Daniel T. Rogers(b. 1943) - all my relatives - pafc4414 - Generated by Personal Ancestral File

Daniel T. Rogers(b. 1943) - all my relatives

Citations


Joseph Jenks Sr.

1William Jenks, NEHGR Vol. 9, pp. 201-206 (Jul. 1855).
"COPY OF A LETTER TO ALONZO LEWIS, ESQ.,
OF, LYNN, MASS., INTENDED FOR USE IN PREPARING THE SECOND ED. OF HIS HISTORY OF THAT TOWN.
[The letter here inserted, not having been used as was expected, we are permitted to lay it before our readers. Great pleaure is taken in doing so, as it supplies information respecting families about which there must ever be much interest felt in the community. -- EDITOR.]
BOSTON, Jan. 8, 1844.
My dear Sir: -- I shall, probably, be better able to comply with your desire, that I would prepare for you an account of the family of JENKS of Lynn, by employing the form of a letter, than in any other method; because it will afford me a starting-point, and render the language used more definite and intelligible.
The family, then, of my name, which settled in Lynn, yet of which none but descendants in female lines are now living there, had for its head the very ingenious machinist, as he would now be termed, whom you have so often mentioned in your History, JOSEPH JENKS---Jenkes, Jencks, or Jenckes---for the name is variously written. He is traditionally stated to have come from Hammersmith, or Hounslow, near London; and is supposed by Dr. Savage, which much reason, I think, to have been one of the workmen, whom John Winthrop the younger engaged and brought over with him in 1643, in order to commence the Iron-works, of which you have given so large an account. At those works you found he was in 1645; and in the next year he was an applicant to the General Court for patents, respecting scythes and mills, among the earliest taken out in the country. He is styled 'senior' in 1647, having been joined by a son of his own name, born in England, as is asserted, in 1632.
Joseph Jenks, senior, was a widower when he came over. Our tradition states, that he left Joseph junior with his maternal grandmother, whose family-name I know not, after assigning a sum sufficient for his maintenance until he should be of age, when he was directed to join his father in America. But he must have arrived, it appears, before that period, perhaps when 16, and is said to have had a brother, George, or William, who 'went from England to Virginia.' The name occurs in the interior of North Carolina.
By his second marriage, as the obliging communication of your own researches has shown, he had three sons and two daughters. These were Sara, born near 1650; Samuel, in 1654; Deborah, 11 : 4mo. 1658; John, my own ancestor, July 27th. 1660; and Daniel, 19th. 2d. mo. 1663. Elizabeth, his second wife, died in July, 1679; and in March, 1683, he died, but at what age I do not know; probably, however, between 70 and 80.*
I have not been able, thus far, to ascertain the Engliah descent of the founder of this American family. The name appears to have originated with Robert Jenkes, of Wolverton (manor), in the parish of Eaton-under-Eywood, Shropshire, as early as about 1350, in the reign of Edward III. This gentleman was the son of Jenkyn Cambrey, of that place, and of Dorothy, a daughter and co-Heiress of Sir Walter Collyng, knight, of Church Stretton, in the same county. From Robert (or John, as one authority has it) the ancestry is traceable as far upward as Welsh annals and bard pedigrees are carried, in the house of Elystan Glodrydd. At Wolverton the name continued for ten dirct descents, and families branched off from this stock. But from which of these my own came, since I can hardly doubt it was from one of them, as yet I know not. Herbert Jenkes, esquire, grandson of Herbert Westphaling, bishop of Hereford, and uncle of "the truly primitive Rector of Harley and Kenley,' Rev. Benjamin Jenks, author of well-known Prayers, Meditations and other pious works, possessed Wolverton in about 1640, and it descended to his heirs by a daughter.†
As I cannot trace the son who went to Virginia, and who may never have been at Lynn, I will remark that Joseph Jenckes, junior, after residing there with his father a few years, as also at Concord, and having married Esther, the eldest daughter of William Ballard of Lynn, (a farmer who came over in 1635, when this daughter was two years of age, as appears by the interesting discoveries recently published by Dr. Savage in our Historical Collections,) went, 'with a young family,' into the State of Rhode island, where his posterity have been numerous and respectable. He first settled in Warwick, a town so called from the earl of that name, long President of the Plymouth Council, and in 1642, Admiral of England for the Parliament, whose ancestress was Elizabeth Jenkes,‡ wife of lord chancellor Rich, and, as I judge, descended of the Shropshire stock, though her father and brother were of London. Afterward he removed to Pawtucket, and settles on a large tract of land he purchased of the Indians --- a tract, which has since occasioned much litigation, and rendered an account of his descendants, its claimants, a matter of public interest in the vicinity. He was one of the "Assistants' or as we should say in Massachusetts, 'Counsellors,' of the Governor, in 1681. In Backus's Catalogue his name is spelt Jencks, although his autograph, which I have seen, spells it Jenckes, as many of his descendants do to the present day.
