college, New Brunswick, New Jersey, 1798 to 1800, a classical academy at Baskingridge. New Jersey, conducted by the Reverend Doctor Findley, 1800 to 1802 and was graduated at the College of New Jersey with high honors in 1804. He studied law under his brother John at Millstone, New Jersey, and was admitted to the Bar in 1808 and practiced in Newark, New Jersey.

He served in the war of 1812 as captain of volunteers and in 1817 he was appointed attorney-general of the state and was twice reappointed, serving until his election as U.S. senator in 1829. He served a full senatorial term and in 1835 resumed the practice of his profession in Newark.

He was Mayor of the city, 1837 to 1838; presidential elector-at-large for New Jersey in the electoral college of 1829; Chancellor of the University of the city of New York, 1839 to 1850, and president of Rutgers college, 1850 to 1861. He was the Whig candidate for Vice President in the campaign of 1844 with Henry Clay for President.

He was President of the American board of commissioners for foreign missions for sixteen years; president of the American Bible society, 1846 to 1861; [page 188] president of the American Trust Society, 1842 to 1848; Vice President of the American Sunday School Union, 1826 to 1860 and member of the council of the University of the City of New York, 1839 to 1850, and for several years Vice Ppresident of the American Colonization Society. He received the degree of LL D. from the College of New Jersey in 1833 and from Rutgers College in 1841.

He died in New Brunswick, New Jersey, April 12, 1862.

31. Lee, Francis Bazley, Genealogical and Memorial History of the State of New Jersey, Volume 4, (1910) Lewis Historical Publishing Company, New York, page 11,

"...1828: elected to the United States Senate, where he was prominent as a debater on the Whig side...failing reelection in 1835 he resumed his law practice in Newark...served as Mayor of Newark 1837 to 1838...was the Whig candidate for Vice President on the ticket with Henry Clay in 1844...and was president of Rutgers College from 1850 until his death..."

32. Ibid. page 11.

33. Appleton's Cyclopedia of American Biography of 1887 to 1889:

"General Frederick's eldest son, John Frelinghuysen lawyer, born near Millstone, Somerset County, New Jersey on 21 March 1776 and died there, 10 April 1833, was graduated from Queen's College (now Rutgers University) in 1792 and was admitted to the Bar in 1797.

By reason of his great aversion to public speaking he figured but little in the courts, but as an office lawyer enjoyed an extensive practice. For many years he was a member of the state council, and for three consecutive terms of five years each, was surrogate of his County.

Inheriting from his father, General Frederick Frelinghuysen, a great fondness for military life, he promptly offered his services at the beginning of the second war with Great Britain and was for many months encamped with a regiment of New Jersey militia, which he commanded, at Sandy Hook, with a view to preventing the enemy's vessels from passing up the bay to attack New York. At the close of the war he was made a Brigadier General.

He was a man of profound piety, and while on duty at Sandy Hook frequently conducted public services at the head of his regiment. So tenderly did he care for his soldiers that the sick among them were sheltered in his own tent, and made to eat at his own table. He freely used his own means to relieve their wants, even going so far as to embarrass his estate for this purpose."

and... Find A Grave: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gsr&GSfn=&GSmn=&GSln=&Frelingh&GSpartial=1&GSby=&GSbyrel=inl&GSdy=&GSdyrel=in&GScntry=4&

34. Lee, Francis Bazley, Genealogical and Memorial History of the State of New Jersey, Volume 4, (1910) Lewis Historical Publishing Company, New York, page 11.

35. Ibid. page 12.

36. Ibid. page 11.

37. Find A Grave: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gsr&GSfn=&GSmn=&GSln=&Frelingh&GSpartial=1&GSby=&GSbyrel=inl&GSdy=&GSdyrel=in&GScntry=4&

    Jane DuMont Frelinghuysen
    Birth: Dee. 1, 1791
    Death: May 28, 1875
    Wife of Frederick Frelinghuysen.
    Burial: DuMont Cemetery, Raritan, Somerset County, New Jersey
    Record added: June 21 2005 by Kevin Murphy.

38. Lee, Francis Bazley, Genealogical and Memorial History of the State of New Jersey, Volume 4, (1910) Lewis Historical Publishing Company, New York, page 12.

39. Ibid.

    Only 3 years old when his father died, he was adopted by his uncle Theodore Frelinghuysen who took him to his home in Newark.

