Alexander (McBurney) McBirnie

M, b. circa 1834, d. 23 September 1896
FatherWilliam (McBirney) (McBurney) McBirnie b. c 1808, d. 10 Sep 1888
MotherMary McAllister b. c 1811, d. s 1847
ChartsJames McBirnie (est. 1780-) Descendants
Last Edited6 Jan 2017
     Alexander (McBurney) McBirnie was born circa 1834 at Garnkirk, parish of Cadder, Lanark, Scotland. He appeared on the census of 7 June 1841 in the household of William (McBirney) (McBurney) McBirnie and Mary McAllister at Cailin Croft South Row, Gartsherrie Quoad Sacra Parish, Parish of Old Monkland, Lanark, Scotland.1 Alexander (McBurney) McBirnie was a brickmaker. He appeared on the census of 30 March 1851 at Forth Ironworks (now Oakley ?), parish of Carnock, Fife, Scotland.2 He married Sophia McNeilly on 20 October 1851 at Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland.3 Alexander (McBurney) McBirnie and Sophia McNeilly appeared on the census of 7 April 1861 at Peesweep village, parish of Dalry, Ayr, Scotland.4 Alexander (McBurney) McBirnie and Sophia McNeilly appeared on the census of 2 April 1871 at Chequer Lane, Upholland, Lancashire, England.5 Alexander (McBurney) McBirnie and Sophia McNeilly were separated before 1881. Alexander (McBurney) McBirnie married Elizabeth Noble on 16 February 1889 at Parish of Cockpen, Edinburgh, Scotland.3 Alexander (McBurney) McBirnie and Elizabeth Noble appeared on the census of 5 April 1891 at Upper Uphall, Uphall, West Lothian, Scotland.6 Alexander (McBurney) McBirnie died on 23 September 1896 at Mid Calder Station, Kirknewton, Lothian, Scotland.

From the 1841 census, we know that Alexander McBirnie was born in Lanarkshire, Scotland but the question is where in Lanarkshire. In the 1851 census, his place of birth is given as Glasgow, Lanarkshire. In the 1855 birth record of his daughter, Mary, Alexander McBirnie, who was reporting the birth, stated that he was 21 years old and born in Garnkirk, parish of Cadder, Lanarkshire.

The following description of Cadder from "A Vision of Britain Through Time"
indicates that it was 5 miles Northeast of Glasgow. It is reasonable to think that, since Alexander was in another county in 1851, he would reference the better known Glasgow as his place of birth:     

     Cadder, a small village and a parish of NW Lanarkshire. The village stands on the site of a fort of Antoninus' Wall... 5 miles N by E of Glasgow.... The parish contains also the villages of Bishopbriggs, Moodiesburn, Garnkirk, Auchenairn, Auchenloch, Chryston, Muirhead, Mollenburn, and part of Lenzie. It is bounded N by Campsie in Stirlingshire and Kirkintilloch and Cumbernauld in Dumbartonshire, E by New Monkland, SE by Old Monkland, S by Barony of Glasgow, NW by New Kilpatrick and Baldernock in Stirlingshire.... Sections of the Forth and Clyde Canal and of the North British and Caledonian railways traverse the parish, whose surface is either quite level or gently undulated, attaining 319 feet above sea-level near Auchenairn, 349 at Hillhead, and 343 at Hill of Garnqueen in the SE, whilst sinking along the Kelvin to less than 100 feet.... The rocks are variously eruptive, Devonian, carboniferous, and recent; and they include excellent building stone, abundance of limestone, large store of valuable ironstone, some coal, and extensive beds of fireclay. These are all worked in various localities-the fireclay in a great establishment at Garnkirk.... All the parish, except the estate of Cadder and the Midtown of Bedlay belonged formerly to the see of Glasgow.... Chief antiquities are vestiges of Antoninus' Wall and the site of the house at Robroyston, where Sir William Wallace was betrayed.... In the presbytery of Glasgow and synod of Glasgow and Ayr, this parish is ecclesiastically divided into Cadder and Chryston, the former having 3261 inhabitants in 1871...

Scots Ancestry Research Society which provided Report B/55520, p. 3 which cites the Registers of Births, Marriages and Deaths for Kirknewton:

     Death of Alexander McBirnie
     On 23rd September, 1896 in a railway carriage in Mid Calder Station, Kirknewton, Alexander McBirnie, brickworker died aged 53 (sic); married to 1. Sophia McNeilly, 2. Elizabeth Noble, and the son of William McBirnie, brickworker, and Mary McAllister, both deceased. Informant: William Miller, inspector of the Poor, West Calder. As Alexander McBirnie's death had been sudden and unusual it was the subject of an investigation by the Procurator Fiscal - a Scottish Officer of law - and an entry in the Register of Corrected Entries alters the age and gives the cause of death as: - Injuries through being severely scalded - per verdict of Jury. Age given as 63. Procurator Fiscal's Office, 27 Oct., 1896. It was noted that while his death certificate gave his age as '53', the statement from the inquiry into his death gave his age as '63'. The latter is much more probable when the date of his marriage and the birth of his son is taken into account.

The report goes on to discuss the marriage of Alexander McBirnie to Elizabeth Noble:

     Search for a marriage of an Alexander McBirnie and Elizabeth Noble
     The International Genealogical Indexes of Fife and that of 1981 covering all Scotland, but not comprehensive were consulted but no such marriage was found to be recorded. The General Indexes of marriages in Scotland between the years 1855, the year of commencement of compulsory registration to 1896 were also consulted without result. It seems unlikely that Alexander McBirnie married Elizabeth Noble, as Sophia McNeilly outlived him.

In fact, Tom McBirnie, Jr. located a marriage record for Alexander McBurney and Elizabeth Noble. I don't know what divorce options were available at that time.

I am speculating that Alexander McBirnie was a Protestant when he married Sophia McNeilly. They were married by a Protestant Minister near where Alexander's family lived. I am also speculating that Sophia McNeilly, although born in Antrim, Ireland, was POSSIBLY Catholic. The Irish Potato Famine, which started in 1846 and which continued through the crop year in 1847, caused a massive exodus from Ireland to Britain and the United States which continued for many years. Based on the number of McNeilly's showing up in the 1871 census in Scotland and the marriage of Alexander's uncle James to Jean Lamond, who was Sophia McNeilly's aunt, there might have been enough Catholic relatives in the area in 1853 to influence the baptism of Alexander's son, William, as a Catholic. The priest performing the baptism was apparently not acquainted with the family (or with Scotland), since he seemed to assume that the name McBirnie was a nickname for McBernard.

Finally, Alexander appears to have been separated from Sophia McNeilly by 1881 since the 1881 census shows Sophia living with her mother and using her maiden name. Possibly they separated before 1877 since her son did not name his first daughter after her.

Offline a McBurney
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Posts: 1
Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Re: McBurney (McBurnie)
« Reply #1 on: Thursday 18 March 10 21:08 GMT (UK) »
Two brief answers to your inquiries:
Father, Alexander McBurney, died 23 SEP 1896. Mother, Elizabeth Noble, died sometime between SEP 1896 and MAR 1918.

In more detail:

Circa 1834, Alexander McBurney was born in Garnkirk, parish of Cadder, Lanark. His parents were William McBurney and Mary McAllister.
20 OCT 1851, Alexander McBurney married Sophia McNeilly in Dunfermline, Fife. They had three known children.
1871 census, Alexander and Sophia were living in Upholland, Lancashire, England. Alexander’s occupation was brick maker.
Sometime after the 1871 census, Alexander and Sophia either separated or were divorced.

01 MAY 1861, Elizabeth Noble was born in Tranent, East Lothian. Her parents were William Noble and Elizabeth Davidson.
1881 census, Elizabeth Noble was in Carrington, Midlothian, living with her mother and siblings. Her occupation was brickwork labourer, rolling the clod.
30 JUL 1883, daughter Elizabeth McBurney (“McBurnie”) was born to Alexander McBurney and Elizabeth Noble in parish of Dalry, County of Ayr.
28 NOV 1887, son Alexander McBurney (“McBurnie”) was born to Alexander McBurney and Elizabeth Noble in parish of Markinch, County of Fife.
16 FEB 1889, Alexander McBurney and Elizabeth Noble were married in parish of Cockpen, County of Edinburgh. (Interestingly, Alexander is listed in the marriage record as age 49, a widower.)
1891 census, Alexander, Elizabeth and their two children were living in Uphall, West Lothian.
27 MAY 1891, son Charles Noble McBurney was born to Alexander McBurney and Elizabeth Noble McBurney in District of Buckhorn, County of Fife.

23 SEP 1896, Alexander McBurney (“McBirnie”) was killed in a train steam accident in parish of Kirknewton and East Calder, County of Edinburgh. The death record states that Alexander was married to 1st Sophia McNeilly and 2nd Elizabeth Noble.

24 FEB 1899, Sophia McNeilly McBurney (“McBirnie, widow of Alexander McBirnie, brickburner,”) died in Eastern District of Old Monkland, County of Lanark.

1901 census, sons Alexander and Charles McBurney (“McBurnie”) were living with their uncle, aunt and grandmother (“Elizabeth Noble”) in Beath, Fife. No record was found of their mother, Elizabeth Noble McBurney, or their sister, Elizabeth McBurney.
16 JAN 1916, son Alexander McBurney (“McBurnie”), a Lance Corporal in the Black Watch (Royal Highlanders), died of wounds in WWI.
26 MAR 1918, son Charles Noble McBurney (“McBurnie”) married Grace Kirkwood Phillips in Inveresk & Musselburgh District, County of Midlothian. The marriage record states that both of Charles’ parents were deceased.
18 APR 1918, son Charles Noble McBurney (“McBurnie’), a private in the Black Watch (Royal Highlanders), died in WWI.

After an extensive search of marriage, death, census and immigration records, nothing further has been found regarding mother Elizabeth Noble McBurney or daughter Elizabeth McBurney.

Family 1

Sophia McNeilly b. bt 1833 - 1839, d. 28 Feb 1899
Children

Family 2

Elizabeth Noble b. 1 May 1861, d. b 1918
Children

Citations

  1. [S569] 1841 Census of Scotland.
  2. [S566] 1851 Census of Scotland.
  3. [S523] Marriage, Religious.
  4. [S565] 1861 Census of Scotland.
  5. [S570] 1871.
  6. [S568] 1891 Census of Scotland.
  7. [S515] Birth Certificate.

William (McBirney) (McBurney) McBirnie

M, b. circa 1808, d. 10 September 1888
FatherJames (McBurnie) McBirnie b. s 1780, d. bt 1812 - 1841
MotherAnn/Agnes? Campbell b. s 1782
ChartsJames McBirnie (est. 1780-) Descendants
Last Edited2 Jul 2016
     William (McBirney) (McBurney) McBirnie was born circa 1808 at Renton, Dunbarton, Scotland.1 He was a fire brick maker. He married Mary McAllister say 1831.2 William (McBirney) (McBurney) McBirnie and Mary McAllister appeared on the census of 7 June 1841 at Cailin Croft South Row, Gartsherrie Quoad Sacra Parish, Parish of Old Monkland, Lanark, Scotland.3 William (McBirney) (McBurney) McBirnie married Mary Scott on 20 August 1848 at Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland.4 William (McBirney) (McBurney) McBirnie and Mary Scott appeared on the census of 31 March 1851 at Blair Tilework, Parish of Beath, Fife, Scotland.5 William (McBirney) (McBurney) McBirnie and Mary Scott appeared on the census of 7 April 1861 at Dalry, Ayr, Scotland.6 William (McBirney) (McBurney) McBirnie and Mary Scott appeared on the census of 2 April 1871 at Civil Parish [or Township] of Upholland, Lancashire, England.7 William (McBirney) (McBurney) McBirnie was a brick burner. He and Mary Scott appeared on the census of 4 April 1881 at 9 Carmethie [Carnethie?] Street, Lasswade, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.8 William (McBirney) (McBurney) McBirnie married Mary McDonald.9 William (McBirney) (McBurney) McBirnie died on 10 September 1888 at Barnhill Poorhouse near Glasgow, Dennistoun District, Lanark, Scotland.9

William MacBurney was noted with his young family in the 1841 Census of Scotland, County of Lanark, District of Middle Ward, Parish of Old Monkland, Gartsherrie Quoad Sacra Parish:

     No. of Enumeration District: 9
     Description: So Much of the Parish as lyes at Gartsherrie Works Cailincroft South of Main Street p. 25? Parish of Old Monkland Gartsherrie Quoad Sacra Parish;
     Place-Here insert Name of Village, Street, Square, Close, Court, etc.: Cailin Croft South Row;
     Houses Inhabited: 1;
     Name and Surname, Sex and Age of each Person who abode in each House on the Night of 6th June.
     Name and Surname:
     William MacBurney Male Age: 30;
          Occupation: Fire Brickmaker;
          if born in Scotland state whether in county or otherwise: No;
          Whether Foreigner or Whether Born in England or Ireland: [blank];
     Name and Surname: Mary MacBurney
          Female
          Age: 30;
          Occupation: [blank];
          if born in Scotland state whether in county or otherwise: Yes;
          Whether Foreigner or Whether Born in England or Ireland: [blank];
     Name and Surname: Alexander MacBurney
          Male
          Age: 5;
          Occupation: [blank];
          if born in Scotland state whether in county or otherwise: Yes;
          Whether Foreigner. or Whether Born in England or Ireland: [blank];
     Name and Surname: Mary MacBurney
          Female
          Age: 4;
          Occupation: [blank];
          if born in Scotland state whether in county or otherwise: Yes;
          Whether Foreigner or Whether Born in England or Ireland: [blank];
     Name and Surname: Jane?/June? MacBurney
          Female
          Age: 35;
          Occupation: [blank];
          if born in Scotland state whether in county or otherwise: No;
          Whether Foreigner. or Whether Born in England or Ireland: [blank];
          Name and Surname: Isabella [can't read]
          Female
          Age: 10;
          Occupation: H.[ouse?] S.[ervant?];
          if born in Scotland state whether in county or otherwise: [blank];
          Whether Foreigner. or Whether Born in England or Ireland: Ireland
     (LDS film 101, 881)

William was noted as a "Fire Brickmaker" in the 1841 census record. The following is from "Fire Clay Mining & Making Fire-Clay Bricks and Pipes" :

What is Fire-clay?

     Despite its name, fire-clay is a hard rock and has to be mined at depth by blasting and drilling like coal. Indeed fire-clay seams are associated with the geological Coal Measures. Bricks made from fire-clay can withstand temperatures of 1500 0 C without changing shape and without cracking as they cool. Fire-clay is thus essential for firebricks for industrial furnaces, and for strong glazed pipes, pots and tiles.

     Legend has it that the Romans fired their tiles and pots from the fire-clay in this area.

Making Fire-Clay Bricks and Pipes

     At the Works the rough rock was crushed in large mills then passed to a wet mill where it was finely ground into a clay paste. From here, it was taken to the moulders' benches. The brickmaker would cut off a lump of clay with a wire bow, square the clay in his hand by bumping it on the bench, then lifting it up above his head would throw the clay into the waiting mould. He would then level the clay with his "strike" (a flat-bladed knife) and after stamping the Company's name on the brick, the assistant or "carrier off" would turn the brick onto the drying floor. From here the bricks would pass to the drying stove and onto the kilns for firing. A good brickmaker in the 1920s could mould 2500 to 3000 bricks in a 10 hour day. For this he would receive £2 per week.

William married Mary Scott 20 Aug 1848 and they are noted in the 1851 Census of Scotland County of Fife, District of Beath, Parish of Beath, Description and Boundary of Enumeration District: ?ly Villages - Oakfield Village - Caulsdam Hamlet - Nethertown - Hilton - ?etertown - Shiells - Mossgreen - Blackhall - Cocklars? - Whitehouse - Thornton - Braehead - ?rton - GreenKnomes? - Blairanbathie - Lochornie - Gask? Toll - Lochend - Torryhaw - Rural ?ded - N. by Cleish and Ballingry - E. by Ballingry - S. by Fittie? rivalet and Road from Caulsdam ? Dumfermline and W. by Dunfermline
     p. 32 Parish of Beath
     Name of Street, Place or Road and Name or No. of House: Blair Tilework;
     Name and Surname, Sex and Age of each Person who abode in the House on the Night of the 30th March, 1851:
          William MacBirney Married Male Age 40, Rank, Profession or Occupation: Brickmaker, Where Born: Dunbarton, Renton;
          Mary McBirney Wife Married Female Age 37, Rank, Profession or Occupation: [blank], Where Born: MidLothian, Edinburgh;
          Agnes McBirney Daughter Female Age 9, Rank, Profession or Occupation: Scholar, Where Born: Lanark, Gar[t]sherrie;
          William McBirney Son Male Age 7, Rank, Profession or Occupation: Scholar, Where Born: Ayr, Dalry;
          James McBirney Brother Unmarried Male Age 38, Rank, Profession or Occupation: Labourer at Tilework, Where Born: Lanark, Anders[t]on;
          Thomas Kirkland Lodger Unmarried Male Age 20, Rank, Profession or Occupation: Brickmaker, Where Born: Lanark, Gorbels Glasgow
     LDS film 103, 677

In the 1861 census, William McBurney, age 60, Brickmaker, born in Dunbartonshire, Renton was noted with his Mary McBurney, age 45 born in Edinburgh were noted in Dalry, Ayrshire, Scotland. But, by
1871, they were noted in the 1871 Census of England Civil Parish [or Township] of Upholland Ecclesiastical District of Upholland, Lancashire, p. 5 [32 stamped] No. 23:
     Road, Street, etc. and No. or Name of House: Newgate;
     House: inhabited;
     Name and Surname of each Person:
     William McBurny;
          Relation to Head of Family: Head;
          Condition: Married;
          Age: Male age 70;
          Rank, Profession or Occupation: Brick Maker;
          Born in: Scotland.
     Mary McBurny;
          Relation to Head of Family: Wife;
          Condition: Married;
          Age: Female age 54;
          Rank, Profession or Occupation: [blank];
          Born in: Scotland.