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* Since found to be 81: born in 1602.
† See art. Barneby, in Burke's Engl. Commoners, Vol. IV, p. 6.
‡ Her portrait by Holbein is given in a lately published Vol. of his "Heads.'
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Beside five daughters, who were all married, he had four sons, who left large families. Their names were: Joseph, who ws Governor of Rhode island from 1727 to 1732; Nathaniel, a Major of the militia; Rev. Ebenezer, Elder in the Baptist church, and pastor of the ancient flock in Providence; and William, a Judge, who died in 1765, at the venerable age of 91. Their father at his death was eighty-four years old, and the same age was attained by the governor. I have the pleasure of acquaintance with gentlemen descended of each of these brothers. Benedict in his History of American Baptists, Vol. I. pp. 492-495, gives a pretty full account of this eldest and largest branch of the family.
But I return to Lynn. Sara, the elder daughter, married John Chilson, July 28th, 1667; Samuel followed his father's business of working iron, which, in fact, pervaded a large portion of the family, and is, in some of the branches, still continued. His first wife was Elizabeth Darling, and they had seven children, four of whom lived to marry; of these, two were sons, Samuel and Nathan; but the elder of them left no posterity, and the younger left only daughters, so that the surname of the family is not transmitted in this branch. Samuel, senior, died in 1738, at the age of eighty-four.
John, fourth son of the 'patentee,' or second by his second marriage, lived and died in Lynn, as did his brother Samuel. At the early age of 21, he married Sarah Meriam; and died when but 38 years old, leaving her a widow, who, marrying John Lewis for her second husband, became, I think, your ancestress, or relative. My honored grandfather, Capt. John Jenks, was his only son, and youngest child,left an orphan in infancy. But he had four daughters, two of whom married and settled in Lynn.
There was formed in the town a company of horse, agreeably to a recent provision made by the General Court, and my great-grandfather, loving musuc, became its trumpeter; this exercise of the lungs was thought to have shortened his life.
His son was, however, of a strong constitution, and lived, if not to extreme old age, yet to nearly the period of 'threescore years and ten,' having been born April 6th, 1697, and dying June 15, 1764. On him I would dwell a little more than on others; and am ready to say with the Roman historian, Paterculus, 'quod alieno testimonium redderem, in eo non frandabo avum meum :' that is, I shall not deprive my own grandfather of the commendation I would bestow on a stranger. He was, indeed, by all I have learned, a good citizen, beloved and confided in by his neighbors and townsmen, amiable and provident in his own family, yet 'ruling well his household,' industrious and temperate in his habits, a professing Christian, and an honest man. He was brought up by his uncle Samuel, and was his apprentice.
In 1720 he married his first wife, my grandmother, in Chelsea. She was of a family that called themselves Berry, several of which English name were respectable in Lynn. But her familyname was, in fact, Barry, and the father of her father, Thaddeus, came from Ireland, a man in humble life. His son, Thomas, however, my great-grandfather, by a blessing on his good habits, was able at his decease to bequeath to his daughter, Elizabeth, one hundred pounds. Of this marriage Capt. Jenks had nine children. The same number were the offspring of his second marriage, with Mary Hayden, of Marblehead. Of the third marriage, with Lydia waite, of malden, one child only was born, whose mother remained a widow, residing on her husband's estate, five and twenty years after my grandfather's death. This child was Elizabeth, who never married, and was an exemplary convert in the Methodist communion. She died in Boston, at the age of 52.
