Paternal Line of Robin Bellamy - pyan107 - Generated by Personal Ancestral File

Piatt/Pyatt/Peyatte of all spellings

Notes


Samuel Willcox

Information about Samuel Wilcox and his family is from John Wilcox of Delaware, OH
Samuel was living in the James Dickerson household in 1850.
A map in the 1874 Gallia Co., Atlas shows him farming eighty-five acres in SE quarter, Section 16 land that was originally part of the one-hundred twenty acre holding of his grandfather Stephen and
his father, Alfred (1795).


Joel Boen Holcomb

Information on Joel from John Wilcox of Delaware, OH
Joel Boen Holcomb left to fight in the Civil War soon after this marrige to Susannah and never returned to Ohio. Various exploits and sightings in South and West of Mississippi ore recounted in
"James Ewing -- Pioner". Susannah charged him with desertion and obtained a divorce in 1867.
(Sources: Mary Hawks Ewing, "James Ewing -- Pioneer." Loose-leaf manuscript, compiled by Barbara Ewing Powell, 27631 Fig Lane, Newman, CA 95360 located in the Gallipolis, OH library.
Hanna Elizabeth Weir McPherson, "The Holcombs, Nation Builders" 1947. Ohio Genealogical Society, Mansfield )


Susannah Willcox

Susannah's birth and death dates are from her death record. Died at 79y 11m 10d, Pneumonia. Her parents are verified by her death record.
She is probably buried with Zarah in the Old Holcomb Cemetery, but this is not marked on his tombstone. Her death record says Holcomb Cemetery.
Susannah and her mother, Taphena Ewing, were living alone together at the times of the 1860 and 1870 Census.


Zarah Holcomb

Zarah Holcomb may have been wed to Ormazinda A. Holcomb (who died June 19, 1876); other accounts say that Ormazinda was his sister. Ormazidna's tombstone in the Glenn Cemetery doesn't indicate that
she was married. Update: The 1860 census data found by Joyce Zeigler for Cynthia Holcomb's household confirms that Ormazinda was Zarah's elder sister. She says that Zarah lost a leg in the Civil
War. (Source: John Wilcox, Delaware, OH)
Zarah is buried in the Old Holcomb Cemetery, Vinton, OH. Tombstone: Age 62y 6m 11d.
Zarah farmed the land homesteaded by his father, north of the road to Vinton and west of Shepard Lane.
Sources:
Mary Hawks Ewing, "James Ewing -- Pioneer." Loose-leaf manuscript, compiled by Barbara Ewing Powell, 27631 Fig Lane, Newman, CA 95360. Gallipolis, OH Library.
Hanna Elizabeth Weir McPherson, "The Holcombs, Nation Builders" 1947. Ohio Genealogical Society, Mansfield, OH.


Susannah Willcox

Susannah's birth and death dates are from her death record. Died at 79y 11m 10d, Pneumonia. Her parents are verified by her death record.
She is probably buried with Zarah in the Old Holcomb Cemetery, but this is not marked on his tombstone. Her death record says Holcomb Cemetery.
Susannah and her mother, Taphena Ewing, were living alone together at the times of the 1860 and 1870 Census.


Rebecca Willcox

Joyce Zeigler has found a marriage of Rebecca Scurlock to Azariah Jenkins on March 10, 1856. (Check further)


Gaius Willcox

Joyce Zeigler is the source of the data about the children of Gaius and Martha.


Martha W Sheppard

_FA1
PLAC School Lot Cemetery, Columbia TwpJoyce Zeigler finds Gaius and Martha in Greenup County, KY in 1850 Census, in Elk Township, Vinton County in 1860, and in Columbia Township, Meigs County in 1870
and 1880. (source: John Wilcox).


Hiram Willcox Sr

See Historical Document.


Thankful Niles

Thankful Niles Willcox is buried in the Willcox Farm Cemetery in Huntington Twp, Gallia Co., OH.


Liet Joseph Wilcockson

Liet. Joseph Wilcockson was interred October 1, 1747 in Killingworth, Middlesex Co., CT. Joseph although born at Stratford, was taken as a child to Killingworth in 1665 when his parents moved there.
He was still using Wilcockson at the time of his marriage, but the children are shown in records as Wilcox. He was known as Lieut. from the commission in the local trainband. He served Killingworth
as Deputy in the General Assembly at Hartfolrd in 1726, 1730, 1738, 1741 to 1743, and 1745.


Hannah Kelsey

Hannah Kelsey Wilcockson's body was interred February 1728/29 in Killingworth, Middlesex Co., CT.


William Wilcockson

William Wilcockson came to America on the ship "Planter" in June of 1635 with his wife Margaret Birdseye Wilcockson and their two year old son John. He became a freeman on 12/7/1636. He, then,
traveled to Connecticut in 1639. William was 34 years old, Margaret 24 years and John was two. When they appeared at Stratford in 1639 the family was composed of the father, mother and three small
children. From this we know that the children were born in Concord. His very first American home was at Concord, MA. He lived there for four years. The children born there were Joseph and Timothy.
At the very beginning of its settlement, Stratford was called Pequennocke, then changed to Cupheag Plantation and, then, to Stratford. Here six more children were born to William and Margaret. Their
entire family comprised nine children, all of whom lived to adulthood, married and had families of their own.
William Wilcockson died early in the year 1652. All his children were, still, underage, with John, the oldest, but 19, and Phoebe yet a babe in arms.
Margaret evidently remarried in 1663 to William Hayden, an immigrant of 1630. By this time John, Joseph, Timothy, and Elizabeth had married. William Hayden had removed to Killingworth with his three
motherless children and there he was joined by Margaret and the younger Wilcockson children. John and Timothy remained with their families in Stratford, Elizabeth moved with here husband, Sargeant
Henry Stiles, to Windsor. Joseph, already the father of three children, followed his mother to Killingworth and settled there permanently. Samuel married the following year, thus did not live long
at Killingworth. The younger children who accompanied their mother to Killingworth were Hannah (who became the bride of her stepbrother Daniel Hayden), Sarah, Obadiah and Phoebe.
Savage corroborates the names of the children of William and Margaret.
The name was, originally, Wilcockson (Wilcoxson), but the last syllable was generally dropped about the middle of the eighteenth century. There is a line of the family, however, which still retains
the original name in full.
From "Abner Wilcox & Lucy Eliza Hart Wilcox" the fact that just because the passengers of the "Planter" embarked with a blanket certificate from the minister of St. Alban's, Hertfordshile, there is
no reason to believe that William lived there. The records of the shire do not contain his name, and he was more likely from Derbyshire, the town of Biggin. If so, his father could have been the
William Wilcoxson who married Anne Howdische on 8 February 1575. Since William was a linen weaver, and Biggin was an area where flax was grown and woven into cloth, there is credibility to this
theory.
In the book "Wilcoxson and Allied Families", the author quotes a letter dated 23 March 1931, from Harold M. Wilcox, 60 Wall St., NY to Mrs. Jane C. Stow, 8109 High School Road, Elkins Park, PA. This
letter is in the Manuscript Files (Wilcox-Conn) of the Pennsylvania Historic Society, Philadelphia.
"William Will 'Cocks' or Wilcox, who was the first of his line to be designated by the name of "Wilcox" was William Goch, the fourth son of Griffiths, having his citadel at Powys Castle in Montgomery
shire, Wales, near the village of Welsh-Poole, situate on Poole Mount. (E. note: this theory is one of many on the origin of the name,)"