By the time of the 1881 census, William had returned to Edinburgh, Scotland Enumeration District 10, p. 24 Ref No. 740716:
     Dwelling: 9 Carmethie [Carnnethie?] Street
          William McBurnet, Head Married Male age 79 Brick Burner born Renton, Dunbarton, Scotland;
          Mary McBurnet, Wife Married Female age 66 no occupation born St. Cuthberts, Edinburgh, Scotland.
     LDS Film: 224014 GRO Ref Volume 691

William died in 1888 and, according to the death record, he was now married to Mary McDonald. The following is from 1888 Deaths in the District of Dennistown in the County of Lanark p. 406 No. 1916

     Surname and Name - Rank and Profession, and Condition (whether Married or Single, Widower or Widow:
          William McBurnie,
          Brick-burner,
          Married to Mary McDonald;
     When and where Died, with Hour of Death:
          1888 September Tenth 5 h. 30 m. A. M.,
          Barnhill Poorhouse near Glasgow,
          usual residence 8 Williams Street, Greenhead;
     Sex:
          Male;
     Age:
          88 years [sic];
     Parents Names and Rank, Profession, or Occupation:
          James McBurnie, Soldier (deceased)           Agnes McBurnie, Maiden Surname: Campbell (deceased);
     Cause of Death, and how long Disease continued - Medical Attendant by whom certified, and when he last saw deceased:
          Senile Decay, as Certified by W. T. Nicholson, M B ? C M;
     Signature, Qualification, and Residence of Informant, if out of the House in which the Death occurred:
          Archibald? M. Miuli? Asst. Coronor?;
     When and where Registered and Signature of Registrar:
          1888 September 19 at Glasgow,
          ? Ferguson, Registrar.

Family 1

Mary McAllister b. c 1811, d. s 1847
Children

Family 2

Mary Scott b. c 1814

Family 3

Mary McDonald b. c 1809, d. 24 Apr 1889

Citations

  1. [S566] 1851 Census of Scotland.
  2. [S380] Scots Ancestry Research Society. "McBirnie and McGovern: Report B/55520." (Edinburgh, Scotland: 3 Albany St., Edinburgh EH13PY, Scotland, 1988).
  3. [S569] 1841 Census of Scotland.
  4. [S523] Marriage, Religious.
  5. [S383] 1851, ,

    1851 Census of Scotland County of Fife, District of Beath, Parish of Beath Description and Boundary of Enumeration District: ?ly Villages - Oakfield Village - Caulsdam Hamlet - Nethertown - Hilton - ?etertown - Shiells - Mossgreen - Blackhall - Cocklars? - Whitehouse - Thornton - Braehead - ?rton - GreenKnomes? - Blairanbathie - Lochornie - Gask? Toll - Lochend - Torryhaw - Rural ?ded - N. by Cleish and Ballingry - E. by Ballingry - S. by Fittie? rivalet and Road from Caulsdam ? Dumfermline and W. by Dunfermline p. 32 Parish of Beath Name of Street, Place or Road and Name or No. of House: Blair Tilework;
    Name and Surname, Sex and Age of each Person who abode in the House on the Night of the 30th March, 1851: William MacBirney Married Male Age 40, Rank, Profession or Occupation: Brickmaker, Where Born: Dunbarton, Renton;
    Mary McBirney Wife Married Female Age 37, Rank, Profession or Occupation: [blank], Where Born: MidLothian, Edinburgh;
    Agnes McBirney Daughter Female Age 9, Rank, Profession or Occupation: Scholar, Where Born: Lanark, Gar[t]sherrie;
    William McBirney Son Male Age 7, Rank, Profession or Occupation: Scholar, Where Born: Ayr, Dalry;
    James McBirney Brother Unmarried Male Age 38, Rank, Profession or Occupation: Labourer at Tilework, Where Born: Lanark, Anders[t]on;
    Thomas Kirkland Lodger Unmarried Male Age 20, Rank, Profession or Occupation: Brickmaker, Where Born: Lanark, Gorbels Glasgow
    LDS film 103, 677.
  6. [S565] 1861 Census of Scotland.
  7. [S570] 1871.
  8. [S571] 1871 Census of Scotland.
  9. [S509] Death Certificate.

Mary McAllister

F, b. circa 1811, d. say 1847
Last Edited16 Jun 2016
     Mary McAllister was born circa 1811 at Lanark, Scotland.1 She married William (McBirney) (McBurney) McBirnie, son of James (McBurnie) McBirnie and Ann/Agnes? Campbell, say 1831.2 Her married name was McBirnie. Mary McAllister and William (McBirney) (McBurney) McBirnie appeared on the census of 7 June 1841 at Cailin Croft South Row, Gartsherrie Quoad Sacra Parish, Parish of Old Monkland, Lanark, Scotland.1 Mary McAllister died say 1847. I am assuming that the Mary that showed up as the wife of William McBurney in the 1841 census was the Mary McAllister listed as Alexander (born circa 1835) McBirnie's mother on his death certificate. However, that was not the same Mary that showed up as the wife of William McBirney in the 1851 census. The Mary in the 1841 census was listed as having been born in the county of Lanark. The Mary in the 1851 census was listed as having been born in the county of Mid-Lothian. There appears to be a five year gap between the daughter, Mary, listed in the 1841 census and the son, William, listed in the 1851 census and the youngest child appears to be seven years old in the 1851 census. For search purposes, I am going to assume that William McBirnie was married at least twice, possibly three times. I am assuming that Mary McAllister, died after 1845.

Family

William (McBirney) (McBurney) McBirnie b. c 1808, d. 10 Sep 1888
Children

Citations

  1. [S569] 1841 Census of Scotland.
  2. [S380] Scots Ancestry Research Society. "McBirnie and McGovern: Report B/55520." (Edinburgh, Scotland: 3 Albany St., Edinburgh EH13PY, Scotland, 1988).

Mary (McBurney) McBirnie

F, b. circa 1837
FatherWilliam (McBirney) (McBurney) McBirnie b. c 1808, d. 10 Sep 1888
MotherMary McAllister b. c 1811, d. s 1847
ChartsJames McBirnie (est. 1780-) Descendants
Last Edited30 Apr 2006
     Mary (McBurney) McBirnie was born circa 1837 at Lanark, Scotland. She appeared on the census of 7 June 1841 in the household of William (McBirney) (McBurney) McBirnie and Mary McAllister at Cailin Croft South Row, Gartsherrie Quoad Sacra Parish, Parish of Old Monkland, Lanark, Scotland.1 Mary (McBurney) McBirnie died.

Citations

  1. [S569] 1841 Census of Scotland.

William (McBirney) McBurney

M, b. 10 April 1846, d. 12 August 1909
FatherWilliam (McBirney) (McBurney) McBirnie b. c 1808, d. 10 Sep 1888
MotherMary McAllister b. c 1811, d. s 1847
ChartsJames McBirnie (est. 1780-) Descendants
Last Edited12 Aug 2014
     William (McBirney) McBurney was born on 10 April 1846 at Dalry, Ayr, Scotland.1,2 He appeared on the census of 31 March 1851 in the household of William (McBirney) (McBurney) McBirnie and Mary Scott at Blair Tilework, Parish of Beath, Fife, Scotland.3 William (McBirney) McBurney was a fire brick maker. He appeared on the census of 7 April 1861 in the household of William (McBirney) (McBurney) McBirnie and Mary Scott at Dalry, Ayr, Scotland.4 William (McBirney) McBurney married Eleanor 'Ella' 'Ellen' Dykins on 17 June 1867 at St. Thomas Eccleston parish church, Prescot, Lancashire, England.5 William (McBirney) McBurney was a fire brick moulder. He and Eleanor 'Ella' 'Ellen' Dykins appeared on the census of 2 April 1871 at Landward, New Monkland, Lanark, Scotland.1,6 William immigrated, on 22 July 1871. Destination: New York, NY. He was employed as the foreman of a brickyard at Chattanooga, Hamilton Co., TN. He and Eleanor 'Ella' 'Ellen' Dykins appeared on the census of 1 June 1880 at Chattanooga, Hamilton Co., TN.7 William (McBirney) McBurney and Eleanor 'Ella' 'Ellen' Dykins appeared on the census of 1 June 1900 at Middlesboro, Bell Co., KY.8 William (McBirney) McBurney died on 12 August 1909 at Thomson, McDuffie Co., GA, at age 63.

Tom McBirnie, Jr. corresponded with Mike Baggett, a descendant of William McBurney and "Ellen" Dykins and Tom compiled the following:

WILLIAM [ROBERT] MCBURNEY- BROTHER OF ALEXANDER MCBIRNIE I

     -New York Passenger List records include W. McBurney, age 22, arriving 22 JUL 1871 from Glasgow, Scotland, aboard ship India

     -12 AUG 1909, William R. McBurney died in Thomson, McDuffie County, Georgia. (The British Dykins source lists 1907 as his year of death in "Thompson.") William reportedly is buried at Marshall Church [now Baptist] at 436 Marshall Church Road in Thomson, Georgia 30824.

Family

Eleanor 'Ella' 'Ellen' Dykins b. 29 Aug 1849, d. 4 Jan 1929
Children

Citations

  1. [S590] Per Mike Baggett
    Re: McBirnie/McBurney of Ayr and Dundee
    <http://genforum.genealogy.com/mcburney/messages/58.html>
    I don't know if there is a connection or not but I'm searching for info on WIlliam Robert McBurney born in Ayr on April 10, 1846.
    Per Tom McBirnie, Jr.:

    WILLIAM [ROBERT] MCBURNEY- BROTHER OF ALEXANDER MCBIRNIE I
    -Born 1843/1844 in Dalry, Ayrshire, Scotland, the son of William McBurney and Mary _______ (birth year per the 1851 and 1861 Scottish censuses)
    -NOTE: in later censuses William indicated he was younger. For example, in the 1900 US census he said that he was born in JUL 1846. Recent family trees have a date of birth of 10 APR 1846.
    -NOTE: William?s mother was possibly Mary McAllister, mother of Alexander McBurney/McBirnie. However, William?s mother may have been a later wife of his father, whose name was William.
  2. [S583] Tom McBirnie, Cathy Griffin, Per Tom McBirnie, Jr.:
    WILLIAM [ROBERT] MCBURNEY- BROTHER OF ALEXANDER MCBIRNIE I
    -Born 1843/1844 in Dalry, Ayrshire, Scotland, the son of William
    McBurney and Mary _______ (birth year per the 1851 and 1861 Scottish censuses)
    -NOTE: in later censuses William indicated he was younger. For example, in the 1900 US census he said that he was born in JUL 1846. Recent family trees have a date of birth of 10 APR 1846.
    -NOTE: William’s mother was possibly Mary
    McAllister, mother of Alexander McBurney/McBirnie. However, William’s mother may have been a later wife of his father, whose name was William.
  3. [S383] 1851, ,

    1851 Census of Scotland County of Fife, District of Beath, Parish of Beath Description and Boundary of Enumeration District: ?ly Villages - Oakfield Village - Caulsdam Hamlet - Nethertown - Hilton - ?etertown - Shiells - Mossgreen - Blackhall - Cocklars? - Whitehouse - Thornton - Braehead - ?rton - GreenKnomes? - Blairanbathie - Lochornie - Gask? Toll - Lochend - Torryhaw - Rural ?ded - N. by Cleish and Ballingry - E. by Ballingry - S. by Fittie? rivalet and Road from Caulsdam ? Dumfermline and W. by Dunfermline p. 32 Parish of Beath Name of Street, Place or Road and Name or No. of House: Blair Tilework;
    Name and Surname, Sex and Age of each Person who abode in the House on the Night of the 30th March, 1851: William MacBirney Married Male Age 40, Rank, Profession or Occupation: Brickmaker, Where Born: Dunbarton, Renton;
    Mary McBirney Wife Married Female Age 37, Rank, Profession or Occupation: [blank], Where Born: MidLothian, Edinburgh;
    Agnes McBirney Daughter Female Age 9, Rank, Profession or Occupation: Scholar, Where Born: Lanark, Gar[t]sherrie;
    William McBirney Son Male Age 7, Rank, Profession or Occupation: Scholar, Where Born: Ayr, Dalry;
    James McBirney Brother Unmarried Male Age 38, Rank, Profession or Occupation: Labourer at Tilework, Where Born: Lanark, Anders[t]on;
    Thomas Kirkland Lodger Unmarried Male Age 20, Rank, Profession or Occupation: Brickmaker, Where Born: Lanark, Gorbels Glasgow
    LDS film 103, 677.
  4. [S565] 1861 Census of Scotland.
  5. [S523] Marriage, Religious.
  6. [S567] 1871 Census of Scotland.
  7. [S494] United States Census, 1880.
  8. [S500] United States Census, 1900.

Agnes (McBirney) McBirnie

F, b. circa 1842
FatherWilliam (McBirney) (McBurney) McBirnie b. c 1808, d. 10 Sep 1888
MotherMary McAllister b. c 1811, d. s 1847
ChartsJames McBirnie (est. 1780-) Descendants
Last Edited30 Apr 2006
     Agnes (McBirney) McBirnie was born circa 1842 at Gartsherrie, Old Monkland, Lanark, Scotland. She appeared on the census of 31 March 1851 in the household of William (McBirney) (McBurney) McBirnie and Mary Scott at Blair Tilework, Parish of Beath, Fife, Scotland.1 Agnes (McBirney) McBirnie appeared on the census of 7 April 1861 in the household of William (McBirney) (McBurney) McBirnie and Mary Scott at Dalry, Ayr, Scotland.2 Agnes (McBirney) McBirnie died.

Citations

  1. [S383] 1851, ,

    1851 Census of Scotland County of Fife, District of Beath, Parish of Beath Description and Boundary of Enumeration District: ?ly Villages - Oakfield Village - Caulsdam Hamlet - Nethertown - Hilton - ?etertown - Shiells - Mossgreen - Blackhall - Cocklars? - Whitehouse - Thornton - Braehead - ?rton - GreenKnomes? - Blairanbathie - Lochornie - Gask? Toll - Lochend - Torryhaw - Rural ?ded - N. by Cleish and Ballingry - E. by Ballingry - S. by Fittie? rivalet and Road from Caulsdam ? Dumfermline and W. by Dunfermline p. 32 Parish of Beath Name of Street, Place or Road and Name or No. of House: Blair Tilework;
    Name and Surname, Sex and Age of each Person who abode in the House on the Night of the 30th March, 1851: William MacBirney Married Male Age 40, Rank, Profession or Occupation: Brickmaker, Where Born: Dunbarton, Renton;
    Mary McBirney Wife Married Female Age 37, Rank, Profession or Occupation: [blank], Where Born: MidLothian, Edinburgh;
    Agnes McBirney Daughter Female Age 9, Rank, Profession or Occupation: Scholar, Where Born: Lanark, Gar[t]sherrie;
    William McBirney Son Male Age 7, Rank, Profession or Occupation: Scholar, Where Born: Ayr, Dalry;
    James McBirney Brother Unmarried Male Age 38, Rank, Profession or Occupation: Labourer at Tilework, Where Born: Lanark, Anders[t]on;
    Thomas Kirkland Lodger Unmarried Male Age 20, Rank, Profession or Occupation: Brickmaker, Where Born: Lanark, Gorbels Glasgow
    LDS film 103, 677.
  2. [S565] 1861 Census of Scotland.

James (McBurnie) (McBirney) McBirnie

M, b. 14 March 1811, d. 7 March 1883
FatherJames (McBurnie) McBirnie b. s 1780, d. bt 1812 - 1841
MotherAnn/Agnes? Campbell b. s 1782
ChartsJames McBirnie (est. 1780-) Descendants
Last Edited6 Jan 2017
     James (McBurnie) (McBirney) McBirnie was born on 14 March 1811 at Anderston, Lanark, Scotland.1 He was christened on 14 April 1811 at Barony, Lanark, Scotland.2 He was (an unknown value) at tile labourer. William (McBirney) (McBurney) McBirnie and Mary Scott appeared on the census of 31 March 1851 at Blair Tilework, Parish of Beath, Fife, Scotland.3 James (McBurnie) (McBirney) McBirnie married Jean/Jane? Lamond on 11 November 1851 at Beath, Fife, Scotland.4 James (McBurnie) (McBirney) McBirnie and Jean/Jane? Lamond appeared on the census of 7 April 1861.5 James (McBurnie) (McBirney) McBirnie and Jean/Jane? Lamond appeared on the census of 3 April 1871 at Beath, Fife, Scotland.6 James (McBurnie) (McBirney) McBirnie and Jean/Jane? Lamond appeared on the census of 4 April 1881 at Norton, Beath, Fife, Scotland.7 James (McBurnie) (McBirney) McBirnie died on 7 March 1883 at Norton, Beath, Fife, Scotland, at age 71.8

James McBirnie's death record named Helen, no last name given, as his mother.

I am speculating that the James McBirnie, listed in the 1851 census of Beath, Fife as the brother of William (born 1811), was the same James McBirnie who married Jean Lamond in Beath, Fife in November, 1851. For search purposes, I am also speculating that Jean Lamond was related to Catherine Lamond, the mother of Sophia McNeilly, who married Alexander (born 1835) McBirnie, the son of William, in Dunfermline, Fife in October of 1851.

This is information about James McBirnie from a 1 Apr 2006 e-mail from Tom McBirnie, Jr.:

     The 1851 Scottish census for Beath, Fife, lists James McBirney, age 38, unmarried, labourer at tile work, born in Anders[t]on, Lanark, living with his brother, William McBirney, William's family and a lodger, Thomas Kirkwood. It is noteworthy that William was born in Renton, Dunbarton, so the two brothers were born in different locations.