Of this large family, nineteen in all twelve children lived to be heads of families themselves. My grandfather, whom I have called Capt. Jenks, received a commission of that tenor, after having been an ensign and lieutenant, April 14, 1746. These three commissions are in my keeping. And a letter from his Colonel, Ichabod Plaisted, of salem, dated Sept. 22d, of the same year, after reciting the requisition of Governor Shirley, 'to have the whole Regiment' he commanded 'forthwith raised to march directly to the Town of Salem for the defence thereof against an Enemy, and to prevent the Enemy's landing there or in other places in the Southern Parts of the County of Essex,' directs him accordingly, that he 'may be ready to march instantly upon an Alarm,' This panic arose, and justly, from the expedition of the French duke, d'Anville, to the North American coast --- an expedition whose issue, you know, was memorable, and by the community of New England regarded as peculiarly providential.*
­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­------------------------------------------------------------------------------
* The failure of this enterprise of the French, and the partial destruction by storms of their formidable fleet, with the loss of many of their men by, 'a pestilential fever,' have been themes of interesting remark with New England historians; and with great propriety; for, as is observed by Dr. Holmes, 'had the project of the enemy succeeded, it is impossible to determine to what extent the American colonies would have been distressed or desolated. When man,' he continues, 'is made the instrument of averting public calamity, the divine agency ought still to be acknowledged; but this was averted without human power. If philosophers would ascribe this event to blind chance, or fatal necessity, Christians ascribe it to the almighty BEING, under whose providence, in ancient time, "the stars, in their courses, fought against Sisera."' Annals, Vol.II. pp. 30,31, and authorities quoted.
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My grandfather, beside his captaincy, held the office of "Selectman' in the town and was a good specimen of the uncorrupt integrity and practical ability of a respectable New Englander of 'the olden time." It should further be said, that, in addition to working at his trade, he cultivated, with the aid of his sons, a little farm of about sixty acres.
John Jenks, my uncle, the eldest (surviving) son of the family, died before his father, at Medford, in 1762. He was a man of piety, a convert under the preaching of Whitefield. John and Daniel Jenks, for many years respected merchants in Salem, were his only children.
Sarah, his next sister, who married Nathan Sargent, became in her widowhood, an instructress of children, and died, much venerated and beloved, in her 79th year. Her life was passed in Lynn, and I trust she is not forgotten there, where some of her descendants still live to cherish and revere her memory. I have several of her letters. She was a woman of deep-felt religion and sterling worth. John Jenks Sargent and Samuel Jenks Ireson, now living in Lynn, are her grandchildren.
My dear and honored father, Samuel Jenks, esquire, who had been intended by the childless kinsman,* whose name he bore, for a collegiate education. learned his trade of his father, and wrought at it, successively, in Chelsea (on Point Shirley), Medford, Newtown, and Boston; but died at Cambridge, June 8th, 1801, in his 70th year. He was twice engaged in military expeditions, being in the Canadian campaigns of 758 and 1760, in the latter of which he was the youngest captain in the provincial army; and the late Governor Brooks assured me, that the instruction which he derived, at Medford, from my father's experience and military knowledge, was of essential service to himself at the opening of the revolutionary contest.
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* His grave-stone is in the burying ground of Saugus, near the old meeting house, a few steps from the gate.
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Of the three other sons who lived to rear families, Richard, Benjamin and William, the last, who long resided in Portland, Maine, where he died, was a much beloved and respected Deacon of the church of which my late excellent friend, Dr. Payson, was Pastor; and left a large number of descendants, but, like most of our New England families, scattered widely. At his lamented death he was in his 66th. year.