40. The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans Volume IV

    Frelinghuysen, Frederick Theodore, statesman was born in Millstone, New Jersey August 4, 1817, a son of Frederick Frelinghuysen, a lawyer and grandson of General Frederick Freylinghuysen and great grandson of Dominee John Frelinghuysen.
    He was adopted by his uncle Theodore, second son of General Frederick Freylinghuysen, upon the death of his father in 1820 and graduated from Rutgers college, A.B. in 1836 and A.M.in 1839. After studying law under his uncle Theodore at Newark, New Jersey, he was admitted to the Bar in 1839 and succeeded to his uncle's practice in 1840.
    He was city attorney of Newark in 1849 and a member of the City Counci1 in 1850. He became an attorney for the New Jersey Central railroad and for the Morris Canal and Banking Company.
    In 1861 he was appointed by Governor Olden Attorney General of New Jersey and was reappointed in 1866 by Governor Ward. He was a delegate from his state to the peace convention of February 4, 1861 at Washington DC.
    In 1866 he was appointed by Governor Ward to the vacant seat in the United States Senate caused by the death of Senator Wright and in the winter of 1867 was elected by the state legislature to complete the term expiring March 4, 1869.
    He failed of reelection and President Grant appointed him United States Minister to Great Britain, his confirmation being secured in the senate without a reference to the committee, but he declined the mission. He was elected to the United States Senate July 25, 1871 for a full term.
    He voted for the conviction of President Johnson in the impeachment trial; introduced a bill to restore specie payment; supported a tariff for protection; advocated the civil rights bill and secured the passage of the antipolygamy bill and the Japanese indemnity fund act. He was a member of the judiciary committee and the committee on foreign relations of which he was acting chairman during the session of the joint high commission on the Alabama claims and on the committees on Naval Affairs, Claims and Railroads.
    In 1877 he was a member of the joint committee of the Senate and House which created the electoral commission and was appointed a member of the commission. He was defeated by the vote of the Democratic majority in the election for senator in 1877 and was succeeded March 4, 1877 by John R. McPherson.
    President Arthur, on December 12, 1881, appointed him Secretary of State in his cabinet, as successor to James G. Blaine, resigned, and he held the position till the close of the term of the administration on March 4, 1885 when he retired to his home in Newark, New Jersey, suffering from an illness from which he never recovered.
    He was president of the American Bible Society and a trustee of Rutgers College from 1851 to 1885. He received the honorary degree of LLD from the College of New Jersey in 1864. He died in Newark, New Jersey May 20, 1885.

41. Lee, Francis Bazley, Genealogical and Memorial History of the State of New Jersey, Volume 4 (1910) Lewis Historical Publishing Company, New York, page 14.

42. Find A Grave: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gsr&GSfn=&GSmn=&GSln=&Frelingh&GSpartial=1&GSby=&GSbyrel=inl&GSdy=&GSdyrel=in&GScntry=4&

    Frederick Theodore Frelinghuysen
    Birth: August 4, 1817
    Death: May 20, 1885
    American Statesman. He served as a United States Senator from New Jersey, where in 1868 he voted to removed President Andrew Johnson from office, and as United States Secretary of State in Chester Arthur's administration.
    Burial: Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Newark, Essex County, New Jersey
    Plot: Section M, Lots 44 and 45 and 58 and 59
    Record added: March 21 1999.

43. Lee, Francis Bazley, Genealogical and Memorial History of the State of New Jersey, Volume 4, (1910) Lewis Historical Publishing Company, New York, page 13.

44. Ibid.

    In 1866, Abraham Lincoln appointed him as United States Attorney General.
    In December 1866, appointed to vacant seat in the United States Senate...in 1867 he voted for the conviction of President Johnson on his impeachment...his term expired in 1869. In 1871 he was again appointed to a vacant seat in the Senate, this term expired March 4, 1877 and he lost reelection when the opposing Democratic party was victorious. He was called again to serve following the assassination of James Garfield, when President Arthur called him to serve as Secretary of State on December 12, 1881. At the inauguration of Grover Cleveland, Frelinghuysen surrendered his seat in the cabinet.

45. Ibid. page 14.

46. The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans: Volume IV Frelinghuysen, Frederick Theodore page 187

    Frelinghuysen, Frederick, Senator, was born in Somerset county, New Jersey, April 13, 1753; son of the Reverend John Frelinghuysen (1727 to 1784), a founder of Queens College in New Brunswick, New Jersey and a grandson of the Dominee Theodorus Jacobus Frelinghuysen, founder of the family in New Jersey ...
    Frederick was graduated at the College of New Jersey in 1770 and was admitted to the Bar in 1774.
    He was a member of the provincial congress of New Jersey from 1775 to 1776 and in 1778, he was elected by the Legislature as a delegate to the Continental Congress, serving from 1778 to 1779 and again from 1782 to 1783.
    He commanded a Corps of Artillery at the battle of Trenton, was promoted to Colonel in the Militia, and took part in the battles at Springfield and Elizabethtown and in June 1778 in the battle of Monmouth Court House.
    He was elected to the United States senate, serving in the 3rd and 4th Congresses from 1793 to 1796.
    He resigned in 1796 and was succeeded by Richard Stockton.
    He was commissioned by President Washington a Major General in the army raised to suppress the whiskey insurrection in Pennsylvania.
    He was a trustee of Princeton University from 1802 to 1804.
    He correctly predicted the day of his death at the time he fell ill and died at his home near Millstone, New Jersey, on his fiftieth birthday, April 13, 1804.

47. Tanis, James; Dutch Calvinistic Pietism in the Middle Colonies, A Study in the Life and Theology of Theodorus Jacobus Frelinghuysen; Martinus Nijhoff. The Hague 1967, page 23.

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