     On 11 NOV 1851, James McBirnie and Jean Lamond were married in Beath, Fife.

     The attached 1861 Scottish census for Beath, Fife, lists James McBirnie, age 55, married, A[gricultural?] Lab[orer], born in Glasgow, Lanarkshire, living at Cocklaw Cot House with his wife Jane, aged 50.

     The attached 1871 Scottish census for Beath, Fife, lists James McBirnie, age 57, married, pit labourer, born in Anderston, Lanark, living at Cocklaw Cottar[?] House with his with wife Jane, aged 6_. (I am attaching two census pages so you can see everyone living on the farm.)

     The 1881 Scottish census for Beath, Fife, lists James McBurney, age 77, married, pauper late general labourer, born in Anderston, Glasgow, living at Norton [dwelling] with his wife Jane, age 71, [Jane's sister] Rachel Lamond, and a boarder, Thomas Jackson. (I am not able to download this census image, but I can mail it to you if you want.)

     The attached 1883 death record for Parish of Beath, County of Fife, lists James McBirnie, age 82 years, died 07 MAR 1883 at Norton, Beath. He was a pauper, formerly a labourer, married to Jean Lamond/Lamont. *His parents*were *James McBirnie, soldier*, deceased, *and Helen* McBirnie [maiden surname not stated], deceased. He died of apoplexy. The death was reported by a brother-in-law, Thomas Lamont.

     It is evident from these records that James and Jane had no children (at least who lived very long).

Family

Jean/Jane? Lamond b. c 1809, d. 29 Apr 1892

Citations

  1. [S515] Birth Certificate.
  2. [S508] Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. FamilySearch. Online at: <https://familysearch.org>.
  3. [S383] 1851, ,

    1851 Census of Scotland County of Fife, District of Beath, Parish of Beath Description and Boundary of Enumeration District: ?ly Villages - Oakfield Village - Caulsdam Hamlet - Nethertown - Hilton - ?etertown - Shiells - Mossgreen - Blackhall - Cocklars? - Whitehouse - Thornton - Braehead - ?rton - GreenKnomes? - Blairanbathie - Lochornie - Gask? Toll - Lochend - Torryhaw - Rural ?ded - N. by Cleish and Ballingry - E. by Ballingry - S. by Fittie? rivalet and Road from Caulsdam ? Dumfermline and W. by Dunfermline p. 32 Parish of Beath Name of Street, Place or Road and Name or No. of House: Blair Tilework;
    Name and Surname, Sex and Age of each Person who abode in the House on the Night of the 30th March, 1851: William MacBirney Married Male Age 40, Rank, Profession or Occupation: Brickmaker, Where Born: Dunbarton, Renton;
    Mary McBirney Wife Married Female Age 37, Rank, Profession or Occupation: [blank], Where Born: MidLothian, Edinburgh;
    Agnes McBirney Daughter Female Age 9, Rank, Profession or Occupation: Scholar, Where Born: Lanark, Gar[t]sherrie;
    William McBirney Son Male Age 7, Rank, Profession or Occupation: Scholar, Where Born: Ayr, Dalry;
    James McBirney Brother Unmarried Male Age 38, Rank, Profession or Occupation: Labourer at Tilework, Where Born: Lanark, Anders[t]on;
    Thomas Kirkland Lodger Unmarried Male Age 20, Rank, Profession or Occupation: Brickmaker, Where Born: Lanark, Gorbels Glasgow
    LDS film 103, 677.
  4. [S482] Register of Marriages, Parochial Registers County of Fife: Beath B 1820-1854, M 1820-1854, D 1820-1852 (LDS Film 1040150 Item 3):
    James McBirnie and Jean Lamond both in this parish, gave in their names on the 25 Oct. 1851 to be proclaimed in order to marriage and after a regular proclamation were married on the 11th day of November.
  5. [S565] 1861 Census of Scotland.
  6. [S567] 1871 Census of Scotland.
  7. [S490] Thomas Joseph McBirnie Jr. Ronald Lamond (Lamont) and Mary Mcbride and Some of Their Descendants 31 Dec 2003).
  8. [S509] Death Certificate.

Sophia McNeilly

F, b. between 1833 and 1839, d. 28 February 1899
Last Edited25 Apr 2016
     Sophia McNeilly was born between 1833 and 1839 at Antrim (Aontroim), Northern Ireland.1 She immigrated before 1851 to Scotland. She married Alexander (McBurney) McBirnie, son of William (McBirney) (McBurney) McBirnie and Mary McAllister, on 20 October 1851 at Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland.2 As of 20 October 1851,her married name was McBirnie. Sophia McNeilly and Alexander (McBurney) McBirnie appeared on the census of 7 April 1861 at Peesweep village, parish of Dalry, Ayr, Scotland.3 Sophia McNeilly and Alexander (McBurney) McBirnie appeared on the census of 2 April 1871 at Chequer Lane, Upholland, Lancashire, England.4 Sophia McNeilly and Alexander (McBurney) McBirnie were separated before 1881. Sophia McNeilly was an agricultural labourer at Palacecraig hamlet, civil parish of Old Monkland, Lanark, Scotland. She was a domestic servant. She appeared on the census of 5 April 1891 at Calder Close, Civil Parish of Old Monkland, Lanark, Scotland.5 She died on 28 February 1899 at 3 Palacecraig, Calderbank, East District Old Monkland, Lanark, Scotland.6

Tom McBirnie in "Ronald Lamond (Lamont) and Mary McBride and some of their descendants" 12/31/2003 noted that Sophia McNeilly was "Born circa 1833 (per census) to 1839 (per death record) in County Antrim, Ireland."

As a young girl, Sophia probably fled from Ireland to Scotland with her parents to escape the potato famine. She married Alexander McBirnie in Scotland and is known to have had three children by him.

Sophia and Alexander McBirnie were separated by 1881 since she was listed by her maiden name and was living with her mother in the 1881 Census of Scotland.

Sophia appears to have been Catholic since at least one of her children was baptized and raised as a Catholic. Based on the 1881 census, Sophia worked as an agricultural laborer after she separated from Alexander McBirnie. And, based on the 1891 census, she worked as a domestic servant.

Mom obtained the following information comes from Scots Ancestry Research Society Report B/55520, p. 3 which cites the Registers of Births, Marriages and Deaths from East District, Old Monkland:

Death of Sophia McBirnie or McNeily:

     On 28th February, 1899 at 3 Palascraig (sic), Calderbank, Sophia McBirnie died aged 59, widow of Alexander McBirnie, brickburner, and the daughter of Charles McNeily, boot and shoemaker and Catherine Lamond, both deceased. Informant: W. McBirnie, son, of No. 7 Charload Square, Shotts.

According to the Extract of an entry in a REGISTER of DEATHS which Tom McBirnie got in Scotland, Sophia died 5:05 a.m. of "Renal Dropsy."

Family

Alexander (McBurney) McBirnie b. c 1834, d. 23 Sep 1896
Children

Citations

  1. [S396] 1855 Births, Parish of Cadder, County of Lanark, Scotland, #87, (from Mary McBirnie birth record).
  2. [S523] Marriage, Religious.
  3. [S565] 1861 Census of Scotland.
  4. [S570] 1871.
  5. [S568] 1891 Census of Scotland.
  6. [S509] Death Certificate.

William McBirnie

M, b. 11 August 1853, d. 11 April 1914
FatherAlexander (McBurney) McBirnie b. c 1834, d. 23 Sep 1896
MotherSophia McNeilly b. bt 1833 - 1839, d. 28 Feb 1899
ChartsJames McBirnie (est. 1780-) Descendants
Last Edited6 Jan 2017
     William McBirnie was born on 11 August 1853 at Beath, Fife, Scotland; However, Kelty, Fifeshire is given in the 1901 Census of Scotland. Since Kelty is a village, perhaps, the nearest larger town was noted as the place of birth.1 He was baptized on 18 September 1853 at the Roman Catholic Church, Lochgelly, Fife, Scotland.2 He appeared on the census of 7 April 1861 in the household of Alexander (McBurney) McBirnie and Sophia McNeilly at Peesweep village, parish of Dalry, Ayr, Scotland.3 William McBirnie was a brickmaker journeyman circa 1870. He appeared on the census of 2 April 1871 in the household of Alexander (McBurney) McBirnie and Sophia McNeilly at Chequer Lane, Upholland, Lancashire, England.4 William McBirnie married Catherine McGovern on 3 August 1875 at St. Margaret's Catholic Church, Airdrie, Lanark, Scotland.5 William McBirnie was a blast furnace filler circa 1877. He was a works labourer circa 1878. He was an iron furnace filler circa 1880. He and Catherine McGovern appeared on the census of 4 April 1881 at Shotts Ironworks, Quoad Sacra Parish of Calderhead, Lanark, Scotland.1 William McBirnie was a coal miner circa 1886. He was an iron works labourer circa 1888. He was a coal miner circa 1890. He and Catherine McGovern appeared on the census of 1 April 1901 at 74 Stane Place, Stane, Cambusnethan parish, district of Calderhead, Lanark, Scotland.6 William McBirnie died on 11 April 1914 at W District Shotts, Calderhead, Lanark, Scotland, at age 60.2

The following is from p. 2 of Report B/55520 of the Scots Ancestry Research Society of 3 Albany Street, Edinburgh EHI 3PY, Scotland:     

Search for the birth of William McBirnie

     As the marriage of his parents, Alexander McBirnie and Sophia McNeil took place in Dunfermline and was conducted by the Revd. James French, minister of the First Charge of Dunfermline Abbey from 1845-1870, and because William gives Beath, Fife as his place of birth in the 1881 census return for Calderhead, the old parochial registers of both Beath and Dunfermline were searched for his birth between the years 1851-1854, but no record of his birth was found in either old parochial register. However, as he was married according to the forms of the Roman Catholic Church in 1875 (although this could have been because Catherine McGovern was Catholic), the records of the Roman Catholic Church in Dunfermline was consulted and the following entry was found:

     William, lawful son of Alexander McBernard and Sophia McBernard, born on the 11th August, 1853 at Beath, was bap. by me on the 18th Sep., 1853 at Lochgelly. Sponsors James Duffy, Mary Jane McInally, John Stuart. _________________ Roman Catholic Records Dunfermline

     Allowing for the slight discrepancy in the surname, the Christian name 'Sophia' is unusual enough to make this entry seem probable as well as the actual year and place of birth.

Scottish Mining Website "Beath Parish" noted:

     Beath, a parish, in the district of Dunfermline, county of Fife, 2 1/2 miles (S) from Blair-Adam Inn; containing, with the villages of Cowden-Beath, Kelty, and Oakfield, 973 inhabitants. This parish, though now destitute of any trees of the kind, is supposed to have originally abounded with birch, and from that circumstance to have derived its name, anciently written Baith, which, in the Gaelic language, signifies a birch-tree. It is situated on the great road from Perth to Queensferry, extending for about four miles in length, and three miles in breadth, and comprising 6500 acres, of which about 5300 are arable, 500 meadow and pasture, 500 woodland and plantations, and the remainder water and waste. The surface is very irregular, rising in many places into hills of considerable elevation, some of which afford rich pasture, and one called the Hill of Beath commands interesting views; the scenery has been, in some parts, enriched with thriving plantations, and is enlivened by the loch Fitty, a fine sheet of water, about three miles in circumference, and abounding with pike, perch, and other fish. The soil is generally good, consisting of a clay and loam, interspersed occasionally with moss; the crops are oats, barley, peas, beans, potatoes, and turnips, with wheat occasionally, and a small quantity of flax. The system of agriculture is excellent; a considerable quantity of waste has been reclaimed, and much which, from previous mismanagement, had been unproductive, has been rendered fertile. The rateable annual value of the parish is £4404. The substrata are chiefly whinstone and sandstone; coal is found in abundance, and there are at present three collieries worked in the parish, which afford a plentiful supply of fuel; limestone is also wrought, but on a very limited scale. The parish is in the presbytery of Dunfermline and synod of Fife, and in the patronage of the Earl of Moray; the minister's stipend is about £165, with a manse, and a glebe valued at £17 per annum. The church is a handsome edifice, erected in 1835, by the heritors, and affords ample accommodation. The parochial school is attended by about 100 pupils; the master has a salary of £34 4s 4d, with £30 fees, and a house and garden.

Report B/55520 of the Scots Ancestry Research Society continues:

     No trace of any McBirnie's (or variation thereof) was to be found in Palacecraig or the whole of Calderbank (the area in which Palacecraig is situated) in 1871 census of Old Monkland, and although William and Catherine McBirnie were there in the 1881 and 1891 census returns, no trace of Alexander and Sophia McBirnie was found in either census. Nor were the latter couple to be found in Beath in the 1861 census.

William appears to have been born into a family of brickmakers since his father's occupation was listed as "Brickmaker" in the father's marriage record and as "Brickmaker (Journeyman)" in the son's marriage record. Also, his uncle James was listed as a "Labourer at Tilework" in the 1851 census. Bricks and tiles were made by a similar process.

Unfortunately, this was a time period when brickmakers were being put out of work by automation. By the 1861 census, at the Garnkirk Works, near where William's brother and sister were born, one brickmaker supervised approximately 80 labourers. William's family had already moved on. Brickmaking was no longer a family affair, it was a matter of supervising a manufacturing process.

William apparently tried to change with the times. When William married in 1875, he listed his own occupation as "Journeyman Brickmaker." However, by the birth of his second child in 1877, he listed his occupation as "Blast furnace filler." In 1887, on the birth record of his son, Louis, William's occupation had changed once again to "Coal Miner." Finally, on his death record in 1914, his occupation was listed as "general labrourer."

The following is from p. 6 of the Scots Ancestry Research report which cites the Registers of Births, Marriages and Deaths for West District, Shotts:

Death of William McBirnie

     On 11th April, 1914 at Omoa Poorhouse, Cleland, usual residence 71 Stane Place, Shotts (sic), William McBirnie, general labourer died aged 59; widower of Catherine McGovern, and the son of Alexander McBirnie, brick maker and Sophia Macneilly (sic), both deceased Informant: William McBirnie, son, of 71 Stane Place, Shotts.

According to the Extract of an entry in a REGISTER of DEATHS that Tom McBirnie obtained in Scotland, William died at 1:55 a.m. of "Chronic Bronchitis & Cardiac Dilation Dropsy."

Family

Catherine McGovern b. c 1853, d. 18 Jul 1910
Children

Citations

  1. [S571] 1871 Census of Scotland.
  2. [S380] Scots Ancestry Research Society. "McBirnie and McGovern: Report B/55520." (Edinburgh, Scotland: 3 Albany St., Edinburgh EH13PY, Scotland, 1988).
  3. [S565] 1861 Census of Scotland.
  4. [S570] 1871.
  5. [S508] Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. FamilySearch. Online at: <https://familysearch.org>.
  6. [S601] 1891 Census of Scotland.
  7. [S483]

Mary McBirnie

F, b. 13 May 1855, d. after 1871
FatherAlexander (McBurney) McBirnie b. c 1834, d. 23 Sep 1896
MotherSophia McNeilly b. bt 1833 - 1839, d. 28 Feb 1899
ChartsJames McBirnie (est. 1780-) Descendants
Last Edited22 Jan 2014
     Mary McBirnie was born on 13 May 1855 at Garnkirk, parish of Cadder, Lanark, Scotland.1 She appeared on the census of 7 April 1861 in the household of Alexander (McBurney) McBirnie and Sophia McNeilly at Peesweep village, parish of Dalry, Ayr, Scotland.2 Mary McBirnie was a cotton weaver. She died after 1871.

In the 1871 census, a Mary McBirnie is shown as a "Niece" with an occupation of "Weaver Cotton Factory" in the household of Daniel Duffy, age 32, an Ironstone Miner born in Ireland and his wife, Catherine (McNeilly) Duffy, age 26 in the 1871 census, the younger sister of Sophia McNeilly. Possibly Daniel was related to the James Duffy who was married to Sophia's sister and who was listed as a sponsor in the birth record of Mary McBirnie's older brother, William. Finally, if Mary was a Cotton Weaver and Catherine McGovern was a Steam Loom Weaver, it is possible that William McBirnie met Catherine McGovern through his sister.

Citations

  1. [S515] Birth Certificate.
  2. [S565] 1861 Census of Scotland.

Charles McBirnie

M, b. 22 December 1856, d. 6 July 1858
FatherAlexander (McBurney) McBirnie b. c 1834, d. 23 Sep 1896
MotherSophia McNeilly b. bt 1833 - 1839, d. 28 Feb 1899
ChartsJames McBirnie (est. 1780-) Descendants
Last Edited30 Apr 2006
     Charles McBirnie was born on 22 December 1856 at Garnkirk Works, Cadder, Lanark, Scotland.1 He died on 6 July 1858 at 62 Rumford Street (dispensary?) District of Bridgeton, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland, at age 1.2 He was buried circa 8 July 1858 at Eastern Necropolis, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland.2

Citations

  1. [S515] Birth Certificate.
  2. [S509] Death Certificate.

Catherine McGovern

F, b. circa 1853, d. 18 July 1910
Last Edited6 Jan 2017
     Catherine McGovern was born circa 1853 at Clarkston, New Monkland, Lanark, Scotland. She was a general servant. She was a steamloom weaver. She married William McBirnie, son of Alexander (McBurney) McBirnie and Sophia McNeilly, on 3 August 1875 at St. Margaret's Catholic Church, Airdrie, Lanark, Scotland.1 As of 3 August 1875,her married name was McBirnie. Catherine McGovern and William McBirnie appeared on the census of 4 April 1881 at Shotts Ironworks, Quoad Sacra Parish of Calderhead, Lanark, Scotland.2 Catherine McGovern appeared on the census of 6 April 1891 at Loudon's Land, Cambusnethan Parish, Calderhead District, Lanark, Scotland.3 She and William McBirnie appeared on the census of 1 April 1901 at 74 Stane Place, Stane, Cambusnethan parish, district of Calderhead, Lanark, Scotland.4 Catherine McGovern died on 18 July 1910 at 71 Stane Place, Stane, Cambusnethan, Calderhead, Lanark, Scotland. According to the Extract of an entry in a REGISTER of DEATHS that Tom McBirnie, Jr. got in Scotland, Catherine died at "about 8 a.m." of "Valvular disease of heart Aortic and Mitral.5" She was buried on 20 July 1910 at Stane Cemetery Plot A254, Stane, Lanark, Scotland.