The sisters, beside those I have named, married into the families of Hall, Nutting, Sargent, Alley, Butler, and Coates; but none of them continued in Lynn. The last named died (as did her preceding sisters) in Boston, and one of her grandsons, Ezra Jenks Coates, is now a merchant in London.
But, without enlarging on persons with whom I am most nearly connected, I would just mention farther, that Daniel, youngest son of the first Joseph --- progenitor of the family --- followed his eldest brother into Rhode island, and settle at Cumberland, where, it is said, he built mills among the earliest erected in the country. This was, probably, about the close of the 17th century; but the township was not incorporated, I think, before 1710. He left a large family, and many of his descendants are living there, and in that vicinity.
Though my communication is so long, I would yet observe, that the present member of Congress, Hon. M. H. Jenks, from Bucks Co., Pennsylvania, is of another family than this. Watson's History of Philadelphia gives an account of it. The same may, I think, be said of Mr. John Jenks, who died at Gray, Maine, in 1797, at the patriarchal age of 114. He was, probably, son of grandson of the Richard Jenks, whom Farmer and Whitman mention as a member of the Artillery Company in 1666, and who was of the north or second church in Boston, in 1682. I do not trace him to the Lynn family. But, beside these two families now alluded to, I know none of the name in the United States who do not derive their descent from the stock of Lynn.
If these notices, my dear Sir, are acceptable to you, and will answer the purpose of aiding to recal the memory of past times, and former Lynn inhabitants, they are at your service, and I am happy to be able to furnish them.
Yours, with sincere regard,
WM. JENKS.
Note. --- It is proper to remark, that, on transcribing this letter, a few alterations and additions have been made. They are but slight, however. W. J.
Crescent Place, Boston, June 5th, 1855."

An account of the Jenks family of Lynn, Mass.

2Meredith B. Colket, The Jenks Family of England, NEHGR Vol. 110, pp. 9-20, 81-93, 161-172, 244-256 (1956).
Records ancestors as well as the sword-making proficiency of Joseph Jenckes.

3Josiah Howard Temple and Charles Adams, History of North Brookfield, Massachusetts, Vol. 3, p. 644 (1887).
"JENKS (JENCKS, JENKES, JENCKES), Joseph 1, b. 1602, came from Hammersmith, Eng., a widower, settled in Lynn, 1643, and d. Mar. 1682-3, aged eighty-one. He was a blacksmith and machinist at the iron foundry, made the dies for coining the "Pine Tree" money, and built the first fire engine in this country. "A man of grest genius"; He was granted the first patent for inventions in America, of which the following is a copy: -- (see p. 645.)
COPY OF THE FIRST PATENT GRANTED IN AMERICA.
From the records of the general Court of Massachusetts. (Reduced to one-half the actual size.) It reads as follows: --
At a generall Courte at Boston
the 6th of the 3th mo 1646
Jenkes monopolye
The Co't considringe ye necessity of raising such manifactures of engins of mils to go by water for speedy dispatch of much worke w th few hands, & being sufficiently informed of ye ability of ye petitionr to p forme such workes grant his petition (yt no othr p-son shall set up, or use any such new invention, or trade for fourteen yeares wthout ye licence of him ye said Joseph Jenkes) so farr as concernes any such new invention, & so as it shalbe alwayes in ye powr of this Corte restrain ye</syp> exportation of such manifactures, & ye prizes of them to moderation if occasion so require.
He m. (2) Elizabeth -----, who d. July, 1679. Children, Joseph, b. England, 1634 2: George, went to Virginia; (second wife) Sarah, b. about 1650, m. July 28, 1667, John Chilson; Samuel, b. 1654, m. Elizabeth Darling, and d. 1738, aged eighty-four; Deborah, b. June 11, 1638; John, b. July 27, 1660; m. 1681, Sarah Meriam, and d. 1698; she m. (2) John Lewis; Daniel, b. Apr. 19, 1663; removed to Rhode Island, where he built several mills.".


Joseph Jenks Sr.

1William Jenks, NEHGR Vol. 9, pp. 201-206 (Jul. 1855).
"COPY OF A LETTER TO ALONZO LEWIS, ESQ.,
OF, LYNN, MASS., INTENDED FOR USE IN PREPARING THE SECOND ED. OF HIS HISTORY OF THAT TOWN.
[The letter here inserted, not having been used as was expected, we are permitted to lay it before our readers. Great pleaure is taken in doing so, as it supplies information respecting families about which there must ever be much interest felt in the community. -- EDITOR.]
BOSTON, Jan. 8, 1844.
My dear Sir: -- I shall, probably, be better able to comply with your desire, that I would prepare for you an account of the family of JENKS of Lynn, by employing the form of a letter, than in any other method; because it will afford me a starting-point, and render the language used more definite and intelligible.
The family, then, of my name, which settled in Lynn, yet of which none but descendants in female lines are now living there, had for its head the very ingenious machinist, as he would now be termed, whom you have so often mentioned in your History, JOSEPH JENKS---Jenkes, Jencks, or Jenckes---for the name is variously written. He is traditionally stated to have come from Hammersmith, or Hounslow, near London; and is supposed by Dr. Savage, which much reason, I think, to have been one of the workmen, whom John Winthrop the younger engaged and brought over with him in 1643, in order to commence the Iron-works, of which you have given so large an account. At those works you found he was in 1645; and in the next year he was an applicant to the General Court for patents, respecting scythes and mills, among the earliest taken out in the country. He is styled 'senior' in 1647, having been joined by a son of his own name, born in England, as is asserted, in 1632.
Joseph Jenks, senior, was a widower when he came over. Our tradition states, that he left Joseph junior with his maternal grandmother, whose family-name I know not, after assigning a sum sufficient for his maintenance until he should be of age, when he was directed to join his father in America. But he must have arrived, it appears, before that period, perhaps when 16, and is said to have had a brother, George, or William, who 'went from England to Virginia.' The name occurs in the interior of North Carolina.
By his second marriage, as the obliging communication of your own researches has shown, he had three sons and two daughters. These were Sara, born near 1650; Samuel, in 1654; Deborah, 11 : 4mo. 1658; John, my own ancestor, July 27th. 1660; and Daniel, 19th. 2d. mo. 1663. Elizabeth, his second wife, died in July, 1679; and in March, 1683, he died, but at what age I do not know; probably, however, between 70 and 80.*
I have not been able, thus far, to ascertain the Engliah descent of the founder of this American family. The name appears to have originated with Robert Jenkes, of Wolverton (manor), in the parish of Eaton-under-Eywood, Shropshire, as early as about 1350, in the reign of Edward III. This gentleman was the son of Jenkyn Cambrey, of that place, and of Dorothy, a daughter and co-Heiress of Sir Walter Collyng, knight, of Church Stretton, in the same county. From Robert (or John, as one authority has it) the ancestry is traceable as far upward as Welsh annals and bard pedigrees are carried, in the house of Elystan Glodrydd. At Wolverton the name continued for ten dirct descents, and families branched off from this stock. But from which of these my own came, since I can hardly doubt it was from one of them, as yet I know not. Herbert Jenkes, esquire, grandson of Herbert Westphaling, bishop of Hereford, and uncle of "the truly primitive Rector of Harley and Kenley,' Rev. Benjamin Jenks, author of well-known Prayers, Meditations and other pious works, possessed Wolverton in about 1640, and it descended to his heirs by a daughter.†
As I cannot trace the son who went to Virginia, and who may never have been at Lynn, I will remark that Joseph Jenckes, junior, after residing there with his father a few years, as also at Concord, and having married Esther, the eldest daughter of William Ballard of Lynn, (a farmer who came over in 1635, when this daughter was two years of age, as appears by the interesting discoveries recently published by Dr. Savage in our Historical Collections,) went, 'with a young family,' into the State of Rhode island, where his posterity have been numerous and respectable. He first settled in Warwick, a town so called from the earl of that name, long President of the Plymouth Council, and in 1642, Admiral of England for the Parliament, whose ancestress was Elizabeth Jenkes,‡ wife of lord chancellor Rich, and, as I judge, descended of the Shropshire stock, though her father and brother were of London. Afterward he removed to Pawtucket, and settles on a large tract of land he purchased of the Indians --- a tract, which has since occasioned much litigation, and rendered an account of his descendants, its claimants, a matter of public interest in the vicinity. He was one of the "Assistants' or as we should say in Massachusetts, 'Counsellors,' of the Governor, in 1681. In Backus's Catalogue his name is spelt Jencks, although his autograph, which I have seen, spells it Jenckes, as many of his descendants do to the present day.