From: T.McBirnie
To: Cathy Griffin
Sent: Saturday, August 28, 2004 9:29 AM
Subject: McNeilly and McGovern info....

          •     Circa 1852, immigrated to Scotland
          •     Circa 1853, daughter Catherine McGovern born in Clarkston, New Monkland, County of Lanark, Scotland

The Scottish Mining Website "Airdrie & New Monkland Area" noted:

     Clarkston, a village in New Monkland parish, and a quoad sacra parish partly also in Shotts parish, Lanarkshire. The village, standing near the right bank of North Calder Water, has a station on the main Bathgate line of the North British, 1 1/2 mile E of Airdrie, of which it ranks as a suburb, and under which it has a post office. The parish, constituted in 1869, is in the presbytery of Hamilton and synod of Glasgow and Ayr; its minister's stipend is £120. The church was built about 1830 as a chapel of ease. Pop. of village (1881) 540; of quoad sacra parish (1871) 4902, (1881) 6218.

Scots Ancestry Research Society which provided Report B/55520, p. 5 which cites the Registers of Births, Marriages and Deaths for Calderhead:

Death of Catherine McBirnie or McGovern

     On 18th July, 1910 at 71 Stane Place, Stane, Cambusnethan, Catherine McBirnie died aged 52; married to William McBirnie,labourer, and the daughter of Patrick McGovern, labourer, and Catherine (blank), both deceased. Informant: William McBirnie, son.

From: T. McBirnie
To: Cathy Griffin
Sent: Saturday, August 28, 2004 9:29 AM
Subject: McNeilly and McGovern info

Second Generation

     Catherine McGovern (McBirnie)
          •     Born circa 1853 in Clarkston, New Monkland, County of Lanark, Scotland
          •     1871 census, Calderbank, Old Monkland parish, County of Lanark, Scotland, lists Catherine McGovern, daughter, unmarried, age 18, born in New Monkland, Lanarkshire, Scotland, general servant. She is living with her parents and sister Rose on Welsh Row, Old Forge Road.
          •     Married William McBirnie on August 3, 1875, at St. Margaret’s Roman Catholic Church, Airdrie, County of Lanark, Scotland. Catherine was listed as a spinster, 20 years old, a steam loom weaver, residing at Calderbank, Old Monkland, the daughter of Patrick McGovern, furnace labourer, and Catherine (maiden surname McGovern) McGovern. Witnesses were Henry McNeilly and Catherine Bol___.
          •     Son Alexander McBirnie born May 16, 1876, at 18 Welsh Row, Calderbank, in the Eastern District of Old Monkland, County of Lanark.
          •     Daughter Rose Ann McBirnie born September 15, 1877, at 14 Welsh Row, Calderbank, in the Eastern District of Old Monkland, County of Lanark.
          •     Son Patrick McBirnie born May 21, 1879, at 24 Old Forge, Calderbank, in the Eastern District of Old Monkland, County of Lanark.
          •     1881 census, Shotts, County of Lanark, Scotland, lists Catherine McBernie, age 28, wife, born in Old(?) Monkland, County of Lanark. She is living with her husband and daughter Rose on High Street in Shotts.
          •     Daughter Catherine McBirnie born April 6, 1881, on High Street, Shotts Iron Works in Calderhead District, County of Lanark.
          •     Son William McBirnie born June 6, 1883, at 22 Stable Row, Newmains, in Parish of Cambusnethan, County of Lanark.
          •     Son Joseph Patrick McBirnie born February 16, 1885, at Charlotte Square, Stane, Cambusnethan, Calderhead district, County of Lanark.
          •     Son Louis McBirnie born June 9, 1887, in Stane, Cambusnethan, Calderhead district, County of Lanark.
          •     Daughter Mary McBirnie born May 15, 1889, in Stane, Cambusnethan, Calder-head district, County of Lanark.
          •     Son James McBirnie born July 11, 1891, in Stane, Cambusnethan, Calderhead district, County of Lanark.
          •     1891 census, Cambusnethan parish, Calderhead district, County of Lanark, Scotland, lists Catherine McBirnie, age 36, head of household, coal miner’s wife, born in New Monkland, County of Lanark. She is living at Loudons Land with her children Rose, Catherine, William, Joseph and Louis.
          •     Daughter Agnes McBirnie born April 10, 1893, in East Benhar, Fauldhouse District, County of Linlithgow.
          •     1901 census, Cambusnethan parish, Calderhead district, County of Lanark, Scotland, lists Catherine McBirnie, age 46, wife, born in Clarkston, County of Lanark. Living with her husband and children Catherine, William, Joseph, Louis and Agnes at 74 Stane Place, [Stane].
          •     Died July 18, 1910, at 71 Stane Place, Stane. She is listed as age 56, married to William McBirnie, laborer, and the daughter of Patrick McGovern, laborer, deceased, and Catherine (maiden name blank) McGovern, deceased. She died of aortic and mitral valvular disease of the heart. The death was reported by her son, William McBirnie.

Tom McBirnie, Jr. in a 25 May 2014 e-mail noted the following burial record from Stane Cemetery:

CATHERINE McBIRNIE, housewife, 71 Stane Place, Stane. Aged 52 years, married.
Father - Patrick
McGovern. (no mother's name given).
Plot A254 on 20th July 1910.

Family

William McBirnie b. 11 Aug 1853, d. 11 Apr 1914
Children

Citations

  1. [S508] Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. FamilySearch. Online at: <https://familysearch.org>.
  2. [S571] 1871 Census of Scotland.
  3. [S381] 1891, , LDS Film 220,243
    Census of Scotland 1891
    County or BUrgh of Lanark
    Registration District of Calderhead
    Enumeration District No. 6268
    Name of Enumerator, Mr. John Smith
    p. 31
    Civil Parish of Cambusnethan
    Quoad Sacra Parish of Calderhead
    School Board District of Calderhead
    Parliamentary Division of Mid Lanark
    No. 156 (or 157?) Loudon's Land
    1 inhabited house
    Cath(?) McBirnie Head Married age 36 Coal Miner's wife born in Lanark, New Monkland
    Rose McBirnie Daughter unmarried age 13 scholar born in Lanark, Old Monkland
    Cather McBirnie Daughter unmarried age 10 scholar born in Lanark, Shotts
    Wm McBirnie Son unmarried age 8 scholar born in Lanark, Cambusnethan (? Cam'nethan)
    Joseph McBirnie Son unmarried age 6 scholar born in Lanark, Cambusnethan (? Cam'nethan)
    Louis McBirnie Son unmarried age 4 born in Lanark, Cambusnethan (? Cam'nethan).
  4. [S601] 1891 Census of Scotland.
  5. [S380] Scots Ancestry Research Society. "McBirnie and McGovern: Report B/55520." (Edinburgh, Scotland: 3 Albany St., Edinburgh EH13PY, Scotland, 1988).
  6. [S483]

Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie

M, b. 16 May 1876, d. 5 August 1924
FatherWilliam McBirnie b. 11 Aug 1853, d. 11 Apr 1914
MotherCatherine McGovern b. c 1853, d. 18 Jul 1910
ChartsJames McBirnie (est. 1780-) Descendants
Last Edited6 Jan 2017
     Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie, son of William McBirnie and Catherine McGovern, was born at 3 h 15 m A.M. On 16 May 1876 at 18 Welsh Row, Calderbank, East District Old Monkland, Lanark, Scotland.

     Extract of an entry in a Register of Births No. 178
          Name: Alexander McBirnie
               Born: 1876 May Sixteenth 3 h, 15 m A.M.
               18 Welsh Row
               Calderbank [Eastern District of Old Monkland Lanark]
               M[ale]
          Father: William McBirnie Brickmaker Journeyman
          Mother: Catherine McBirnie M[aiden] S[urname] McGovern
               Married: 1875 August 3rd Airdrie
          Reported by: William McBirnie (present)
          1876 May 30th at Coatdyke
          Andrew Baird, Registrar.

Francis H. Groome, editor. Ordnance Gazetteer of Scotland: A Survey of Scottish Topography, Statistical, Biographical, and Historical (Edinburgh: Thomas C. Jack, Grange Publishing Works, 1882-84) noted:

     Calderbank, a large industrial village of NE Lanarkshire, partly in Bothwell but chiefly in Old Monkland parish, on the North Calder Water, 2 miles SSE of Airdrie. It has a post office under Airdrie, a board school, and an Established chapel of ease; and at it are situated the iron-works of the Monkland Company, with 6 blast furnaces, 46 puddling furnaces, and 6 rolling mills. The school, with accommodation for 252 children, had (1879) an average attendance of 186, and a grant of £158, 9s. Pop. (1841) 1064, (1861) 2461, (1871) 2176, (1881) 1739.1

Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie was first noted in census records in 1881, NOT living with his parents but instead with his maternal grandparents.

     FHL Film 0203487 GRO Ref Vol 282-4 EnumDist 25 p. 33:

          Patk. McGovern Head Gen Labourer married age 54 male Born in Ireland;
          Catherine McGovern Wife married age 50 female born in Ireland;
          Bridget McGovern Daughter Millworker Jute unmarried age 28 [sic] female born in Ireland;
          Rose McGovern Daughter Millworker Jute unmarried age 21 [sic] female born in Bothwell, Lanark, Scotland;
          Alex McBurnie Grand Son age 5 male born in Old Monklands, Lanark, Scotland...

At first I thought Alexander McBurnie might have been staying with the McGoverns because Alexander's sister, Catherine, was born a few days after the census was taken; and, since a younger brother, Patrick, had died shortly after birth, possibly Alexander was sent to stay with his grandparents for this birth. However, in the 1891 census, Alexander was again noted living with, now widowed, Catherine McGovern. Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie was noted as a jute preparer in the 1891 census. "Old Time Jobs" noted that this described "One who beat and prepared jute plants prior to them being turned into rope."

When he joined the militia in 1895, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie stated that he was a millworker and his "master" was J. Cleghorn. On his Royal Artillery enlistment papers, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie was more specific, he noted his occupation as a carpet printer. No description has been found; however, a general search for the topic of carpet printing suggests that color is injected deeply into the fibers that make up the rug to create a design on the rug.

On his enlistment papers, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie also stated that he was living with his father at "East Benhaer by Bathgate" and he had resided in his father's house for at least three years. No information has been located for "East Benhaer." It is likely that between 1892 and 1895 he resided at East Benhar by Bathgate, Linlithgow, Scotland. Ordnance Gazetteer of Scotland: A Survey of Scottish Topography, Statistical, Biographical, and Historical (Edinburgh: Thomas C. Jack, Grange Publishing Works, 1885) vol 6, p. 483 notes:

     Whitburn, a village and a parish of SW Linlithgowshire.... The parish, containing also the town of Fauldhouse, the villages of Longridge and East Benhar, with part of Blackburn, and the stations of Bents, Crofthead, and Fauldhouse... is bounded N by Bathgate and Livingston, E by Livingston, SE by West Calder in Edinburghshire, and W and NW by Shotts in Lanarkshire....

Bathgate is near Kirknewton and the mid-Calder station where Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie's grandfather would be killed in 1896. Possibly the family was now living together since Alexander's youngest sister, Agnes, was noted as having been born in East Benhar, District of Fauldhouse, Linlithgow on 10 Apr 1893. And his youngest brother, James, died of measles and bronchial pneumonia on 7 Nov 1894 at East Benhar, District of Fauldhouse, County of Linlithgow.

On 12 August 1895, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie took an oath at Dundee, Angus, Scotland, to serve for six years in the F & K Artillery Militia. He stated that he was born near Coatbridge in the parish of Calderbank, Lanark, Scotland. He said that he was living at 18 Clark Street, Dundee, Forfar, Scotland. This is where he was noted living with his widowed grandmother, Catherine McGovern, before her death in 1891. When Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie joined the Royal Artillery a few weeks later, he stated that he had lived at least three years at his father's house at East Benhar by Bathgate so perhaps he split time between the two residences.

According to The New Annual Army List, Militia List, Yeomanry Cavalry List, and Indian Civil Service List for 1893 (London, John Murray, Albemarle Street, 1893), the F & K Artillery Militia was probably the Forfar and Kincardine Artillery Militia. The following is from Wikipedia:

     ...Following the Militia Act of 1797, the regiment was raised in 1798 as the Forfarshire Militia. Four years later its territorial scope was broadened when it became the Forfarshire and Kincardine Militia and in 1854 it was redesignated the Forfar and Kincardine Artillery. In 1902 it was renamed as the Forfar and Kincardine Royal Garrison Artillery (Militia) and it was disbanded in 1909.

In any event, less than two months later, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie joined the Royal Artillery. At age 19, he began regular military service, taking his oath on 2 October 1895 at Dundee, Scotland, as a gunner in the Royal Artillery. At the time of his enlistment, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie was described as 5 foot 7 1/8 inches tall, 133 pounds with a fresh complexion, grey eyes, and brown hair and three tattoos:

     an anchor-cross and heart on his right forearm
     a star N.A. on the left forearm
     a dot (it is not clear if this was a tatoo or a mark) on the web of the left thumb

He was a Roman Catholic and he signed his name: Alex McBirnie

The Royal Artillery uniform and POSSIBLY the jacket Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie was wearing in the photo was dark blue with scarlet facings and a pill box cap with a "Slade-Wallace" waist belt.

Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie formally joined the Royal Artillery 7 Oct 1895 at Fort Rowner, Gosport, England. From Wikipedia:

     Fort Rowner is one of the Palmerston Forts, in Gosport, England.... Built circa 1858 as part of the outer defense line for Gosport along with Fort Brockhurst and Fort Elson to the North East and Fort Grange and Fort Gomer to the South West.... Fort Rowner was designed by William Crossman to protect Portsmouth. With its formidable firepower, its main purpose was to guard the approach from potential landing areas on the south Hampshire coast.... The fort was manned by companies from the garrison Artillery and in the 1880s it became the Depot of the 2nd Brigade Southern Division R.G.A. Various regiments were quartered in the fort during the Victorian period as they moved to and from postings in the U.K. and the colonies....

30 Nov 1895, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie was posted as a gunner to the 14th Co. Southern Division, Royal Artillery. The officer certifying the correctness of the entry was "R A Kaye Capt." Apparently officers moved around a lot more than the enlisted men. The following obituary was found on Rootsweb message board:

     COLONEL R. A. KAYE
     Colonel Ralph Arthur Kaye, C.M.G., who died last Friday, was the third son of James Kaye, of the Middle Temple. He was educated at Wellington College, and passed twelfth into the R.M.A. Woolwich. He was commissioned in the Royal Artillery, and served mostly with Mountain Batteries in India, taking part in the Hazara Expedition (1891) and the N.W. Frontier Expedition (1897-8). When the War broke out he was in command of the inner defenses of Portsmouth Harbour. He was sent to France with a brigade of the then new 6in. howitzers, and took part in the battles of the Somme and Arras. He was twice mentioned in dispatches, and for his service was promoted Colonel and made C.M.G. He retired from the Army in 1917 through ill-health. He married Geraldine, daughter of Colonel G. H. W. O'Sullivan, R.E.

Source: The Times, Friday, Apr 28, 1933; pg. 19; Issue 46430; col B

The Army Book for the British Empire: A Record of the Development and Present Composition of the Military Forces and their Duties in Peace and War (London: printed for Her Majesty's Stationery Office, by Harrison and Sons, St. Martin's Lane, Printers in Ordinary to Her Majesty, 1893), part II, p. 214 notes:

     The purpose of the artillery is the handling, transporting, and fighting guns, howitzers, and mortars, in fact, ordnance of every kind, and the custody of the ammunition appropriated for its use. It has also the duty in the field of transporting and issuing the small arms ammunition for the rest of the army. Thus the essential duty of artillery is to study and direct the working of the guns or engines which throw more or less heavy projectiles, and to have charge of and distribute ammunition and explosives in immediate reserve for army use.

     The artillery does not, customarily, in British service construct or build works or batteries in garrison or at sieges, nor construct platforms or gun mountings, but confines itself to the use, setting up, or adaption of the material or appliances provided for it, or which may come to hand. Nor does the artillery construct or fire mines on shore or in the water, nor employ its men to the storage or custody of general reserves of ammunition, powder, or explosives....

According to his military history, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie received a 3rd Class Certificate of Education 3 Mar 1896.

According to The Army Book for the British Empire, part II, p. 420:

     In 1870 army schools passed under the jurisdiction of the Director-General of Military Education, and in the succeeding year all recruits were required to attend school compulsorily till they obtained a 4th class certificate of education; a 3rd class certificate being required for promotion to corporal, and a 2nd class for promotion to sergeant....

22 Jun 1897, there is a notation that appears to indicate that the Royal Artillery was reorganized into Districts and Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie was in the Southern District. And 2 Oct 1897, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie was granted Good Conduct pay.

1 Apr 1898, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie was selected to come under the provisions of Special Army Order W[ar] O[ffice] dated 2 Apr 1898. I found suggestions that the Special Army Order of 2nd April 1898 ended the practice of deducting "2d" (two pennies?) per day from a soldier's pay to cover the cost of his food; however, this meant he would not receive the money back in a lump sum when he left the service. Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie signed some kind of authorization 21 Apr 1898 and there was a certifying signature over a stamp reading "COMMANDING 14th Co. S.D.R.A" Unfortunately, I haven't been able to read it. The only person that I have been able to find that had a name any where near what was written (which looks like Weil or Weisl or Weid to me) is Major Harry George Weir. I haven't been able to find anything else about him.

Although the Second Boer War took place between 1899 and 1902, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie does not appear to have been sent to South Africa. According to his military history, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie spent his time in the service at "Home" which was defined at any station in England, Scotland and Ireland.

There is a notation that 28 Apr 1899, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie was posted as a gunner to "D.E. North" and the "Battn or Depot" noted was "W. D." presumably the War Department. The Officer signing the form was Major R(owley) Wynyard.

According to the Royal Artillery article in Wikipedia, on 1 July 1899, the Royal Artillery was divided into three groups:

     the Royal Horse Artillery of 21 batteries and the Royal Field Artillery of 95 batteries comprised one group, while the coastal defense, mountain, siege and heavy batteries were split off into another group named the Royal Garrison Artillery of 91 companies. The third group continued to be titled simply Royal Artillery, and was responsible for ammunition storage and supply. Which branch a gunner belonged to was indicated by metal shoulder titles (R.A., R.F.A., R.H.A., or R.G.A.)

In the 1901 census, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie was noted as a soldier, a gunner in the Royal Garrison Artillery. According to Wikipedia:

     The Royal Garrison Artillery (RGA) was an arm of the Royal Artillery that was originally tasked with manning the guns of the British Empire's forts and fortresses, including coastal artillery batteries, the heavy gun batteries attached to each infantry division, and the guns of the siege artillery.

     The Royal Garrison Artillery came into existence as a separate entity when existing coastal defence, mountain, siege and heavy batteries of the Royal Artillery were amalgamated into a new sub-branch. A royal warrant provided that from 1 June 1899:

     "... the mounted and dismounted branches of the Royal Regiment of Artillery shall be separated into two corps... to be named respectively (a) the Royal Horse Artillery and the Royal Field Artillery; (b) the Royal Garrison Artillery."

Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie appeared on the census of 31 March 1901 at Altcar, West Lancashire, England. According to Wikipedia, "Great Altcar is a village and civil parish in West Lancashire, England, close to Formby on the West Lancashire Coastal Plain..... Altcar Rifle Range, established in 1860, is actually in Hightown."

     England and Wales Census, 1901
          Road, Street or Name of House: Rifle Range
          Name or Surname: Alexander McBirnie
          Relation to Head of Family: Visitor (the family was headed by George Staffin, Soldier- Sergeant Royal Garrison Artillery)
          Condition as to Marriage: Single
          Age at last birthday: 24
          Occupation: Soldier-Gunner Royal Garrison Artillery
          Born: Scotland.

2 Oct 1901, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie was granted Good Conduct pay a second time. 2 Oct 1902, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie was transferred as a gunner "1st Cl A.R. Sec B". He ended his regular military service on 2 October 1902. At that point Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie was transferred to the Army Reserve for a five year period which would have ended on October 2, 1907. However, his record notes that he was absent on 1 Jan 1907. Presumably, this was when the family left Motherwell for Liverpool, England to immigrate to the United States.

After Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie left the service, he was employed as a train brakeman circa 1903 for Caledonian Railway, Motherwell, Lanark, Scotland. On his marriage record in 1905, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie listed his occupation as Railway Brakeman. And he was living on Kirk Street in Motherwell, only two blocks from the Muir Street Station of the Caledonian Railway "which connected Glasgow with the South." It seems likely that Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie worked as a Brakeman for the Caledonian Line.

Motherwell An Outline History by Ethel Goodall, published in 1982 by Motherwell District Libraries, Hamilton Road, Motherwell which included the following information about the Caledonian Railway from pp. 12-14:

     The advent of the railway was a key factor in the industrial development of Motherwell. The Wishaw and Coltness Railway opened in 1841 and ran from Motherwell to Coatbridge. This line ran over the Jerviston Viaduct, built in 1840, the first railway viaduct in Scotland and Motherwell's first railway bridge, so called because its stone came from Jerviston Quarry. The bridge, over 300 yards long, was designed by Sir John McNeill and spanned the South Vale of the Calder. It was supported by 10 stone pillars, three of which were 110 feet high, while the rest varied in height from 80 feet to 45 feet. The viaduct carried a single track railway on a base of horizontal wooden beams. No metal was used in the structure except the iron sockets for holding the arched beams. When the Caledonian Railway took over the Wishaw and Coltness Railway in 1848, the Jerviston Viaduct was unable to support the increased freight and was abandoned in 1857, after a new stretch of railway line was laid further down the Calder. The old bridge was allowed to remain and was known locally as the 'Globe Viaduct' until its demolition in 1922, when its stones were used in the construction of the Gleneagles Hotel in Perthshire. In 1848, the Caledonian Line, which connected Glasgow with the South, opened a station in Melville Road. In 1871, a station was opened in Clyde Street, and both stations were superseded by the present station in Muir Street, which was built in 1885.

The date Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie started work as a brakeman is a guesstimate and it isn't known if he began work as a brakeman or if he was promoted to the position. This is a description of the job from Wikipedia:

     In the US, the brakeman was a member of a railroad train's crew responsible for assisting with braking a train when the conductor wanted the train to slow down. A brakeman's duties also included ensuring that the couplings between cars were properly set, lining switches, and signaling to the train operators while performing switching operations. The brakemen rode in the caboose, the last car in the train, which was built specially to allow a crew member to apply the brakes of the caboose quickly and easily, which would help to slow the train. In rare cases, such as descending a long, steep grade, brakemen might be assigned to several cars, and be required to operate the brakes while the train was moving from atop the train. Brakemen were also required to watch the train when it was underway to look for signs of hot box (a dangerous overheating of axle bearings), as well as for people trying to ride the train for free, and cargo shifting or falling off.

     As rail transport technology has improved, a brakeman's duties have been reduced and altered to match the updated technology, and the brakeman's job has become much safer than it was in the early days of railroading. Individually operated car brakes were replaced with automatic air brakes, eliminating the need for the brakeman to walk atop a moving train to set the brakes. Link and pin couplings were replaced with automatic couplings, and hand signals are now supplemented by two-way radio communication.

Before his marriage, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie lived at 40-1/2 Kirk Street, Motherwell, Lanark, Scotland.2

On 26 January 1905, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie, at age 28, married Mary Veronica Richmond Tennant/Haughney, at age 24 at St. Mary's Church, Larkhall, Lanark, Scotland:

     January 26, 1905
     married in the District of Larkhall, County of Lanark
          Groom: Alexander McBirnie
               age 27 (sic)
               Bachelor
               Railway Brakesman
               residing at 40-1/2 Kirk Street, Motherwell.
               Father: William McBirnie
               Father's occupation: Coal Miner
               Mother: Catherine McBirnie
               Maiden Surname: McGovern
          Bride: Mary Haughney
               age 23 (sic)
               domestic servant
               Spinster
               residing a 7 Croft, Larkhall
               Bride's father: Thomas Haughney (sic)
               Father's occupation: Coal Miner
               Bride's mother: Mary Haughney
               Maiden Surname: Tennant
          Marriage at St. Mary's Church, Larkhall
               According to the forms of the Roman Catholic
          Witnesses: William McBirnie, Jane Haughney.3

After their marriage, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie and Mary Veronica Richmond Tennant/Haughney lived at 48 Kirk Street, Motherwell, Lanark, Scotland. (an unknown value.)

When Aunt Mary was four and a half months old, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie and his young family emigrated from Scotland via Liverpool, England with their in-laws, the Tom Haughney family.

The McBirnie family probably took the Caledonian Railway to Liverpool when they decided to emigrate. The tradition is that the family came over on a ship which was sunk by the Germans during World War I. Aunt Mary remembered her mother listening to the radio during World War I and hearing about a ship which sank. Her mother said that the ship was the one on which the family had come to the United States, but Aunt Mary wasn't sure of the name of it.

Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie, at age 30, and Mary Veronica Richmond Tennant/Haughney, at age 26, immigrated on 14 January 1907 to Ellis Island, New York, NY, from Liverpool, England on the RMS Carmania accompanied by their four and a half month old daughter, Mary. They were joined on the trip by their mother-in-law, Mary (Tennant) Haughney and her husband, Tom and their children, Tom, Jr., Jane, Ann and Elizabeth.

I found the family on a Passenger List of the S.S. Carmania which left Liverpool on 5 Jan 1907 and arrived at Ellis Island and the Port of New York on 13 Jan 1907.

     Name in Full: McBirnie, Alex
          Age: 28
          Sex: M
          Married or Single: M
          Calling or Occupation: Brakesman
          Able to Read: (checked)
          Able to Write: (checked)
          Nationality (Country of which citizen or subject: England
          Race or People: Scotch
          Last Permanent Residence (Country - City or Town): Scotland Motherwell
          Final Destination: Beaver Falls, Pa.
          Whether having a ticket to such final destination: check
          By Whom Passage Paid: (blank)
          Whether in possession or $50 and, if less, how much: $71 (for the family of three)
          Whether going to join a relative or friend, and if so, what relative or friend, his name and complete address: Hugh Tennant, Cinderhurst Col.
          Ever in prison, almshouse, institution for care of the insane or supported by charity? If so which?: check (no written at top of column)
          Whether a Polygamist: check (no written at top of column)
          Whether an Anarchist: check (no written at top of column)
          Whether coming with offer, promise, or agreement of labor: check (no written at top of column)
          Condition of Health: check (good written at top of column)
          Deformed of Crippled: check (no written at top of column)
          Height Feet/Inches: (can't read)
          Complexion: Fresh
          Color of Hair: Brown
          Color of Eyes: Gray
          Marks of Identification: Anchor Cross & Heart on right forearm
          Place of Birth Country/City (or town): Coatbridge

According to Arnold Kludas on p. 112 of Great Passenger Ships of the World Volume I: 1858-1912 the S.S. Carmania was the Cunard Line's first turbine-steamer. She was built at Clydebank Yard 366 and launched on 21 Feb 1905. She was completed on 16 Nov 1905 and her maiden voyage was 2 Dec 1905 from Liverpool, England to New York, New York. On 14 Aug 1914 the S.S. Carmania was converted to an auxiliary cruiser for World War I and on 15 Sep 1914:

     The Carmania surprised the German auxiliary cruiser Cap Trafalgar while the latter was bunkering off the Brazilian island of Trinidad. After two hours of fighting the German ship sank, the survivors being taken aboard the Eleonore Woermann. The badly damaged Carmania, which had lost nine men in the action, turned away on fire.

The damage was repaired and in May 1916, the S.S. Carmania began service as a troop transport. On 21 Dec 1918, she returned to passenger service, sailing from Liverpool to New York. In 1923, she was refitted as an oil-firing vessel and in 1924 ran a Liverpool to Montreal service and in 1926 ran a London to New York service. Finally, in 1931, the S.S. Carmania was "laid up" at Sheerness and in March 1932 was "sold for breaking-up" to Hughes, Bolckow & Co., Blyth.

According to the "Record of Aliens Held for Special Inquiry," it appears that, because of his health, Tom Haughney was held for a few days on Ellis Island until a bond could be posted showing that he would not be a burden on society. It appears that Tom Haughney was released on 18 Jan 1907. The other family members appear to have been released from Ellis Island on 14 Jan 1907.

According to Loretto Dennis Szucs on p. 3 of Ellis Island Gateway to America "During the peak years of immigration, from about 1900 to 1914, as many as five thousand people a day were processed at Ellis Island." Mary (Tennant) Haughney's father, Daniel Tennant, had immigrated more than 20 years before the McBirnie family.

According to the "List or Manifest of Alien Passengers for the U.S. Immigration Officer at Port of Arrival" of the S.S. Carmania, the McBirnie and Haughney families were supposed to go first to Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania and then on to join Hugh Tennant, at Cinderhurst, Colorado (place not found in USGS Geographic Names database). Hugh F. Tennant was noted in Pictou/Maitland in the 1900 U.S. Census and this is where Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie was next noted.

Between 1907 and 1912, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie lived at Maitland, Huerfano Co., CO.

Based on the birth locations of his sons, a U.S. Census record, and other sources, between 1907 and 1912, after arriving in Colorado from Scotland via Pennsylvania, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie worked as a miner for Victor-American Fuel Co., Maitland, Huerfano Co., CO. The "Huerfano County, Colorado Miners Page" notes this about the mine:

     Mine: MAITLAND
          Location: Northwest of Walsenburg and just north of Pictou
          Operator: Victor Coal Company, a.k.a., Victor American Caliente Coal Company, Red Ash Coal Company
          Operation: 1897 – 1962
          Production: 1,823,238 tons
          Fatalities: Actually, with one notable exception, the Maitland was a relatively safe mine. A tragedy occurred in August 1903 when the company stable caught fire and 15 mules and five horses were killed. In February 1906, 16 men were killed in a gas explosion in the old Sunshine mine workings "reached through the Maitland entry." This was Huerfano County's worst mining disaster to that date, and was only surpassed when 18 were killed in Oakdale in 1919.

According to "Recalling the 20th Century in Huerfano County" by Nancy Christofferson in Huerfano World 6 Jan 2000:

     ...In the year 1900 Huerfano County boasted 18 post offices, 19 coal mines and 37 school districts. The post offices were Apache, Badito, Capps, Cucharas, Gardner, La Veta, Maitland, Malachite, McMillan, Pictou, Pryor, Rouse, St. Mary's, Seguro, Sharpsdale, Talpa, Ute (which became Huerfano in 1900) and Walsenburg. Of these, Seguro and McMillan were silver and gold mining camps, Malachite a copper town and Maitland, Pictou, Pryor and Rouse were coal camps. Cucharas, La Veta, Ute/Huerfano and Walsenburg were centers of railroad activity. The other post offices served rural farming communities....

     (Maitland was to the northwest of Walsenburg.) The census of 1910 showed Walsenburg had a population of 2,323, La Veta, 691 and Huerfano County, 13,320. Both municipalities had more than doubled, and the additional 5,000 county residents were mostly in coal camps.... Walsenburg was busy with two newspapers, schools, at least 15 saloons, nine hotels, 24 wholesale and retail grocery, meat and merchandise businesses, 10 physicians and two dentists, two undertakers, three drugstores, three furniture and hardware businesses, six churches, a dairy, two banks, several feed and livery stables, blacksmiths, three confectionery/bakery shops, two lumber yards, numerous restaurants and cafes and all kinds of services....

Unfortunately, the First Annual Report of the State Inspector of Coal Mines, 1913 (Denver, CO: The Smith-Brooks Printing Company, State Printers, 1914) was from the year after Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie would have moved from the Maitland Mine to the Hastings Mine but he probably would have known of these men:

     p. 58 Huerfano County
     Names of Mines: Maitland
          Names and Addresses of Operators: Victor-American Fuel Co., Denver
          President of Company: J. C. Osgood
          General Manager or Superintendent: W. J. Murray
          Local Superintendent: ---
          Method of Ventilation: Fan
          Railroad Connection: D. & R.G.

The National Mining Hall of Fame and Museum site included the following:

     John Cleveland Osgood was one of the founders of the Colorado Fuel & Iron Company and a coal baron whose influence extended throughout the Rocky Mountain West. Orphaned by age fourteen, John Osgood learned the coal business from the ground up. He attended night classes at the Peter Cooper Institute in New York and then found employment as a bookkeeper for the Union Mining Company in Iowa. Subsequent work in a bank gave him financial experience, and he soon gained control of the White Breast Mining Company, which supplied coal to the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad.

     At age thirty, John Osgood was sent to Colorado to look for more coal deposits, and he reportedly inspected every coal mine in the state. He was most attracted to a large deposit that had been exposed by an avalanche. He purchased this deposit and formed the Colorado Fuel Company. Aggressively adding to his coal holdings, within a few years he controlled 5,622 acres of coal land, mostly in the Crystal River Valley south of Glenwood Springs.

     In 1892, John Osgood’s Colorado Fuel Company merged with William J. Palmer’s Colorado Coal & Iron Company to form Colorado Fuel & Iron, with Osgood as President. Now Osgood controlled 69,000 acres of coal land, including 14 operating mines and four coking plants containing 800 coke ovens, producing 25,000 tons of coke monthly. His empire included 38 mining camps and rolling mills in Colorado, Wyoming, and the Territory of New Mexico. By 1902, CF&I employed 15,000 men in Colorado and was the largest employer in the state. John Osgood was the undisputed fuel king of the West....

     By 1904, John Osgood was having a cash flow problem and asked his friends John D. Rockefeller and Jay Gould if they would help him financially. Soon, he learned that they had taken over his company. When told he could continue as President, he said he would not work for anyone and resigned....

     Osgood still owned the Victor-American Fuel Company, and the extensive labor strikes of the United Mine Workers in 1914 to 1917 adversely affected its production. The rest of his life was a continuous struggle to maintain his empire.

Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie and Mary Veronica Richmond Tennant/Haughney appeared on the census of 15 April 1910 at Maitland, Huerfano Co., CO:

     Precinct No. 23, Maitland, Huerfano County, Colorado,
     Supervisor's District No. 3, Enumeration District No. 86,
     sheet 1 A, p. 128
     (Series: T624, Roll: 120, Book: 2, Page: 128A) (image 1 of 8)
          dwelling visited 8
          family visited 8
          McBirnie, Alex
               head
               male
               white
               age 34
               married once for 5 years
               born in Scotland
               English mother tongue
               parents born Scotland
               English mother tongue
               immigrated to the United States in 1907
               an alien
               speaks English
               miner in a coal mine
               wage worker not out of work
               able to read and write
               renting a house;
          McBirnie, Mary
               wife
               female
               white
               age 29
               married once for 5 years
               had 2 children both still living
               born in Scotland
               English mother tongue
               parents born Scotland
               English mother tongue
               immigrated to the United States in 1907
               speaks English
               no occupation
               able to read and write;
          McBirnie, Mary
               daughter
               female
               white
               age 3
               single
               born in Colorado (sic)
               parents born Scotland
               English mother tongue
               no occupation

Although Uncle Bill was born 18 Dec 1908 in Colorado, he was not listed in this census. The other odd thing is that Aunt Mary was listed as having been born in Colorado. Since Uncle Bill has not been noted elsewhere in the census, it is possible that the census taker conflated Aunt Mary's and Uncle Bill's information into one record.4

Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie was working at the Maitland Mine at least through 26 Sep 1912 when he was noted as a member of a team that won first prize in a First-Aid contest:

“Annual First Aid Contests: First Aid and Helmet Contest at Trinidad.” The Colliery Engineer (Mines and Minerals), vol. 33 (Aug 1912-Jul 1913), No. 4 (Nov 1912), pp. 187-188:

     There are within a few miles of Trinidad, Colo., large coal mines operated by the Colorado Fuel and Iron Co., the Victor-American Fuel Co., the Cedar Hill Coal and Coke Co., the Chicosa Fuel Co., and the Rocky Mountain Fuel Co.

     Beginning September 25, 1912, there was held, at Trinidad, the Las Animas County Fair. In some respects, this was an old-fashioned, annual county fair, but this year the region's two main industries, agriculture and coal mining, were given equal prominence. The program for the Fair therefore brought into town not only ranchers and cowboys, but miners and mining engineers from that part of the state.

     The program of miners' events had been prepared under the direction of H. H. Sanderson, mining engineer, who has devoted much time and attention to first-aid and helmet work instruction. Thursday (26 Sep 1912) was "Miners' Day" and there was a large attendance.

     Previous to this meet, the various companies had been furnished sets of the rules that would govern, and had been invited to send teams. For weeks, accordingly, teams worked in nearly every camp, training for this meet. There were thirteen entries and these all participated.

     Each first-aid team consisted of six men — a captain, a patient, and four operators — and every man was required to be a bona fide employee about the mine represented by his team. It was further stipulated that not more than three men on a team should have participated in the similar contests of the preceding year. Each helmet team comprised five men — a captain and four miners — and the same restriction was made concerning engagement in the contests of 1911. In all other respects, the rules were substantially the same as are adopted elsewhere in such contests.

     The participants in the first-aid events were the following teams, who took places in line according to numbers drawn by lot: 1. Segundo; 2. Berwind ; 3. Piedmont; 4. Starkville; 5. Walsen-Robinson, second team ; 6. Frederick ; 7. Sopris; 8. Primero; 9. Maitland; 10. Walsen-Robinson, first team; 11. Tercio; 12. Morley; 13. Tabasco.

     Four events took place on the race course in front of a large grand stand. The judges were four surgeons, of whom two are stationed at Fort Logan, Colo., on the medical staff of the Regular Army. All four judges were unprejudiced by any company connections and were total strangers to every man on the teams.

     The specifications of the events had been withheld from everybody (except the committee in charge) until the contests started, when the judges were each supplied with complete copies. Immediately preceding each event, a sealed envelope was handed to the captain of each team, and this contained the specifications for that particular event only, in type-written form. These were then read by each captain to his team and, simultaneously, by megaphone, the same were announced to the spectators and to the teams, so that there might be no mis-interpretations. After a few moments allowed for questions, signals were given and the work begun. Thereafter there could be no explanations nor suggestions offered by anybody.

     It would be difficult to conceive better system than was displayed throughout these events. It was almost military in its quiet and smoothness. For each event, each of the four judges selected four or five of the teams for his special attention, and it was so mutually arranged among them that each judge inspected each of the teams at least once during the contest. The teams proved to be so well matched that the arrival at final averages required careful deliberation on the part of the surgeons. The winners were: First, Maitland team, grade 95 per cent; second, Morley team, grade 93 3/4 per cent; third, Walsen-Robinson, first team, grade 90 per cent. The Maitland team represented the Victor-American Fuel Co., while the Morley and the Walsen-Robinson teams were from the Colorado Fuel and Iron Co. The men on the Maitland team were: David Aitkens, captain; Alex. McBurnie (sic), Robert Shaw, William McLennon and Alex. Wilson, operators; Arthur Quinn, patient.

     All the teams, with the exception of the winning team, were in neat Red Cross regulation uniforms. The Maitland team was uniformed in neat white soft shirts and blue overalls. (This is confusing because the picture of the team members in the same article clearly shows them in Red Cross uniforms. Possibly they changed to the Red Cross uniforms for the picture?)

     To the winning team was voted a silver cup that, a year before, had been captured by the Primero team, with the stipulation that its permanent possession depended upon being won thrice. In addition to this, six polished aluminum Wolf safety lamps were presented to this team. The second prize consisted of six automatic lighters.

This identifies the mine superintendent and pit boss that Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie would have worked with in 1912:

Coal Age, vol. 2 (July 1 to December 31, 1912) (Hill Publishing Co. 505 Pearl Street, New York), pp. 751-752:

     Charter Members of the Rocky Mountain Coal Mining Institute
     The following is an official list of those who have become charter members of the Rocky Mountain Coal Mining Institute:

          ...Beere, W. J., Pit Boss, Victor-American Fuel Co., Maitland
          ...Shaw, Jno. Mine Supt., Victor-American Fuel Co., Maitland

Jno. B. Shaw was also the father of Robert Shaw, one of the members of the Maitland First Aid Team. In addition to the Maitland Team, there was also an unidentified man in a suit seated beside the trophy in the photo. I think it quite likely that the man was Jno. B. Shaw, Mine Superintendent at the Maitland mine in 1912.

However, the whole region was a powder keg. According to "Recalling the 20th Century in Huerfano County" by Nancy Christofferson in Huerfano World 6 Jan 2000:

     ...By far the most memorable event of the 1910s was the coal strike of 1913-1914. Lasting over a year, the strike affected not just miners and their families but everyone in Huerfano County, from bankers and merchants right down to the little old lady who sold eggs to the coal camps. By strike's end, at least 15 people in Huerfano County had lost their lives.... (an unknown value.)

Circa July 1913, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie moved to Hastings, Las Animas Co., CO. Between 1913 and 1914, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie was employed by Victor-American Fuel Co., Hastings Mine, Las Animas Co., CO. The exact date of the move from Maitland to the Hastings Mine is unknown and how long Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie worked there is not known. It is known that, in 1913, he was apparently working for Victor-American Fuel Co. Hastings:

The Colliery Engineer, vol. 34 (Aug 1913-Jul 1914), Nov. 1913, pp. 214-215:

     In order to stimulate the interest in first-aid practice, a handsome silver cup was furnished by the Victor-American Fuel Co., for a first prize. This becomes the permanent property of the team which wins it three times. The first contest for this cup occurred July 13, 1912, and was won by the Maitland team, which afterwards took first place in the State Meeting at Trinidad, where first-aid teams from all over Colorado participated....

     The second annual Colorado contest was held in the baseball park at Walsenberg, August 23, 1913....

     Following are the scores made by the teams participating, based on 600 as being perfect:

          Chandler, 590; Hastings, 588; Delagua, 584; Gray Creek, 583; Ravenwood, 580; Bowen, 567; Radient, 560; Maitland, 554....

     The winning teams were composed of the following:

          First, Chandler....

          Second, Hastings, Dave Williams, Captain, Tony Arbo, Joe Robinson, John Berthliner, Alex. McBirnie. Jim Natole, subject.


The Hastings Mine was located about three miles up Hastings Canyon from Ludlow, which stands at the entrance to the Hastings and Berwind Canyons, approximately 20 miles from Trinidad, CO. The move from Maitland to Hastings MIGHT have been precipitated by two events, an explosion at the Hastings Mine 19 Jun 1912 and the certification in 1913 of Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie as a Mine Examiner.

Karen Mitchell noted the following article:

     Hastings Mine Explosion 6-19-1912"

     Fort Collins Weekly Courier – June 21, 1912 – Thirteen Men Killed in Mine Explosion Today – Explosion Caused by Windy Shot, Is Believed – Victor American Fuel Company’s Mine at Hastings, Colo., Scene of the Disaster – One Man Escapes With His Life, Though Badly Injured – Trinidad, June 19 – Thirteen men are entombed and believed to be dead behind hundreds of tons of rock 4,500 feet from the mouth of the tunnel in the Hastings coal mine. The mine is owned by the Victor-American Fuel company. The explosion took place at 1 a.m. today and the work of rescue is going on slowly. Fourteen men entered the mine before the rest of the workmen and only one of them escaped, Geo. Papes, a Greek. The only American in the gang is John Thomas, a fireman. It is believed that the explosion was caused by a windy shot set off in a pocket of dust and gas. The blast was so tremendous that it is believed it must have either instantly killed the men or suffocated them. Papes, the only man who escaped, is so seriously burned that he is hovering between life and death. That more men were not in the mine at the time is caused by the fact that the explosion took place between the hours of day and night changing of shifts. The rescue car was at Hastings at the time of the explosion and all appliances are being used to reach the men. Gangs from neighboring mines came to the rescue and it is believed that all of the men or their bodies will be rescued before night. Superintendent Cameron believes all of the men perished. The company is in complete control and there are no disturbances. No bodies have yet been recovered.

The certification of Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie as a Mine Examiner in 1913 was noted in the First Annual Report of the State Inspector of Coal Mines, 1913 (Denver, CO: The Smith-Brooks Printing Company, State Printers, 1914), p. 49:

     MINE EXAMINERS HOLDING CERTIFICATES ISSUED DURING YEAR 1913

          Name: McBirnie, Alex M. (sic)
          Address: Hastings

After his certification as a mine inspector, it is assumed that Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie was employed as a "Fire Boss." According to Wikipedia:

     A fire boss is a person employed at a mine or state certified official, responsible for examining a mine for dangers, particularly explosive, poisonous or suffocating gases. Usually the fire boss is the first person to enter a mine, to verify its safety, before a shift crew enters. It may also loosely refer to a foreman or shift manager. (an unknown value.) (an unknown value.) (an unknown value.) ; in Troop A, First Squadron Cavalry, National Guard of Colorado. (an unknown value.) (an unknown value.) (an unknown value.)

Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie and Mary Veronica Richmond Tennant/Haughney lived circa 1915 at Oakview, Huerfano Co., CO. Between 1915 and 1917, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie was PROBABLY employed by Oakdale Coal Co., Oakdale Mine, Oakview, Huerfano Co., CO.

Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie and Mary Veronica Richmond Tennant/Haughney lived circa July 1918 at Walsenburg, Huerfano Co., CO. Based on his World War I draft registration, circa 1918, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie was working for Black Canon Fuel Co., Walsenburg, Huerfano Co., CO. The "Huerfano County, Colorado Miners Page" notes:

     Mine: BLACK CANYON
          Location: North of Walsenburg
          Owner: Dick Brothers then in December 1909 sold to William H. Van Mater
          Operation:
               1905 – 1909 as Black Canyon
               1909 – 1913 as Black Canyon – William H. Van Mater
               1913 – 1916 Black Canyon Fuel Company, President John Q. Royce
               1917 as Hickory Canon
               1918 – 1919 as New Maitland
          Production: 130,540 tons

According to the Sixth Annual Report of the State Inspector of Coal Mines, 1918 (Denver, CO: Eames Brothers, State Printers, 1919), p. 12, Black Canon Coal & Fuel Co. owned the Caddell mine at Walsenburg in Huerfano Co., CO. The manager or general superintendent was Talton F. Crane, Denver, CO and the superintendent was Hugh McGinn, Walsenburg, CO. Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie gave his occupation on the draft registration as coal miner.

Before Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie registered for the World War I draft, he declared his intention to become an American citizen:

     U.S. Department of Labor
     Naturalization Service
     No. _?648
     UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
     DECLARATION OF INTENTION

     Invalid for all purposes seven years after the date hereof
               State of Colorado, /
               County of Huerfano./ ss:

     In the District Court of Huerfano County, Alexander McBirnie, aged 38 (sic) years, occupation Miner, do declare on oath that my personal description is: Color White, complexion medium, height 5 feet 8 inches, weight 174 pounds, color of hair light brown, color of eyes blue other visible distinctive marks None.

     I was born in Shotts (sic), Scotland on the 17th day of May, anno Domini 1880 (sic); I now reside at Walsenburg, Colorado.

     I emigrated to the United States from Liverpool, England on the vessel Carmania; my last foreign residence was Shotts, Scotland;

     I am married; the name of my wife is Mary McBirnie; she was born at Larkhall (sic), Scotland and now resides at Walsenburg, Colorado.

     It is my bona fide intention to renounce forever all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty, and particularly to George V King of Great Britain and Ireland, of whom I am now a subject;

     I arrived at the port of New York, in the State of New York, on or about the 12th day of January anno Domini 1906 (sic);

     I am not an anarchist; I am not a polygamist nor a believer in the practice of polygamy; and it is my intention in good faith to become a citizen of the United States of America and to permanently reside therein: SO HELP ME GOD.

          (signed) Alexander McBirnie

     Subscribed and sworn to before me in the office of the Clerk of said Court this 6th day of September, anno Domini 1918.

          ALEXANDER LEVY
          Clerk of the District Court.
          By (signed) R. E. Thornton (?), Deputy Clerk.

On 12 September 1918, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie, at age 42, registered for the World War I draft at Walsenburg, Huerfano Co., CO.

     Serial Number: 1844
     Order Number: 2320?
     Name: Alexander McBirnie
          Address:
               City: Walsenburg
               County: Huerfano
               State: Colorado
          Age: 38 (sic)
          Birth Date: May 17 1880 (sic)
          Race: White
          U. S. Citizen: Alien Declarant
          If not a citizen of the U.S., of what nation are you a citizen or subject? Ireland (sic)
          Occupation: Coal Miner
          Employer's Name: Black Canon Fuel Co.
          Place of Employment or Business: Walsenburg, Huerfano Co., Colorado
          Nearest Relative Name: Mrs. Mary McBirnie
          Nearest Relative Address: Walsenburg, Huerfano Co., Colorado

     Stamped Number at top: 5-1-19. C
          Height: Medium
          Build: Medium
          Color of Eyes: Blue
          Color of Hair: Brown
          Is person obviously physically disqualified: No
     Date of Registration: Sept. 12 1918
     Roll: 1561832
     DraftBoard: 0

Fortunately, the war was winding down.5

According to his Sep 1920 petition for Naturalization, between 1919 and 1921, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie and Mary Veronica Richmond Tennant/Haughney lived at Berwind, Las Animas Co., CO. According to an obituary, he worked for Colorado Fuel & Iron Company there and had taken part in a mine safety contest in Pittsburgh. Between 1919 and 1921, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie worked for Colorado Fuel & Iron Company, Berwind, Las Animas Co., CO.

National Library Service Bulletin, No. 5 (Jan 1919-Jun 1919) (Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1919) p. 34:

There will be a nation-wide first-aid and mine rescue meet in Pittsburgh the week of September 29, 1919, in connection with the formal dedication of the Pittsburgh station of the Bureau of Mines. It is planned to hold this meet at Forbes field during the first three days of the week. It is expected that teams will compete representing every mining district in the country, and that the various State mining departments, mining schools, the labor unions, and the mining societies will be represented by delegates. Field men of the Bureau of Mines are also expected to make note of this affair and aid and stimulate local interest whenever possible.

29 September 1919, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie was a member of one of two Colorado First Aid teams that participated in the National First Aid and Mine Rescue Meet at Forbes Field in Pittsburgh, PA. This gives an overview of the purpose of the contests:

F. J. Bailey. "National and International Mine-Rescue and First-Aid Meets." Reports of Investigations (Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of Mines) Nov. 1921, Serial No. 2294:

     Mine-rescue and first-aid meets are held for the purpose of promoting general interest in mine-safety work and with the object of increasing the proficiency of the miner in rendering first-aid and rescue assistance to their fellow workers in time of accidents. The actual work of training the miners in rescue and first-aid methods is carried on constantly throughout the year by the United States Bureau of Mines, the State mining bureaus, mining companies and associations of mining companies, and organizations of workers.

     National or international mine-rescue and first-aid meets are held annually under auspices of the United States Bureau of Mines. Their popularity is attested by the number of mining companies and other organizations that have, at considerable expense, sent well-trained teams to participate in the competition for prizes that are awarded for excellence in the demonstration of mine-safety methods.

Unfortunately, the Berwind, Colorado Fuel & Iron First Aid team which Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie participated with, did not win the contest:

     
"National First Aid and Mine Rescue Meet." The Coal Industry, vol. 2, no. 10 (Oct 1919) p. 448:

     ...The Standard Mine team of H.C. Frick Co., of Mount Pleasant, Pa., won the first aid contest in competition with 20 teams which survived the eliminations Tuesday (81 teams from 15 different states)

     State Champions - First Aid

     ...Colorado-First prize, Primos Chemical Company, Vanadium. Second prize, Berwind Mine, Colorado Fuel & Iron Co....

Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie and Mary Veronica Richmond Tennant/Haughney appeared on the census of 1 January 1920 at Berwind Coal Camp, Las Animas Co., CO. This was the census record shortly before the family became U.S. citizens. Note the name is MacBirnie. Tom McBirnie, Sr., recalled that his father taught him to spell the family name with an underscore under the c which means it was an abbreviated way to write MacBirnie.