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* Since found to be 81: born in 1602.
† See art. Barneby, in Burke's Engl. Commoners, Vol. IV, p. 6.
‡ Her portrait by Holbein is given in a lately published Vol. of his "Heads.'
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Beside five daughters, who were all married, he had four sons, who left large families. Their names were: Joseph, who ws Governor of Rhode island from 1727 to 1732; Nathaniel, a Major of the militia; Rev. Ebenezer, Elder in the Baptist church, and pastor of the ancient flock in Providence; and William, a Judge, who died in 1765, at the venerable age of 91. Their father at his death was eighty-four years old, and the same age was attained by the governor. I have the pleasure of acquaintance with gentlemen descended of each of these brothers. Benedict in his History of American Baptists, Vol. I. pp. 492-495, gives a pretty full account of this eldest and largest branch of the family.
But I return to Lynn. Sara, the elder daughter, married John Chilson, July 28th, 1667; Samuel followed his father's business of working iron, which, in fact, pervaded a large portion of the family, and is, in some of the branches, still continued. His first wife was Elizabeth Darling, and they had seven children, four of whom lived to marry; of these, two were sons, Samuel and Nathan; but the elder of them left no posterity, and the younger left only daughters, so that the surname of the family is not transmitted in this branch. Samuel, senior, died in 1738, at the age of eighty-four.
John, fourth son of the 'patentee,' or second by his second marriage, lived and died in Lynn, as did his brother Samuel. At the early age of 21, he married Sarah Meriam; and died when but 38 years old, leaving her a widow, who, marrying John Lewis for her second husband, became, I think, your ancestress, or relative. My honored grandfather, Capt. John Jenks, was his only son, and youngest child,left an orphan in infancy. But he had four daughters, two of whom married and settled in Lynn.
There was formed in the town a company of horse, agreeably to a recent provision made by the General Court, and my great-grandfather, loving musuc, became its trumpeter; this exercise of the lungs was thought to have shortened his life.
His son was, however, of a strong constitution, and lived, if not to extreme old age, yet to nearly the period of 'threescore years and ten,' having been born April 6th, 1697, and dying June 15, 1764. On him I would dwell a little more than on others; and am ready to say with the Roman historian, Paterculus, 'quod alieno testimonium redderem, in eo non frandabo avum meum :' that is, I shall not deprive my own grandfather of the commendation I would bestow on a stranger. He was, indeed, by all I have learned, a good citizen, beloved and confided in by his neighbors and townsmen, amiable and provident in his own family, yet 'ruling well his household,' industrious and temperate in his habits, a professing Christian, and an honest man. He was brought up by his uncle Samuel, and was his apprentice.
In 1720 he married his first wife, my grandmother, in Chelsea. She was of a family that called themselves Berry, several of which English name were respectable in Lynn. But her familyname was, in fact, Barry, and the father of her father, Thaddeus, came from Ireland, a man in humble life. His son, Thomas, however, my great-grandfather, by a blessing on his good habits, was able at his decease to bequeath to his daughter, Elizabeth, one hundred pounds. Of this marriage Capt. Jenks had nine children. The same number were the offspring of his second marriage, with Mary Hayden, of Marblehead. Of the third marriage, with Lydia waite, of malden, one child only was born, whose mother remained a widow, residing on her husband's estate, five and twenty years after my grandfather's death. This child was Elizabeth, who never married, and was an exemplary convert in the Methodist communion. She died in Boston, at the age of 52.