1920 U.S. Census Las Animas Co., Colorado, T 31 R 65 Precinct 24 (Berwind Coal Camp crossed out from incorporated place) Supervisor's Dist. No. 3 Enumeration Dist. No. 126 sheet 12 A (177 stamped) (image 12 of 14 in Berwind)

     house number 261
     dwelling visited 223
     family visited 244
          MacBirnie, Alexander head renting male white age 48 married immigrated 1907 Pennsylvania able to read and write born in Scotland mother tongue English parents born in Scotland mother tongue Scotch able to speak English fireboss in a coal mine wage worker;
          MacBirnie, Mary wife female white age 34 married immigrated 1907 Pennsylvania able to read and write born in Scotland mother tongue Scotch father born in Ireland mother tongue Irish mother born in Scotland mother tongue Scotch able to speak English no occupation;
          MacBirnie, Mary daughter female white age 13 single immigrated 1907 Pennsylvania attended school since Sept. 1, 1919 able to read and write born in Scotland mother tongue Scotch parents born in Scotland mother tongue Scotch able to speak English no occupation;
          MacBirnie, William son male white age 11 single attended school since Sept. 1, 1919 able to read and write born in Colorado parents born in Scotland mother tongue Scotch able to speak English no occupation;
          MacBirnie, Thomas son male white age 8 single attended school since Sept. 1, 1919 born in Colorado parents born in Scotland mother tongue Scotch no occupation;
          MacBirnie, Alexander son male white age 6 single attended school since Sept. 1, 1919 born in Colorado parents born in Scotland mother tongue Scotch no occupation;
          MacBirnie, Agnes daughter female white age 3 years ? months single born in Colorado parents born in Scotland mother tongue Scotch no occupation;
          MacBirnie, Catherine daughter female white age 1 year 7 months single born in Colorado parents born in Scotland mother tongue Scotch no occupation;
          Haughney, Mary mother-in-law female white age 58 widowed immigrated 1907 ? able to read and write born in Scotland mother tongue Scotch father born in Scotland mother tongue Scotch mother born in Ireland mother tongue Irish able to speak English no occupation;
          Haughney, Thomas brother-in-law male white age 33 single immigrated 1907 Pennsylvania able to read and write born in Scotland mother tongue Scotch father born in Ireland mother tongue Irish mother born in Scotland mother tongue Scotch able to speak English miner in a coal mine wage worker;
          boarders:
               David Roberts
               David Stewart
               James Kelley
               Aim? Richards.6

This petition was filed 25 Sep 1920, the writing at top of form is not visible in copy:

     No. 576 Naturalization Service      UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
     PETITION FOR NATURALIZATION
     To the Honorable the District Court of Las Animas County at Trinidad, Colorado

     The petition of Alexander McBirnie hereby filed, respectfully showeth:

          First. My place of residence is Berwind, Colorado
          Second. My occupation is Mine Fire-Boss
          Third. I was born the 17 day of May, anno Domini 1880 (sic), at Shotts, Scotland
          Fourth, I emigrated to the United States from Liverpool, England, on or about the 4th day of January anno Domini 1906 (sic), and arrived in the United States, at the port of New York on the 12th day of January anno Domini 1906 (sic), on the vessel Carmania.
          Fifth. I declared my intention to become a citizen of the United States on the 6th day of September, anno Domini 1918 at Walsenburg, Colorado in the District Court of Huerfano County
          Sixth. I am married. My wife's name is Mary: she was born on the 14th day of April, anno Domini 1884 (sic) at Scotland, and now resides at Berwind, Colorado.
          I have 6 children, and the name, date and place of birth, and place of residence of each of said children is as follows:

               Mary, born Aug 14, 1906 at Scotland, resides at Berwind, Colorado.
               William, born Dec. 18, 1908 at Maitland, Colo., resides at Berwind, Colorado.
               Thomas, born Feb. 11, 1911 at Maitland, Colo., resides at Berwind, Colorado.
               Alexander, born June 12, 1913 at Maitland, Colo., resides at Berwind, Colorado.
               Catherine, born May 13, 1918 at Oakview, Colo., resides at Berwind, Colorado.
               Agnes, born July 20, 1916 at Oakview, Colo., resides at Berwind, Colorado.

          Seventh. I am not a disbeliever in or opposed to organized government or a member of or affiliated with any organization or body of persons teaching disbelief in or opposed to organized government. I am not a polygamist nor a believer in the practice of polygamy. I am attached to the principles of the Constitution of the United States, and it is my intention to become a citizen of the United States and to renounce absolutely and forever all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty, and particularly to George V King of Great Britain and Ireland, of whom at this time I am a subject, and it is my intention to reside permanently in the United States.
          Eighth. I am able to speak the English language.
          Ninth. I have resided continuously in the United States of America for a term of five years at least immediately preceding the date of this petition, to wit, since the 12 day of January, anno Domini 1906 (sic), and in the State of Colorado, continuously next preceding the date of this petition, since the 16th day of January, anno Domini 1906 (sic), being a residence within this State of at least one year next preceding the date of this petition.
          Tenth. I have not heretofore made petition for citizenship to any court.

     Attached hereto and made a part of this petition are my declaration of intention to become a citizen of the United States and the certificate from the Department of Labor, together with my affidavits and the affidavits of the two verifying witnesses thereto, required by law. Wherefore you petitioner prays that he may be admitted a citizen of the United States of America.

                    (signed) Alexander McBirnie

     Declaration of Intention 648      filed this 25 day of Sept., 1920.

     Memo to Clerk of Court, - If petitioner arrived in the United States on or before June 29, 1906, strike out the words reading "and Certificate of Arrival No.___ from Department of Labor."

-------------------------

AFFIDAVITS OF PETITIONER AND WITNESSES
State of Colorado /
Las Animas County / ss:

     The afore? petitioner being duly sworn, deposes and says that he is the petitioner in the above-entitled proceedings; that he has read the foregoing petition and knows the contents thereof; that the ? petition he signed with his full, true name; that the same is true of his own knowledge, except as to matters therein stated to be alleged upon information and belief and that as to those matters he believes to be true.

               (signed) Alexander McBirnie

     Henry T. Turner, occupation Service Cars, residing at Kallarso (?), Colo.
     Ira W. Wiles, Occupation Master Mechanic, residing at Berwind, Colorado

     each being severally, duly, and respectively sworn, deposes and says that he is a citizen of the United States of America; that he has personally known Alexander McBirnie, the petitioner above mentioned, to have resided in the United States continuously immediately preceeding the date of filing his petition, since the 15 day of Sept., anno Domini 1915, and in the State in which the above-entitled petition is made continuously (?) since the 15 day of Sept, anno Domini 1915; and that he has personal knowledge that the said petitioner is a person of good moral character, attached to the principles of the Constitution of the United States, and that the petitioner is in every way qualified, in his opinion, to be admitted (?) a citizen of the United States.

               (signed) Henry T. Turner
               (signed) Ira W. Wiles

     Subscribed and sworn to before me by the above-named petitioner and witnesses in the office of the Clerk of said Court this 25 day of Sept., anno Domini 1920.

               (signed) Max Tafoya, Clerk
               By Don Vigil, Deputy Clerk. Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie and Mary Veronica Richmond Tennant/Haughney petitioned the court to become citizens on 17 March 1921 at Trinidad, Las Animas Co., CO; A Certificate of Naturalization was issued which also listed the children as citizens (#1510586, Vol. 3, Number 576, Court of Las Animas County, Trinidad, CO). Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie was described as 40 years old, 5 ft. 8 inches tall, white with medium complexion, blue eyes and light brown hair. In fact, he would have been 44 years old. The family was residing in Berwind, Colorado.7

Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie and Mary Veronica Richmond Tennant/Haughney lived circa 1922 at Delagua, Las Animas Co., CO. According to an obituary, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie was employed at Cass Mine, Victor-American Fuel Co., Delagua, Las Animas Co., CO. Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie then “left Cass mine last March (1924?) to take a position with the Alamo Coal Co., near Walsenburg.”.

In October 1923, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie placed a down payment on a house at 621 Park Street, Trinidad, Las Animas Co., CO. Mrs. Mary McBirnie took over payments for "LOT - I3, IN BLOCK 4I, TREAT'S NORTH SIDE ADDITION, KNOWN AS 621 - PARK STREET, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF" which had been sold to Alex Shields in October, 1922. The property cost $3,900 and required a $400 down payment and installment payments of $60 a month plus interest of 6% a year. This was the house where the McBirnie family continued to live while they remained in Colorado. He was a fire boss between March 1924 and 5 August 1924 at Alamo Mine, Alamo Coal Co., Alamo Post Office, Huerfano Co., CO.

At age 48, Alexander 'Alex' McBirnie was killed by an explosion about 5:40 o'clock a. m.. On 5 August 1924 at Alamo Mine, Huerfano Co., CO.8 He was buried on 7 August 1924 at St. Mary’s South Cemetery, Walsenburg, Huerfano Co., CO.2

The following is from "Coroner's Inquest Is Held Over The Body of Alex M'Birnie Wed.: Jury Claims that Company Violated State Mining Laws." The Independent (Walsenburg, CO), 8 Aug 1924, p. 1, col. 2:

     The coroner's jury hearing evidence on the death of Alex McBirnie, who was killed in an explosion at the Alamo mine Tuesday, delivered a stinging rebuke to officials of the mine, Wednesday when they declared that the mine was violating state coal mining laws in allowing shots to be fired when other men were inside the mine in addition to the shot firer. The jurymen also declared that they had allowed men to work overtime in the mine and that they were driving entries too far apart without using cross-cuts.

     Evidence in the case brought out the fact that the explosion was terrific, and the four men who were in the mine at the time of the explosion escaped death only because they were in the rock tunnel.

     Five mules in the mine at the time of the accident were instantly killed, and it was said that the body of one was carried for a distance of several hundred yards. A coal car that was resting in a hollow close to the scene of the explosion was carried to the top of a small hill.

     James Dalrymple, state mine inspector, conducted the inquiry.

     The verdict submitted by the coroner's jury is as follows:

     That deceased came to his death about 5:40 o'clock a.m. on August 5, 1924, while at work in the Alamo coal mine, conducted by Alamo Coal company, located at Alamo, Huerfano county, Colorado.

     The jury finds that death was caused when gas exploded, burning deceased internally and externally, causing injuries that resulted in his death. The jury was unable to determine in what manner gas was ignited causing the explosion. The state mining laws provide that shots should not be fired when others are in the mine. This law was violated, as evidence shows that other men were in mine at the time of explosion. The jury finds the law violated in working overtime, driving entries too far without cross-cuts.

     From the evidence we find the accident was unavoidable. (an unknown value.)

Pre-1963 Colorado Mining Fatalities
     by Gerald E. Sherard
     429 South Moore St.
     Lakewood, CO 80226-2629
     1995

     McBIRNIE, ALEC
          Death Date: 1924AUG5
          Nationality: AMERICAN
          Occupation: FIRE BOSS
          Yrs Mine Exp: 30
          Age at death:
          Marital Status: M
          Surving [sic] children: 6
          County: HUE[RFANO]
          Company name: ALAMO COAL CO.
          Mine name: ALAMO
          Cause of death/comments: EXPLOSION OF GAS & DUST.

According to an obituary notice, Alexander McBirnie worked at several mines in the area including the C.F. and I. at Berwind, the Victor American and Cass which was the Victor-American Fuel Co. mine at Delagua, Las Animas Co., CO. He then went to work for the Alamo Coal Company of Denver which had a mine 18 miles northwest of Walsenburg. The obituary notice continues:

MacBirnie was known as a high class, practical miner with a thorough knowledge of mine hazards and an expert in mine rescue work. He was a member of the Colorado team which participated in the international first aid contests in Pittsburg about four years ago.

According to "Table 2. - National First-Aid and Mine Rescue Contests" on p. 3 of "National First-Aid and Mine Rescue Contest, Charleston, W. Va., October 2-4, 1961" by H. F. Weaver and D. M. Alden (U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of Mines Information Circular 8132, SuDocs I 28.27:8132), there was a contest held in 1919 in Pittsburgh, Pa which included 83 First-aid teams, 24 Mine rescue teams and represented 16 states. (an unknown value.)

Family

Mary Veronica Richmond Tennant/Haughney b. 11 Jan 1881, d. 4 May 1942
Children

Citations

  1. [S515] Birth Certificate.
  2. [S483]
  3. [S483] , January 26, 1905, married in the District of Larkhall, County of Lanark. Groom: age 27, railway brakesman, residing at 40-1/2 Kirk Street, Motherwell. Father's occupation: coal miner. Bride: Mary Haughney, age 23, domestic servant, spinster, residing a 7 Croft, Larkhall. Bride's father, Thomas Haughney, coal miner. Bride's mother, Mary (Tennant) Haughney. Marriage at St. Mary's Church, Larkhall. Witnesses: William McBirnie, Jane Haughney.
  4. [S501] United States Census, 1910.
  5. [S532] National Archives and Records Administration. World War I Selective Service System Draft Registration Cards, 1917-18.
  6. [S502] United States Census, 1920.
  7. [S483] , March 17, 1921, [Alexander McBirnie] became a naturalized American citizen in Trinidad, Las Animas County, Colorado. [He was] described as 40 years of age, 5 feet, 8 inches tall, white color, medium complexion, blue eyes, light brown hair. Residing with wife Mary and family in Berwind, [Las Animas County,] Colorado.
  8. [S483] , "August 5, 1924, died in Alamo, Huerfano County, Colorado, of internal and external burns from a gas explosion in coal mine. Occupation: coal miner (fire boss). Resident of Trinidad, [Las Animas County,] Colorado. Married. Buried August 7, 1924, in [St. Mary’s Cemetery South,] Walsenburg, [Huerfano County,] Colorado."

Rose Ann McBirnie

F, b. 15 September 1877, d. 31 March 1917
FatherWilliam McBirnie b. 11 Aug 1853, d. 11 Apr 1914
MotherCatherine McGovern b. c 1853, d. 18 Jul 1910
ChartsJames McBirnie (est. 1780-) Descendants
Last Edited17 Aug 2014
     Rose Ann McBirnie was born on 15 September 1877 at 14 Welsh Row, Calderbank, East District Old Monkland, Lanark, Scotland.1 She appeared on the census of 4 April 1881 in the household of William McBirnie and Catherine McGovern at Shotts Ironworks, Quoad Sacra Parish of Calderhead, Lanark, Scotland.2 Rose Ann McBirnie appeared on the census of 4 April 1881 at Shotts Ironworks, Calderhead, Lanark, Scotland. She appeared on the census of 6 April 1891 in the household of Catherine McGovern at Loudon's Land, Cambusnethan Parish, Calderhead District, Lanark, Scotland.3 Rose Ann McBirnie appeared on the census of circa 1901 at Cambusnethan, Calderhead, Lanark, Scotland. She married John Kelly on 4 February 1904 at Roman Catholic Church Stane?, Shotts?, District of Calderhead, Lanark, Scotland.4 As of 4 February 1904,her married name was Kelly. Rose Ann McBirnie died on 31 March 1917 at 24 Gray Street, Shotts, District of Calderhead, Lanark, Scotland, at age 39.5

According to Aunt Mary, Rose had beautiful hair and would model it. According to Extract of an entry in a REGISTER of DEATHS #40 of the district of Calderhead, county of Lanark, Scotland, Rose died at 11:30 a.m. at 24 Gray Street Shotts. She died of "Endocarditis" and "Heart Failure" brought on by "Influenza" and "Bronchitis." Her husband reported her death.

Family

John Kelly b. 1876

Citations

  1. [S483] , "September 15, 1877, born in the Eastern District of Old Monkland, County of Lanark. Father’s occupation: blast furnace filler. Where born: 14 Welsh Row, Calderbank."
  2. [S571] 1871 Census of Scotland.
  3. [S381] 1891, , LDS Film 220,243
    Census of Scotland 1891
    County or BUrgh of Lanark
    Registration District of Calderhead
    Enumeration District No. 6268
    Name of Enumerator, Mr. John Smith
    p. 31
    Civil Parish of Cambusnethan
    Quoad Sacra Parish of Calderhead
    School Board District of Calderhead
    Parliamentary Division of Mid Lanark
    No. 156 (or 157?) Loudon's Land
    1 inhabited house
    Cath(?) McBirnie Head Married age 36 Coal Miner's wife born in Lanark, New Monkland
    Rose McBirnie Daughter unmarried age 13 scholar born in Lanark, Old Monkland
    Cather McBirnie Daughter unmarried age 10 scholar born in Lanark, Shotts
    Wm McBirnie Son unmarried age 8 scholar born in Lanark, Cambusnethan (? Cam'nethan)
    Joseph McBirnie Son unmarried age 6 scholar born in Lanark, Cambusnethan (? Cam'nethan)
    Louis McBirnie Son unmarried age 4 born in Lanark, Cambusnethan (? Cam'nethan).
  4. [S483] , "February 4, 1904, married in the District of Calderhead, County of Lanark. Groom: John Kelly, age 27, coal miner, widower, residing at Tarbothie, Cambusnethan. Groom’s father: James Kelly, farm labourer. Groom’s mother, Ann (Buggy) Kelly. Bride: age 27, no occupation, spinster, residing at Stane Place, Cambusnethan. Father’s occupation: pit labourer. Marriage at Roman Catholic Church [Stane?, Shotts?]. Witnesses: William Boland, Mary Haughney."
  5. [S483] , "March 31, 1917, died in the District of Calderhead, County of Lanark, of influenza, bronchitis, endocarditis and heart failure. Age 38. Both parents deceased, survived by husband, John Kelly, coal miner. Place of death: 24 Gray Street, Shotts."