Of this large family, nineteen in all twelve children lived to be heads of families themselves. My grandfather, whom I have called Capt. Jenks, received a commission of that tenor, after having been an ensign and lieutenant, April 14, 1746. These three commissions are in my keeping. And a letter from his Colonel, Ichabod Plaisted, of salem, dated Sept. 22d, of the same year, after reciting the requisition of Governor Shirley, 'to have the whole Regiment' he commanded 'forthwith raised to march directly to the Town of Salem for the defence thereof against an Enemy, and to prevent the Enemy's landing there or in other places in the Southern Parts of the County of Essex,' directs him accordingly, that he 'may be ready to march instantly upon an Alarm,' This panic arose, and justly, from the expedition of the French duke, d'Anville, to the North American coast --- an expedition whose issue, you know, was memorable, and by the community of New England regarded as peculiarly providential.*
­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­------------------------------------------------------------------------------
* The failure of this enterprise of the French, and the partial destruction by storms of their formidable fleet, with the loss of many of their men by, 'a pestilential fever,' have been themes of interesting remark with New England historians; and with great propriety; for, as is observed by Dr. Holmes, 'had the project of the enemy succeeded, it is impossible to determine to what extent the American colonies would have been distressed or desolated. When man,' he continues, 'is made the instrument of averting public calamity, the divine agency ought still to be acknowledged; but this was averted without human power. If philosophers would ascribe this event to blind chance, or fatal necessity, Christians ascribe it to the almighty BEING, under whose providence, in ancient time, "the stars, in their courses, fought against Sisera."' Annals, Vol.II. pp. 30,31, and authorities quoted.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
My grandfather, beside his captaincy, held the office of "Selectman' in the town and was a good specimen of the uncorrupt integrity and practical ability of a respectable New Englander of 'the olden time." It should further be said, that, in addition to working at his trade, he cultivated, with the aid of his sons, a little farm of about sixty acres.
John Jenks, my uncle, the eldest (surviving) son of the family, died before his father, at Medford, in 1762. He was a man of piety, a convert under the preaching of Whitefield. John and Daniel Jenks, for many years respected merchants in Salem, were his only children.
Sarah, his next sister, who married Nathan Sargent, became in her widowhood, an instructress of children, and died, much venerated and beloved, in her 79th year. Her life was passed in Lynn, and I trust she is not forgotten there, where some of her descendants still live to cherish and revere her memory. I have several of her letters. She was a woman of deep-felt religion and sterling worth. John Jenks Sargent and Samuel Jenks Ireson, now living in Lynn, are her grandchildren.
My dear and honored father, Samuel Jenks, esquire, who had been intended by the childless kinsman,* whose name he bore, for a collegiate education. learned his trade of his father, and wrought at it, successively, in Chelsea (on Point Shirley), Medford, Newtown, and Boston; but died at Cambridge, June 8th, 1801, in his 70th year. He was twice engaged in military expeditions, being in the Canadian campaigns of 758 and 1760, in the latter of which he was the youngest captain in the provincial army; and the late Governor Brooks assured me, that the instruction which he derived, at Medford, from my father's experience and military knowledge, was of essential service to himself at the opening of the revolutionary contest.
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* His grave-stone is in the burying ground of Saugus, near the old meeting house, a few steps from the gate.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Of the three other sons who lived to rear families, Richard, Benjamin and William, the last, who long resided in Portland, Maine, where he died, was a much beloved and respected Deacon of the church of which my late excellent friend, Dr. Payson, was Pastor; and left a large number of descendants, but, like most of our New England families, scattered widely. At his lamented death he was in his 66th. year.
The sisters, beside those I have named, married into the families of Hall, Nutting, Sargent, Alley, Butler, and Coates; but none of them continued in Lynn. The last named died (as did her preceding sisters) in Boston, and one of her grandsons, Ezra Jenks Coates, is now a merchant in London.