Patrick McBirnie

M, b. 21 May 1879, d. 19 June 1879
FatherWilliam McBirnie b. 11 Aug 1853, d. 11 Apr 1914
MotherCatherine McGovern b. c 1853, d. 18 Jul 1910
ChartsJames McBirnie (est. 1780-) Descendants
Last Edited5 Feb 2014
     Patrick McBirnie was born on 21 May 1879 at 24 Old Forge, Calderbank, East District Old Monkland, Lanark, Scotland.1 He died on 19 June 1879 at 24 Old Forge, Calderbank, East District Old Monkland, Lanark, Scotland.2,3

The following information is from Scots Ancestry Research Society Report B/55520 which cites the Registers of Births, Marriages and Deaths for the East District, Old Monkland:

     We also noted the death of William McBirnie and Catherine McGovern's son: - On 19th June, 1879 at 24 Old Forge, Calderbank, Patrick McBirnie died aged 1 month, the son of William McBirnie, brickmaker, and Catherine McGovern.

Citations

  1. [S483] , "May 21, 1879, born in the Eastern District of Old Monkland, County of Lanark. Father’s occupation: works labourer. Where born: 24 Old Forge, Calderbank."
  2. [S380] Scots Ancestry Research Society. "McBirnie and McGovern: Report B/55520." (Edinburgh, Scotland: 3 Albany St., Edinburgh EH13PY, Scotland, 1988).
  3. [S483] , "June 19, 1879, died in the Eastern District of Old Monkland, County of Lanark, of irritation of bowels and whooping cough. Age 1 month. Survived by both parents (father’s occupation, works labourer). Place of death: 24 Old Forge, Calderbank."

Catherine McBirnie

F, b. 6 April 1881, d. 23 January 1924
FatherWilliam McBirnie b. 11 Aug 1853, d. 11 Apr 1914
MotherCatherine McGovern b. c 1853, d. 18 Jul 1910
ChartsJames McBirnie (est. 1780-) Descendants
Last Edited17 Aug 2014
     Catherine McBirnie was born on 6 April 1881 at High Street, Shotts Iron Works, Calderhead District, Lanark, Scotland.1 She appeared on the census of 6 April 1891 in the household of Catherine McGovern at Loudon's Land, Cambusnethan Parish, Calderhead District, Lanark, Scotland.2 Catherine McBirnie appeared on the census of 1 April 1901 in the household of William McBirnie and Catherine McGovern at 74 Stane Place, Stane, Cambusnethan parish, district of Calderhead, Lanark, Scotland.3 Catherine McBirnie appeared on the census of circa 1901 at Cambusnethan, Calderhead, Lanark, Scotland. She was a domestic servant. She married John McGowan on 25 June 1903 at Roman Catholic Oratory, Shotts, District of Calderhead, Lanark, Scotland.4 As of 25 June 1903,her married name was McGowan. Catherine McBirnie died on 23 January 1924 at 11 Green Lane Pollockshaws near Glasgow, parish of Eastwood, Renfrew, Scotland, at age 42.5

According to an Extract of an entry in a REGISTER of DEATHS that Tom McBirnie, Jr. got in Scotland, Catherine (McBirnie) McGowan died at 2:30 p.m. 23 Jan 1924 at 11 Green Lane, Glasgow. I thought this was in Lanark, Scotland but the Register entry was #20 in the parish of Eastwood in the county of Renfrew, Scotland. Catherine died of "Valvular Disease of Heart." She was 42 years old. Her husband, John McGowan reported the death.

It was Catherine McBirnie's son, James "Scotty" McGowan, to whom Alexander McBirnie sent a letter 21 May 1924 with instructions on how to get through immigration in New York. The letter was addressed to 11 Green Lane, Pollockshaws, Glasgow so apparently Scotty was living at home. The location has not been found on a current map.

Family

John McGowan b. 1881
Child

Citations

  1. [S483] , "April 6, 1881, born in District of Calderhead, County of Lanark. Father’s occupation: iron furnace filler. Where born: High Street, Shotts Iron Works."
  2. [S381] 1891, , LDS Film 220,243
    Census of Scotland 1891
    County or BUrgh of Lanark
    Registration District of Calderhead
    Enumeration District No. 6268
    Name of Enumerator, Mr. John Smith
    p. 31
    Civil Parish of Cambusnethan
    Quoad Sacra Parish of Calderhead
    School Board District of Calderhead
    Parliamentary Division of Mid Lanark
    No. 156 (or 157?) Loudon's Land
    1 inhabited house
    Cath(?) McBirnie Head Married age 36 Coal Miner's wife born in Lanark, New Monkland
    Rose McBirnie Daughter unmarried age 13 scholar born in Lanark, Old Monkland
    Cather McBirnie Daughter unmarried age 10 scholar born in Lanark, Shotts
    Wm McBirnie Son unmarried age 8 scholar born in Lanark, Cambusnethan (? Cam'nethan)
    Joseph McBirnie Son unmarried age 6 scholar born in Lanark, Cambusnethan (? Cam'nethan)
    Louis McBirnie Son unmarried age 4 born in Lanark, Cambusnethan (? Cam'nethan).
  3. [S601] 1891 Census of Scotland.
  4. [S483] , "June 25, 1903, married in District of Calderhead, County of Lanark. Groom: John McGowan, age 22, journeyman painter, bachelor, residing at 17 ____tonhill Street, Pollockshaws. Grooms father: James McGowan, ship carpenter. Groom’s mother: Mary (Burns) McGowan, deceased. Bride: age 20, domestic servant, spinster, residing at 82 Stane Place, Cambusnethan. Father’s occupation: furnace keeper. Marriage at Roman Catholic Oratory, Shotts. Witnesses: Charles McGowan, Rose McBirnie."
  5. [S483] , "January 23, 1924, died in the Parish of Eastwood, County of Renfrew, of valvular disease of the heart. Age 42. Both parents deceased, survived by husband, John McGowan, merchant seaman. Place of death: 11 Green Lane, [Pollockshaws,] Glasgow."

William McBirnie

M, b. 6 June 1883, d. 5 July 1924
FatherWilliam McBirnie b. 11 Aug 1853, d. 11 Apr 1914
MotherCatherine McGovern b. c 1853, d. 18 Jul 1910
ChartsJames McBirnie (est. 1780-) Descendants
Last Edited27 Feb 2014
     William McBirnie was born on 6 June 1883 at 22 Stable Row, Newmains, Parish of Cambusnethan, Lanark, Scotland.1 He appeared on the census of 6 April 1891 in the household of Catherine McGovern at Loudon's Land, Cambusnethan Parish, Calderhead District, Lanark, Scotland.2 William McBirnie appeared on the census of 1 April 1901 in the household of William McBirnie and Catherine McGovern at 74 Stane Place, Stane, Cambusnethan parish, district of Calderhead, Lanark, Scotland.3 William McBirnie was a coal miner. He married Mary Ann Conner on 7 January 1911 at [St. Patrick's?] Roman Catholic Church, Shotts, District of Calderhead, Lanark, Scotland.4,5 William McBirnie died on 5 July 1924 at 12 Stane Place, Shotts, District of Calderhead, Lanark, Scotland, at age 41.6

William and Catherine's son, John McBirnie (1914-1953) married Mary Watters and they had four children, including William "Willie" McBirnie who married Mary Pauline Butler. Willie lived at 12 Stane Place, Shotts, Lanarkshire, Scotland where his father was born and where his grandfather died. Tom McBirnie, Jr. contacted him and he travelled by train across the United States and hiked in Yosemite.

Family

Mary Ann Conner b. 7 Jul 1885, d. 3 Apr 1965
Children

Citations

  1. [S483] , "June 6, 1883, born in Parish of Cambusnethan, County of Lanark. Father’s occupation: furnace filler. Where born: 22 Stable Row, Newmains."
  2. [S381] 1891, , LDS Film 220,243
    Census of Scotland 1891
    County or BUrgh of Lanark
    Registration District of Calderhead
    Enumeration District No. 6268
    Name of Enumerator, Mr. John Smith
    p. 31
    Civil Parish of Cambusnethan
    Quoad Sacra Parish of Calderhead
    School Board District of Calderhead
    Parliamentary Division of Mid Lanark
    No. 156 (or 157?) Loudon's Land
    1 inhabited house
    Cath(?) McBirnie Head Married age 36 Coal Miner's wife born in Lanark, New Monkland
    Rose McBirnie Daughter unmarried age 13 scholar born in Lanark, Old Monkland
    Cather McBirnie Daughter unmarried age 10 scholar born in Lanark, Shotts
    Wm McBirnie Son unmarried age 8 scholar born in Lanark, Cambusnethan (? Cam'nethan)
    Joseph McBirnie Son unmarried age 6 scholar born in Lanark, Cambusnethan (? Cam'nethan)
    Louis McBirnie Son unmarried age 4 born in Lanark, Cambusnethan (? Cam'nethan).
  3. [S601] 1891 Census of Scotland.
  4. [S483] , "January 7, 1911, married in District of Calderhead, County of Lanark. Groom: age 27, coal miner, bachelor, residing at 71 Stane Place, Shotts. Father’s occupation: labourer (mother, deceased). Bride: Mary Ann Connor, age 25, no occupation, spinster, residing at 163 Stane Place, Shotts. Bride’s father: John Connor, coal miner. Bride’s mother: Margaret (Hughes) Connor, deceased. Marriage at Roman Catholic Church, Shotts. Witnesses: Joseph McBirnie, Margaret Connor."
  5. [S585] Thomas Joseph McBirnie Jr. William McBirnie & Mary Ann Connor and Their Descendants 24 Jan 2009).
  6. [S483] , "July 5, 1924, died in District of Calderhead, County of Lanark, of influenza, acute rheumatism, valvular disease of the heart and acute bronchitis. Age 40. Occupation: coal miner. Both parents deceased, survived by wife, Mary (Connors) McBirnie. Place of death: 12 Stane Place, Shotts. Informant: Joseph McBirnie, brother, residence 112 Stane Place, Shotts."

Joseph Patrick McBirnie

M, b. 16 February 1885, d. 24 April 1948
FatherWilliam McBirnie b. 11 Aug 1853, d. 11 Apr 1914
MotherCatherine McGovern b. c 1853, d. 18 Jul 1910
ChartsJames McBirnie (est. 1780-) Descendants
Last Edited15 Jan 2015
     Joseph Patrick McBirnie was born on 16 February 1885 at Charlotte Square, Stane, Cambusnethan parish, district of Calderhead, Lanark, Scotland.1 He appeared on the census of 6 April 1891 in the household of Catherine McGovern at Loudon's Land, Cambusnethan Parish, Calderhead District, Lanark, Scotland.2 Joseph Patrick McBirnie appeared on the census of 1 April 1901 in the household of William McBirnie and Catherine McGovern at 74 Stane Place, Stane, Cambusnethan parish, district of Calderhead, Lanark, Scotland.3 Joseph Patrick McBirnie married Annie Burns on 17 September 1917 at Roman Catholic Church, Shotts, District of Calderhead, Lanark, Scotland.4 Joseph Patrick McBirnie married Marion Stone on 13 December 1934 at Blythswood ? near Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland.5,6 Joseph Patrick McBirnie died on 24 April 1948 at Royal Infirmary, George Square District, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland, at age 63.7

According to the Extract of an entry in a REGISTER of DEATHS that Tom got in Scotland, Joseph died 7:45 p.m. of "Silico-anthrocosis" and "Congestive Heart Failure." He was a coal miner who had married twice and although he died at the Royal Infirmary in Edinburgh, his usual residence was 27 Quarry Road, Dykehead, Shotts. His stepson, James Stone, reported the death. Joseph was 63 years old when he died.

Family 1

Child

Family 2

Annie Burns b. c 1892, d. 8 Oct 1924

Family 3

Marion Stone b. s 1895, d. Aug 1968

Citations

  1. [S483] , "February 16, 1885, born in District of Calderhead, County of Lanark. Father’s occupation: furnace filler. Where born: Charlotte Square, Stane, Cambusnethan."
  2. [S381] 1891, , LDS Film 220,243
    Census of Scotland 1891
    County or BUrgh of Lanark
    Registration District of Calderhead
    Enumeration District No. 6268
    Name of Enumerator, Mr. John Smith
    p. 31
    Civil Parish of Cambusnethan
    Quoad Sacra Parish of Calderhead
    School Board District of Calderhead
    Parliamentary Division of Mid Lanark
    No. 156 (or 157?) Loudon's Land
    1 inhabited house
    Cath(?) McBirnie Head Married age 36 Coal Miner's wife born in Lanark, New Monkland
    Rose McBirnie Daughter unmarried age 13 scholar born in Lanark, Old Monkland
    Cather McBirnie Daughter unmarried age 10 scholar born in Lanark, Shotts
    Wm McBirnie Son unmarried age 8 scholar born in Lanark, Cambusnethan (? Cam'nethan)
    Joseph McBirnie Son unmarried age 6 scholar born in Lanark, Cambusnethan (? Cam'nethan)
    Louis McBirnie Son unmarried age 4 born in Lanark, Cambusnethan (? Cam'nethan).
  3. [S601] 1891 Census of Scotland.
  4. [S483] , "September 7, 1917, married in District of Calderhead, County of Lanark. Groom: age 32, coal miner, bachelor, residing at 71 Stane Place, Shotts. Father’s occupation: general labourer (both parents deceased). Bride: Annie Burns, age 25, spinster, no occupation, residing at 1 High Street, Shotts. Bride’s father: Robert Burns, coal miner, deceased. Bride’s mother: Alaria[?] (O’Neil) Burns (Cooke). Marriage at Roman Catholic Church, Shotts. Witnesses: John Hanlon, Winnie[?] Cooke."
  5. [S483]
  6. [S554] Ancestry.com. Online at: <http://www.ancestry.com>.
  7. [S483] , "April 24, 1948, died in the District of George Square, City of Edinburgh, of silico-antrocosis and congestive heart failure. Age 63. Occupation: coal miner. Both parents deceased, survived[?] by wife, Marion (Stone) McBirnie. Place of death: Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh, brought from 27 Quarry Road, Dykehead, Shotts. Informant: Joseph Stone, stepson."

Louis McBirnie

M, b. 9 June 1887, d. 14 November 1918
FatherWilliam McBirnie b. 11 Aug 1853, d. 11 Apr 1914
MotherCatherine McGovern b. c 1853, d. 18 Jul 1910
ChartsJames McBirnie (est. 1780-) Descendants
Last Edited27 Feb 2014
     Louis McBirnie was born on 9 June 1887 at Stane, Cambusnethan parish, district of Calderhead, Lanark, Scotland.1 He appeared on the census of 6 April 1891 in the household of Catherine McGovern at Loudon's Land, Cambusnethan Parish, Calderhead District, Lanark, Scotland.2 Louis McBirnie appeared on the census of 1 April 1901 in the household of William McBirnie and Catherine McGovern at 74 Stane Place, Stane, Cambusnethan parish, district of Calderhead, Lanark, Scotland.3 Louis McBirnie was a coal miner. He appeared on the census of circa 1911 at Shotts, Calderhead, Lanark, Scotland. He married Elizabeth 'Lizzie' Leddy on 31 January 1913 at Roman Catholic Church, Shotts, District of Calderhead, Lanark, Scotland.4 Louis McBirnie died on 14 November 1918 at 52 [or 55] Stane Place, Stane, Cambusnethan parish, district of Calderhead, Lanark, Scotland, at age 31.5

According to the Extract of an entry in a REGISTER of DEATHS that Tom McBirnie, Jr. got in Scotland, Louis died at 11:50 p.m. 14 Nov 1918 at 55 Stane Place, Stane, Cambusnethan in the district of Calderhead in the county of Lanark. He died of "Influenza" and "Broncho pneumonia." There was a deadly flu epidemic in 1918 and, as a coal miner, his lungs were probably already in bad shape. A brother, William, who was living at "12 Stane Place Shotts" reported the death.

Family

Elizabeth 'Lizzie' Leddy b. 1894, d. 13 Jan 1932
Child

Citations

  1. [S483] , "June 9, 1887, born in District of Calderhead, County of Lanark. Father’s occupation: coal miner. Where born: Stane, Cambusnethan."
  2. [S381] 1891, , LDS Film 220,243
    Census of Scotland 1891
    County or BUrgh of Lanark
    Registration District of Calderhead
    Enumeration District No. 6268
    Name of Enumerator, Mr. John Smith
    p. 31
    Civil Parish of Cambusnethan
    Quoad Sacra Parish of Calderhead
    School Board District of Calderhead
    Parliamentary Division of Mid Lanark
    No. 156 (or 157?) Loudon's Land
    1 inhabited house
    Cath(?) McBirnie Head Married age 36 Coal Miner's wife born in Lanark, New Monkland
    Rose McBirnie Daughter unmarried age 13 scholar born in Lanark, Old Monkland
    Cather McBirnie Daughter unmarried age 10 scholar born in Lanark, Shotts
    Wm McBirnie Son unmarried age 8 scholar born in Lanark, Cambusnethan (? Cam'nethan)
    Joseph McBirnie Son unmarried age 6 scholar born in Lanark, Cambusnethan (? Cam'nethan)
    Louis McBirnie Son unmarried age 4 born in Lanark, Cambusnethan (? Cam'nethan).
  3. [S601] 1891 Census of Scotland.
  4. [S483] , "January 31, 1913, married in District of Calderhead, County of Lanark. Groom: age 25, coal miner, bachelor, residing at 24 Gray Street, Shotts. Father’s occupation: labourer (father living, mother deceased). Bride: Lizzie Leddy, age 19, spinster, no occupation, residing at 26 Gray Street, Shotts. Bride’s father: John Leddy, locomotive driver. Bride’s mother: Annie (Burns) Leddy. Marriage at Roman Catholic Church, Shotts. Witnesses: James Boyne[?] and Annie Leddy."
  5. [S483] , "November 14, 1918, died in District of Calderhead, County of Lanark, of influenza and broncho-pneumonia. Age 31, coal miner. Both parents deceased, survived by wife, Elizabeth (Leddy) McBirnie. Place of death: 52 [or 55] Stane Place, Stane, Cambusnethan. Informant: William McBirnie, brother, 12 Stane Place, Shotts."