But, without enlarging on persons with whom I am most nearly connected, I would just mention farther, that Daniel, youngest son of the first Joseph --- progenitor of the family --- followed his eldest brother into Rhode island, and settle at Cumberland, where, it is said, he built mills among the earliest erected in the country. This was, probably, about the close of the 17th century; but the township was not incorporated, I think, before 1710. He left a large family, and many of his descendants are living there, and in that vicinity.
Though my communication is so long, I would yet observe, that the present member of Congress, Hon. M. H. Jenks, from Bucks Co., Pennsylvania, is of another family than this. Watson's History of Philadelphia gives an account of it. The same may, I think, be said of Mr. John Jenks, who died at Gray, Maine, in 1797, at the patriarchal age of 114. He was, probably, son of grandson of the Richard Jenks, whom Farmer and Whitman mention as a member of the Artillery Company in 1666, and who was of the north or second church in Boston, in 1682. I do not trace him to the Lynn family. But, beside these two families now alluded to, I know none of the name in the United States who do not derive their descent from the stock of Lynn.
If these notices, my dear Sir, are acceptable to you, and will answer the purpose of aiding to recal the memory of past times, and former Lynn inhabitants, they are at your service, and I am happy to be able to furnish them.
Yours, with sincere regard,
WM. JENKS.
Note. --- It is proper to remark, that, on transcribing this letter, a few alterations and additions have been made. They are but slight, however. W. J.
Crescent Place, Boston, June 5th, 1855."

An account of the Jenks family of Lynn, Mass.

2Meredith B. Colket, The Jenks Family of England, NEHGR Vol. 110, pp. 9-20, 81-93, 161-172, 244-256 (1956).
Records ancestors as well as the sword-making proficiency of Joseph Jenckes.

3Josiah Howard Temple and Charles Adams, History of North Brookfield, Massachusetts, Vol. 3, p. 644 (1887).
"JENKS (JENCKS, JENKES, JENCKES), Joseph 1, b. 1602, came from Hammersmith, Eng., a widower, settled in Lynn, 1643, and d. Mar. 1682-3, aged eighty-one. He was a blacksmith and machinist at the iron foundry, made the dies for coining the "Pine Tree" money, and built the first fire engine in this country. "A man of grest genius"; He was granted the first patent for inventions in America, of which the following is a copy: -- (see p. 645.)
COPY OF THE FIRST PATENT GRANTED IN AMERICA.
From the records of the general Court of Massachusetts. (Reduced to one-half the actual size.) It reads as follows: --
At a generall Courte at Boston
the 6th of the 3th mo 1646
Jenkes monopolye
The Co't considringe ye necessity of raising such manifactures of engins of mils to go by water for speedy dispatch of much worke w th few hands, & being sufficiently informed of ye ability of ye petitionr to p forme such workes grant his petition (yt no othr p-son shall set up, or use any such new invention, or trade for fourteen yeares wthout ye licence of him ye said Joseph Jenkes) so farr as concernes any such new invention, & so as it shalbe alwayes in ye powr of this Corte restrain ye</syp> exportation of such manifactures, & ye prizes of them to moderation if occasion so require.
He m. (2) Elizabeth -----, who d. July, 1679. Children, Joseph, b. England, 1634 2: George, went to Virginia; (second wife) Sarah, b. about 1650, m. July 28, 1667, John Chilson; Samuel, b. 1654, m. Elizabeth Darling, and d. 1738, aged eighty-four; Deborah, b. June 11, 1638; John, b. July 27, 1660; m. 1681, Sarah Meriam, and d. 1698; she m. (2) John Lewis; Daniel, b. Apr. 19, 1663; removed to Rhode Island, where he built several mills.".


Judge William Jenks

1Josiah Howard Temple and Charles Adams, History of North Brookfield, Massachusetts, Vol. 3, p. 644 (1887).
"3. William, son of Joseph 2, b. Pawtucket, 1674, m. Patience, daughter of Jonathan Sprague of Providence, and d. Oct. 2, 1765. He was judge, senator, and a member of Providence Church. Among his children was son,
4. Jonathan, b. Providence, July, 1707, . . .".